[concours] Best paint suitable for amateur


(Nick Saltarelli) #1

The last paintjob I did on one of my cars was more than a couple of
decades ago. I sprayed the car with multiple double coats of
lacquer, light sanding between coats and final wet colour sanding
followed by hand polishing and the finished result was stunning,
but only for 15 years or so when the finish started slowly to
craze. A little more flex agent would have helped. I’m not redoing
the paintjob in lacquer this time obviously but was wondering if
there’s a modern replacement. I’m in the process of stripping the
car down to get it ready for some body repairs and will be in
painting mode in a few months.

I understand automotive paints aren’t what they were 20 years ago,
with VOC concerns mostly. In an amateur restorer but OCD particular
about doing things right and safely. Are there modern paint systems
that will allow me to do a show quality, hand rubbed finish in my
shop?

Thanks.–
1968 E-type OTS, 1954 XK120SE OTS
Ontario, Canada
–Posted using Jag-lovers JagFORUM [forums.jag-lovers.org]–


(Geoffrey Green) #2

wondering if
there’s a modern replacement. I’m in the process of
stripping the
car down to get it ready for some body repairs and will be
in
painting mode in a few months.

I understand automotive paints aren’t what they were 20
years ago,
with VOC concerns mostly. In an amateur restorer but OCD

The last car I painted years ago was also in lacquer. Checking into modern paints and there is concern with some about toxic chemicals requiring a full suit and breathing equipment to use. I have not looked into the water base paints.

Modern paints are much better than the old lacquer and enamel. I have my parts painted with collision repair paint systems which hold up better than powder coating.

Looking forward to what you find out.

Geoff Green


(Robert Wilkinson) #3

In reply to a message from NickolasS sent Wed 28 Sep 2011:

I’m also looking into this, and would appreciate what others
have to say.

I painted a couple cars with acrylic lacquer back in the
day. More recently, but still 20 years or so ago, I painted
my first XJ with base-clear. It’s easy to use, and can
employ the same colour sanding/polishing as does lacquer. I
used a PPG system: epoxy chromate primer, urethane surfacer,
DBU basecoat, and a clearcoat (DC1100) that’s no longer
available. This clearcoat (called NCT or new curing
technology) was iso-free (no remote air required) and out of
dust in about 5 min–important for my outdoor painting. You
just sand out and polish any runs or insects.

Currently I’ve found only one iso-free clearcoat, Dupont
1780S. The problem is that it’s pricey, even among
clearcoats that are not cheap as a class. They also
recommend a pricey premium basecoat. Anyway, price-no
object that’s what I’d use. Alternatives are to use iso
products and wear a good mask, changing cartridges
frequently, of buy a remote air source, which at least you’d
keep, unlike the 1780S which would be gone after the job.

There are excellent one-step paints that are forgiving, but
they take a while to dry–more dust and bugs. I like being
able to always correct my work if I goof. The base-clear
allows this, similar to the old lacquer. But if you have a
booth, they’re fine. I know folks who do beautiful work
with them.–
The original message included these comments:

with VOC concerns mostly. In an amateur restorer but OCD particular
about doing things right and safely. Are there modern paint systems
that will allow me to do a show quality, hand rubbed finish in my
shop?


Bob Wilkinson, 73 XJ6
Saint Louis, MO, United States
–Posted using Jag-lovers JagFORUM [forums.jag-lovers.org]–
–Support Jag-lovers - Donate at http://www.jag-lovers.org/donate04.php


(Steven Trovato) #4

I just opened my mailbox and found my copy of AutoRestorer. There’s
an article called “A Closer Look at Color Sanding” that might be of
interest to you.

-Steve Trovato
@Steven_Trovato1


(gary grant) #5

In reply to a message from NickolasS sent Wed 28 Sep 2011:

Hi Nickolass
A year ago I painted my XK140 at home. Previously I had
only painted two cars, with a brush, and one car using
spray cans.

To paint the Jag I used Dupont Nason Ful-thane 2K
urethane paint which is a catalyzed urethane needing no
clear coat. Most importantly, for me, is that this type
of paint, which has been around for years, according to
the paint stores is completely compliant with the new
paint regulations coming into effect in Ontario (maybe
they are already in effect) and will still be available
in the future. I like this as I know I will be doing
various repairs and touch ups to the paint job, and can
still buy additional paint of this exact type whenever
needed.

I painted the car outdoors and rolled it into the garage
to dry. As expected, I ended up with bugs, runs, dust and
a little orange peel in the paint, but these defects can
be sanded out and the polished just like the old fashioned
lacquer paint which is no longer available here.

Straight out of the spray gun the paint dries to a nice
gloss, and this gloss can be regained after wet sanding
the defects out and then polishing.

I only put on 3 relatively heavy coats, but now I wish I
had applied 2 or 3 more coats, because after the wet
sanding, the remaining paint is pretty thin.

Also, be sure to let the primer dry completely for at
least a few days before applying any paint. I did not,
and 3 weeks after painting the car, a bunch of bubbles
appeared right in the middle of the bonnet. Apparently
these are called solvent pops, and are caused by gas
emanating from the uncured primer under the paint. I had
to sand down and repaint the bonnet to get rid of the
darned things.

You could always get a small can of this type of paint
and try it out on something to see if you like it.

I made a simple fresh air breathing apparatus by
attaching one end of a long vinyl tube to a regular dust
mask, and feeding fresh air from a separate compressor to
the other end of the tube.

If interested, you can read more in a posting I made on
the XK list back on October 7 , 2010, titled ‘‘new paint
job’’. Most helpful are comments made by others much more
experienced and knowledgeable than myself.

The two tone brown paint on the car which I sanded off
The XK was actual nitrocellulose lacquer, applied in the
springtime of 1970. The ancient brown paint still had
that really nice polished lacquer gloss, but had cracked
and peeled off in so many places that I finally got up
enough courage to say good bye to the patina that had
developed over the years.
Oh well, that old brown lacquer paint job still exists in
my mind.

http://www.jag-lovers.org/snaps/snap_view.php3?
id=1286288215–
The original message included these comments:

with VOC concerns mostly. In an amateur restorer but OCD particular


Gary Grant S818919DN
Ottawa, Canada
–Posted using Jag-lovers JagFORUM [forums.jag-lovers.org]–
–Support Jag-lovers - Donate at http://www.jag-lovers.org/donate04.php


(gary grant) #6

In reply to a message from NickolasS sent Wed 28 Sep 2011:

This should be the link to a few pictures.

[http://www.jag-lovers.org/snaps/snap_view.php3?
id=1286288215]–
Gary Grant S818919DN
Ottawa, Canada
–Posted using Jag-lovers JagFORUM [forums.jag-lovers.org]–
–Support Jag-lovers - Donate at http://www.jag-lovers.org/donate04.php


(Nick Saltarelli) #7

In reply to a message from Gary Grant sent Sat 1 Oct 2011:

Just back from the AACA meet in Hershey PA. Very few Jaguars this
year … but back to the topic at hand. I was much impressed by a
black paintjob on a MC TC and queried the owner about it. He did it
himself using single stage urethane, colour sanded and buffed out a
couple of days after spraying. Really beautiful depth and gloss,
much like lacquer, and a dead ringer for original. Old technology,
of course, VOCs and ISO galore (read: air supplied respirator a
must).–
1968 E-type OTS, 1954 XK120SE OTS
Ontario, Canada
–Posted using Jag-lovers JagFORUM [forums.jag-lovers.org]–
–Support Jag-lovers - Donate at http://www.jag-lovers.org/donate04.php


(oldgas) #8

In reply to a message from NickolasS sent Wed 28 Sep 2011:

I did my XK120 DHC in my garage last year using a base/clear
system. It turned out well but you have to be really careful
when sanding and buffing the clear that you don’t penetrate
into the base coat. It can be difficult to touch up and match.

I will use the above mentioned single stage urethane for my
next project. Five coats, sand and buff and done. Easier to
touch up. And yes, a fresh air system is a must.

Vern–
oldgas
–Posted using Jag-lovers JagFORUM [forums.jag-lovers.org]–
–Support Jag-lovers - Donate at http://www.jag-lovers.org/donate04.php


(Nick Saltarelli) #9

In reply to a message from oldgas sent Thu 20 Oct 2011:

Acquired a new air supplied respirator and turbine
recently for c. $350 and used it to do a chemical strip
on my E. Worked great. I’m looking forward to the
urethane respray.
Email me if you want more info.–
The original message included these comments:

touch up. And yes, a fresh air system is a must.


1968 E-type OTS since 1982, 1954 XK120SE OTS since 1991
Ontario, Canada
–Posted using Jag-lovers JagFORUM [forums.jag-lovers.org]–
–Support Jag-lovers - Donate at http://www.jag-lovers.org/donate04.php


(Jim XK140 FHC) #10

Although a long way off for me , I am still deliberating which paint . I have had decent results with cellulose ( I think lacquer in USA ) and brush/ rollered Rustolium . This non too deadly more modern paint does look interesting and not too pricey .