Finally Settled on Colour..Pastel Blue Metallic

After much thought on how to paint and trim my 120 FHC…I’ve settled on Pastel Blue Metallic with a red interior. Combed the forms for original modern paint code matching advice with no clear direction.

Am I crazy or is Healey Blue pretty damn close?



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That Healey blue looks more like Jaguar Opalescent Silver Blue to me, rather than Pastel Blue Metallic. These two cars look like closer to my understanding of what Pastel Blue Metallic looked like…

I suspect that the first one is closer - the second a bit too saturated, but hopefully someone else has photos of a good example.

William, what is your XK120 FHC’s Chassis Number (and thus Date of Manufacture) and equally important Body Number (basis of exact demarcation)
I don’t know whether you are concerned about authenticity or not, but given your interest in correct shade of Pastel Blue metallic, I presume you are interested…

But there is thus, a far more important consideration…
PASTEL BLUE METALLIC, a Cellulose Enamel, was only offered/available on earlier XK120s built up to November 1952, so very few FHCs…

From November 1952 onwards, all Jaguars, including XK120 FHC, were now painted in a new range of Synthetic Enamel colours, that no longer included Pastel Blue metallic, being replaced with a non-metallic solid colour equivalent PASTEL BLUE.

If you get metallic versus non-metallic wrong, then having the exact shade of the blue colour is secondary…

but did include “Twilight Blue” a metallic paint colour a brighter than light blue colour

Roger, my car is a December 52, with a dispatch of January 53 (S680530). Original colors were white with a blue interior. Being an early Browns Lane car, I’ve struggled with the color selections and combinations and am not a fan of the non metallic pastel colors. I feel some guilt in steering away from complete originality but have decided to at least go with an original scheme from Foleshill. Also plan to paint the engine bay, underside, trunk, etc. the way they did at Browns Lane. I am making other safety modifications and drivablity improvements which I think would probably not bode well in a concours environment anyhow.

My book says modern paint codes are PPG 2933 and NEXA 2674…but these leads seem to be a cold trail. Guy named Carl Hanson tried to recreate the original color on his car (679012) but the result was more grey than some of the more typical examples I’ve seen.

Anyone tried the Urs Schmitt paint code?

For reference:

As previously posted by someone (Rob R. maybe?) in another thread on this subject, TCP Global has a copy of the 1952 Jaguar factory color chip chart on their website and will supply paint in those colors including Pastel Blue Metallic. I haven’t seen an example of a car painted with the TCP version but I would like to, since my 52 ots was that color originally.

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OK,
Sounds like you are not seeking strict authenticity with your paint colour choice if you want PASTEL BLUE METALLIC for your mid-Dec 1952 built FHC; that’s fine - its your personal choice…
But really becomes 50 shades of grey as to how accurately or otherwise you want to match the original 1949- Nov 1952 only PASTEL BLUE METALLIC that was made from the then Cellulose Enamels that had more an opalescent appearance, rather than the ‘metallic’ appearance we expect with modern metallic synthetic enamel paints.
These early ‘opalescent’ colours had an extremely subdued metallic appearance that I understand was provided by adding finely ground ‘mother-of-pearl’ to the base solid cellulose paint. I am only aware of one person/effort to accurately match both the colour shade and the very subdued ‘opalescent’ appearance of these early XK metallics… with the help of a very small paint company in the West Coast of USA, if I can recall correctly - I can check my files if you want to pursue this.
See also attached my original factory colour swatch booklet of the complete range of these Cellulose Enamel paints, including the five ‘Metallics’, and thus Pastel Blue Metallic. I have not shown this for accurate colour shade matching, being a notoriously inaccurate digital image as seen on a screen, but draw you attention to fact of how subdued the ‘metallic’ appearance is within the five metallic colours shown…

More later re current options - have an appointment I need to now go to…

I’ve spent most or the day looking into this…I think I know the subdued look you’re talking about. I’m starting to think I’m never going to be comfortable with the look using modern painting practices and metal flaking knowing this. I suppose with the standard pastel blue it seems like there is better information on getting it close to original look with synthetic enamels.

I appreciate your offer to look deeper into this for me, but I’m no longer settled with my decision, so I don’t want to waste any of your time. I’m really having a tough time with this. Really appreciate all the information you and everyone else has provided.

Another pastel blue…

This color for the Healey is not close at all. Cliff

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BTW, one of the cars in Uri’s book is a Pastel Blue DHC S/N 678168. The color of this car in the printed copy of the book is very close.

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My car is a very early steel bodied example; the colour was chosen by the previous owner and I do not know whether it is close to the original pastel blue metallic used by Jaguar. My comment is that the colour really suits the car . . . .

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Whether or not that is an accurate representation of the Jaguar factory color matters not! That is just a fabulous looking car in a spectacular picture! Good on ya.

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For whatever it is worth I have a good example of the original Pastel Blue paint applied by the factory to my car. It is a '54 OTS S/N S675134 with a build date of 03-04-54. I have owned it since 3-26-72, and it had been poorly repainted (at least once) in the past. Thankfully this was just an “exterior job” and the trunk, engine compartment, and interior were left alone. I am in the process of trying to get it back on the road and recently wrapped up most of the metal work on the drivers door. As you can see in the photos I replicated and replaced the very “tired” latch mounting panel. I carefully cleaned up the original panel which, never being exposed to the sun or engine fumes, seems to me to be as good a color sample as you could get. I have not taken it to my paint shop as yet to be lasered for a code and mixing paint, but will be doing so fairly soon for “jamming” the doors and such. The photos below were taken in natural sunlight and have not been “enhanced”. Obviously individual computer settings can change how colors appear. I will post more as I know more.

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Pastel Blue Metallic '51 FHC 679012.

Pastel Blue non-metallic '53 FHC 669035 (claimed to be original).

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Pastel Blue non-metallic looks remarkably similar to this. The colour on the doors, not the car, that is.


This is Jaguar light blue, 1968 to 1971, the later formula is more grey.
Again, the photos change the appearance somewhat, but I am reasonably familiar with the colour in natural light.

The joys of colour matching - its a ‘Black Art’.
Trouble is everyone wants a simple/quick answer, and that simply does not exist…

  1. The prime focus is on matching the SHADE of paint colour - that’s the easiest bit, albeit still not simple, and most certainly there is no quick answer, unless you have an original sample area of original paint from a hidden/protected/unweathered part of the car - for example my best sample of ARBOR GREEN, a very short lived colour used for only about 18 months for USA market only export XK140s, was a piece cut out of the headlamp nacelle of an ex-USA XK140 FHC he was restoring - car had been repainted, but inside the headlamp nacelle was original factory-fresh Arbor Green. (I can see why it was a short lived colour!).
  2. The second major problem is GLOSS levels - and this remains a huge problem, with todays painters seeming to assess the standard of their paint job efforts on the depth of gloss, and extreme gloss levels. Trouble is 1950s paint and gloss levels were far less than todays paints, and a modern high-gloss paint job, even if the shade of colour is an excellent match - looks totally different to an original 1950s paint job…
  3. Only applicable to Metallic Colours. Modern metallics look nothing at all like the original 1949-1952 Metallic colours offered by Jaguar. The original metallics were very subdued and certainly not excessive gloss enhanced. Modern metallics, totally different chemistry, are all about maximum enhanced metallic affect and maximum enhanced gloss effect. Even if the shade of colour is an accurate match, a modern metallic looks NOTHING at all like an original 1949-1952 metallic…

AS with all things ‘authenticity’ claimed/focused - its really a matter of what you are trying to achieve, and how much time/effort are you prepared to put into it…

This thread re its “Pastel Blue Metallic” heading is the most difficult of all to get right, because all three criteria have to be satisfied - Shade, Gloss and Metallic effect…

I will go out on a limb, and apologies up front if my opinions offend anyone, but as much as I am loath to comment about digital images re colour matching…

679012 re Metallic Pastel Blue looks (to me) to be a reasonably good match, possibly needs a tad more blue, albeit that can be fixed by photoshopping…, so maybe the actual car is a little better than what I see in this photo
669035 re (non metallic) Pastel Blue (to me) doesnt look very good at all - so hopefully a lot better in the flesh.
Eric’s Inner door re (non metallic) Pastel Blue (to me) looks excellent - as you would expect., being an inner panel protected all its life by the door trim…

Syd’s early steel XK120 - all I can say is previous owners personal choice, but in authenticity terms bears no resemblance to any factory blue colour I have ever seen on an XK120 - maybe the closest is an excessively glossy/excessively bright Twilight Blue

And PS - William C’s early comment about the Urs Schmid paint codes…
I have in hand a set of colour patches booklet, diligently made up based on Urs paint formulas, and I am afraid all the metallics suffer from all three of the problems mentioned above - the PASTEL BLUE (Metallic) colour patch for instance is not an accurate shade, far to glossy, and has excessive metallic effect, with the combination of these three things resulting in a metallic effect colour that looks totally wrong…