[E-Type] Vinyl or canvas? Hood or hood envelope?

Looking at the various available sources, I was not able to
find out when the hood (convertible top) material went from
canvas (cloth) to vinyl, beyond ‘‘maybe early 1967’’. My car
was manufactured in Dec 1965, and it currently has a vinyl
hood. I don’t know if this is the original top, but it was
on the car when I bought it in Oct 1971.

Now, let us examine the hood envelope (the cover when the
top is down). I know for sure that this is the original
hood envelope on the car. And it is vinyl… So, did the
material of the hood envelope always match the hood itself?
Or did even the canvas hoods come with a vinyl hood
envelope? A possible historical clue?

The reason I ask is that I am getting ready to replace the
hood and was curious as to what material was indeed original
to 1E12168.–
Mike - Ol’ Gurrl ('66 E-type OTS) & New ('08 S 4.2)
Aiken, SC, United States
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In reply to a message from Mike Gregory sent Fri 19 Sep 2014:

Hi Mike. My car is August 1965 and the original hood (as
told by the previous and only owner) was definitely vinyl.
However,I have just replaced it with a cloth hood.
Rob Herrick.
S1 1965 OTS–
The original message included these comments:

find out when the hood (convertible top) material went from
canvas (cloth) to vinyl, beyond ‘‘maybe early 1967’’. My car
was manufactured in Dec 1965, and it currently has a vinyl


Gas409
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Mike,

Mike,

Did you check the E-Type Judges’ Guides available for free on the Jaguar
Clubs of America (JCNA) website for this information. It should be there.
There are different Judges’ Guides for the Series 1, 1968, Series 2 and
Series 3 E-Types.

Regards,

Paul M. Novak

1990 Series III V12 Vanden Plas
1990 XJ-S Classic Collection convertible
1987 XJ6 Vanden Plas
1984 XJ6 Vanden Plas
1969 E-Type FHC
1957 MK VIII Saloon
Ramona, CA
P.M.Novak7@gmail.com-----Original Message-----
From: owner-e-type@jag-lovers.org [mailto:owner-e-type@jag-lovers.org] On
Behalf Of Mike Gregory
Sent: Friday, September 19, 2014 2:29 PM
To: e-type@jag-lovers.org
Subject: [E-Type] Vinyl or canvas? Hood or hood envelope?

Looking at the various available sources, I was not able to find out when
the hood (convertible top) material went from canvas (cloth) to vinyl,
beyond ‘‘maybe early 1967’’. My car was manufactured in Dec 1965, and it
currently has a vinyl hood. I don’t know if this is the original top, but it
was on the car when I bought it in Oct 1971.

Now, let us examine the hood envelope (the cover when the top is down). I
know for sure that this is the original hood envelope on the car. And it
is vinyl… So, did the material of the hood envelope always match the
hood itself?
Or did even the canvas hoods come with a vinyl hood envelope? A possible
historical clue?

The reason I ask is that I am getting ready to replace the hood and was
curious as to what material was indeed original to 1E12168.

Mike - Ol’ Gurrl ('66 E-type OTS) & New ('08 S 4.2) Aiken, SC, United
States --Posted using Jag-lovers JagFORUM [forums.jag-lovers.org]–


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In reply to a message from Paul M. Novak sent Fri 19 Sep 2014:

The Judges’ Guide is not definitive for this particular
question. In fact, it is the source of the ‘‘maybe early
1967’’ statement. And Rob Herrick above is reporting in with
another 1965 car in original vinyl. So maybe my clearly
original vinyl hood envelope indeed confirms that my
original hood was also vinyl?–
The original message included these comments:

Did you check the E-Type Judges’ Guides available for free on the Jaguar
Clubs of America (JCNA) website for this information. It should be there.


Mike - Ol’ Gurrl ('66 E-type OTS) & New ('08 S 4.2)
Aiken, SC, United States
–Posted using Jag-lovers JagFORUM [forums.jag-lovers.org]–


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In reply to a message from Mike Gregory sent Fri 19 Sep 2014:

My recently acquired '65 OTS was restored in 2006 by Classic
Showcase. They must have put in the existing vinyl top, while
the cover (presumably made at the same time) is cloth/canvas,
so mine has the same mix of vinyl and cloth that you have.
Clearly not original to the car, but perhaps they were copying
what was there?–
Alberto A
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In reply to a message from Mike Gregory sent Fri 19 Sep 2014:

I was visiting Stan Swan at GB Classic Trim in Nuneaton the
other day and asked him the same question. Stan started work in
the Jaguar trim department at the age of 15 (1965) and remained
there until the 1980’s when he left to set up his own business.
Mine of information! More info here:
http://forum.etypeuk.com/viewtopic.php?t=6260

But back on subject. Stan told me the vinyl roof was introduced
for export vehicles after complaints from owners the Twillfast
fabrics were fading in the sun, not something we experience in
the UK! Jaguar therefore used Everflex cloth backed vinyl for
the hood bags and eventually for the hoods themselves. So cars
went down the line with Twillfast hoods for UK and Europe,
Everflex hoods for the US, Australia and South Africa. Dates
are difficult to nail down because it started as an ad-hoc
process with warranty claims on hood bags being fulfilled with
Everflex replacements. They then figured if the sun was out the
roof would be down so started fitting the Everflex bags on the
line. This was on the 3.8’s. Later (1965?) they fitted Everflex
hoods and bags on export vehicles until they became standard
fitments with the S2 cars. It seems UK owners were pretty
insistent their hoods were ‘Mohair’ (a generic term for twill
fabric) so we were the last to get the Everflex versions.

Another interesting snippet from Stan was that Jaguar had three
sizes of hood available and the fitters chose the best one for
each car going down the line.

For pedants:

Everflex is the registered trademark of a vinyl fabric used as
roof covering on hardtops and convertibles. It was popular from
the 1960s to the 1980s on luxury cars though its use has
decreased in recent years. On hardtop vehicles a fabric is
placed below the Everflex material to add definition and make
the car look more like a genuine convertible. The Everflex is
then glued down and screwed in around doors and windows. Rolls-
Royce, Bentley and Jaguar were the main users. It was
particularly popular on the Rolls-Royce Silver Shadow in the
early 1970s. Everflex was used for some hood bags on the very
early cars and later for the hood material on the S2 and S3. It
was originally manufactured by Bernard Wardle (Everflex) Ltd
and is still manufactured by Wardle Storey.

Mohair is a silk-like fabric or yarn made from the hair of the
Angora goat. Both durable and resilient, mohair is notable for
its high lustre, sheen and cost! It has nothing to do with the
hood material used on an E-Type which is typically made from
fine polyester yarn and cotton with a synthetic rubber
interply. The term ‘‘Mohair’’ has become more like a brand name
over the years. True Mohair, which used to be made from Goats
hair, hasn’t actually been produced for many, many years. Most
manufacturers offering ‘‘Mohair’’ actually produce the hoods
using Twillfast which is a very close and modern representation
of the original ‘‘Mohair’’ fabric.

More info on Jaguar trim materials here:
http://tinyurl.com/nncr79l

David–
The original message included these comments:

Now, let us examine the hood envelope (the cover when the
top is down). I know for sure that this is the original
hood envelope on the car. And it is vinyl… So, did the
material of the hood envelope always match the hood itself?
Or did even the canvas hoods come with a vinyl hood
envelope? A possible historical clue?


David Jones, S1 OTS
Nottingham, United Kingdom
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In reply to a message from Heuer sent Sat 20 Sep 2014:

David,
Marvelous bits of historical information! Many thanks for
posting the details here - wins the prize for the most
definitive post on E-Type hoods!
Mike–
The original message included these comments:

I was visiting Stan Swan at GB Classic Trim in Nuneaton the
other day and asked him the same question. Stan started work in
the Jaguar trim department at the age of 15 (1965) and remained
there until the 1980’s when he left to set up his own business.


Mike - Ol’ Gurrl ('66 E-type OTS) & New ('08 S 4.2)
Aiken, SC, United States
–Posted using Jag-lovers JagFORUM [forums.jag-lovers.org]–


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Subscription changes - http://www.jag-lovers.com/cgi-bin/majordomo
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