[E-Type] Knock off tightening was E-Type tube-tubeless

David,
Why? It seems logical that the car is “hanging” from the wires so why
wouldn’t the weight be born by the “top” of the knock off? As for the
planetary tightenening effect I agree with you that will happen, as you
mention, no matter what type of wheels are in use. So it’s not
important where where the load is, just that its there.
pauls 67ots sans timing

Giving this just a little more thought, it seems completely logical that
the
most important part of the theorem is the interaction between the wheel
and
the knock-off, where they meet. It makes more sense to think of the
wheel
cone and the knockoff as planetary wheels rather than planetary
gears.
Forward motion of the car causes the wheels to drive the knockoffs until
they can’t tighten anymore. But it otherwise has nothing to do with the
construction of the wheel itself - wire wheels could just as well be
alloy -
the key is the knockoff/wheel interface.

…I conducted an experiment today. I loosened one knock-off by one
spoke,
marked the new location with a permanent marker, then took the car for a
short drive. On return, the knockoff had moved in the direction of
tightening by 1/2 spoke. So, I now think that the weight of the car
rests
on the bottom of the knock-off, not the top, and the planetary wheel
concept drives the knock-off in the direction of tightening because the
hub/wheel endeavour to rotate faster than the knockoff.

Thoughts?

David
<<<<<<<<<<From: “David J. Shield” dshield@pacbell.net
Subject: RE: RE: [E-Type] Re: E-Type tube-tubeless

Paul,

Well, you could be right about the weight of the wheel pressing upwards
against the inside of the knock-off, vs. resting downwards on the knock-off.
I’m trying to figure this out intuitively. My thinking is that the splined
hub carries the weight of that corner of the car, and when you put it in a
wheel and tighten the knock-off, now the wheel/knock-off bear the weight of
the splined hub and that corner of the car. This puts the load at the
bottom end of the wheel/knock-off. This is what in turn causes the wheel
center to pull downward on the top spoke(s).

I could be wrong, of course. You rightly point out that the load being
focused on one part of the knock-off (and the direction of rotation) is the
key to the planetary self-tightening action. For this, whether it’s top or
bottom doesn’t matter.

Cheers,

David>paul spurlock paulsp@snet.net

Subject: [E-Type] Knock off tightening was E-Type tube-tubeless

David,
Why? It seems logical that the car is “hanging” from the wires so why
wouldn’t the weight be born by the “top” of the knock off? As for the
planetary tightenening effect I agree with you that will happen, as you
mention, no matter what type of wheels are in use. So it’s not
important where where the load is, just that its there.
pauls 67ots sans timing