[E-Type] was Stainless steel brake lines - now "naff", knackered, etc., et c.,

Mike More noted:

“My wife also found out the word “tush” has different meetings here and
there.”

This is becoming a “dangerous” subject - let’s not venture to the realms of
such things as “fanny packs” which would cause consternation in many English
speaking but non-American societies. Certainly, Churchill’s famous statement
“Two great nations separated by a common language” is just as valid now as
it was then!!!

By the way, I received an interesting e-mail from an Indian lister (for
which many thanks - I have to admit to never having seen an E-type on any
trip I made to India!) that advised that “naff” was in common usage years
ago in some of the tea growing areas. It would not surprise me if there was
an original linkage here to an Indian dialect - given the great number of
languages spoke in India - as “English” has incorporated words from all over
the world. This always makes an interesting comparison with France (my
wife’s first language is French) where every effort has been made to keep
the language “pure” - there must be some listers sufficiently old to
remember the controversy over “le weekend” a couple of decades ago - whereas
the English process was always to “absorb” any useful word no matter the
origin.

We’d better get this thread back to Jags in general and Es in particular or
George will need to intercede.

John (with relatively “un-naff” 62 OTS, knackered 56 XK140 and fairly naff
Norton, etc., etc…)

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Duhig, John F writes:

We’d better get this thread back to Jags in general and Es in particular or
George will need to intercede.

I don’t mind the occasional excursions as they tend to make every one of us
seem more human. This is a great community whose love of e-types brought us
together but we also share many other interests as well.

After all, a lot of us are Yanks but wonder just why the English call some
things what they do. It’s all a part of the education and charm of being an
e-type owner.

If someone complains, I’ll let you know.

George Cohn
'70 OTS

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Well George, since you asked…

“Knocking up” comes from the early days of the
industrial revolution in Northern England. The workers
would be woken up for the early morning shift by a man
who would go from house to house tapping on the
upstairs windows with a long cane. He was called the
“knocker upper”. Now, how’s that for a job
description!

All the best

Ray Sharp
'61FHC
'71s2OTSDate: Wed, 21 May 2003 19:06:46 GMT
From: “George Cohn” gwcohn@bblabs.net
Subject: [E-Type] Re: was Stainless steel brake lines -
now =?iso-8859-1?Q?=22naff=22,?= knackered, etc., et
c.,

Duhig, John F writes:

We’d better get this thread back to Jags in general
and Es in particular or
George will need to intercede.

I don’t mind the occasional excursions as they tend to
make every one of us
seem more human. This is a great community whose love
of e-types brought us
together but we also share many other interests as
well.

After all, a lot of us are Yanks but wonder just why
the English call some
things what they do. It’s all a part of the education
and charm of being an
e-type owner.

If someone complains, I’ll let you know.

George Cohn
'70 OTS

Search the archives & forums - http://search.jag-lovers.org/
Subscription changes - http://www.jag-lovers.com/cgi-bin/majordomo