Brakes too Good - Not normal for a MK2!

I hear you about the knees. I’m booked in for a TKR mid November. Currently not too mobile.

Anyway I’m off today and about to pull the steering column out of my MK2 to fix some freeplay.

There you go. They’re all mine bar the XJ6.

The MGB is a basket case…

Do NOT do both at once. You’ll be unstable and really miserable. I need to pull by steering column to replace the bushings that were squealing, but I added graphite powder as the originals were flt and I could only purchase plastic rings. Then the rubber accordion like piece on the lower shaft like on a front wheel drive shaft is tearing. I have power steering, alternator, drilled and slotted discs. And way too much money in to the car

Three e-types - pull a second mortgage!

I’ve acquired and restored them myself over the last 12 years. I see it as like saving for retirement, but more fun.

10 years ago I had a bit of a mid life crisis and dropped a day at (paid) work, and started working on that day with a company that restores E types. Not paid, but great fun and the boys taught me a lot. Sadly they shut up shop last year as they are both in their mid 70’s.

The shed in the top picture is actually a small aircraft hangar and there is a dirt strip to our right. My friend Tim (owns the XJ6) has a Tiger Moth and a 1930’s Stinson Reliant in there.

Actually that’s not my XJS. This is mine.

That’s a very American thing to do. The health insurance companies like it because they save on hospital costs.

I’m an anaesthesiologist by trade here in Australia.

We refuse to do bilateral hip or knee replacements because the risks to the patient are a lot higher. I think in 30 years I’ve done maybe one (when I was young and silly). None of the orthopaedic surgeons I work with now have ever asked me to do one.

I know Andrew, I did it helping out on a 65 E Type with Dunlop calipers, see my initial picture.
The moving piston (seen from the seal) is a much better design but the Dunlops aren’t bad per se. It’s very early disc brake technology after all.

If they were done 15 years ago they should be fine.

Do you think he should have a look?

Sorry this has become a bit of a rambling series of replies.

I don’t think that the problem Gerard is describing can be related to the wheel cylinders, so in that regard I wouldn’t be suggesting it as the first thing to look at.

I think that the problem lies in the booster, and that there is a malfunction of the valve system that allows air into the atmospheric pressure side of the booster tank.

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The Reservac valve won’t fix your problem, but sounds like it needs replacing anyway.

So things have taken a downward turn. We were testing that each piston was working within each of the four calipers. We would remove one pad and then slowly, by hand, press the brake pedal to see if the opposite piston in that caliper/ cylinders was moving. They all worked fine and we did NOT overextend the pistons so that they would come out of the calipers/cylinders. BUT, upon compressing the pistons back into the calipers on the left and right front brakes, the inside caliper began to leak brake fluid. Now we have to remove the calipers and rebuild the piston assembly. Is this difficult on a 1966 ?? The bleed nipples are NOT open. Thanks. Gerard

So things have taken a downward turn. We were testing that each piston was working within each of the four calipers. We would remove one pad and then slowly, by hand, press the brake pedal to see if the opposite piston in that caliper/ cylinders was moving. They all worked fine and we did NOT overextend the pistons so that they would come out of the calipers/cylinders. BUT, upon compressing the pistons back into the calipers on the left and right front brakes, the inside caliper began to leak brake fluid. Now we have to remove the calipers and rebuild the piston assembly. Is this difficult on a 1966 ?? The bleed nipples are NOT open. Thanks. Gerard

I decided to check all of the calipers and pistons. So far there are a few rusty spots which I will fix with thee wire wheel and steel wool. The fittings appear to be “AF”? The closest I can come is 11mm which will strip the fittings. One of the cross pipes so far was rusted to the point that I had to use a cut off saw. Now I need to buy a new crossover pipe!. The pipe on the axle to the rear caliper is very tight and does anyone know where I can buy the right size open end wrench? I have all the other fitting soaking in Kroil in the meantime.

AF - 7/16 wrenches. 11mm brake pipe wrenches do well

They make a special open end wrench made for brake fittings:

Thanks, I just bought a metric set at O’Reilly which equates to 6 different sizes for a “on sale” price of $20 USD. The help I am getting is amazing.

If you have fittings seized in the calipers (bleed nipple or interconnect pipe) try heating the assembly in a bbq; I’ve had amazing success with bits that I’m sure would have been seriously damaged had I forced them. Localised heating with a propane torch or similar is not as effective, in my experience.

The fittings are 7/16" AF. If you try to use a metric spanner all you’ll do is round off the nut.