Is this a replacement water pump? (Late XK120)

There were several water pumps for the XK120 and Mark VII up to the end of '54, and it looks like you have one of the later ones, although not as late as my 1960s replacement, in that you have the hub with two ball bearings and driving dog, where I have the bearing shaft assembly as was used in XK140 and later pumps.
These are some versions; there may be more:

  1. without top port, 5 bolt hub
  2. with top port, 5 bolt hub
  3. without top port, 4 bolt hub
  4. with top port, 4 bolt hub
  5. repro with bearing shaft and 5 bolt hub (top port unknown)
  6. repro without top port, with bearing shaft and 4 bolt hub (mine)
    You can run your bypass into the top port with that nipple you have.
    If you have a heater, you will need a banjo, copper gaskets and banjo bolt.
    Or you can get two banjos, more gaskets and a longer banjo bolt and run bypass and heater from the side port.

    Or you can run without a heater.
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Thank you, Rob. As always a valuable font of knowledge.

There is a heater, as I understand became a standard fitment later in XK120 production, but this car spent the first several years of its existence in Florida, so it might have been bypassed. In any event a simple tee on the heater return line would allow the thermostat bypass hose to be connected.

Thanks also to Mike.

Here’s a WX128 style with the 4 bolt hub, no grease fitting and no top port.

Yep, that’s exactly what I have, except no WX number that I can see with a mirror and flashlight. Note the shaft end (5/8"?) is larger than the driving dog variety (3/8"?) indicating the later bearing shaft assembly type.
These from the manual show without top port, and a bypass on the top port.


Nick, your fan and balance pieces should have tiny holes indicating the original balanced positions.
Black is the generally agreed color. Fan blades were sometimes unpainted and sometimes half painted, and the manuals and period photos show both. BTW I saw you have the right color on the oil filter, but why did you paint the aluminum tailcase on the gearbox? Was it painted before?

Nick,

Can you read the number on the pump housing? I tried to enlarge your photo but still cannot read it. This number will tell you which version you have. Note that some suppliers quote the pump housing number instead of the actual complete pump part number. There were 5 different pumps used on the XK 120 but there were only 4 different housings.
C.2209 (very rare)
C.2457
C.4025
C.4938
I guess yours has the latter pump housing C.4938 but the pump itself has Jaguar part number C.6746 and was used from June 1952 onwards. See photo;


Regarding the replacement pumps as mentioned: Whiteley was the main supplier after Jaguar stopped supplying spare parts for the XKs and many have been sold in the US also via Jaguar dealers.
There were two versions for the XK 120: the early one was coded WX 75 and later versions were coded WX 128 which had the (improved) internal construction of the XK 140 pumps. To complete the Whiteley range: the replacement water pump for the XK 140 & 150 was coded WX 79. What I’ve seen sofar, is that the Whiteley pumps are of a higher quality than the original Jaguar pumps.

Good eye - you must be referencing the pic I posted 4 days ago in the Virtual car show thread. Also a good question. I don’t know the answer, Rob, or at least can’t remember. I painted it and the case way back in 1992 when I changed out the seals. It probably had a smattering of black paint on it so I figured it was supposed to be completely covered. Not going to change it now, though.

Fabulous tidbit! I was wondering about that … how I was going to figure out how to rebalance the thing.

You’re right. It’s C4938, Bob, and what looks like Q23 above.

Simply amazing, the depth and breadth of knowledge on this site!

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well, look at this (as restored 27 years ago) …

and the closeup …

son of a gun. I don’t know if I’d have noticed that.

between this and dangling bulldozers with a crane to determine centre of gravity I definitely owe you at least a beer, old boy.

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Yep, that’s them.
Now just strip and recurve the blades and you’re done.

I think I’m about to learn something new.

New to me, that is.

I betcha’ you could draw up a blade in CAD and have a bunch of new ones cut out with a water jet pretty cheap. Aluminum or stainless steel. Why mess with 60 year old aluminum?

I thought one of your blades looked a little bent, the one with the curly scratch.

I’d be surprised if they weren’t bent out of shape after all these years. Nothing a little bit of carefull hammer and dolly work won’t cure.

In this particular case–me, being a proponent of use-use-use–I’ve seen the effects of a tossed fan blade.

I’d probably do that, too.

Hammer and anvil cured a loose rivet on mine.

BTW pale green and red, not an approved color. :laughing:



Putting the D in DPO. :wink:

Great…since both Rob and Nick are hammer and dolly guys, I can’t decide which one I should send MY fan to…

Appears to me that Rob is the go-to guy for loose rivets, while Nick is the blade specialist.

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Terrific…two different shipments…

Ha, ha. And Mike’s your man if you need new blades, for example if you see cracks developing around the rivets.

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Now you guys have made me afraid to go ahead and use this fan…