[concours] Authenticity and Markets and the Parts Catalog

I’ve got something that’s been troubling me that hasn’t come to any
resolution in my own mind and I thought clarity might be obtained from
discussion here.

Here’s the dilemma. JCNA rules basically establish that parts contained and
documented in the applicable Jaguar Parts Manual or other official Jaguar
publications are proof of authenticity. The rules are, however, silent on
how this applies when the parts being selected were never available from
Jaguar for a particular market. The gray area gets even darker when the
parts being selected would not have been allowed by regulations in a
particular market. It gets even darker when the car is shown somewhere
other than its original market. I cite the following XJ examples to
illustrate:

7" headlights were supplied on XJ models by Jaguar to most markets, but NOT
to the US market. I don’t know that the 7" headlights are prohibited by the
US market, however.

Kent Alloys were listed by Jaguar in the Series 2 Parts Manual. I don’t
have any documentation that Jaguar actually ever DID SO in the US or
Canada. They clearly did in the UK, especially on XJ12 cars.

Jaguar supplied markets OTHER than North America with chrome bumpers on the
Series 2 cars. The North American cars came with the ugly rubber bumpers
required by then-current laws.

Jaguar supplied North American Series 2 vehicles with either Zenith
Stromberg carbs or EFI. Some Series 2 variants were never available with
EFI. In this case, either is legal but they aren’t proper for all model
years of Series 2. All are, however, listed in the S2 parts catalog without
model year restriction. Does this mean that I could put Series 2 EFI on my
1976 XJ6C without penalty?

Jaguar supplied European markets with SU carburetors for Series 2 cars, but
these were never offered or legal in the US.

In ALL of these cases, the parts are official, well documented Jaguar
issue. One thing that runs through my mind is the protest board ruling a
few years back regarding E-type front license plate brackets. Basically,
that followed the local laws rather than the Jaguar Parts Catalog. Is this
a case where a simple rules clarification indicating “parts documented by
the Jaguar Parts Catalog and legal for the market of the car’s initial
sale” would suffice? How is a judge to determine the market of the car’s
initial sale in that case without a JDHT certificate? I know of at least
one Canadian car that was initially sold in the US and of more that are in
the US but were originally sold in Canada. See why this is a confusing area?
-Steve A.
'67 E Type Coupe
'76 XJ6C
'91 XJ40

Steve,

I’ve often wondered the same thing. Never has a judge ever mentioned my
incorrect-for-the-USA 7" headlamps, for example.

At my very first show a fellow next to me (SerIII XJ6, USA) had XJ-S Lattice
wheels. The judge questioned authenticity, the entrant replied “Genuine
Jaguar accessory”. The judge shrugged his shoulders and moved on…

Obviously much depends how far a judge wants to go. I would also suspect the
E-type discrepancies are more intensely questioned than others.

Doug Dwyer
Longview, Washington USA

I’ve got something that’s been troubling me that hasn’t come to any
resolution in my own mind and I thought clarity might be obtained from
discussion here.

Here’s the dilemma. JCNA rules basically establish that parts contained
and
documented in the applicable Jaguar Parts Manual or other official Jaguar
publications are proof of authenticity. The rules are, however, silent on
how this applies when the parts being selected were never available from
Jaguar for a particular market. The gray area gets even darker when the
parts being selected would not have been allowed by regulations in a
particular market. It gets even darker when the car is shown somewhere
other than its original market. I cite the following XJ examples to
illustrate:

7" headlights were supplied on XJ models by Jaguar to most markets, but
NOT
to the US market. I don’t know that the 7" headlights are prohibited by
the
US market, however.

Kent Alloys were listed by Jaguar in the Series 2 Parts Manual. I don’t
have any documentation that Jaguar actually ever DID SO in the US or
Canada. They clearly did in the UK, especially on XJ12 cars.

Jaguar supplied markets OTHER than North America with chrome bumpers on
the
Series 2 cars. The North American cars came with the ugly rubber bumpers
required by then-current laws.

Jaguar supplied North American Series 2 vehicles with either Zenith
Stromberg carbs or EFI. Some Series 2 variants were never available with
EFI. In this case, either is legal but they aren’t proper for all model
years of Series 2. All are, however, listed in the S2 parts catalog
without
model year restriction. Does this mean that I could put Series 2 EFI on my
1976 XJ6C without penalty?

Jaguar supplied European markets with SU carburetors for Series 2 cars,
but
these were never offered or legal in the US.

In ALL of these cases, the parts are official, well documented Jaguar
issue. One thing that runs through my mind is the protest board ruling a
few years back regarding E-type front license plate brackets. Basically,
that followed the local laws rather than the Jaguar Parts Catalog. Is this
a case where a simple rules clarification indicating “parts documented by
the Jaguar Parts Catalog and legal for the market of the car’s initial
sale” would suffice? How is a judge to determine the market of the car’s
initial sale in that case without a JDHT certificate? I know of at least
one Canadian car that was initially sold in the US and of more that are in
the US but were originally sold in Canada. See why this is a confusing
area?----- Original Message -----
From: “Steve Averill” averill@earthlink.net
-Steve A.
'67 E Type Coupe
'76 XJ6C
'91 XJ40

Steve. That is a very good question and one that I have been wrestling with
while I have been restoring my Sovereign. Lets hope you get a clear answer. I
have been collecting parts from all over the world hoping that what I am
doing is within the club rules.
Regards Bob.

I ran my E thru JCNA concours for 4 years about 10 yrs ago.
Currently campaigning a Bug Eye Sprite.

There is an 80 page Concours Guide for Sprites (as delivered to
the USA). Very detailed and updated every couple of years.
Effectively this means the standards are slowly changing (read
tightening) as time goes on. One can challenge the standards on
the field with documentation or at any time suggest corrections to
the Committee for consideration. The AH parts manual has detail
changes identified by VIN number ranges. At the other end of the
scale the MGA I am now restoring has no Guide and no official
concours infrastructure.

The Healey concours does not rate one car against another as in
1st, 2nd etc. They do not publish the scores, but only Gold (>95),
Silver (90-95) and Bronze (80-90). You alone know your exact score
and can compare it with someone else who is willing to divulge
his. This helps remove a lot of confrontational heat out of what
is supposed to be a ‘fun’ day. With Healeys, getting a Gold is a
very serious hurdle and adds considerable price appreciation. Just
to give you an insight, registering for a Healey concours you send
in your VIN with the application form - the judges are being lined
up for the cars that are expected to show up and they are studying
the concours specifics related to your car long before the event.

Here’s my take on how it should be. You declare the production
(not registration) month, year and model. All the serial numbers
physically on the car had better line up. Heritage certificates
are not required, so you declare the factory color and country of
destination. The car then should be representative of what could
have wound up on any dealer’s showroom, as defined by your
declarations. Anything outside this requires hard documentation.

Here is the Grey Area - dealer installed options (factory
authorized, period accessories) and race set-ups.

Mike L
60A,67E,59Bug----- Original Message -----
From: Steve Averill averill@earthlink.net
To: concours@jag-lovers.org
Sent: July 28, 2001 11:18 PM
Subject: [concours] Authenticity and Markets and the Parts Catalog

I’ve got something that’s been troubling me that hasn’t come to
any
resolution in my own mind and I thought clarity might be
obtained from
discussion here.

Here’s the dilemma. JCNA rules basically establish that parts
contained and
documented in the applicable Jaguar Parts Manual or other
official Jaguar
publications are proof of authenticity. The rules are, however,
silent on
how this applies when the parts being selected were never
available from
Jaguar for a particular market. The gray area gets even darker
when the
parts being selected would not have been allowed by regulations
in a
particular market. It gets even darker when the car is shown
somewhere
other than its original market. I cite the following XJ examples
to
illustrate:

7" headlights were supplied on XJ models by Jaguar to most
markets, but NOT
to the US market. I don’t know that the 7" headlights are
prohibited by the
US market, however.

Kent Alloys were listed by Jaguar in the Series 2 Parts Manual.
I don’t
have any documentation that Jaguar actually ever DID SO in the
US or
Canada. They clearly did in the UK, especially on XJ12 cars.

Jaguar supplied markets OTHER than North America with chrome
bumpers on the
Series 2 cars. The North American cars came with the ugly rubber
bumpers
required by then-current laws.

Jaguar supplied North American Series 2 vehicles with either
Zenith
Stromberg carbs or EFI. Some Series 2 variants were never
available with
EFI. In this case, either is legal but they aren’t proper for
all model
years of Series 2. All are, however, listed in the S2 parts
catalog without
model year restriction. Does this mean that I could put Series 2
EFI on my
1976 XJ6C without penalty?

Jaguar supplied European markets with SU carburetors for Series
2 cars, but
these were never offered or legal in the US.

In ALL of these cases, the parts are official, well documented
Jaguar
issue. One thing that runs through my mind is the protest board
ruling a
few years back regarding E-type front license plate brackets.
Basically,
that followed the local laws rather than the Jaguar Parts
Catalog. Is this
a case where a simple rules clarification indicating “parts
documented by
the Jaguar Parts Catalog and legal for the market of the car’s
initial
sale” would suffice? How is a judge to determine the market of
the car’s
initial sale in that case without a JDHT certificate? I know of
at least
one Canadian car that was initially sold in the US and of more
that are in
the US but were originally sold in Canada. See why this is a
confusing area?
-Steve A.
'67 E Type Coupe
'76 XJ6C
'91 XJ40

Do you have a “driven” class (or something like it) for the Austin Healeys?
If so, please describe.

Cheers
Doug Dwyer
Longview, Washington USA----- Original Message -----
From: “Michael Lupynec” mlupynec@globalserve.net

I ran my E thru JCNA concours for 4 years about 10 yrs ago.
Currently campaigning a Bug Eye Sprite.

There is an 80 page Concours Guide for Sprites (as delivered to
the USA). Very detailed and updated every couple of years.
Effectively this means the standards are slowly changing (read
tightening) as time goes on. One can challenge the standards on
the field with documentation or at any time suggest corrections to
the Committee for consideration. The AH parts manual has detail
changes identified by VIN number ranges. At the other end of the
scale the MGA I am now restoring has no Guide and no official
concours infrastructure.
snipped

Doug:
Healeys only have one class. You can trailer them or you can drive them.
The judges don’t care (but they are more lenient about the dirt if they know
you drove there).

Most owners rebuild their car and go for the gold. They show it a few years
then drive it or sell it.
I on the other hand bought a half done car 2 years ago and have driven it
several thousand miles since then. At the same time I continue to work towards
a gold level car. My goal is is have a rated by the national concours committee
at an event next spring or early summer. What ever rating I get I will continue
to drive it because that was my goal from the beginning: to own a gold level
car that I could drive.
I know that does not make sense to every one but that is why they make 31
flavors.
Ron Rader

1965 BJ8 Austin Healey Mark III
1994 XJ6
1989 Speedster
xk150 FHC needed

Doug Dwyer wrote:> Do you have a “driven” class (or something like it) for the Austin Healeys?

If so, please describe.

Cheers
Doug Dwyer
Longview, Washington USA

----- Original Message -----
From: “Michael Lupynec” mlupynec@globalserve.net

I ran my E thru JCNA concours for 4 years about 10 yrs ago.
Currently campaigning a Bug Eye Sprite.

There is an 80 page Concours Guide for Sprites (as delivered to
the USA). Very detailed and updated every couple of years.
Effectively this means the standards are slowly changing (read
tightening) as time goes on. One can challenge the standards on
the field with documentation or at any time suggest corrections to
the Committee for consideration. The AH parts manual has detail
changes identified by VIN number ranges. At the other end of the
scale the MGA I am now restoring has no Guide and no official
concours infrastructure.
snipped

In a message dated 7/29/2001 6:46:38 PM Central Daylight Time,
rader@interworld.net writes:

<< to own a gold level car that I could drive.
I know that does not make sense to every one >>>

Let’s see… to own and drive a beautiful car that you have worked on…
No, that doesn’t make sense.

May you suffer the enjoyment, pride of ownership, and thrill of driving. Not
that I’m jealous mind you.

If I weren’t determined to keep my XJ6C as authentic as possible, it
appears that I could come close to creating my “dream” XJ6C with items from
the Jaguar parts catalog and other documented unusual occurrences. It would
consist of:

  • European bumpers - MUCH nicer than the US rubber jobs
  • EFI as used on the 1979 Series 2 cars
  • Kent alloy wheels as in the Parts Catalog
  • A painted roof as in the single XJ6C that escaped the Jaguar factory so
    equipped and now residing in Australia
  • A limited slip differential (hey, the changes aren’t JUST for show!)
  • The late Series 2 radio (8 track tapes are getting hard to find)
  • 7" headlights as on the European cars

The EFI would be my choice if I could only put ONE of the items on the car.
1976 California emissions as interpreted by Jaguar were the pits. The
1970’s were an interesting era equipmentwise - regulations were changing so
rapidly that a broad spectrum was used on models produced during this time.
The situation never existed prior to this period and by the end of the
Series 3 cars, the systems were so integrated that mix and match became
much less of an option. Oh well, a boy can always dream!
-Steve A.
'67 E Type Coupe
'76 XJ6C
'91 XJ40----------------------

Bob wrote:

Steve. That is a very good question and one that I have been wrestling with
while I have been restoring my Sovereign. Lets hope you get a clear answer. I
have been collecting parts from all over the world hoping that what I am
doing is within the club rules.
Regards Bob.

The equipment on the Jaguar must be that which was available/offered by
Jaguar Cars in the country where the car was delivered. As with other
items, if it isn’t something that’s judged (i.e… not on the score sheet
or obvious) then you’re probably safe installing it.

It happens frequently that cars originally delivered in another country
are brought to the US with many different features or accessories not
found on the same vintage Jags delivered in the US. (Series 2 E-types
delivered in France continued to have 3 SU Carbs.)

At a JCNA Concours, when required, the onus is on the owner to produce
documentation showing the country to which the car was originally
delivered. Thereafter, the owner must also show that any items in
question were offered by Jaguar Cars for that particular year and model.

A while back it was determined that all E-types and other Jags delivered
to the US had front license plate holders. Staying basically with the
idea that the car must be presented in an “as delivered” configuration,
the requirement for the license plate holders was re-affirmed.

Jeff cited the oft repeated refrain so familiar to authenticity buffs…
cosmetics often blind the judges such that the truly authentic cars,
with original levels of cleanliness and polish, fair poorly.

Regards,
Dick Cavicke
Chief Judge, San Diego Jaguar Club

Does anybody know if Series 1.5 Etypes had covered headlamps, as
delivered in Europe?

I know they had different signals (amber), speedo (KPH), rocker
covers (extra screw), spinners (strange) and 3 SU’s (no
emission). - Anything else?

PS - Overpolishing aluminum, non original finishes such as
chroming, undercoat, wrong colors etc can easily be penalized. But
there is no such thing as too good a paint job or panel fits.

Mike L
60A,67E,59Bug----- Original Message -----
From: F8driver@pacbell.net
To: concours@jag-lovers.org
Sent: July 31, 2001 1:03 AM
Subject: Re: [concours] Authenticity and Markets and the Parts
Catalog

The equipment on the Jaguar must be that which was
available/offered by
Jaguar Cars in the country where the car was delivered. As with
other
items, if it isn’t something that’s judged (i.e… not on the
score sheet
or obvious) then you’re probably safe installing it.

It happens frequently that cars originally delivered in another
country
are brought to the US with many different features or
accessories not
found on the same vintage Jags delivered in the US. (Series 2
E-types
delivered in France continued to have 3 SU Carbs.)

At a JCNA Concours, when required, the onus is on the owner to
produce
documentation showing the country to which the car was
originally
delivered. Thereafter, the owner must also show that any items
in
question were offered by Jaguar Cars for that particular year
and model.

A while back it was determined that all E-types and other Jags
delivered
to the US had front license plate holders. Staying basically
with the
idea that the car must be presented in an “as delivered”
configuration,
the requirement for the license plate holders was re-affirmed.

Jeff cited the oft repeated refrain so familiar to authenticity
buffs…
cosmetics often blind the judges such that the truly authentic
cars,
with original levels of cleanliness and polish, fair poorly.

Regards,
Dick Cavicke
Chief Judge, San Diego Jaguar Club

In a message dated 7/31/01 4:35:15 AM Central Daylight Time,
F8driver@pacbell.net writes:

The equipment on the Jaguar must be that which was available/offered by
Jaguar Cars in the country where the car was delivered.
snip
At a JCNA Concours, when required, the onus is on the owner to produce
documentation showing the country to which the car was originally
delivered.

Hi Dick,
I can’t find a reference to the country/market issue in the JCNA judges rule
book. Can you tell me where I can find this written down?

Chapter VI, Paragraph A states: “A part, component, finish, color or material
is considered to be non-authentic if it is not a genuine Jaguar item for the
particular year and model of the Jaguar being presented. The item must be as
it was specified and intended to leave the factory by Jaguar Cars.” Year and
model, yes but not country of original delivery.

Chapter IV, Paragraph B, sub paragraph 3 goes on to talk about factory and
aftermarket options accepted as authentic and specifically approves of
“European style headlamps” on any Jaguar.

I have always used this section to justify the 7" headlamps on my Ser III
xj6. The lamps were not offered in the US but they were “a genuine Jaguar
item for the particular year and model”. Where does it talk about producing
documentation showing the country to which the car was originally delivered?

Wanting to know more in St. Louis
John Testrake, JCNA# 30420
President, Jaguar Assoc. of Greater St. Louis

In a message dated 7/31/01 4:35:15 AM Central Daylight Time,
F8driver@pacbell.net writes:> The equipment on the Jaguar must be that which was available/offered by

Jaguar Cars in the country where the car was delivered. As with other
items, if it isn’t something that’s judged (i.e… not on the score sheet
or obvious) then you’re probably safe installing it.

It happens frequently that cars originally delivered in another country
are brought to the US with many different features or accessories not
found on the same vintage Jags delivered in the US. (Series 2 E-types
delivered in France continued to have 3 SU Carbs.)

At a JCNA Concours, when required, the onus is on the owner to produce
documentation showing the country to which the car was originally
delivered. Thereafter, the owner must also show that any items in
question were offered by Jaguar Cars for that particular year and model.

A while back it was determined that all E-types and other Jags delivered
to the US had front license plate holders. Staying basically with the
idea that the car must be presented in an “as delivered” configuration,
the requirement for the license plate holders was re-affirmed.

Jeff cited the oft repeated refrain so familiar to authenticity buffs…
cosmetics often blind the judges such that the truly authentic cars,
with original levels of cleanliness and polish, fair poorly.

Regards,
Dick Cavicke
Chief Judge, San Diego Jaguar Club

IMHO, you don’t prove the delivery destination, you declare it,
but then your car must be exactly as it was delivered to that
country. Since when do you have to produce Heritage certificates
or delivery docs at a concours?

Mike L
60A,67E,59Bug----- Original Message -----
From: Jtestrake@aol.com
To: concours@jag-lovers.org
Cc: F8driver@pacbell.net
Sent: July 31, 2001 10:12 AM
Subject: Re: [concours] Authenticity and Markets and the Parts
Catalog

In a message dated 7/31/01 4:35:15 AM Central Daylight Time,
F8driver@pacbell.net writes:

The equipment on the Jaguar must be that which was
available/offered by
Jaguar Cars in the country where the car was delivered.
snip
At a JCNA Concours, when required, the onus is on the owner
to produce
documentation showing the country to which the car was
originally
delivered.

Hi Dick,
I can’t find a reference to the country/market issue in the JCNA
judges rule
book. Can you tell me where I can find this written down?

Chapter VI, Paragraph A states: “A part, component, finish,
color or material
is considered to be non-authentic if it is not a genuine Jaguar
item for the
particular year and model of the Jaguar being presented. The
item must be as
it was specified and intended to leave the factory by Jaguar
Cars.” Year and
model, yes but not country of original delivery.

Chapter IV, Paragraph B, sub paragraph 3 goes on to talk about
factory and
aftermarket options accepted as authentic and specifically
approves of
“European style headlamps” on any Jaguar.

I have always used this section to justify the 7" headlamps on
my Ser III
xj6. The lamps were not offered in the US but they were “a
genuine Jaguar
item for the particular year and model”. Where does it talk
about producing
documentation showing the country to which the car was
originally delivered?

Wanting to know more in St. Louis
John Testrake, JCNA# 30420
President, Jaguar Assoc. of Greater St. Louis

In a message dated 7/31/01 4:35:15 AM Central Daylight Time,
F8driver@pacbell.net writes:

The equipment on the Jaguar must be that which was
available/offered by
Jaguar Cars in the country where the car was delivered. As
with other
items, if it isn’t something that’s judged (i.e… not on the
score sheet
or obvious) then you’re probably safe installing it.

It happens frequently that cars originally delivered in
another country
are brought to the US with many different features or
accessories not
found on the same vintage Jags delivered in the US. (Series 2
E-types
delivered in France continued to have 3 SU Carbs.)

At a JCNA Concours, when required, the onus is on the owner
to produce
documentation showing the country to which the car was
originally
delivered. Thereafter, the owner must also show that any
items in
question were offered by Jaguar Cars for that particular year
and model.

A while back it was determined that all E-types and other
Jags delivered
to the US had front license plate holders. Staying basically
with the
idea that the car must be presented in an “as delivered”
configuration,
the requirement for the license plate holders was
re-affirmed.

Jeff cited the oft repeated refrain so familiar to
authenticity buffs…
cosmetics often blind the judges such that the truly
authentic cars,
with original levels of cleanliness and polish, fair poorly.

Regards,
Dick Cavicke
Chief Judge, San Diego Jaguar Club

Dick

I thought an exception was made for those states where front license plates
are not issued. If not then the understanding must be that all E-types must
have a front license plate bracket or else it is a deduction.

Len Wheeler
JCSA

F8driver@pacbell.net wrote:> The equipment on the Jaguar must be that which was available/offered by

Jaguar Cars in the country where the car was delivered. As with other
items, if it isn’t something that’s judged (i.e… not on the score sheet
or obvious) then you’re probably safe installing it.

It happens frequently that cars originally delivered in another country
are brought to the US with many different features or accessories not
found on the same vintage Jags delivered in the US. (Series 2 E-types
delivered in France continued to have 3 SU Carbs.)

At a JCNA Concours, when required, the onus is on the owner to produce
documentation showing the country to which the car was originally
delivered. Thereafter, the owner must also show that any items in
question were offered by Jaguar Cars for that particular year and model.

A while back it was determined that all E-types and other Jags delivered
to the US had front license plate holders. Staying basically with the
idea that the car must be presented in an “as delivered” configuration,
the requirement for the license plate holders was re-affirmed.

Jeff cited the oft repeated refrain so familiar to authenticity buffs…
cosmetics often blind the judges such that the truly authentic cars,
with original levels of cleanliness and polish, fair poorly.

Regards,
Dick Cavicke
Chief Judge, San Diego Jaguar Club

Does anybody know if Series 1.5 Etypes had covered headlamps, as
delivered in Europe?

As far as I know, all of the “Series 1.5” E-types has uncovered
headlights, regardless of market.

I know they had different signals (amber), speedo (KPH), rocker
covers (extra screw), spinners (strange) and 3 SU’s (no
emission). - Anything else?

I also believe that all non-USA 1.5’s retained the toggle-switch dashboard.
Porbably many other oddities, but I’m no E-type expert.

Doug Dwyer----- Original Message -----
From: “Michael Lupynec” mlupynec@globalserve.net

Chapter VI, Paragraph A states: “A part, component, finish, color or
material
is considered to be non-authentic if it is not a genuine Jaguar item for
the
particular year and model of the Jaguar being presented. The item must be
as
it was specified and intended to leave the factory by Jaguar Cars.” Year
and
model, yes but not country of original delivery.

“…as it was specified and intended to leave the facory…”

That about says it all, I think. If it was “specified and intended” to
have, let’s say, the small headlamps and an air pump…then that’s what
is “correct”.

Of course, perhaps it’s not what the rules say but, instead, waht the
don’t say ! :slight_smile:

Cheers,
Doug----- Original Message -----
From: Jtestrake@aol.com

Hi doug,
This section certainly leaves room for interpretation. At least the 7"
headlights are given the go ahead in the following paragraph VI. B. 3. which
refers to “European Headlights”.
John Testrake
St. Louis, USA
84xj6 76xj12

In a message dated 7/31/01 3:24:51 PM Central Daylight Time,
DWYERD@email.msn.com writes:

---- Original Message -----
From: <@Jtestrake>

Chapter VI, Paragraph A states: “A part, component, finish, color or
material
is considered to be non-authentic if it is not a genuine Jaguar item for
the
particular year and model of the Jaguar being presented. The item must
be> as
it was specified and intended to leave the factory by Jaguar Cars.” Year
and
model, yes but not country of original delivery.

“…as it was specified and intended to leave the facory…”

That about says it all, I think. If it was “specified and intended” to
have, let’s say, the small headlamps and an air pump…then that’s what
is “correct”.

Of course, perhaps it’s not what the rules say but, instead, waht the
don’t say ! :slight_smile:

Cheers,
Doug

Merging Dick and John’s comments together, it appears that I would be on
solid ground to convert my California Emissions XJ6C to 49-state
configuration, particularly since it was originally sold in Oregon and now
lives in Washington.

It would appear somewhat shakier to install the 7" headlamps as these were
constrained by lighting regulations of the time. A European-style light
would be OK, but not perhaps in the 7" size? It’s shaky enough that I’d let
it slide (lucked out again, Dwyer!) unless there was a clear protest board
ruling on the question. This would be the case for a Canadian car as well
unless it was late enough that 7" headlights were being offered in Canada,
though even a Canadian car would be on more solid ground. This appears to
be an item that might benefit from clarification in a future edition of the
Manual.

It appears that the European bumpers would be “over the edge.”

Kents would get the JCNA seal of approval on an XJ6C because they were
certainly available in 1976 (OE on the XJ-S), were legal, and certainly
could have been installed by dealers even though Jaguar never put them on
as OEM on any Series 2 XJ6 bound for the US. They are also listed as
options in the Parts Catalog without any market specifics.

As for the other comments, I’d hate to see us go down a slippery slope
whereby we required a JDHT certificate on every car being shown. Things are
complicated enough with the VIN numbers without trying to establish the
original market of the car and documentation within the 15 minute judging
window.

Speaking of the VIN, there has GOT to be a better way! I judged a half
dozen Driven Division E-types, none of which had the VIN number on the
scoresheet. We wound up asking the owners if they planned to show the car
more than once. If the answer was “no” we blew it off and spent the time
actually reviewing the car. Validating the VIN number led to less thorough
judging in this case, which I don’t think was the original intent. Too bad
my XJ6C’s got the number in the window or I could increase scores by the
simple expedient of “forgetting” to send in the VIN.
-Steve A.
'67 E Type Coupe
'76 XJ6C
'91 XJ40--------------

Dick Cavicke wrote:

The equipment on the Jaguar must be that which was available/offered by
Jaguar Cars in the country where the car was delivered. As with other
items, if it isn’t something that’s judged (i.e… not on the score sheet
or obvious) then you’re probably safe installing it.
John Testrake adds:
I can’t find a reference to the country/market issue in the JCNA judges rule
book. Can you tell me where I can find this written down?

Chapter VI, Paragraph A states: “A part, component, finish, color or material
is considered to be non-authentic if it is not a genuine Jaguar item for the
particular year and model of the Jaguar being presented. The item must be as
it was specified and intended to leave the factory by Jaguar Cars.” Year and
model, yes but not country of original delivery.

Chapter IV, Paragraph B, sub paragraph 3 goes on to talk about factory and
aftermarket options accepted as authentic and specifically approves of
“European style headlamps” on any Jaguar.

I have always used this section to justify the 7" headlamps on my Ser III
xj6. The lamps were not offered in the US but they were “a genuine Jaguar
item for the particular year and model”. Where does it talk about producing
documentation showing the country to which the car was originally delivered?

i guess that rule should actually read “…as it was specified and intended
to leave the factory except where it’s OK to make it otherwise…”

That would include leapers as well as 7" headlights. Now, as for the smog
equipment, did Jaguar really intend to ship California cars to Oregon or
did things just happen that way? I think I’ll leave my car just the way it
was shipped from Jaguar and ignore Andrachuk’s comments about how much
better the larger headlights look. Rules are rules, but I also have to feel
good about the car’s retention of originality and authenticity even if the
rules are a little shaky in places. THAT is the only really solid ground to
stand on.
-Steve A.
'67 E Type Coupe
'76 XJ6C
'91 XJ40--------------------------

Doug Dwyer wrote:

“…as it was specified and intended to leave the facory…”

That about says it all, I think. If it was “specified and intended” to
have, let’s say, the small headlamps and an air pump…then that’s what
is “correct”.

Of course, perhaps it’s not what the rules say but, instead, waht the
don’t say ! :slight_smile:

Since when do you have to produce Heritage certificates
or delivery docs at a concours?

I think this is a requirement for preservation class only.

Cheers,
Doug----- Original Message -----
From: “Michael Lupynec” mlupynec@globalserve.net

So, what we’re saying here is that you could not be docked for the
headlights, but it would be entirely appropriate for the judge to deduct
for the European headlight trim rings? Those are not the same thing as
headlights.

Or would we deduct for a “missing component” since the spacer between the
trim ring and the standard tiny US headlights is absent? Perhaps the
“missing” is most apropos.

Definitely a gray area. I think I’ll request Interiors if I judge the
Series 3 XJ cars at Portland this year. If I were judging exteriors, I
might FREEZE when I saw Doug’s missing spacers!

Seriously, I retreat to my former position that I would not deduct for 7"
headlights without a clear ruling but that I WOULD deduct for European
bumpers. If confronted with a gray market car, I would merely do my best in
the 15 minutes allotted. Those are easy to recognize, but the
market-to-market variation is pretty great. On the other hand, many “wrong”
items would still be caught because they tend to not get done in “the way
Jaguar does things.”

Dick Cavicke?
-Steve A.
'67 E Type Coupe
'76 XJ6C
'91 XJ40---------------------------

John Testrake wrote:

This section certainly leaves room for interpretation. At least the 7"
headlights are given the go ahead in the following paragraph VI. B. 3. which
refers to “European Headlights”.