[concours] Novice detailer

I’m a new member to the List and a new Jaguar owner (a former Porsche
loyalist). While I don’t enter concours, I enjoy making the most of my cars.

I have a pretty clean 92 Sovereign with 46K on the clock. Its black over
black. I have been a long time Zymol user but have just received an order of
Pinnacle. I am anxious to try it but, living in Minneapolis, I doubt I will
have the opportunity until Spring. Any thoughts on the one wax over the other
. . . or tips on use? I have noticed that just waxing the chrome tends to
cloud it (I generally use a metal polish - Blue Magic - followed by wax).
Ideas on making it gleam? I would also like to get at the interior. The seat
seams have a fair amount of goop in them and I would like to clean it out. I
bought a natural-hair paint brush and trimed it so that it’s firm but I’m not
sure on the proper cleaning technic. I also have noticed that the wood
cutouts (around the vents) is black in some spot but not in others. I assume
it was originally all black. Is that right? And, if so, what’s the best way
to restore the color? Lastly, I have a pesky door ding I would like to take
care of . . . thoughts?

Sorry for the rambling . . . I have been waiting to ask these questions for
some time.

-Scott

In regard to your door ding, the best thing to do is see if there is a
franchise of Dent Doctor in Minneapolis. Our Wisconsin Jaguar Club had a
tech session at the local franchise last spring and it is amazing what they
can do. It is a paintless repair whereby they access the back of the panel
and massage out the ding with long special tools. This is for the typical
dings where someone opens their car door into your side panel. If in the
door, they use a wedge to slightly bow the door panel where it meets the
side glass. In a few instances, they may have to drill a hole in a door
post or through the boot but a plug seals it up later. They do a little
touch up painting if necessary but it is best where the paint is OK but the
sheet metal is dinged. It costs about $50-$70 for the first ding and less
for each additional. They can access and fix 90% of the car area with this
technique but it is obviously not for large dents and collision repair.

I have recently seen and ad here for a company called Dent Wizard which I
assume offers the same service. A lot of business for these companys is for
used car dealers where they take in trades with dings. In these cases, the
company does the work on the dealer’s lot.

Bob Reid

61 E-Type OTS
69 E-Type FHC
73 E-Type OTS
84 XJ6
Milwaukee, Wisconsin, USA

At 11:08 PM 12/21/97 -0500, you wrote:>I’m a new member to the List and a new Jaguar owner (a former Porsche

loyalist). While I don’t enter concours, I enjoy making the most of my cars.

I have a pretty clean 92 Sovereign with 46K on the clock. Its black over
black. I have been a long time Zymol user but have just received an order of
Pinnacle. I am anxious to try it but, living in Minneapolis, I doubt I will
have the opportunity until Spring. Any thoughts on the one wax over the other
. . . or tips on use? I have noticed that just waxing the chrome tends to
cloud it (I generally use a metal polish - Blue Magic - followed by wax).
Ideas on making it gleam? I would also like to get at the interior. The seat
seams have a fair amount of goop in them and I would like to clean it out. I
bought a natural-hair paint brush and trimed it so that it’s firm but I’m not
sure on the proper cleaning technic. I also have noticed that the wood
cutouts (around the vents) is black in some spot but not in others. I assume
it was originally all black. Is that right? And, if so, what’s the best way
to restore the color? Lastly, I have a pesky door ding I would like to take
care of . . . thoughts?

Sorry for the rambling . . . I have been waiting to ask these questions for
some time.

-Scott

Scott> I have a late 82 xj6, a 3 time first in classs JCNA winner. My
advice to you is that you are wasting money with ZYMOL and I have never heard
of Pinnacle, but what you say about the chrome clouding shows that they are
not doing the job. FIRST: STOP using chrome POLISH. Everytime you use it
you are removing some of the chrome plating. SECOND: buy a good quality
NON-abrasive CARNAUBA wax (several brands are good. I have used Eagle,
and Classic for 20 years!). This wax gives absolutely the clearest, most
brilliant, UV protective shine, and it is a snap to put on. It makes your
chrome glisten, clearly. You also use it on the wood inside the Jaguar
to protect it from sun damage. You can apply coat after coat with absolutely
no damage to the paint. Leather:you areusing something like LEXOL to keep
it soft and supple, I hope? To clean, use something like the LEXOL cleaner
which is designed with the right PH for leather so that it will not dry or
damage it. There is no car shinier than mine, so I know this stuff works
and has worked, as I said, for 20 years.

                                    Gregory Andrachuk
                                    Victoria, Canada

Thanks for the tip, I’ll check around.

Scott

Thanks for the tips! I have a Connelly leather care kit and it has worked
pretty well. What technics do you use on cleaning the seams? Scrubbing the
cleaner in with a brush?

I have some carnuba wax (can’t recall the brand but its non-abrasive) and
would like to apply it to the interior wood. I have the car in a semi-heated
garage (above freezing) . . . is it O.K. to wax at these low temps?

Thanks again for your help. Advice from people with such experience is
invaluable.

Scott

No. Wax should be applied above 60 degrees F. For absorptive surfaces, if
the wood is not laquer coated, it should be quite warm. Park the car
outside on a bright sunny day and heat it up. Work the leather treatment in
with your hand. A good leather treatment compound will also be good for
your skin. That’s another way to evaluate these things.

Thanks for the tips! I have a Connelly leather care kit and it has worked
pretty well. What technics do you use on cleaning the seams? Scrubbing the
cleaner in with a brush?

I have some carnuba wax (can’t recall the brand but its non-abrasive) and
would like to apply it to the interior wood. I have the car in a semi-heated
garage (above freezing) . . . is it O.K. to wax at these low temps?

Thanks again for your help. Advice from people with such experience is
invaluable.

Scott

Peter

For Scott re: Carnauba wax and leather care: Scott, you can use the carnauba wa
x at any temperature. My car is in an UNheated garage, and I have used it
in the winter. This wax does not go cloudy, and is very easy to buff to a
brilliant shine. This may be because it is basically made by God and not
by chemical engineers! The wax is the natural wax found in the Brazilian
carnauba tree and is what gives the leaves their shiny protective coat. You
can use this wax on everything that is smooth, icluding the black rubber
bumpers. Two coats gives them a gloss that is unequalled, much better than
those “black wax” products made for bumpers. True! About the leather:
the idea is to use the minimum of cleaner, and with a very soft bristle brush,
and by that I mean something like a SOFT bristle toothbrush. Follow up with
some leather conditioner like LEXOL. If you have a Connolly kit, it probably
contains their HIDE FOOD. I think you will find, no, I know you will find, that
something like LEXOL is much easier to use and more effective than HIDE
FOOD (which I have used in the past, but gave up because it requires a
lot of buffing to get rid of the sticky feel left on the leather). Make sure
that you treat the top of the rear seat regularly since this is the area of
greatest sun damage. The leather dries, shrinks, and then pulls at the
sttching. LEXOL will actually expand and soften the leather so if there
is a hint of this problem, that is what I recommend, and no, I do
not have shares in LEXOL, not am I related to anyone there, I am just a
very satisfied and impressed owner. I have found that I can buy larger
size bottles of this product at tack shops. Good luck!

                                             Gregory Andrachuk
                                             Victoria, Canada

Carnauba wax can be applied at virtually ANY temperature with no change in
gloss properties. I have done it in freezing conditions in an unheated garage,
as well as in summer heat. Same result.
Gregory Andrachuk
Victoria, Canada

12/23/97

Hi Scott & all – Scott, to clean the leather seams gently, use a bit of
Ivory liquid dishwashing detergent or equivalent mixed with enough water to
make suds, and go over the seams with it and a SOFT (worn-out) toothbrush,
with GENTLE pressure. Do as many times as necessary to be sure seams are
clean, then dry thoroughly with terrycloth towel. After this cleaning, put
Connolly Hide Food on all leather surfaces (light coat with a terry
washcloth), let set up 1/2 hour (more if very cold), buff out with a clean
terry towel. Do Hide Food every 3 months, and leather will stay soft and
usable.

For wood: my brother-in-law, who’s a woodworker, recommended years ago
that I wax the wood with Minwax Finishing Wax (paste, in yellow can). I’ve
followed his advice since acquiring 792817 BW, my original Mk IX, in Feb.
'89, and the original wood GLOWS! Put a thin coat on with terry washcloth,
let set up 1/2 hour (more if very cold), buff out with clean terry towel.
If your wood is close to original without damage, you’ll like the finish
this gives you.

I hope this is helpful – happy holidays to all! Larry Martz**********
Thanks for the tips! I have a Connelly leather care kit and it has worked
pretty well. What technics do you use on cleaning the seams? Scrubbing the
cleaner in with a brush?

I have some carnuba wax (can’t recall the brand but its non-abrasive) and
would like to apply it to the interior wood. I have the car in a semi-heated
garage (above freezing) . . . is it O.K. to wax at these low temps?

Thanks again for your help. Advice from people with such experience is
invaluable.

Scott