[collectibles] Brooks Auction - Quail Lodge 19th August

Those of you who take auction cats may have seen the above. There are
four ‘original Jaguar mascots’ in their lots plus one that is Jaguar
related. They look very inviting and rare must-haves if you read the
descriptions (and especially so if you take note of the estimates) but,
and I stress IMHO, they are all incorrectly described to a greater or
lesser extent.

Now, we have the acknowledged expert on these mascots right on this
list - Ian Cooling - in fact, Brooks are offering a copy of one of
Ian’s articles as supporting documentation for one of the lots. Even
here, I’m not sure they are correct in using to support their own
description.

So that anyone on this list knows what they might be bidding for if
tempted, could you offer your observations on these lots to the list
please Ian and prove me wrong?

Tony–
Tony (UK) [1998 XKR Coupe]
Jag-lovers Brochures: www.jag-lovers.org/brochures/
Collectibles Homepage: www.jag-lovers.org/collectibles/
Jaguar/Daimler Collectibles Exchange
www.jag-lovers.org/HyperNews/get/collectibles.html
Local JEC Site: www.jagweb.com/west-sussex-jec/

Hi All!

Happy to add my fourpenn’orth to this one. I do agree with Tony. I have
been concerned for some time about more than a few of Brooks’ catalogue
descriptions of Jaguar automobilia . I have written to them pointing out
the inaccuracies; but to no avail, they are simply repeated in later
catalogues. I have even offered to proof-read their Jaguar entries - but
received no reply.

There are five lots of Jaguar mascots in the Quail Lodge catalogue for next
week’s sale. Brooks’ descriptions and my specific comments on those
descriptions are in the attachment to this e-mail. All of the mascots are
also illustrated and discussed in the mascots chapter of my book “Jaguar
Collectibles.” JC/?? refs are to the page numbers in that book. Finally,
my apologies in advance for the length of this mail. However, as I have
just discovered, I can’t send attachments into this list.

On now with the stuff:

Lot 64 is described as: “An SS Jaguar mascot by Desmo. Dating from the 1938
period it was at the time an “approved” optional extra mascot having been
designed by F Gordon Crosby. In excellent original condition with all of its
original fine detail, it is display base mounted”

I would comment: Desmo never produced an “SS Jaguar” mascot. They produced a
generic jaguar mascot within their general range of animal mascots. It was
not designed by Gordon Crosby but by one of Desmo’s (unidentified) house
designers. It was never “approved” by SS Cars - on the contrary, William
Lyons hated it reputedly describing the mascot as looking like “a cat shot
off a fence!” (JC/153 - bottom left)

Lot 85 is described as: " F Gordon Crosby - an original mascot depicting a
Jaguar leaping from its lair, with its tail straightened as if pouncing for
a kill. This particularly rare mascot dates from the vintage period and
differs from the 1937-48 F Gordon Crosby version by having a much smaller
base."

I would comment: This is not a Gordon Crosby original but a crude copy of
(or based on) his mascot, lacking much significant detail. It does not date
from the vintage period being a post-war offering. The late David Barber
(who owned one) told me it was offered in the Gamages store catalogue in the
early 1950s, but I have never been able to track down a copy of the
catalogue in question. (JC/154 - top right)

Lot 105 is described as: “A very rare Jaguar Prototype ‘factory model’
dating from about 1938. Finished in chrome plating, it measures 7.5 inches
long and is mounted on a turned wooden base.”

I would comment: This is not a “Jaguar Prototype” or a “factory model” or
anything of the sort. It is a copy of the one-off mascot produced for the
Prince Michael of Roumania’s 3.5 litre SS 100 (39001). David Barber had six
copies made while the car was with him for restoration. Other copies (or
copies of copies) may have been made by other people. The (unique) original
remains in private hands in England. (JC/154 - top left is an unfinished
sand-cast copy presented to me by David Barber)

Lot 120 is described as: “An SS Jaguar leaping cat mascot. Offered as an
optional extra for use on SS80 or SS100 cars, it is very stylised and
appears to be directly based on Casimir Brau’s leaping panther mascot.
Believed to date from the 1936-37 period, it measures 7 inches long and is
in delightful original plated condition. Mounted on a turned display base”.

I would comment that this is not an SS Jaguar leaping cat mascot. It is a
pre-war or immediately post-war copy of either Gordon Crosby’s mascot or (as
Brooks say) Brau’s mascot, originating probably from France (the stepped
mounting is very characteristic of French mascots of this era). It was never
offered as an optional extra for the SS 100 or SS 90 (there never was an SS
80). Indeed, no mascot was ever offered as an optional extra for these cars.
The original dog’s-bone radiator cap for the SS 90/100 made a secure fitting
for a mascot very difficult to achieve. Post-1938, once Gordon Crosby’s
mascot had appeared, some SS90/100 owners retrospectively fitted flat-topped
radiator caps, but this was private enterprise and nothing to do with
Jaguar. (JC/153 - centre photo)

Lot 214 is described as: “Casimir Brau - the original 1928 leaping Panther
mascot. The rarest and most controversial of all the Brau mascots it was
probably copied by F Gordon Crosby from the Brau original and used by Cecil
Kimber for his ill-fated MG 18/80 Mk III ‘Tigresse’ car which he produced in
1930. Indeed, such was Kimber’s pride in the design, in a famous photograph
of Kimber, sat in his office, a similar mascot is in full view sitting on
his desk. That F Gordon Crosby gained significant inspiration from the Brau
original and offered it to Kimber is undoubted, whether Kimber knew it had
been copied or believed it to be original is not recorded. However, proof if
proof be needed is offered with this lot in the shape printed articles by
Ian Cooling and Roger Stanbury on the matter and details that can be
obtained from the Automotive Mascots book by David Kay and others. Perhaps
the most impressive mascot Brau produced with its strong Art Deco styling
and artistic good taste, is it any wonder that it was copied. This correct
1928 example retains its original nickel-plated finish and pre-dates all the
MG copies. A great mascot, a good story, an interesting discovery”.

Difficult to know where to start here, so I’ll begin with the general
comment that this description is a hopeless muddle of errors, unsupported
assertions and opinions couched in pretty convoluted and badly-punctuated
English. Here are a few specifics: first, if the article by me is the one I
think it is, it will certainly not support any of the conclusions of this
description. I hope any potential buyers read it carefully! Next, the
photograph for this mascot is reversed. Also, this mascot is certainly not
the “rarest” of Brau’s mascots. Many had very limited production runs. The
statement that Kimber had a copy of the Brau mascot on his desk is wrong. He
had an original.

The MG Mark III (18/100 model not 18/80) was only unofficially dubbed Tiger
or Tigress. Bearing in mind that only five Mark IIIs were ever built - from
a planned production run of 25 - I am not at all sure that a mascot of any
sort was ever offered for this car by Abingdon (perhaps an MG specialist can
advise). I only have clear proof of one of the five Mark IIIs carrying the
mascot. This was JB 855, which was owned for more than 60 years by Chris
Barker.

A key point here is that JB 855 was built in 1930, but was not fitted with
its mascot until after 1935, possibly during the car’s major rebuild after
an engine compartment fire in 1936. Another point is that it had a very
awkward fitting at the base of the radiator inside the protective apron. As
with the SS 90 and SS 100, the design of the 18/100 radiator cap did not
provide an effective mounting for a mascot.

Kimber’s pride in this mascot is grossly overstated. He had a Brau panther
mascot on his desk - nothing more and nothing less. Over the years, he had
many things on his desk. The “famous” photo became famous in retrospect. It
was and is nothing more than a bog standard press photo. The retrospective
value derives from it being one of the few photos of Kimber at his desk to
have survived. There is no evidence I am aware of, that Gordon Crosby
presented this panther mascot (or any other mascot) to Kimber. GC may well
have recommended it to Kimber though - he had one on his own 18/80 MG
saloon.

Copies of this mascot were made in the MG factory (not by Gordon Crosby) in
both metal and wood. Any inspiration GC may have gained from this mascot
would probably have fed into his design for the official Jaguar mascot. It
would not, repeat not, have fed into his copying the panther and passing
these copies to Kimber or anyone else! An artist of GC’s quality and
standing had better things to do with his time.

And that’s it! Hope it all makes some sense. Do mail me if you have any
questions on any of this.

Best regards,

Ian-----------------------------------------------------
Jaguar Automobilia Collector

----- Original Message -----
From: Tony Bailey tony@jag-lovers.org
To: Collectibles List collectibles@jag-lovers.org
Sent: 07 August 2000 13:52
Subject: [collectibles] Brooks Auction - Quail Lodge 19th August

Those of you who take auction cats may have seen the above. There are
four ‘original Jaguar mascots’ in their lots plus one that is Jaguar
related. They look very inviting and rare must-haves if you read the
descriptions (and especially so if you take note of the estimates) but,
and I stress IMHO, they are all incorrectly described to a greater or
lesser extent.

Now, we have the acknowledged expert on these mascots right on this
list - Ian Cooling - in fact, Brooks are offering a copy of one of
Ian’s articles as supporting documentation for one of the lots. Even
here, I’m not sure they are correct in using to support their own
description.

So that anyone on this list knows what they might be bidding for if
tempted, could you offer your observations on these lots to the list
please Ian and prove me wrong?

Tony


Tony (UK) [1998 XKR Coupe]
Jag-lovers Brochures: www.jag-lovers.org/brochures/
Collectibles Homepage: www.jag-lovers.org/collectibles/
Jaguar/Daimler Collectibles Exchange
Classifieds - Jag-lovers Forums
Local JEC Site: www.jagweb.com/west-sussex-jec/

Ian: The breadth of your knowledge is astounding! Thank you!

Patrick McLoad
Houston

By the way, can someone send up a link to the Brooks auction so I can see
these “beauties”?!====================================================================
At 07:28 PM 08/09/2000 +0100, you wrote:

Hi All!

Happy to add my fourpenn’orth to this one. I do agree with Tony. I have
been concerned for some time about more than a few of Brooks’ catalogue
descriptions of Jaguar automobilia . I have written to them pointing out
the inaccuracies; but to no avail, they are simply repeated in later
catalogues. I have even offered to proof-read their Jaguar entries - but
received no reply.

There are five lots of Jaguar mascots in the Quail Lodge catalogue for next
week’s sale. Brooks’ descriptions and my specific comments on those
descriptions are in the attachment to this e-mail. All of the mascots are
also illustrated and discussed in the mascots chapter of my book “Jaguar
Collectibles.” JC/?? refs are to the page numbers in that book. Finally,
my apologies in advance for the length of this mail. However, as I have
just discovered, I can’t send attachments into this list.

On now with the stuff:

Lot 64 is described as: “An SS Jaguar mascot by Desmo. Dating from the 1938
period it was at the time an “approved” optional extra mascot having been
designed by F Gordon Crosby. In excellent original condition with all of its
original fine detail, it is display base mounted”

I would comment: Desmo never produced an “SS Jaguar” mascot. They produced a
generic jaguar mascot within their general range of animal mascots. It was
not designed by Gordon Crosby but by one of Desmo’s (unidentified) house
designers. It was never “approved” by SS Cars - on the contrary, William
Lyons hated it reputedly describing the mascot as looking like “a cat shot
off a fence!” (JC/153 - bottom left)

Lot 85 is described as: " F Gordon Crosby - an original mascot depicting a
Jaguar leaping from its lair, with its tail straightened as if pouncing for
a kill. This particularly rare mascot dates from the vintage period and
differs from the 1937-48 F Gordon Crosby version by having a much smaller
base."

I would comment: This is not a Gordon Crosby original but a crude copy of
(or based on) his mascot, lacking much significant detail. It does not date
from the vintage period being a post-war offering. The late David Barber
(who owned one) told me it was offered in the Gamages store catalogue in the
early 1950s, but I have never been able to track down a copy of the
catalogue in question. (JC/154 - top right)

Lot 105 is described as: “A very rare Jaguar Prototype ‘factory model’
dating from about 1938. Finished in chrome plating, it measures 7.5 inches
long and is mounted on a turned wooden base.”

I would comment: This is not a “Jaguar Prototype” or a “factory model” or
anything of the sort. It is a copy of the one-off mascot produced for the
Prince Michael of Roumania’s 3.5 litre SS 100 (39001). David Barber had six
copies made while the car was with him for restoration. Other copies (or
copies of copies) may have been made by other people. The (unique) original
remains in private hands in England. (JC/154 - top left is an unfinished
sand-cast copy presented to me by David Barber)

Lot 120 is described as: “An SS Jaguar leaping cat mascot. Offered as an
optional extra for use on SS80 or SS100 cars, it is very stylised and
appears to be directly based on Casimir Brau’s leaping panther mascot.
Believed to date from the 1936-37 period, it measures 7 inches long and is
in delightful original plated condition. Mounted on a turned display base”.

I would comment that this is not an SS Jaguar leaping cat mascot. It is a
pre-war or immediately post-war copy of either Gordon Crosby’s mascot or (as
Brooks say) Brau’s mascot, originating probably from France (the stepped
mounting is very characteristic of French mascots of this era). It was never
offered as an optional extra for the SS 100 or SS 90 (there never was an SS
80). Indeed, no mascot was ever offered as an optional extra for these cars.
The original dog’s-bone radiator cap for the SS 90/100 made a secure fitting
for a mascot very difficult to achieve. Post-1938, once Gordon Crosby’s
mascot had appeared, some SS90/100 owners retrospectively fitted flat-topped
radiator caps, but this was private enterprise and nothing to do with
Jaguar. (JC/153 - centre photo)

Lot 214 is described as: “Casimir Brau - the original 1928 leaping Panther
mascot. The rarest and most controversial of all the Brau mascots it was
probably copied by F Gordon Crosby from the Brau original and used by Cecil
Kimber for his ill-fated MG 18/80 Mk III ‘Tigresse’ car which he produced in
1930. Indeed, such was Kimber’s pride in the design, in a famous photograph
of Kimber, sat in his office, a similar mascot is in full view sitting on
his desk. That F Gordon Crosby gained significant inspiration from the Brau
original and offered it to Kimber is undoubted, whether Kimber knew it had
been copied or believed it to be original is not recorded. However, proof if
proof be needed is offered with this lot in the shape printed articles by
Ian Cooling and Roger Stanbury on the matter and details that can be
obtained from the Automotive Mascots book by David Kay and others. Perhaps
the most impressive mascot Brau produced with its strong Art Deco styling
and artistic good taste, is it any wonder that it was copied. This correct
1928 example retains its original nickel-plated finish and pre-dates all the
MG copies. A great mascot, a good story, an interesting discovery”.

Difficult to know where to start here, so I’ll begin with the general
comment that this description is a hopeless muddle of errors, unsupported
assertions and opinions couched in pretty convoluted and badly-punctuated
English. Here are a few specifics: first, if the article by me is the one I
think it is, it will certainly not support any of the conclusions of this
description. I hope any potential buyers read it carefully! Next, the
photograph for this mascot is reversed. Also, this mascot is certainly not
the “rarest” of Brau’s mascots. Many had very limited production runs. The
statement that Kimber had a copy of the Brau mascot on his desk is wrong. He
had an original.

The MG Mark III (18/100 model not 18/80) was only unofficially dubbed Tiger
or Tigress. Bearing in mind that only five Mark IIIs were ever built - from
a planned production run of 25 - I am not at all sure that a mascot of any
sort was ever offered for this car by Abingdon (perhaps an MG specialist can
advise). I only have clear proof of one of the five Mark IIIs carrying the
mascot. This was JB 855, which was owned for more than 60 years by Chris
Barker.

A key point here is that JB 855 was built in 1930, but was not fitted with
its mascot until after 1935, possibly during the car’s major rebuild after
an engine compartment fire in 1936. Another point is that it had a very
awkward fitting at the base of the radiator inside the protective apron. As
with the SS 90 and SS 100, the design of the 18/100 radiator cap did not
provide an effective mounting for a mascot.

Kimber’s pride in this mascot is grossly overstated. He had a Brau panther
mascot on his desk - nothing more and nothing less. Over the years, he had
many things on his desk. The “famous” photo became famous in retrospect. It
was and is nothing more than a bog standard press photo. The retrospective
value derives from it being one of the few photos of Kimber at his desk to
have survived. There is no evidence I am aware of, that Gordon Crosby
presented this panther mascot (or any other mascot) to Kimber. GC may well
have recommended it to Kimber though - he had one on his own 18/80 MG
saloon.

Copies of this mascot were made in the MG factory (not by Gordon Crosby) in
both metal and wood. Any inspiration GC may have gained from this mascot
would probably have fed into his design for the official Jaguar mascot. It
would not, repeat not, have fed into his copying the panther and passing
these copies to Kimber or anyone else! An artist of GC’s quality and
standing had better things to do with his time.

And that’s it! Hope it all makes some sense. Do mail me if you have any
questions on any of this.

Best regards,

Ian

Jaguar Automobilia Collector
http://www.jaguarautomobilia.com/

----- Original Message -----
From: Tony Bailey tony@jag-lovers.org
To: Collectibles List collectibles@jag-lovers.org
Sent: 07 August 2000 13:52
Subject: [collectibles] Brooks Auction - Quail Lodge 19th August

Those of you who take auction cats may have seen the above. There are
four ‘original Jaguar mascots’ in their lots plus one that is Jaguar
related. They look very inviting and rare must-haves if you read the
descriptions (and especially so if you take note of the estimates) but,
and I stress IMHO, they are all incorrectly described to a greater or
lesser extent.

Now, we have the acknowledged expert on these mascots right on this
list - Ian Cooling - in fact, Brooks are offering a copy of one of
Ian’s articles as supporting documentation for one of the lots. Even
here, I’m not sure they are correct in using to support their own
description.

So that anyone on this list knows what they might be bidding for if
tempted, could you offer your observations on these lots to the list
please Ian and prove me wrong?

Tony


Tony (UK) [1998 XKR Coupe]
Jag-lovers Brochures: www.jag-lovers.org/brochures/
Collectibles Homepage: www.jag-lovers.org/collectibles/
Jaguar/Daimler Collectibles Exchange
Classifieds - Jag-lovers Forums
Local JEC Site: www.jagweb.com/west-sussex-jec/

Gee shucks Patrick!

Seriously though, I do think that Brooks are very much in error here. There
is - and has been for many years - a very sharp disparity between the
quality of the research and knowledge which goes into the description of
their car lots and the automobilia lots.

This latest set of catalogue write-ups are just so wide of the beam that I
felt they should not go unremarked. There are people out there who may be
tempted to spend serious money on the basis of these - how shall I put it -
less than competent descriptions. And that cannot be right - either for the
hobby or for the pockets of those who have to accept these descriptions as
read.

Regards,

Ian-----------------------------------------------------
Jaguar Automobilia Collector

----- Original Message -----
From: Patrick McLoad mcload@ev1.net
To: collectibles@jag-lovers.org
Sent: 09 August 2000 21:27
Subject: Re: [collectibles] Brooks Auction - Quail Lodge 19th August

Ian: The breadth of your knowledge is astounding! Thank you!

Patrick McLoad
Houston

By the way, can someone send up a link to the Brooks auction so I can see
these “beauties”?!

====================================================================
At 07:28 PM 08/09/2000 +0100, you wrote:

Hi All!

Happy to add my fourpenn’orth to this one. I do agree with Tony. I have
been concerned for some time about more than a few of Brooks’ catalogue
descriptions of Jaguar automobilia . I have written to them pointing out
the inaccuracies; but to no avail, they are simply repeated in later
catalogues. I have even offered to proof-read their Jaguar entries - but
received no reply.

There are five lots of Jaguar mascots in the Quail Lodge catalogue for
next
week’s sale. Brooks’ descriptions and my specific comments on those
descriptions are in the attachment to this e-mail. All of the mascots
are
also illustrated and discussed in the mascots chapter of my book “Jaguar
Collectibles.” JC/?? refs are to the page numbers in that book.
Finally,
my apologies in advance for the length of this mail. However, as I have
just discovered, I can’t send attachments into this list.

On now with the stuff:

Lot 64 is described as: “An SS Jaguar mascot by Desmo. Dating from the
1938
period it was at the time an “approved” optional extra mascot having been
designed by F Gordon Crosby. In excellent original condition with all of
its
original fine detail, it is display base mounted”

I would comment: Desmo never produced an “SS Jaguar” mascot. They
produced a
generic jaguar mascot within their general range of animal mascots. It
was
not designed by Gordon Crosby but by one of Desmo’s (unidentified) house
designers. It was never “approved” by SS Cars - on the contrary, William
Lyons hated it reputedly describing the mascot as looking like “a cat
shot
off a fence!” (JC/153 - bottom left)

Lot 85 is described as: " F Gordon Crosby - an original mascot depicting
a
Jaguar leaping from its lair, with its tail straightened as if pouncing
for
a kill. This particularly rare mascot dates from the vintage period and
differs from the 1937-48 F Gordon Crosby version by having a much smaller
base."

I would comment: This is not a Gordon Crosby original but a crude copy of
(or based on) his mascot, lacking much significant detail. It does not
date
from the vintage period being a post-war offering. The late David Barber
(who owned one) told me it was offered in the Gamages store catalogue in
the
early 1950s, but I have never been able to track down a copy of the
catalogue in question. (JC/154 - top right)

Lot 105 is described as: “A very rare Jaguar Prototype ‘factory model’
dating from about 1938. Finished in chrome plating, it measures 7.5
inches
long and is mounted on a turned wooden base.”

I would comment: This is not a “Jaguar Prototype” or a “factory model” or
anything of the sort. It is a copy of the one-off mascot produced for the
Prince Michael of Roumania’s 3.5 litre SS 100 (39001). David Barber had
six
copies made while the car was with him for restoration. Other copies (or
copies of copies) may have been made by other people. The (unique)
original
remains in private hands in England. (JC/154 - top left is an unfinished
sand-cast copy presented to me by David Barber)

Lot 120 is described as: “An SS Jaguar leaping cat mascot. Offered as an
optional extra for use on SS80 or SS100 cars, it is very stylised and
appears to be directly based on Casimir Brau’s leaping panther mascot.
Believed to date from the 1936-37 period, it measures 7 inches long and
is
in delightful original plated condition. Mounted on a turned display
base”.

I would comment that this is not an SS Jaguar leaping cat mascot. It is a
pre-war or immediately post-war copy of either Gordon Crosby’s mascot or
(as
Brooks say) Brau’s mascot, originating probably from France (the stepped
mounting is very characteristic of French mascots of this era). It was
never
offered as an optional extra for the SS 100 or SS 90 (there never was an
SS
80). Indeed, no mascot was ever offered as an optional extra for these
cars.
The original dog’s-bone radiator cap for the SS 90/100 made a secure
fitting
for a mascot very difficult to achieve. Post-1938, once Gordon Crosby’s
mascot had appeared, some SS90/100 owners retrospectively fitted
flat-topped
radiator caps, but this was private enterprise and nothing to do with
Jaguar. (JC/153 - centre photo)

Lot 214 is described as: “Casimir Brau - the original 1928 leaping
Panther
mascot. The rarest and most controversial of all the Brau mascots it was
probably copied by F Gordon Crosby from the Brau original and used by
Cecil
Kimber for his ill-fated MG 18/80 Mk III ‘Tigresse’ car which he produced
in
1930. Indeed, such was Kimber’s pride in the design, in a famous
photograph
of Kimber, sat in his office, a similar mascot is in full view sitting on
his desk. That F Gordon Crosby gained significant inspiration from the
Brau
original and offered it to Kimber is undoubted, whether Kimber knew it
had
been copied or believed it to be original is not recorded. However, proof
if
proof be needed is offered with this lot in the shape printed articles by
Ian Cooling and Roger Stanbury on the matter and details that can be
obtained from the Automotive Mascots book by David Kay and others.
Perhaps
the most impressive mascot Brau produced with its strong Art Deco styling
and artistic good taste, is it any wonder that it was copied. This
correct
1928 example retains its original nickel-plated finish and pre-dates all
the
MG copies. A great mascot, a good story, an interesting discovery”.

Difficult to know where to start here, so I’ll begin with the general
comment that this description is a hopeless muddle of errors, unsupported
assertions and opinions couched in pretty convoluted and badly-punctuated
English. Here are a few specifics: first, if the article by me is the one
I
think it is, it will certainly not support any of the conclusions of this
description. I hope any potential buyers read it carefully! Next, the
photograph for this mascot is reversed. Also, this mascot is certainly
not
the “rarest” of Brau’s mascots. Many had very limited production runs.
The
statement that Kimber had a copy of the Brau mascot on his desk is wrong.
He
had an original.

The MG Mark III (18/100 model not 18/80) was only unofficially dubbed
Tiger
or Tigress. Bearing in mind that only five Mark IIIs were ever built -
from
a planned production run of 25 - I am not at all sure that a mascot of
any
sort was ever offered for this car by Abingdon (perhaps an MG specialist
can
advise). I only have clear proof of one of the five Mark IIIs carrying
the
mascot. This was JB 855, which was owned for more than 60 years by Chris
Barker.

A key point here is that JB 855 was built in 1930, but was not fitted
with
its mascot until after 1935, possibly during the car’s major rebuild
after
an engine compartment fire in 1936. Another point is that it had a very
awkward fitting at the base of the radiator inside the protective apron.
As
with the SS 90 and SS 100, the design of the 18/100 radiator cap did not
provide an effective mounting for a mascot.

Kimber’s pride in this mascot is grossly overstated. He had a Brau
panther
mascot on his desk - nothing more and nothing less. Over the years, he
had
many things on his desk. The “famous” photo became famous in retrospect.
It
was and is nothing more than a bog standard press photo. The
retrospective
value derives from it being one of the few photos of Kimber at his desk
to
have survived. There is no evidence I am aware of, that Gordon Crosby
presented this panther mascot (or any other mascot) to Kimber. GC may
well
have recommended it to Kimber though - he had one on his own 18/80 MG
saloon.

Copies of this mascot were made in the MG factory (not by Gordon Crosby)
in
both metal and wood. Any inspiration GC may have gained from this mascot
would probably have fed into his design for the official Jaguar mascot.
It
would not, repeat not, have fed into his copying the panther and passing
these copies to Kimber or anyone else! An artist of GC’s quality and
standing had better things to do with his time.

And that’s it! Hope it all makes some sense. Do mail me if you have any
questions on any of this.

Best regards,

Ian

Jaguar Automobilia Collector
http://www.jaguarautomobilia.com/

----- Original Message -----
From: Tony Bailey tony@jag-lovers.org
To: Collectibles List collectibles@jag-lovers.org
Sent: 07 August 2000 13:52
Subject: [collectibles] Brooks Auction - Quail Lodge 19th August

Those of you who take auction cats may have seen the above. There are
four ‘original Jaguar mascots’ in their lots plus one that is Jaguar
related. They look very inviting and rare must-haves if you read the
descriptions (and especially so if you take note of the estimates)
but,
and I stress IMHO, they are all incorrectly described to a greater or
lesser extent.

Now, we have the acknowledged expert on these mascots right on this
list - Ian Cooling - in fact, Brooks are offering a copy of one of
Ian’s articles as supporting documentation for one of the lots. Even
here, I’m not sure they are correct in using to support their own
description.

So that anyone on this list knows what they might be bidding for if
tempted, could you offer your observations on these lots to the list
please Ian and prove me wrong?

Tony


Tony (UK) [1998 XKR Coupe]
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