Jag-lovers-digest V2 #322

(owner-jag-lovers-digest@sn.no) #1

jag-lovers-digest Sunday, 1 September 1996 Volume 02 : Number 322

Re: Wind Shield wipers (XJ)
XK engine spark plug harness
RE: XJS Wiring Help Needed
Re: Knock-off wrenches
Re: XJS wiring help needed
Re: Wind Shield wipers (XJ)
64 E-Type Brakes
Re: XJS wiring help needed
XKE Batteries
Re: 64 E-Type Brakes
WW parking position
Alternator conversions
Re: XJS Engine cleaning–cooling overhaul
Re: XJS wiring help needed
Re: Wind Shield wipers (XJ)
E-Type Section of Web Site
Re: E-Type mirrors
Re: S1 E Alternator Conversion
Utilitarian solution to : <Wind Shield wipers (XJ)>
Re: XK engine spark plug harness
Re: S1 E Alternator Conversion----------------------------------------------------------------------

From: scoleman@pcl.net (Steve Coleman)
Date: Sat, 31 Aug 1996 13:14:51 -0500
Subject: Re: Wind Shield wipers (XJ)

Kirbert wrote:

Steve Coleman:

If you disassemble the wiper motor you will find a gear inside whose
position can be reversed (or something to this effect) which will make
the wipers park on the other side.

Both arms have an angular bend toward the side they park on, so they
park nearly parallel to the bottom of the windshield. If you alter
the parking as noted, won’t you need to replace the arms with ones
that bend the other way to avoid the wipers pointing up at steep
angles when parked? Or is it possible to merely BEND the arms you’ve
got?

– Kirbert | If anything is to be accomplished,
| some rules must be broken.
| - Palm’s Postulate

You can get wiper arms with the bend in the opposite direction to
accomodate the new parking position. I remember trying to bend the
original ones and it was not possible, at least for a cosmetically
acceptable result.

Steve Coleman, Gadsden, Alabama
1987 XJ6
1989 XJ40


From: Michael Frank mfrank@westnet.com
Date: Sat, 31 Aug 1996 14:50:02 -0400
Subject: XK engine spark plug harness

I have an NOS spark plug harness on my 4.2L E-type. The problem I have is
that the cardboard organizer should be held in place by two of the head
bolts. If I loosen just these two bolts, will I risk warping the head, or
should I undo all the bolts and retighten in the proper sequence?

Mike Frank
1969 E-Type 2+2


From: “Kirbert” palmk@gcn.scri.fsu.edu
Date: Sat, 31 Aug 1996 15:28:52 -0005
Subject: RE: XJS Wiring Help Needed

The microswitch on the throttle is used in
conjunction with a vacuum operated switch to
provide what the manual refers to as “full fuel
loading”. It causes the EFI to drop out of closed
loop mode when these switches close. Basically
it enriches the mixture under conditions of heavy
acceleration. Interestingly, it seems this is only
used on North American models, so it’s probably
not very necessary.

Up until recently, the North American models were the only ones that
HAD a closed loop mode to drop out of! If you have such a system,
it’s probably pretty important that you have this switch!

The rubber hose is the distributor vent inlet.
I think it is supposed to attach to the air
filter. Mine is also “just there” and I can’t find
a fitting on the air filter to which I might
attach it.

There are two hoses for venting the distributor. One is from the
engine side of the air filter housing. The other is connected to a
small filter (looks like a fuel filter) and simply draws air from
inside the engine compartment; the other end of this filter isn’t
connected to anything. The slight vacuum on the engine side of the
air filter housing is what draws air through the distributor.

– Kirbert | If anything is to be accomplished,
| some rules must be broken.
| - Palm’s Postulate


From: “Kirbert” palmk@gcn.scri.fsu.edu
Date: Sat, 31 Aug 1996 15:28:52 -0005
Subject: Re: Knock-off wrenches

On this topic, I was thinking of making a steel impact wrench attachment with brass lined jaws that would fit knock-offs. I think a heavy duty 1/2" impact gun would be sufficient, although a 3/4" might do the job better. From what Ryan said, it sounds like he easily had 200+ lb-ft of torque on the thing without budging it. Any ideas? Impact is not really comparable to steady torque. However, since knock-offs are DESIGNED to be installed/removed with a HAMMER, I kinda doubt if a 1/2" torque wrench will be very good for removal, especially when stuck. I used to work in a power plant, and the nuts holding the turbines together (about a 4" diameter thread, the turbine was the size of a mobile home) were tightened and loosened with what is called a “sledging wrench”. Essentially this is a relatively short wrench that fits the nut and has a block on the end of the arm for hitting with a sledgehammer. Seems to me that such a device might be adaptable to the knockoff problem. Fashion a wrench with soft jaws that fits the knockoff and with a short arm, perhaps 8 inches, with a spot on it to hit with a sledgehammer. If it doesn’t line up right for hitting, just roll the car forward or back until it does. I believe some of the mail-order outfits offer such a critter, although they claim it’s to protect the tangs of the knockoff from impact rather than to provide a better removal torque. Kirbert | If anything is to be accomplished, | some rules must be broken. | - Palm’s Postulate From: “Kirbert” palmk@gcn.scri.fsu.edu Date: Sat, 31 Aug 1996 15:28:52 -0005 Subject: Re: XJS wiring help needed First, under the bonnet there are two wires comming out of a harnes near the throttle “cam” where the throttle cable connects to the “cam” and there is a microswitch on the side of the cable. These two wires are Green and Green with a yellow tracer. The green one appears to have been snipped off the microswitch with cutters (pourposefully) the Green with Yellow tracer gives me no clue. What are these? Do I need them? What is the microswitch? It doed not seem to be working or at least I could not get it to “click”. You need this switch to give you full power when floored, since it kicks the EFI out of feedback mode and into power mode. As such, it will also probably help prevent burned pistons under full throttle conditions. Yeah, I’d fix it. The microswitch is available from any electronics supply store, complete with roller. You might wanna check first, however, and make sure yours doesn’t simply need adjustment. Loosening the screws allows you to reposition it a little. Second, under the bonnet on the left side just under where the hood brace ataches to the fender there is a black with pale yellow or maybe white tracer that has a connector in the end. It appears to go nowhere. What is this for? I dunno, but mine has it as well. Third, in that same location is a rubber vacuum hose with what appears to be an inline fuerl filter in the end of it. It too goes nowhere. What is it and where should it go? Ventilation for the distributor. It’s SUPPOSED to be just like that, to take in air from within the engine compartment. However, I installed a longer hose and relocated the filter to in front of the radiator so it would draw cooler outdoor air. And finaly, under the drivers carpet on the left side of the car there is a five wire cable that comes from under the drivers seat. The black wire is grounded under a screw into the floor pan under the carpet, the red wire is hanging loose, the yellow wire is cut off, and two wires, Brown and White, go up under the left side of the dash. Any idea what this is? Just a guess: one of those seat belt buzzer systems? Another guess: maybe your car had a driver’s seat heater at one time. Kirbert | If anything is to be accomplished, | some rules must be broken. | - Palm’s Postulate From: “Kirbert” palmk@gcn.scri.fsu.edu Date: Sat, 31 Aug 1996 15:33:29 -0005 Subject: Re: Wind Shield wipers (XJ) Kirbert wrote:

Both arms have an angular bend toward the side they park on, so they
park nearly parallel to the bottom of the windshield. If you alter
the parking as noted, won’t you need to replace the arms with ones
that bend the other way to avoid the wipers pointing up at steep
angles when parked?

Steve Coleman:

You can get wiper arms with the bend in the opposite direction to
accomodate the new parking position. I remember trying to bend the
original ones and it was not possible, at least for a cosmetically
acceptable result.

Where do you get them? Is this via ordering the wiper arms for a
RHD Jaguar (LHD if we’re talking about a RHD car), or using some
generic arm? Are there generic arms that fit the Jaguar posts?

– Kirbert | If anything is to be accomplished,
| some rules must be broken.
| - Palm’s Postulate


From: rrichardson@eurekanet.com (Bob Richardson)
Date: Sat, 31 Aug 1996 15:51:21 -0500
Subject: 64 E-Type Brakes

I finally tracked down the source of my brake fluid leakage. It’s in the
master cylinder for the rear brakes. The newspapers-on-the-floor trick did
it. I pryed
off the rubber dust cap and fluid was dripping out of the cylinder. Looks
like all I’ll need is a new master cylinder (if they exist) or a rebuild
kit. Also, if I used a kit, the bore may have to be resleeved.


From: “Larry Conrad” Larry_Conrad@Wstnres.com
Date: Sat, 31 Aug 96 15:11:20 CST
Subject: Re: XJS wiring help needed

Jim:

The green and green\yellow wires and microswitch are for the automatic
transmission “kickdown” function. My car had intermittant operation for a while
so I replaced the switch and it works fine now. The switch is a standard issue
but I don’t have the number available right now. Also, on my car you have to
stomp the pedal pretty hard to get the switch to actuate.

Larry Conrad
'83 XJ-S

______________________________ Reply Separator _________________________________
Subject: XJS wiring help needed
Author: JISBELL@mail.utexas.edu at INTERNET
Date: 8/31/96 12:35 PM

First, under the bonnet there are two wires comming out of a harnes
near the throttle “cam” where the throttle cable connects to the
“cam” and there is a microswitch on the side of the cable. These
two wires are Green and Green with a yellow tracer. The green one
appears to have been snipped off the microswitch with cutters
(pourposefully) the Green with Yellow tracer gives me no clue. What
are these? Do I need them? What is the microswitch? It doed not
seem to be working or at least I could not get it to “click”.


From: Michael Frank mfrank@westnet.com
Date: Sat, 31 Aug 1996 17:55:58 -0400
Subject: XKE Batteries

Thanks to everyone who replied. I currently run an Interstate battery, which
the PO had installed almost five years ago, so I know they work and last. I
have two problems with replacing it with the same:

 1. The fit is not really the correct  (I have just replaced all the

rusty/worn components in that area, including a new battery tray and hold-down.)

 2. It looks like sh*t. The E-Type engine compartment is a wonderful bit

of eye-candy, but the Interstate battery looks like the color pull-out
section of the Sunday paper.

 I have used repro Mopar batteries from New Castle Battery, and was

hoping that their Lucalike was as good.

 So I am still undecided. I suppose I will buy the New Castle, just to

try something different, and maybe a little better. I’ll post the list.

Mike Frank
1969 E-Type


From: charles daly cdaly@passport.ca
Date: Sat, 31 Aug 1996 18:49:48 +0100
Subject: Re: 64 E-Type Brakes

At 03:51 PM 31/08/96 -0500, Bob Richardson wrote:

…source of my brake fluid leakage…master cylinder
Looks like all I’ll need is a new master cylinder (if they exist)
or a rebuild kit.

Bob,
The major mail order places (SICP, Welch, etc) all have
master cylinders and kits. Hopefully you just will have to
kit it out -the kits are quite inexpensive. Good luck.
Charles Daly, Toronto, Canada
'62 E-Type, ots


From: “Jim Isbell” JISBELLJR@mail.utexas.edu
Date: Sat, 31 Aug 1996 18:08:46 +0000
Subject: WW parking position

Kirby,

Yes there is a slight bend, but its only a few degrees. If they are
supposed to park parallel to the bottom of the windshield, they dont.
If they did I wouldnt complain. The problem is that they are parked
at least 4" off the bottom, in my line of sight. They actualy park
much lower on the right side when I just turn off the wipers when
they get there. Even with the bentd they are lower than the parking
position on the left.

Strange thing, my 1982 XJ6 parks on the right side where they
should.

I think I will try the gear thing, or at least look at it.

There isnt someone in England that wants to swap WW arms is there?
If we reverse the gear and get them to park correctly the postage on
two wiper arms shouldnt be too much and we would have a correct
system.


From: “Jim Isbell” JISBELLJR@mail.utexas.edu
Date: Sat, 31 Aug 1996 18:08:46 +0000
Subject: Alternator conversions

I have been thinking about one of those “one wire” alternators that
JC Whitney sells for $60. The one wire hooks straight to the
battery and the regulator is built in. My concern is how much of the
old wiring (regulator, etc.) can/must be removed.

Anyone have any experience with the “one wire” alternators?


From: Thomas Alberts talberts@aero.odu.edu
Date: Sat, 31 Aug 1996 21:08:05 -0400 (EDT)
Subject: Re: XJS Engine cleaning–cooling overhaul

Question #1) Can I spray clean it with one of those pressure sprays
or will water collect in places I dont want it to like it does in the
spark plug holes of a 4.2? It is not greasy, just very dusty.

I do it that way.

Question #2) Do I have to remove the hood completely to remove the
radiator and water pump? Should I?

No and yes. The pump can be done with the bonnet in place but it is
no picnic. Technically it might be possible to do the radiator with
the hood in place by just removing the gas struts and supporting the
bonnet fully open. I would advise against trying this. It is much
more “fun” working on that car with the bonnet out of the way. The
job you are about to embark on is a sizeable one. Make life easy.
Take the hood off.

Thomas E. Alberts


From: Thomas Alberts talberts@aero.odu.edu
Date: Sat, 31 Aug 1996 21:23:55 -0400 (EDT)
Subject: Re: XJS wiring help needed

First, under the bonnet there are two wires comming out of a harnes
near the throttle “cam” where the throttle cable connects to the
“cam” and there is a microswitch on the side of the cable. These two
wires are Green and Green with a yellow tracer. The green one appears
to have been snipped off the microswitch with cutters (pourposefully)
the Green with Yellow tracer gives me no clue. What are these? Do I
need them? What is the microswitch? It doed not seem to be working
or at least I could not get it to “click”.

It is the kickdown switch for the automatic transmission. The switch
should engage when the throttle pedal is fully deppressed.

Second, under the bonnet on the left side just under where the hood brace atach
es to
the fender there is a black with pale yellow or maybe white tracer
that has a connector in the end. It appears to go nowhere. What is
this for?

I think the only wires at that location are for the O2 sensor. Is the
comnnector like the kind on the fuel injectors?

Third, in that same location is a rubber vacuum hose with what
appears to be an inline fuerl filter in the end of it. It too goes
nowhere. What is it and where should it go?

Yes. That is the inlet for the distributor cap vent. There are two hoses
connected to the distributor capp. One is vacuum. The other goes to that
filter. There would not be a hose connected to the other end of that filter.

And finaly, under the drivers carpet on the left side of the car there is a
five wire cable that comes from under the drivers seat. The black
wire is grounded under a screw into the floor pan under the carpet,
the red wire is hanging loose, the yellow wire is cut off, and two
wires, Brown and White, go up under the left side of the dash. Any
idea what this is?

Doesn’t sound familiar. Do you have a car phone or after market stereo?

Thomas E. Albers


From: scoleman@pcl.net (Steve Coleman)
Date: Sat, 31 Aug 1996 21:17:18 -0500
Subject: Re: Wind Shield wipers (XJ)

You can get wiper arms with the bend in the opposite direction to
accomodate the new parking position. I remember trying to bend the
original ones and it was not possible, at least for a cosmetically
acceptable result.

Where do you get them? Is this via ordering the wiper arms for a
RHD Jaguar (LHD if we’re talking about a RHD car), or using some
generic arm? Are there generic arms that fit the Jaguar posts?

I got them from the Jaguar dealer in West Palm Beach (I was living in
Vero Beach at the time). I had to explain at length what I wanted, that
is, wiper arms with the bend toward the right, but they did get it
right.

Steve Coleman, Gadsden, Alabama
1987 XJ6
1989 XJ40


From: “George W. Cohn” gwcohn@azstarnet.com
Date: Sat, 31 Aug 1996 19:36:50 -0700
Subject: E-Type Section of Web Site

Larry, I notice that we still don’t have anything yet on the
Jag-Lovers Net Guide web site specific to E-types. If I remember
correctly, someone said they were working on this section some months
ago. What happened? How can we contribute our experiences with restoring
and owning E-types?


From: “George W. Cohn” gwcohn@azstarnet.com
Date: Sat, 31 Aug 1996 19:30:57 -0700
Subject: Re: E-Type mirrors

Mike, just to satisfy my curiosity, does your interior mirror appear to
have some mechanism for “breaking away” from the rod in an accident?
I’m curious because all cars sold in the USA during the early 70’s had to
meet certain federal safety and emission standards. The breakaway mirror
was one of them because it’s mentioned in the manual for my 73 Datsun
240Z. It may be possible that Jag snuck one past them but I bought my
Datsun new in 1973 and know first hand what kinds of problems the
government standards presented.

Believe it or not, my Datsun sat on a dock in California for 4 months
before it could be delivered to me because it didn’t meet certain
California emission standards and had to be modified by a team of Nissan
engineers!

I’m not sure how a flying projectile like a “break-away” mirror
represents a safety feature but remember those scariest words:
“I’m from the government and I’m here to help you!”


From: “George W. Cohn” gwcohn@azstarnet.com
Date: Sat, 31 Aug 1996 19:56:43 -0700
Subject: Re: S1 E Alternator Conversion

Hunt, back when I still had my 64 E OTS, it seemed that I lost the
generator about once a year. If I remember the mechanism of failure
correctly, the generator has a ball bearing in the front and a bronze
bushing in the rear. On mine, the bushing would fail and allow the
brushes to ground out, destroying the windings on the armature. I would
take it to an old-timer at Barney’s Auto Electric and he would rewind it.

After about the third time, he got disgusted with the thing and found a
Delco generator the same physical size from a Cadillac, I believe. He
reversed the polarity on it to positive ground (er earth), and machined
the original pulley to a thickness that allowed the belt to line up. I
never had any more problems with electrics after that!

I can just imagine the next owner though if he ever did have to get it
repaired! What do you mean Delco is not a division of Lucas?


From: ee84287@goodnet.com (Weiss-Malik)
Date: Sun, 01 Sep 1996 19:59:36 -0700
Subject: Utilitarian solution to : <Wind Shield wipers (XJ)>

Several people have posted regarding their windshield wipers woes. The way
I have dealt with mine has been to patiently reposition the wiper arm in its
socket (where it attaches to the shaft from the motor assambly; it is
secured with a nut and washers) until the wiperarm (both), rest on the
chrome trim surrounding the windshield. May not look the greatest from the
outside, may offend the original idiot that designed the wipers to begin
with, but it works and it gets them out of my eyesight. All it takes is
patience playing around with the fit on the post. Hope this helps.

Rob W-M
85 XJ-s


From: rrichardson@eurekanet.com (Bob Richardson)
Date: Sun, 1 Sep 1996 00:18:45 -0500
Subject: Re: XK engine spark plug harness

I have an NOS spark plug harness on my 4.2L E-type. The problem I have is
that the cardboard organizer should be held in place by two of the head
bolts. If I loosen just these two bolts, will I risk warping the head, or
should I undo all the bolts and retighten in the proper sequence?

Mike Frank
1969 E-Type 2+2

When I had my Series One E-Type engin rebuilt several years ago, the
mechanic said to get rid of that cardboard organizer. Should moisture
accumulate within the harness, you may get misfiring of the plugs. I think
it’s best to keep the ignition wires as separated as possible for ultimate
performance. Mind you, this is just an opinion.


From: rrichardson@eurekanet.com (Bob Richardson)
Date: Sun, 1 Sep 1996 00:29:59 -0500
Subject: Re: S1 E Alternator Conversion

Hunt, back when I still had my 64 E OTS, it seemed that I lost the
generator about once a year…
…after about the third time, he got disgusted with the thing and found a
Delco generator the same physical size from a Cadillac, I believe…
I too had generator problems with my 64 E FHC. And my Jag mechanic also
fitted a Delco generator. In my case I had to switch to a Mark II belt
because of the new pulley that was fitted.


End of jag-lovers-digest V2 #322


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jag-lovers-digest Sunday, 1 September 1996 Volume 02 : Number 323

Jaguar Paints
Re: SI E Alternator Conversion “Call for Papers”
Re: Alternator conversions
Re: S1 E Alternator Conversion
Re[2]: XJ50
Re[2]: XJS Wiring Help Needed/workshop manuals
Re[2]: Wind Shield wipers (XJ)
MkVIII Window Rubbers
RE:electrical help
XK originality - various
XJ-S Boot Lid Woes
Jaguar Suppliers (posted monthly)


From: “George W. Cohn” gwcohn@azstarnet.com
Date: Sat, 31 Aug 1996 21:33:02 -0700
Subject: Jaguar Paints

I am curious about the type of paint that Jaguar was using in the early
70’s. Was it a lacquer or an enamel? If it was enamel, what type,
acrylic, alklyd, etc. My interest has to do with restoring my 70 E OTS
which is painted Regency Red.

I am thinking about a complete re-spray and have looked at Glasurit
two-pack which is a catalyzed epoxy I think. It is very expensive at
around $380 per gallon (4 litres) US just for the paint.

I am concerned about the future. If the paintwork got scratched, could
the epoxy be retouched? I know that enamel is relatively easy to match
and retouch having done it several times myself on my 240Z.

Are there any experts out there who could put in there 2 cents (pence,
etc) worth?


From: Hunt Dabney hdabney@earthlink.net
Date: Sat, 31 Aug 1996 21:38:27 -0700 (PDT)
Subject: Re: SI E Alternator Conversion “Call for Papers”

Bob-
Thanks for your reply. Which alternator and bracket did you use? Did they
bolt in?
Hunt
At 12:30 PM 8/31/96 -0500, Bob Richardson wrote:

I just managed to get 100 miles out of my newly reconditioned generator on
my '62 E. I plan to pull it in the next few days and resubmit it for repair,
but this has gotten me thinking about alternator conversions, if for no
other reason that to get the part farther away from the exhaust manifold!

I (an I’m sure others), would love to hear from those of you who have
successfully done this – particularly if you have found alternators that
are direct bolt-ons for the original generator.

Thanks!

Hunt
I changed over to an alternator for my '64 E-Type in 1978 and it makes all
the difference in the world in keeping the battery topped while running air
conditioning, sitting in traffic, etc. Trouble is the alternator sits flush
against the subframe’s steel tubing. The only fan belt that would fit is
for a Mark II; the 4.2 belt is too long and the 3.8 belt is too short. If I
could afford it, I’d get rid of my Moss box and also the rubber bellows
vacuum server.


From: Hunt Dabney hdabney@earthlink.net
Date: Sat, 31 Aug 1996 21:38:44 -0700 (PDT)
Subject: Re: Alternator conversions

Jim-
I was discussiong this with my brother last week. He has several MGs and is
quite active in his MG club. Quite a few of the MG folk do this, and simply
jumper across the cuttout contacts on the regulator (or as appropriate).
This looks stock (other than the alt.), and maintains appropriate wiring to
the car. I believe the warning light then gets wired to one of the terminals
(I just put a new alt. in my XJ-6, of the “one-wire” vareity. Actually three
terminals: a field terminal, for noise supression capacitor, output, and the
warning light (I’m pretty sure – maybe an enable line from the ignotion).
Hunt

At 06:08 PM 8/31/96 +0000, Jim Isbell wrote:

I have been thinking about one of those “one wire” alternators that
JC Whitney sells for $60. The one wire hooks straight to the
battery and the regulator is built in. My concern is how much of the
old wiring (regulator, etc.) can/must be removed.

Anyone have any experience with the “one wire” alternators?


From: Hunt Dabney hdabney@earthlink.net
Date: Sat, 31 Aug 1996 21:38:48 -0700 (PDT)
Subject: Re: S1 E Alternator Conversion

Sounds like a good approach, too. It may be possible to put the rear-plate
from a generator with real bearings in. I think a small frame alternator
might be nice, if for no other reason than it would be a couple of inches
farther from the manifold. On the other hand, it would be nice to just have
it work for awhile (boy, are those bolts hard to get to!)
Thanks!
Hunt

At 07:56 PM 8/31/96 -0700, George W. Cohn wrote:

Hunt, back when I still had my 64 E OTS, it seemed that I lost the
generator about once a year. If I remember the mechanism of failure
correctly, the generator has a ball bearing in the front and a bronze
bushing in the rear. On mine, the bushing would fail and allow the
brushes to ground out, destroying the windings on the armature. I would
take it to an old-timer at Barney’s Auto Electric and he would rewind it.

After about the third time, he got disgusted with the thing and found a
Delco generator the same physical size from a Cadillac, I believe. He
reversed the polarity on it to positive ground (er earth), and machined
the original pulley to a thickness that allowed the belt to line up. I
never had any more problems with electrics after that!

I can just imagine the next owner though if he ever did have to get it
repaired! What do you mean Delco is not a division of Lucas?


From: “Richard.Mansell” Richard.Mansell@psemail.ps.net
Date: Sat, 31 Aug 1996 22:02:00 +0100
Subject: Re[2]: XJ50

 Jaguar World Vol8 No 1 September/October 1995 has an article 
 celebrating 60 years of Jaguar
 
 This lists the Series 3 V12's as follows:-
 
 XJ12 4dr March 79/Nov 92           2,861
 XJ12 VDP                           2,553
 XJ12 Sovereign to '88              6,438
 Double-Six VDP                     1,159
 Double-Six                         6,355
 
 Richard

______________________________ Reply Separator


Subject: Re: XJ50
Author: /S=owner-jag-lovers@sn.no/O=SMTP/P=PSC/A=MCI/C=US/ at ccx400uk
Date: 30/08/96 23:37

Sort of. As far as I remember, the XJ12 III was produced in parallel to
the XJ6 III, I don’t know production figures but I guess the 6 was a lot
more popular than the 12.

I can’t split the production figures but the figures I do have say totals
for 6&12 are
Series 1 = 98,527, Series 2 = 127,078 and Series 3 = 177,243

Robert Bradley
82 XJ 4.2 (2 off), 87 XJS, 54 Mk 7


From: “Richard.Mansell” Richard.Mansell@psemail.ps.net
Date: Sat, 31 Aug 1996 22:04:00 +0100
Subject: Re[2]: XJS Wiring Help Needed/workshop manuals

 >> "and there is a microswitch on the side of the cable"
 
 Could this not actually be the kickdown switch?
 
 
 The distributor filter being "just there" is normal. I have heard it 
 was added to vent the distributor after problems with fuel vapor.
 
 
 A word of caution about the factory workshop manuals:-
 
 Having just purchased an '89 XJ-S I ordered the factory manuals that 
 appeared to cover mid 88 until the facelift model. I already have the 
 pre-HE to mid 88 manual set but a lot has changed, Mirelli ignition, 
 air con etc. The manuals that turned up were actually the manuals for 
 the pre-HE to mid 88. 
 
 I had a stand up row with the parts manager who swore blind that they 
 were the only manuals available and that they were the manuals he 
 ordered for the workshop. After a bit of persuasion he went to talk to 
 the workshop who explained to him that most of the changes since late 
 88 were actually in the facelift to present day manuals. 
 
 Unfortunately the later manuals do not cover the earlier cars. This 
 appears to mean that if you want comprehensive manuals for a late 88 
 to facelift model you need both sets! When my parts manual and 
 workshop manual set turns up on Tuesday I should be geared up to 
 answer most XJ-S related questions :-)
 
 
 Richard

______________________________ Reply Separator


Subject: RE: XJS Wiring Help Needed
Author: /S=owner-jag-lovers@sn.no/O=SMTP/P=PSC/A=MCI/C=US/ at ccx400uk
Date: 31/08/96 18:36

Jim,
The microswitch on the throttle is used in
conjunction with a vacuum operated switch to
provide what the manual refers to as “full fuel
loading”. It causes the EFI to drop out of closed
loop mode when these switches close. Basically
it enriches the mixture under conditions of heavy
acceleration. Interestingly, it seems this is only
used on North American models, so it’s probably
not very necessary.

The rubber hose is the distributor vent inlet.
I think it is supposed to attach to the air
filter. Mine is also “just there” and I can’t find
a fitting on the air filter to which I might
attach it.

I’ll check on the other under bonnet wires you
mentioned this afternoon.

Phil


From: “Richard.Mansell” Richard.Mansell@psemail.ps.net
Date: Sat, 31 Aug 1996 22:02:00 +0100
Subject: Re[2]: Wind Shield wipers (XJ)

It’s my understanding that RHD XJ-S’s wipers park to the right
and LHD park on the left – so it’s in your face, regardless of where
you live!

According to the XJ-S Collectors guide by Paul Skilleter the wiper
position was changed after Aug 89 (1990 MY) when the Electrolux
wiper system replaced the Lucas.

In reality both my UK 80 and 83 XJ-S’s hung to the right whereas
my June 89 hangs to the left. That’s me happy, shame about the
wife.

Richard


From: Philip Bell pgbell@ozemail.com.au
Date: Sun, 01 Sep 1996 19:04:58 +1100
Subject: MkVIII Window Rubbers

Hi. I am Clive Bell in Australia and I wish to enquire if NDV window rubbers are available or made on order
from specialised suppliers for a MARK VII Jaguar Saloon. This car has won a number of Concours events in
Australia, however new vent rubbers, front and rear, are in urgent need of replacement.

Any information available would be greatly appreciated.

REGARDS CLIVE.


From: Barrie Dawson DAWSONB@btcec3.agw.bt.co.uk
Date: Sun, 01 Sep 96 13:47:25 -0700
Subject: RE:electrical help

Problems with 83 XJ6:

1.Antenna keeps blowing fuses, could be the system is in need of lubrication.

2.Check fuse and connections under the bonnet these sometimes get forgotten if
there has been any major overhaul work.

3.Interior light problems, check wiring for cuts in the insulation take special
care around the door frame. Check the light units for shorting to the body/doors.
Also check there is no shorting on the dashboard switch.

4.Check the steering column switch for bad connections. If all OK then motor is
faulty.

5.Many possibilties for the A/C not working properly.
Check compressor clutch engages when system operated, if engaging check for air
bubbles in the dryer sight glass, could be low or empty of refridgerant. If
clutch not engaging the limiter switch, overtemp fuse mounted at front of
compressor, may have blown(cheap fix).

The A/C on jaguars is very complicated and you would be best advised NOT to try
and fix it yourself apart from fuse and drive belt changing. Seek out your local
A/C specialist, they aren’t as expensive as some people belive.

Best of luck

Barrie Dawson
Chatham, Kent England
1985 seris III Jaguar Sovereign


From: John Elmgreen 100353.1733@CompuServe.COM
Date: 01 Sep 96 09:26:57 EDT
Subject: XK originality - various

A few points that arose at a Jag meeting this weekend:

    • XK120 brake fluid reservoir tops: most of the ones I have seen are non
      bright plated, including a new onw I bought a few years ago. However, the 1,000
      mile alloy car 670178 in the Jag World article shows the top all painted black.
      Another friend said that he had seen Mk VII roadtest photos with just the cap
      painted black. Anyone any idea how far the black painted tops were used?
    • XK120 fuel lines: the consensus seemed to be that these were copper (and not
      otherwise finished) and that 140/150 were steel with non-bright plating.
    • XK chassis painting: an otherwise knowledgeable English XK guy says that
      the chassis were dipped (not sprayed) when new. This has some repercussions on
      what suspension etc fittings were chassis black.
    • XK120 hood (soft top): what is the distance from the end of the hood up to
      the rear window frame? I don’t suppose anyone out there has got an original 120
      hood (or have you?). I don’t think I have ever seen one actually/.
    • XK120 side screens: I was told that early cars have the chromed frame
      meeting in a point at the lower front, and that later cars have a rounded frame
      there. I have not yet checked my own records.
      All comments welcomed. Regards, John Elmgreen

From: “Phil Patton” ppatton@ibm.net
Date: Sun, 01 Sep 96 08:42:52 -0500
Subject: XJ-S Boot Lid Woes

My '86 Boot lid seems to be permenantly locked.
A few days ago it failed to latch. I discovered
that the bar to which the lock latches had become
loose and dropped down too low. Pulled it up
(all the way) and tightened it then shut the lid
as normal. There was no abnormal resistance,
unusual noises, etc. , however now the thing won’t
open. It acts as if the keying of the lock has
suddenly changed. The key won’t turn the lock.

  1. Any ideas as to what is wrong?
  2. Suggestions on how to repair it?
  3. How can I get the lid open to attempt a repair?
    Thanks,
    Phil Patton

From: jjoy@risc.sps.mot.com
Date: Sun, 1 Sep 1996 09:00:07 -0500 (CDT)
Subject: Jaguar Suppliers (posted monthly)

Suppliers, North America (mostly).

[This list is automatically sent out on the first of each month.]

Updates:
changed phone # and address for Gran Turismo

(Corrections, etc, to: jjoy@risc.sps.mot.com)

The majority of this list has come from Rob Reilly reilly@admail.fnal.gov


   SUPPLIERS OF JAGUAR PARTS AND SERVICES               Rev. 8-1-96

A D Motor Rebuilding, NY 1-516-395-5101
Lucas, Smith’s motors rebuilt


Al Hogan’s Autojumble Mansfield, Ohio 1-419-524-1088
NOS parts supplier

Specializes in buying out old dealer stock. Owner (Al) is knowledgeable
about british car parts.


Dick Ames, 608 Ft. Williams Pkwy, Alexandria, VA 22304 1-703-370-3097
stainless exhaust systems

Best price on stainless steel exhaust systems. I’ve misplaced the
address but can probably look it up if pressed.

  • -PKR@SLACVM.SLAC.Stanford.EDU (Patrick Krejcik)

Ancient Car Parts, 64 N Main, Lyndonville, NY 14098 1-716-765-2894
rust repair panels for XJ


Apple Hydraulics, 715 Route 25A, Miller Place, NY 11764 1-800-882-7753
rebuilds Armstrong, Girling shocks, SU carbs 1-516-744-9627


Asom Electric, 1204 McClellan Dr., Los Angeles, CA 90025 1-310-820-3720
email: asomelect@aol.com 1-800-424-2766

Electrical rebuilding shop that deals mostly in Lucas and Bosch and
rebuild starters, alternators, generators, fuel pumps, voltage regulators,
wiper and window motors. They have a large supply of Lucas parts,
including discontinued items. In business for 36 years, have daily UPS,
and accept credit cards.


Atlantic Enterprises, Route 4, Box 394-B, Loris, SC 29569 1-803-756-7565
steering racks, seal kits, polyurethane rack mounts


Auto Interiors of Europe, 1790 E McFadden, Unit 107 1-800-533-2886
interiors Santa Ana, CA 92705

(not sure which addr. is correct)
3023 S. Orange Ave.
Santa Ana, CA 92707
(714) 751-9046
Nice stuff if I remember correctly. Not cheap but nothing for these
beasts is.

    • s912!rick@bnf.com (Rick Ezneker)

Kent Bain, 1785 Barnum Ave, Stratford, CT 06497 1-203-377-6745
custom interiors, seat rebuilding and repadding


G.W.Bartlett, Muncie, Ind. 1-800-338-8034
interior and trim parts

Sells original Jaguar Interior kits and components. All to exact Jaguar
specifications. As per original spec. Quite costly but isn’t quality
always a bit more? (eg. Interior kit for Jag 3.8s is about $4200, retail.)


Basset’s, Wyoming, R.I. 1-401-539-3010
restoration parts


Borla Industries, Oxnard, Calif. 1-805-983-7300
stainless exhaust


British Auto Center, 2938 SW Avalon Way, Seattle, WA 98126 206-935-0873

Lots of late model stuff, new and used. Very knowledgeable. Can
sometimes be grumpy. – Greg Meboe (meboe@wsunix.wsu.edu)


British Auto USA, 92 Londonderry Trnpk, 1-603-622-1050
British Auto USA Interiors Manchester, NH 03104 1-800-4-JAGPTS
interior and trim parts 1-800-452-4787

Exc. inventory of interiors and body parts. Limited inventory of
mechanical parts but I always check them out because they’re cheaper!
(I avoid Bartlets for Jag interiors)

  • -PKR@SLACVM.SLAC.Stanford.EDU (Patrick Krejcik)

British Car Parts, CA 1-818-788-7636
new and used parts


British Marque Auto PO Box 344, Bainbridge, PA 17502 1-717-426-2675
interiors


British Motor Service, 521 W. Katella, Orange, CA 92667 1-714-997-3800
Moss distributor, used XK parts


British Parts Northwest, 4105 SE Lafayette Hwy, 1-503-864-2001
new parts for late models, no sheet metal Dayton, OR 97114


British Restoration Parts, Kansas City, Mo. 1-800-821-3767
new restoration parts


British Spares, 46 Florence, Springfield, MA 01105 1-413-736-0463
fabricates panels for XK, Marks, E


British Vintages, 645-D Tank Farm Rd, 1-800-350-JAGS
San Luis Obispo, CA 93401 1-805-541-5986

Have their catalog but so far never used them.

  • -PKR@SLACVM.SLAC.Stanford.EDU (Patrick Krejcik)

British Wire Wheel, 1650 Mansfield St, 1-408-479-4495
Santa Cruz, CA 95062
Dayton and Dunlop wire wheels, tires

THE place to go for correct reconditioning of your JagWires. Also to
buy THE correct tires.

  • -PKR@SLACVM.SLAC.Stanford.EDU (Patrick Krejcik)

Bob Brosen, 7804 Billington Court, Oxen Hill, MD 20744 1-301-248-6327
new repro parts for pre-war, Mark IV, V


Classic Parts & Panels, Ltd. 0296 658938
Fleet Marston Farm, Bicester Rd., Nr Waddesdon
Aylesbury, Bucks, UK HD 18 ODZ XK panels


Classic Restoration Parts, Bellflower, Ca. 1-213-804-2756
XK grilles, gas tanks


Classic Tube 1-716-759-1800
A Division of Classic & Performance Specialists
80 Rotech Drive
Lancaster, NY 14086 USA

They supply steel and stainless steel pre-bent brake and fuel lines for
various makes of cars. I got half the brake lines and clutch lines
from them in stainless, and being the prudish restoration junkie I am,
I was concerned that the reproduction in stainless would not be very
“original”. However, I’m happy to say the final product is almost
identical to the original steel lines, most judges will not notice the
difference. – Mark Roberts (markdr@bnr.ca)


Concourse West, 644 Terminal Way, Costa Mesa CA 92627 714-642-9807
fax 714-645-8388

Have rebuilt diffs.

  • -PKR@SLACVM.SLAC.Stanford.EDU (Patrick Krejcik)

Cordell R. Newby, 1410 N. Aurora, East Wenatchee, WA 98801 509-884-6823
Specializes in Mark V parts. New and used.

    • s912!rick@bnf.com (Rick Ezneker)

Coshman Ent, PO Box 2685-J, Orcutt, CA 93455 1-805-937-7456
Whitworth tools, taps & dies, gauges, fasteners


Coventry Engineering, 9500 SW Martha St, Tigard, OR 97224 1-503-620-9482
wiring harnesses


Coventry S Ltd, 6406 85th Place, New Carrolton, MD 20784 1-800-537-4146
stainless exhaust systems


Joe Curto, 230-22 58th Ave. Bayside, NY 11364 1-718-465-4829
S.U. parts


Wes Czech, HCR 9550, Lucerne Valley, CA 92356 1-619-248-9603
XK parts


Stanley Daniel, 124 Parkview Rd. Cheltenham, PA 19012 1-215-782-1248
used Mark 7-9 parts from 30 cars, call after 9PM EST


Doctor Jaguar, 644 W 17th St, Costa Mesa, CA 92627 1-714-646-2816
parts, engines, trans, susp. parts


East Coast Jag Parts DE 1-302-731-7200


EJAG NEWS, Box J, Carlisle, Mass 01741 magazine, a few accessories


Engel Imports, Kalamazoo, Mich. 1-800-253-4080
new car dealer, will UPS, cheaper than other dealers


European Auto Specialists, 1-313-355-2730
OEM parts for late models


John Farrel, 4315 Murray St., Flushing, NY 11355 1-718-762-9071
NOS XK parts


Foreign Car Center, 1610 S Main, Milpitas, CA 95035 1-408-262-0325
used parts recycler


Grand Turisimo Jaguar 1-216-259-5656
4285 Main Street fax: 1-216-259-5588
Perry Village, OH 44081
engine rebuilder, parts
Specializing in high performance parts and services. They list a
‘level 5’ Jaguar V12 with all of the whistles and bells like porting,
balancing, etc. with 6, count them, 6 two bbl Weber carbs mounted
vertically across the top of the V12! This engine sells for about
$13,500. - zrol01@trc.amoco.com (Richard O. Lindsay)


Gunson Ltd., Pudding Mill Lane, London E15 2PJ
UK source for ColourTune


Tony Handler’s Foreign Parts Connection 1-213-473-7773
2028 Cotner Ave, Westwood, CA 90025


H.D. Rogers & Sons 1-318-742-3651
3418 Barksdale Blvd. fax: 1-318-742-5044
Bossier City, LA 71112
email: hdrsons@iamerican.net

Family-owned business supplying used, NOS, discontinued parts as well as
enhancements for newer cars. For example, they offer aftermarket a/c
hoses for XJ series and a less expensive amplifier. They try to give
special rates to internet users. They also have contracts worldwide
and will try to locate hard to find items, and offer special prices for
prepaid orders from overseas.


Harry CA 1-408-262-0235
used parts


H.P. Co., 1079 Colonial Club Dr, Harahan, LA 70123 1-504-737-4691
burled walnut dashboards


I-35 Imports Oklahoma 1-405-799-2886
used parts, 80 and older


Intermarque Auto Parts Houston 1-800-666-8700
parts and sheet metal


International Spare Parts 1-800-243-0073


J.K.Restorations, 12 Jackson, Oswego, IL 1-708-554-2120
complete restorations, specialist for XK and E, some used parts


Jag Atlanta, 3437 Sexton Woods Dr, Chamblee, GA 30341 1-800-533-8973
new, used parts for E and XJ 1-404-455-0175


Jaggist (Alan Trickel) 1065 Hillview, Ashland, OR 97520 1-503-535-8486
used XK parts


Jaguar Cars Inc, Public Relations, Mahwah NJ 1-201-818-9770
For a fee will authenticate your VIDNs.

  • -PKR@SLACVM.SLAC.Stanford.EDU (Patrick Krejcik)

Jaguar Denver 1-800-426-4515
Lucas, Girling, Jag parts


Jaguar Heaven, 1433 Tillie Lewis Dr, Stockton, CA 95206-1130
info: 1-209-942-4524, orders: 1-800-969-4524, FAX: 1-209-942-3670
used parts recycler, all models


Jaguar Interiors of England, PO Box 47, Muncie, IN 47308 1-317-289-9901
carpeting and upholstery


Jaguar Motor Works, 3701 Longview Dr, Atlanta, GA 30341 1-800-331-2193
used XJ parts recycler, rebuilt parts Local 404-451-3839
FAX-404-451-7561


Jaguar of North America, Leonia, NJ 1-201-592-5200
factory American distributor


Jaguar South Greenville, SC 1-803-244-1555, 1-803-292-3934
used parts recycler


Jaguar parts SC 1-803-754-5363


Jaguar Warehouse, 6010 Mardale Lane, Burke, VA 22015 1-703-451-4071
NOS parts


Jaguar Warehouse, 5727 Walcott Ave, Fairfax, VA 22030 1-703-968-3983
XK parts


J C Whitney, Chicago, IL 312-431-6102

Also known as Warshawsky/Whitney. Sells car parts cheap for most cars
including LBCs. Massive buying power. Brainless order-takers. You
can call in the middle of the night for good long-distance rates. They
will not tell you brand names. All the swaybars are ADDCO. See also
ADDCO and Werace. - ?

J.C. Whitney offers a few items that are of interest. Things like generic
weatherstrip by the foot, etc. The do offer after market A/C units and
high output quartz halogen 7 inch headlights (110 watts!!!). The ad
carries the label ‘Not legal for street use.’ They look really cool.


John’s Cars, 800 Jaguar Lane, Dallas, TX 75226 1-214-426-4100
fax: 1-214-426-3116
V-8 conversions, other repro parts, claims improvements over stock


Just Jags, 407 Industrial Dr, Carmel, IN 46032 1-317-844-8823
new, used parts, service, restorations


Just Jags, 8720 Big Bend at Elm, St.Louis, MO 63119 1-314-968-2450
service, parts, restoration shop


Keller Associates, PO Box 2833, Saratoga, CA 95070 1-408-370-3705
burl walnut dashboards


Lister of North Am, 1912 Granvill Av, Muncie, IN 47308 1-800-338-8034
high performance accessories


Lovello, Mark SC 1-803-244-1555
used parts


Moss Motors, PO Box MG, 7200 Hollister Av, Goleta, CA 93116 800-235-6954
new and repro parts for XK’s


Moss Motors, Santa Barbara, California 1-805-963-0741
new car dealer


Cordell Newby, 1625 N Western, East Wenatchee, WA 98801 1-509-662-7748
new, used, repro parts for pre-war, Mark IV, V


added: Jul. 29, 1994
Nisonger Instrument Sales & Service 1-914-381-1952
570 Mamaroneck Ave. fax: 1-914-381-1953
Mamaroneck, NY 10543
Repairs capillary based guages.
“I had them repair my water temp gauge 2 months ago. Charge was $100 including
shipping, turnaround time was 2 weeks, and they take plastic.” Rob Reilly


Northwest Modern Classics, 121 Duryea, Raymond, WA 98577
interiors, carpets, upholstery, tops 1-800-854-1751,1-206-942-5532


Northwest Transmission Parts, Ohio 1-513-442-2811 or 1-800-327-1955
auto trans rebuilding kits, torque convertors


Peninsula Imports, 3749 Harlem Rd, Buffalo, NY 14215 1-800-999-1209
XJ, E body and rust repair panels 1-716-833-3000


Fred Petroske, RR1, Box 112, Chaumont, NY 13622 1-315-649-2861
used parts recycler, all models


Paul K. Phillips 1-305-846-7976
1124 N. W. 134 Ave. fax: 1-305-846-9450
Sunrise, FL 33323
Specializes in the XJ Coupe market and runs an XJC register.
“I have dealt with him once on an exhaust system (via a referral from
SICP) and got good service. He does require cash C.O.D. (no credit cards)
which is a bit of a bother.” - gladish@suite.com (Brian Gladish)


Phil’s, Inc. Ashland Ave, Evanston, IL 1-708-869-2434


PII Distributing, PO Box 27358, Houston, TX 77227-7358 1-800-231-5836
genuine Jaguar parts, sheet metal 1-713-975-6272


Chuck Pilate, 24996 W Magdalena Dr, Mt Clemens, MI 48045
XK, E parts 1-313-791-0429


Rich’s Import Auto Parts & Serv, 730 N Glebe Rd, Arlington, VA 22203
parts for E, XJ and 62 on sedans 1-800-336-6603, 1-703-522-0440


Rhino Auto Parts, Hanover, MN 1-612-498-8711
used and NOS parts 50’s to 70’s


Rhode Island Wiring Service, Box 3737H, Peace Dale, RI 02883
wiring harnesses 1-401-789-1955


Martin Robey Panels, Pool Rd, Camp Hill 011-44-203-386-903
Industrial Estate, Nuneaton, Warks CV10 9AE England


Rodney, 2035 Cornell St, Sarasota, FL 33577 1-813-955-5960
used parts recycler


SCJ, 3 Elizabeth Ave, Burlington, MA 01803
NOS parts, pre-war to 61


Samplex, 30 Parkview Dr, Succasunna, NJ 07876 201-584-9370
US source for ColourTune


Special Interest Car Parts, 1340 Hartford Ave, Johnston, RI 02919
voice: 1-800-556-7496, 1-800-851-5600, 1-401-831-8850
fax: 1-800-672-SICP(1-800-672-7427), 1-401-831-7760
We have parts for your Jaguar, MG, Healey, TR. Good prices. Superb
catalog. Parts from XK120 through XJ40 including e-types. Will often
meet or beat prices from competitors.


S&S Specialties, 108 Sation St, Cumming, IA 50061 1-515-981-9148
NOS, rebuilt and used parts for XK, Mk and E, sheet metal parts


Stainless Steel Muffler Corp, 3032 Genesee St, Buffalo, NY 14225
stainless exhaust systems 1-716-893-2116


Terry’s Jaguar Parts, 117 E Smith St, Benton, IL 62812 1-800-851-9438
new and used parts for later models 1-618-439-4444


Bill Tracy, Sarasota, Florida 1-813-924-9523
new and repro parts for XK’s


Trans Ocean, Dept PDH, 390 Olive Tree Lane, Sierra Madre, CA 91024
Lucas parts jobber, '30 to '76 British cars


Welsh Jaguar Enterprises, Steubenville, Ohio 1-800-875-5247
new and repro parts for XK’s and newer 1-614-282-8649
fax: 1-614-282-1913
Catalogue available. (free)

The best prices for Jaguar parts that I have found.

Exc. inventory of parts, new and used. Can offer helpful technical advice.

  • -PKR@SLACVM.SLAC.Stanford.EDU (Patrick Krejcik)

Ed West, 1941H Jan Marie Place, Tustin, CA 92680 1-714-832-2688
new, used, repro parts for earlier Jags

Ed west has lots of intresting stuff at very resonable prices and lots
of advice. – m_skogs@ix.netcom.com (Matthew Skosberg)


White Post Restorations, White Post, VA 22663 1-703-837-1140
restorations, brake and clutch cylinders resleeved


XK’s Unlimited, 850 Fiero Lane, San Luis Obispo, CA 93401 1-805-544-7864
new and repro parts for XK’s 1-800-444-JAGS
In CA: 805-544-7864 FAX: 805-544-1664

catalog available. ($6.00, refundable first order)
“Parts & Service for all model Jaguars from 1948 on” XK’s Unlimited is
a good place to send Girling calipers for for piston bore sleeving. -?

XK’s Unlimited is good, but is a bit higher than Welch Jaguar. They
are also committed to “correct” parts. Additionally, you can call them
without a part number. Just be sure that they tell you what is
included in the replacement part. - zrol01@trc.amoco.com (Richard O.
Lindsay)

Good inventory and advice, but pricey. Nice catalogue. Has a
restoration shop sleeving brake cylinders in stainless.

  • -PKR@SLACVM.SLAC.Stanford.EDU (Patrick Krejcik)

XKSS Interiors, Thousand Oaks, CA 91359 1-800-922-XKSS, 1-805-482-4682
interior and trim parts


Vicarage Jaguar 1-305-444-8759
% Gables Cats fax: 1-305-443-6443
220 Granello Avenue
Coral Gables, FL 33146
vicarage@ix.netcom.com (alt. vicarage@paradise.net)
http://paradise.net/vicarage

Vicarage says: If one is in need of specialized or hard to find parts
we will have them. In addition we do offer the unique Vicarage
upgrades and enhancement products for all post war Jaguars.


Zimmer, Bob 2675 Stoney Brook Rd, Orchard Park, NY 14127 1-716-652-7909
XK parts



End of jag-lovers-digest V2 #323


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jag-lovers-digest Monday, 2 September 1996 Volume 02 : Number 324

XK120, 140
Console lid cup holders
Re: Console lid cup holders
Re: Stuck XJ-S Boot Lid
Re: XJ6 SIII Smell of gasoline (petrol) in car
XJ-S wiring
Tampa FL, All British Field Meet & Autojumble
Jag Lover Goin’ Down…
Re: Jag Lover Goin’ Down…
Orlando Club of Floirda
Re: E-Type brakes and clutch/reply
XJ40 Rear Lamp Lens
New owner XKE OTS Series 1
Re: Standard or Koni shockabsorbers
XK Engine Oil Filter
[S3 XJ6] Rear shocks/dampers
need mechanic in Atlanta
XJS - Wheel removal
Series III XJ6 Lukewarm Starting Problem
Condensation drain??
XJ6 S III Door lock problem solved.


From: John Elmgreen 100353.1733@CompuServe.COM
Date: 01 Sep 96 09:54:44 EDT
Subject: XK120, 140

Two more points:

    • XK140 roadsters had a special satchel for storing the side curtains (side
      screens), part no. BD 10956. I have never heard of these in real life. Anyone
      seen one?
    • XK120 roadsters are shown in parts book as having glass in the rear window,
      but one original car I saw seemed to have thick perspex. Anyone know for sure?
      Regards, John Elmgreen

From: scoleman@pcl.net (Steve Coleman)
Date: Sun, 01 Sep 1996 09:28:15 -0500
Subject: Console lid cup holders

As many of you probably know, Jaguar makes (or at least sells) a
replacement console lid for the XJ40 which contains a fold-out cup
holder. According to my local Jaguar dealer and at least one of the
third-party Jaguar parts suppliers, there is no such similar device for
the Series III XJ6. Has anyone encountered anything like this either
from third-party manufacturers or perhaps some custom designer? My wife
is about to trade her XJ40 for a Series III and is unprepared to face
the road without a beverage by her side.

Steve Coleman, Gadsden, Alabama
1987 XJ6
1989 XJ40


From: Michael Frank mfrank@westnet.com
Date: Sun, 1 Sep 1996 11:26:36 -0400
Subject: Re: Console lid cup holders

Steve:

I recently bough a high quality replacement armrest with integral
cupholders for my SAAB 900. The company that makes it is HUSCO, and they
carry a line of these items for many luxury vehicles. Husco is located at 17
Calvin Rd, Wilton CT, 06897. Phone 800-752-3181. Fax 203-762-3427, email
husco@prodigy.com. Web site is:

http://www2.spav.com/wilton/husco/

Give them a try.

Mike Frank

At 09:28 AM 9/1/96 -0500, you wrote:

As many of you probably know, Jaguar makes (or at least sells) a
replacement console lid for the XJ40 which contains a fold-out cup
holder. According to my local Jaguar dealer and at least one of the
third-party Jaguar parts suppliers, there is no such similar device for
the Series III XJ6. Has anyone encountered anything like this either
from third-party manufacturers or perhaps some custom designer? My wife
is about to trade her XJ40 for a Series III and is unprepared to face
the road without a beverage by her side.

Steve Coleman, Gadsden, Alabama
1987 XJ6
1989 XJ40


From: Juliansean@aol.com
Date: Sun, 1 Sep 1996 11:49:01 -0400
Subject: Re: Stuck XJ-S Boot Lid

In a message dated 96-09-01 09:43:57 EDT, ppatton@ibm.net (Phil Patton)
writes:

<< My '86 Boot lid seems to be permenantly locked. >>

As luck would have it I just happen to have the trunk lock mechanism in
pieces in my basement for my '87 XJS. I assume that the mechanisms are
identical.
How to open the stuck lid:
When the latch lever is lifted (normal opening procedure) a small lever arm
on the other end of the lock barrel rotates clockwise and moves a linkage bar
which releases the latch.
I can see two failure modes here:

  1. the small lever arm is connected to the lock barrel with a square peg in
    square hole type affair. This is what was worn on mine, requiring previously
    mentioned adjustment. This could easily become a square peg in a round hole
    thus leaving you in deep *****. I would strongly suggest checking this, it
    looks like a summer intern designed it.
  2. The lock mechanism is broken, therefore you can’t rotate the barrel.

There are two philips head screws which attach the lock barrel assy. to the
trunk lid. It looks like maybe with a bit of luck these can be unscrewed
from the outside with a very short screwdriver or needle nose pliers. They
are in the north and south position as you face the trunk. If you can get
these screws out, you should be able to rotate the entire assy. clockwise
enough to release the latch even if the lock is buggered. If you have
situation 1) you may still be able to fish something in there to lift up the
link bar enough to release the latch.
Also, by examining the latch which “hooks” the bar on the bottom side of the
trunk, it lookks like some mild upward lifting of the trunk lid may help it
release. This could help if the latch is almost releasing but not quite
enough.
Good luck,
Julian Mullaney


From: SCleme519@aol.com
Date: Sun, 1 Sep 1996 18:01:53 -0400
Subject: Re: XJ6 SIII Smell of gasoline (petrol) in car

Roger,

I had a leak in the tank of my 85 XJ6. In that case, the only time I could
smell gas on the inside of the car was when the windows were rolled down.
There was a noticeable smell on the outside of the car. Hope this helps.

Steve


From: Tony Watts amw@maths.uq.oz.au
Date: Mon, 2 Sep 1996 08:32:38 +1000
Subject: XJ-S wiring

Jim Isbell wrote:

And finaly, under the drivers carpet on the left side of the car there is a
five wire cable that comes from under the drivers seat. The black
wire is grounded under a screw into the floor pan under the carpet,
the red wire is hanging loose, the yellow wire is cut off, and two
wires, Brown and White, go up under the left side of the dash. Any
idea what this is?

Just a guess: one of those seat belt buzzer systems?

Another guess: maybe your car had a driver’s seat heater at one time.
– Kirbert | If anything is to be accomplished,
| some rules must be broken.
| - Palm’s Postulate

I haven’t got my car or manual here to answer most of the questions.
Regarding the wires under the carpet, my car has a warning light on the
dash for when the seat belt is not done up, and a sensor under the seat to
determine if there is somebody sitting there. It also has a seat warmer
for drivers and passengers with delicate bums.

Tony Watts


From: jaguar@gate.net
Date: Sun, 1 Sep 1996 19:27:45 -0400
Subject: Tampa FL, All British Field Meet & Autojumble

All British Field Meet & Autojumble
Saturday, October 19, 1996, 8:00 am
Picnic Island Park, Tampa, Florida, USA

There are 36 classes for British Cars and Motorcycles including 2 classes for
Jaguar.

This is the 10th annual show and it has grown every year. This is a great show
and there is always a large Jaguar presence.

For further information call Marion Brantley at (813) 867-7129 or Bud Keck at
(813) 752-0186.

Doug Bohannon
jaguar@gate.net
Sun Coast Jaguar Club
(941) 967-7899


From: Tommy loner@peterboro.net
Date: Sun, 1 Sep 1996 21:11:38 -0400
Subject: Jag Lover Goin’ Down…

Hey All Good Jaggers:

Some of you will remember me. 1980 XJ6 and 1971 E-Type roadster. Spent =
the better part of last summer doin’ my sedan. Still pondering the =
roadster.

Been lookin’ for a job or business or source of income for a year and a =
half now. The wife had been nagging me to apply at her factory. No way. =
Been there, done that, lost it. Completely lost it.

My wife recently bought a new 1996 Suzuki Sidekick JX four door 4x4. =
Victory red. Clashes just a bit with the signal red but you couldn’t =
touch it for price in the sport utility category.

It’s a lot less vehicle than all the other sport utilities on the market =

    • but it’s almost half the price. Even I had to agree with my wife that =
      it was an intelligent buy. For the twenty two and change we paid I could =
      have scooped up a decent XJS, any number of excellent XJ6/XJ12’s, or =
      maybe an E-Type coupe. But who am I tryin’ to kid; we live in the =
      country and the roads are the sh*ts, and we’re tired of sliding down the =
      hills sideways in the winter. Any Jag I ever drove was not designed for =
      the rigours of winter we are soon looking forward to. No way.

During our quest for the Sidekick I encountered the two extremes of car =
salesmanship. On the one hand we met the =
I’ll-treat-you-fairly-and-honourably-and-I-won’t-run-you-up-the-flagpole-=
but-then-treated-me-unfairly-and-dishonourably-and-did-run-me-up-the-flag=
pole type, and on the other hand we met the true professional who gave =
us the straight goods from start to finish.

Car sales seemed like such a fascinating activity that I decided I’d try =
my hand at it.

Then I got a job.

At Bill Storey Pontiac Buick GMC in Peterborough. No jag dealerships =
around here. This is GM country.

So everyday last week I took my 1980 signal red XJ6 with the deep wet =
look shine to work, parked discreetly in the back lot, and tried to =
figure out one new car from the other. They all look alike!

Then I started test drivin’ them.

Not suspecting anything, I got behind the wheel of a 1996 Bonneville =
SSEi Supercharged.

Vrooooooooooooooooooooooooooooom!

This machine’s a f*cking rocket!

Vrooooooooooooooooooooooooooooom!

This machine could eat my f*cking Jag and spit the bones out for =
breakfast!

Help me, good Jaggers. You’re losin’ me. I’m goin’ down…

tommy@peterboro.net

formerly loner@peterboro.net


From: stephen kurtzman stephen@kurtzman.com
Date: Sun, 1 Sep 1996 19:49:10 -0800
Subject: Re: Jag Lover Goin’ Down…

Hey All Good Jaggers:


Not suspecting anything, I got behind the wheel of a 1996 Bonneville SSEi
Supercharged.

Vrooooooooooooooooooooooooooooom!

This machine’s a f*cking rocket!

Vrooooooooooooooooooooooooooooom!

This machine could eat my f*cking Jag and spit the bones out for breakfast!

Help me, good Jaggers. You’re losin’ me. I’m goin’ down…

Go ahead and get the Bonneville. It sounds like your kind of car.

I’ll happily stay with my XJR. He too is supercharged, though he isn’t a
“f*cking rocket”. He is dashing British gentleman who reaches reaches
100mph in about a quarter of a minute and in about a quarter of a mile. And
he keeps going till he reaches 155, though I’ve only had him up to 130 on a
couple of occasions – Jaguar owners must be discrete, you know. Best of
all, because he is a Jaguar, he feels, looks, sounds, and smells like a
Jaguar – comfort, ride, wood, and leather. Oh, and the ladies seem to like
him better than a Bonneville.


From: jaguar@gate.net
Date: Mon, 2 Sep 1996 00:17:00 -0400
Subject: Orlando Club of Floirda

The 10th Annual Jaguar Club of Florida Concours D’ Elegance will take place on
Sept. 7th, 1996 at Cranes Roost Park in Altomonte Springs, Florida, USA.

For information contact Neville Brabrook at (407)813-2705.

Doug Bohannon
jaguar@gate.net
Sun Coast Jaguar Club
(941) 967-7899


From: rrichardson@eurekanet.com (Bob Richardson)
Date: Mon, 2 Sep 1996 00:36:41 -0500
Subject: Re: E-Type brakes and clutch/reply

Hi and how is the car?

Any ideas on where the fluid is going? Do you have one of those big “sausage”
ballast things behind, I believe, the air cleaner? Somewhere I remember
someone telling me that brake fluid can get pushed back into that ballast.
It’s black and about 10 inches by 6.

Could your synchronizers be bad in the trans? Is your throughout bearing a
composite or a ball bearing style? Sometimes the composite ones do wierd
things while they are on their way out. Does the clutch slave OPERATE when
the clutch pedal is pressed ( a brave soul under the car is needed).

                 Good luck and let me know what you find out, I may need

the
info myself someday, Valerie
STabenow
The Series One E-Type has a rubber bellows, which furnishes a somewhat
antiquated power boost thus you have power brakes. The 4.2 E-Type has a
much more modern system that probably can be modified for a 3.8 E. Brake
fluid could end up in the bellows, but it’s not likely. My problem was
leakage from the master cylinder’s operating rod that means either a
recored cylinder or a rebuild kit.
Second, third and fourth synchros in the gear box work without any
scrubbing. My problem, I think, is the clearance of 1/16" for the slave
cylinder’s operating rod and that’s the first thing my mechanic will check.
The gearbox is topped up properly and the oil is clean. I really think the
problem is in the slave cylinder. Moss gearbox’s throwout bearing is a
composite and can wear quickly with a slipping clutch plate. The bearing in
my Jag has less than 5,000 miles on it, but that doesn’t mean it’s not at
the root of my problem. I’ll just have to keep my fingers crossed until the
mechanic can give the whole system a good going over.


From: cobac@ix.netcom.com (Eric J Faber )
Date: Sun, 1 Sep 1996 22:11:20 -0700
Subject: XJ40 Rear Lamp Lens

Hi Jag-Lovers!,
I would like to change the rear taillamps in my 1989 XJ40 VDP
(Plain black lens) to the 90’s version (black w/ chrome accents).
What year(s) are the lenses with the chrome strip that surrounds the
outside of the lens?
I assume 1988-89 where plain black/red
1990-1992 black/red some with accents?
1993-1994 look like 92, may have different mounting?
What year would fit into the 1989 body? (90-94 or all?)

Please help! I would like to order these ASAP.
Many thanks for any replys or ideas
-Eric


From: Stewart otis@xtra.co.nz
Date: Mon, 02 Sep 1996 19:41:33 +1300
Subject: New owner XKE OTS Series 1

I’ve been subscribing for a few weeks but have held off introducing myself until
I was sure my car was going to happen.

I’ve purchased ex US (New York) a Series one Roadster, one owner, original condition
89,000 miles. She gets converted to right hand drive on arrival. The sale was arranged
via an agent whose original estimate of 4 weeks delivery has now stretched to 12. On
arrival a RHD XK120 imported as well was found to have been totaled in transit but
mine’s unharmed.

The car has never been in an accident and has little rust but requires TLC to restore
to acceptable condition.

The reasons for purchasing via the US are price, less rust, availability and price.

Personal stuff: 33 years, Account Manager at Compaq Computer and reside in Auckland New
Zealand - and by the way - South Island roads are the ultimate. One Police Officer per
thousand miles and each one of them admires acts of sheer stupidity.

Cheers

Stewart


From: Jeffrey Gram 101454.2570@CompuServe.COM
Date: 02 Sep 96 04:20:24 EDT
Subject: Re: Standard or Koni shockabsorbers

Dear Martin Jacobsen,

To choose schock-absorbers is no easy task with the wealth of choice available.
However,
obviously “standard” schocks as recommended by Jaguar is not the worst choice
you could make. KONI’s are Dutch made and are of high quality, so are many
others, namin but a few Bilstein Girling and many more. KONI’s are adjustable,
which provides you with a minor control over the “stiffness” wanted, however be
careful , since a much stiffer or looser adjustment than standard will not give
satisfacory results

If you have a completely standard car and yoiu are happy with that, standards
schocks or any other suitable replacement will be OK. Quality varies, usually
indicated by price.

Although KONI’s and others are excellent, there will be no noticable increase in
driving characteristics, nithere good nor bad by choosing one brand for another.
There may be a very noticable increase in “feel” and presicion in steering, but
this would just indicate that your old schocks were really worn out.

The story you will get on “agening” symptoms of springs depends upon who you
ask. Some saythey never wear (obviously these are the idealists) , and some
say they do wear (they are right). My opinion is that springs do sag after a
while (long while), and my V12 XJ sits very low, and usually hits the ground in
multistorey car parks.

It is probably not only the amount of kilometers driven that causes this
sagging, but also level of “execising” the springs.

Fact is I will change my springs for high quality Harvey Bailey’s (UK), at a 25
% uprated spring rate. The schocks will be adjusted accordingly . I have now
SPAX externally adjustables on the front. These are brandnew so I have no
experience with these. My other Jag - a XJ6 Coupe has KONI’s all around. These
are now 7 years old and about 75.000 km. still no problems at all.

I would say that if you jag hangs low either always or after a heavy load in the
trunk, then get new springs.

Regards Jeffrey Gram


From: “Alastair Lauener” a.lauener@napier.ac.uk
Date: Mon, 02 Sep 96 11:44:40 gmt
Subject: XK Engine Oil Filter

On an XK Engine oil filter, can anybody say wether the oil flow through the filter is from outside to inside, or the other way? I really can’t recall the layout of all the oilways, and in particular the oil filter housing so that I can decide, and I don’t want to remove it for such a small piece of knowledge Anyone know? ************************************************************************ * Alastair Lauener * * 1964 3.4 S-Type http://www.sn.no/home/nick/alas.html * ************************************************************************ From: Gunnar Helliesen gunnar@bitcon.no Date: Mon, 2 Sep 1996 13:04:43 +0200 (MET DST) Subject: [S3 XJ6] Rear shocks/dampers Folks, Anyone ever tried replacing the rear shocks/dampers on a Series III XJ6 (mine’s an ‘86)? I’m planning on doing this Real Soon Now™ and am wondering if I’ll have to lower the entire rear subframe to get at the upper shock mounts. Gunnar Gunnar Helliesen | Bergen IT Consult AS | NetBSD/VAX on a uVAX II Systems Consultant | Bergen, Norway | ‘86 Jaguar XJ6 4.2 Sovereign gunnar@bitcon.no | http://www.bitcon.no/ | Vicki who? What .sig virus? From: DeEtte Kattel deette@mindspring.com Date: Mon, 02 Sep 1996 08:16:48 -0700 Subject: need mechanic in Atlanta I just bought an 1989 XJ6 with 57k miles. I need to get names of a good local mechanic so I can start my regular mantinence program. I live in the buckhead -midtown area of Atlanta Ga and would prefer someone close. Thanks- I love my new Jag DeEtte From: RWOODLIN@garfield.foods.indiana.edu Date: 02 Sep 96 08:15:14 EDT Subject: XJS - Wheel removal Help! I am in the middle of a brake job - I’ve rebuilt the servo, master cylinder, and replaced the rear brake pads. However, when I attempted to remove the front wheels to gain access to the front brakes I discovered that the wheel is frozen in position. I have removed the five (5) lug nuts but the wheel will not budge! I surmise that either there is another bolt somewhere, not shown in any of my manuals, or the wheel was torqued so tight that the wheel has mated with the bearing dust cover. I have applied penetrating oil around the dust cover and banged on the back of the wheel with a rubber mallet to no avail!! Has anyone encountered this situation before? This would have been extremely frustrating had I had a flat and could not change the tire! Robert Woodling ‘84 XJ-S From: William F Trimble trimbwf@mail.auburn.edu Date: Mon, 2 Sep 1996 08:43:57 -0500 (CDT) Subject: Series III XJ6 Lukewarm Starting Problem Dear Jag-Lovers: I hate to bomb the list with another of my Jag problems, but this one’s been bugging me for a couple of months at least. Here’s the problem: The car (1985 XJ6 Series III) starts OK when cold, after sitting overnight, when the ambient temperature here in Alabama is about 70 degrees F. The car runs fine. And the car hot starts all right, although sometimes with a little cranking. It runs right at 90 degrees C, even on the hottest days with the AC on. Before replacing the thermostat in March, the car ran very cool, and I had no starting problems. The problem is that if the car sits all day in 90 degree plus temperatures, it will not start. Nor will it start after sitting for about 4-5 hours in cooler weather. Rick the mechanic and I have discussed this problem and played around with the thermotime switch, bypassing it and grounding out the cold start injector manually. The car starts instantly every time we do that. The thermotime switch is new, although it is 8 sec. rather than seconds at 35 degrees C. Could it be a broken wire leading from the thermotime switch to the cold start injector? I had to pull the injector harness out of the way back in March when I did the thermostat job, and I might have pulled something loose. The connections at the thermotime switch and at the cold start injector look OK, although the one at the thermotime switch is a little worse for wear, and the rubber boot is cracked from heat. It has always bothered me that the car, as long as I have owned it, has not started on the key, but has always needed some cranking. Could this in some way also be symptomatic of the problem? Any ideas would be greatly appreciated. Bill Trimble Auburn, Alabama From: GORDON80@aol.com Date: Mon, 2 Sep 1996 09:52:57 -0400 Subject: Condensation drain?? I am getting water under the carpet on both sides of my 1986 XJ6. I thought it was a result of our recent and long awaited heavy rains. However, after getting it all cleaned up I once again got wet carpets on the passanger side. Is there a common problem with A/C condensate backing up into the compartment? I can’t seem to find a ready source for water leaks from the A/C. Any suggestions will be appreciated. From: Cosmo simond@informix.com Date: Mon, 02 Sep 1996 14:17:25 -0100 Subject: XJ6 S III Door lock problem solved. A while back I had a problem with the driver side door lock that could be opened with a coin in the keyway. Not very secure and this weekend I had the chance to investigate. The cause was an acumulation of old grease in the lock that had become hard and was preventing the return springs inside the lock barrel from working. Once the correct key had been used to operate the lock, the internal parts got jammed in the grease and anything inserted into the lock that didn’t upset the mechanism would be able to turn the lock. I discovered this after removing the lock from the door - the barrel just drops out - take care. I had hoped to swap the lock barrel from the glove box but although the key is the same, the actual mechanism (push rather than turn) does not allow this. Instead I completely cleaned the door lock, removing all the dried up grease, being vary careful to not mix up or loose any of the small parts inside. I replaced the grease with Vaselene (petroleum jelly) and the internals don’t stick. Now its a little more secure. I don’t know if Vaselene was a good choice but it was better than the only other grease I had around (thick Castrol stuff) and I didn’t think the liberal spraying of WD40 would be a good substitute. Cosmo 83 XJ6 4.2 65 Mustang 289 End of jag-lovers-digest V2 #324 ******************************** Return-Path: @owner-jag-lovers-di1 Received: (from majordom@localhost) by ekeberg.sn.no (8.7.5/8.7.3/on4) id for jag-lovers-digest-out; Tue, 3 Sep 1996 06:33:12 +0200 (MET DST) Date: Tue, 3 Sep 1996 06:33:12 +0200 (MET DST) Message-Id: 199609030433.GAA20500@ekeberg.sn.no X-Authentication-Warning: ekeberg.sn.no: majordom set sender to owner-jag-lovers-digest using -f From: @owner-jag-lovers-di1 To: jag-lovers-digest@sn.no Subject: jag-lovers-digest V2 #325 Reply-To: jag-lovers@sn.no Errors-To: @owner-jag-lovers-di1 Precedence: bulk X-Newsgroups: mail.jag-lovers-digest jag-lovers-digest Tuesday, 3 September 1996 Volume 02 : Number 325 Re: SIII XJ6 Condensation drain?? Dear Tommy, the lonely loner from Peterboro’, engine number Re: XJS - Wheel removal About the ignition wire harness Card board and losening head nuts. Re: Condensation drain?? RE:Condensation drain?? Holiday in Denmark Condensation drain? RE: New Owner Finally Re: xjc question Subwoofers Surface Rust Removal (foot wells) Any 420 owners? Trouble (E-Type) comes in threes Re: 1985 XJS (finaly aquired) 70 E-Type No Start Re: Condensation drain?? 85 XJ-S ac condensate: Where has all the water gone? From: Robert Bradley Robert.Bradley@bh.eyi.com Date: Mon, 2 Sep 1996 10:36:31 -0500 Subject: Re: SIII XJ6 Condensation drain?? Yes, it is an extremely common problem made worse by parking under molting trees, humid conditions and the location and inaccessibility of the drain holes. I have all three. Don’t panic, easily fixed from under the car (need hoist, stands, ramps or very thin son/daughter). There are two plastic tubes, one on either side of the transmission tunnel around about level with the front foot well vents (the ones spraying water on your legs). They are above the exhaust pipes so can be a bit hhard to get at especially if the pipes are hot. The tubes can be cleared easily - I’ve used a piece of single strand auto wire, poke it up the tube until the water pours down your sleeve , my dealer uses compressed air and does it for free (yes, FREE, well, he did it once for free). Long term fix is not to park under trees. Robert Bradley 87 XJS, 82 XJ, 82 XJ WROTE> I am getting water under the carpet on both sides of my 1986 XJ6. I thought it was a result of our recent and long awaited heavy rains. However, after getting it all cleaned up I once again got wet carpets on the passanger side. Is there a common problem with A/C condensate backing up into the compartment? I can’t seem to find a ready source for water leaks from the A/C. Any suggestions will be appreciated. From: Gram@eumetsat.de Date: Mon, 02 Sep 1996 15:52:26 +0100 Subject: Dear Tommy, the lonely loner from Peterboro’, Dear Tommy, the lonely loner from Peterboro’, I don’t think we’re losing you, If you came this far with a Jag, and still admires the deep lustre of a Jag , not only on the outside, but also in the amazing cultured way the drive is, then a supercharged FORD is not going to take the shine away from the Jag, just a part of your time and money, and shake your faith. We (and you ) could live with that. Somewhere there is always a little tendency in all of us (of varying strength) to sometime drive a car that really kicks, but for my beloved vehicle I would only accept such kicking if it came from an otherwise cultured vehicle, or I would have them both and if that is not possible I would only have the Jag. May your God go with you Jeffrey Gram - 2 Jags and none kicks ass (other than mine:-) From: martin.jacobsen@login.eunet.no (Martin Jacobsen) Date: Mon, 2 Sep 1996 17:53:38 -0100 Subject: engine number My Mk II(61.mod) was imported from the US in 1991.The VIN-plate tells me that the original engine number was LA 7878-9 (3.8 l). Both the BW gearbox and the engine are not original. The new engine number (quotet from the top) has the prefix NE (1351-8).I am not familiar with this prefix. “Jaguar 6 Cylinder Engine Overhaul (1948-1986) gives a survey of which prefix belongs to the the spesific model. They do not mention “NE”. Can somebody give me information? Martin Jacobsen Kristiansand, Norway Mk II 3.8 61mod V8 Land Rover County 110” Essex super six 1928 From: mfl@kheops.cray.com (Matthias FOUQUET-LAPAR) Date: Mon, 2 Sep 1996 18:24:55 +0200 (MET DST) Subject: Re: XJS - Wheel removal I am in the middle of a brake job - I’ve rebuilt the servo, master cylinder, and replaced the rear brake pads. However, when I attempted to remove the front wheels to gain access to the front brakes I discovered that the wheel is frozen in position. I have removed the five (5) lug nuts but the wheel will not budge! I surmise that either there is another bolt somewhere, not shown in any of my manuals, or the wheel was torqued so tight that the wheel has mated with the bearing dust cover. I have applied penetrating oil around the dust cover and banged on the back of the wheel with a rubber mallet to no avail!! Has anyone encountered this situation before? This would have been extremely frustrating had I had a flat and could not change the tire! I had the same problem on my '88 XJ-S on one of the rear tires. It was completed seized and only after brute force of 2 pairs of strong arms it came off. I applied anti-seize after this occasion and it is ok now. I had the same thought concerning the flat … I guess the problem is the alu wheel on the steal hub Do you have the same problem on both wheels ? Good luck Matthias Robert Woodling '84 XJ-S From: Gram@eumetsat.de Date: Mon, 02 Sep 1996 18:25:45 +0100 Subject: About the ignition wire harness Card board and losening head nuts. About the ignition wire harness Card board and losening head nuts. Generally it is not a good idea to loosen head bol nuts when not needed. If you must, wait until the engine is stone cold. If possible loosen only one at a time. Regards From: Hunt Dabney hdabney@earthlink.net Date: Mon, 2 Sep 1996 09:45:31 -0700 (PDT) Subject: Re: Condensation drain?? I had this: Someone, at some point, had lifted the car improperly, and cracked the joints between the floor pans and the front bulkhead. Silicone-seal (RTV) applied into the joints from below fixed it. Look for bumps up into the floor wells where the lift points shouldn’t have been! Good luck! Hunt At 09:52 AM 9/2/96 -0400, GORDON80@aol.com wrote:

I am getting water under the carpet on both sides of my 1986 XJ6. I thought
it was a result of our recent and long awaited heavy rains. However, after
getting it all cleaned up I once again got wet carpets on the passanger side.
Is there a common problem with A/C condensate backing up into the
compartment? I can’t seem to find a ready source for water leaks from the
A/C. Any suggestions will be appreciated.


From: Barrie Dawson DAWSONB@btcec3.agw.bt.co.uk
Date: Mon, 02 Sep 96 18:24:59 -0700
Subject: RE:Condensation drain??

There isn’t a common problem as such with draining away the condensation from
the air-con system. But since the drain tubes vent out through the floor either
side if the gearbox there is a tendancy to collect dust and dirt in the tubes.
Pushing a still wire into the tubes then blowing them out usually does the trick.

I have the same problem myself, anoying isn’t it!

Barrie Dawson
Chatham, Kent England
1985 series III Jaguar Sovereign


From: Barrie Dawson DAWSONB@btcec3.agw.bt.co.uk
Date: Mon, 02 Sep 96 18:45:10 -0700
Subject: Holiday in Denmark

Before I went on holiday I had been going through some serious overheating
problems with my series III Sovereign. With the help of several Jag-Lovers and
of course my friendly Jag specialist, JUST JAGS of Strood Kent England (quick
plug there), I was able to go away with confidence. The weather was great and
although outside temperatures were in the upper 30’s C my cat purred along at
a stable 75 C - 80 C all day. A big thankyou once again, especially from the kids.

Denmark is a beautiful country and the roads are well maintained for the comfort
seeker. There weren’t a great number of cats to be seen probably they were in
hiding protecting their paint from the sun. However I did see one series III
Sovereign tearing the tarmac away with such grace and I wasn’t exactly crawling
along, 80 ish, that I suddenly realised just hoe good they look. I saw one other
cat, a well kept red E type V12, resting under the shade of a group of trees at
the road side. Obviously admiring the view of and watching the lesser vehicles go
by.

The kids enjoyed their second trip to Legoland, so did my wife and I. We are
planning on a proper Scandanavian cruise next year sadly the cat will have to stay
at home in pleasent Jaguar storage (hopefully at JUST JAGS)

Barrie Dawson
Chatham Kent England
1985 series III Jaguar Sovereign


From: Jim Walker j.walker@ix.netcom.com
Date: Mon, 2 Sep 1996 11:17:01 -0700
Subject: Condensation drain?

    Welcome to the joys of ownership of older Jags.  I have owned three

Series III XJ 6’s and all have had plugged condensate drains eventually. It
appears that the inside of the AC box (where the evaporator is located and
where the drains are supposed to drain water) is insulated or lined with a
type of foam rubber or cell foam. Over the years this foam dries out or
deteriorates to the point that it crumbles and falls to the bottom of the
box and mixes with the condensate which creates MUD! I have removed the
side panels and the rubber connecters (2-3" horizontal tubes) and cleaned
out the bottom of the box on both sides. This helped but the foam keeps
falling.
The best procedure seem to be to put the car up on a lift and go up
through the drains on either side of the transmision with a straightened out
coat hanger and pull the mud out from the bottom. I have also used an air
gun to blow out the drain which also works but not as long as the coat
hanger method.


From: averill@earthlink.net (Steve Averill)
Date: Mon, 2 Sep 1996 11:35:26 -0700 (PDT)
Subject: RE: New Owner Finally

Roger Peng writes in response to a thread about cell phones:

Like David said, a Jaguar installed cell phone is placed on top of
the center storage compartment (between the driver and front passenger).
Cars equipt with the phone has a special storage compartment lid which
lets the phone sit in there, thus you’ll need to replace the lid if you
want your phone like this. Go to a Jaguar dealer’s parts department,
and ask to see their accessory brochure. You’ll see a picture of this.

On my car, the previous owner had a phone installed after-market, but of course he took the phone unit away when he sold me the car. I can simply purchase a phone and plug it in. It would sit on the right side of the center console, by the left leg of the front passenger. Jaguar also markets a sidemount phone holder & it’s in the accessory brochure along with the storage compartment lid version. The special phone compartment lid is OK, but I’d rather get the cupholder storage lid, as on the new X300 cars. You can’t have both, but you CAN get the cupholder lid combined with the Jaguar sidemount so that you can spill coffee onto the phone! By the way, I have a Jaguar CD changer in my 91 and it works GREAT! The car came that way when I picked it up as a lease return car. So far, after 9 months, the car’s had minimal problems. Steve A. '67 E Type Coupe (JJ - as in “Junior Jaguar” - our 2nd E Type) '76 XJ6C (Felix) '91 XJ40 (Nessie - as in Loch Ness Monster - Guess What Color it is?) From: averill@earthlink.net (Steve Averill) Date: Mon, 2 Sep 1996 11:35:38 -0700 (PDT) Subject: Re: xjc question LLoyd Nolan supposedly wrote:
For those of you who have a mid 70’s xjc, does the back seat sit two adults,
or am I dreaming? If so, does it leave room for the feet of the front passen-
gers?

Jim Cantrell then replied

It does seat two adults. The leg room is adequate by today’s
standards but the head room is marginal.
If its the occasional
passenger, then there should be no real problem. By the way, this car
handles, looks and feels unlike the long wheel base car.
I like it far better as it is more of a sports car than
the traditional XJ6/12.

I’ve never noticed any problems with the head room, but then I’m not a
basketball player, either. The car isn’t a problem for 4 adults and CAN
seat 5 in a pinch (I retrofitted the later seatbelts & now have 3 in back.
The biggest problem for frequent passenger carrying is that ingress and
egress isn’t nearly so nice as for a 4-door car. We often go out for a
drive with all three kids in the back as they MUCH prefer the pillarless
coupe with its weird rear window mechanism over the XJ40 for a “fun” drive.
They prefer the hydraulic ashtrays (great place to keep small toys),
sunroof and reading lights on the XJ40.

Bottom line - decent room in back but with typical coupe entry/exit problems.
-Steve A.
'67 E Type Coupe
'76 XJ6C
'91 XJ40


From: “Gregory W. Price” gprice@mack.rt66.com
Date: Mon, 2 Sep 1996 14:20:58 +0700
Subject: Subwoofers

Hello everyone!

Now that my '85VdP is out of the paint shop (formerly Sage Green, now
Sapphire Blue - and FIVE WEEKS in the making), I’m looking to upgrade
my stereo. I’d like to put in a subwoofer without damaging any
interior panels and I need some advice. Has anyone put a subwoofer in their
XJ6? If so, what size did you install and where? What type of amp did you
install to run the subwoofer? Any info appreciated.

TIA,
Greg


From: “Jim Isbell” JISBELLJR@mail.utexas.edu
Date: Mon, 2 Sep 1996 16:10:32 +0000
Subject: Surface Rust Removal (foot wells)

I am slowly getting the details of the “new” XJS sorted out. You can
tell I am getting to the bottom of the barrel since I am now
concerned with the only rust I could find on the beast. When I
opened the trunk I found a front carpet that had hardened rotten
peaches on one end of it. This led me to the drivers side footwell
which had an older carpet on it that did not match the rest of the
carpets. Under that carpet at about where the peaches had rotted I
found the only rust I have seen on the car.

There was an area about half the size of the footwell where surface
rust was evident and some scale. Not real bad though, some
scratching with a knife got me down to clean metal. I am now going
to take a wire brush to the entire area then use something I found at
the auto parts store on it, says it will convert the rust into
primer, sounds like “snake oil” to me, but what the hell. Has anyone
had any experience with these products that turn rust to primer?
After the “rust converter” follow up with some spray paint.
Hopefully this will cure the problem. Are the rubber strips in the
groves something special?

I think I will replace them with something that does NOT absorb water.
Maybe solid rubber. Anyone done this before?

Also, anyone know of a sourse for the 7 rubber plugs that are at the
back of the trunk bottom? 4 of mine are missing, but luckily, no rust
there.

I found out what the wires from under the seat were. It looks like
the PO had a CD or maybe a Ham radio mounted in the trunk since the
wires came from a 4 pin connector in the trunk that went nowhere.
There is also an audio plug hanging down from under the dash which I
assume went to an audio source. I will try putting something in
there and see if I get anything out the speakers. If so I will save
it for later use.

Removing the bonnet looks like a two man job, so I will wait until I
get the water pump in hand so I don’t have a rainstorm dump in the
engine while it is off and there is no one around to help put it
back.


From: cbetlyon@lumcorp.com (Clayton Betlyon)
Date: Mon, 2 Sep 1996 19:07:15 -0400
Subject: Any 420 owners?

Any 420 owners out there?
I’m looking at a 65 420, green, lhd, automatic, disk wheels, fair shape.
There is a small amount of rust in the usual places (for a 30 year old car)
but the chrome is good and if I buy it, I’ll have it resprayed anyway.
The seller is asking $3995. I’ve not heard the car run as the shop was
closed when I found the car.
Any 420 buying tips? We don’t get many classic jags around here so I have
to admit that I’m very tempted to grab the first thing that comes along…

Clayton B.
85 XJ-S


Clayton Betlyon cbetlyon@lumcorp.com
Software Engineer (717) 543-4994
Luminous Corporation



From: rrichardson@eurekanet.com (Bob Richardson)
Date: Mon, 2 Sep 1996 19:15:05 -0500
Subject: Trouble (E-Type) comes in threes

I almost lost my Jag, my garage and my whole darned house last night. And
of course, I intially suspected and blamed it on the Jag.
Scenario: Discover water on the kitchen floor and go looking for flashlight
in my attached garage. Open garage door and am almost felled by gasoline
fumes. The kitchen was just a few open feet away and the stove’s pilot
lights were-a-burning. Switched on flashlight and there’s a major puddle of
gasoline underneath the Jag’s right outer sill.911!
Wait a minute. The lawn mower is sitting right over the puddle. It wasn’t
the old '64 FHC that has been leaking all manner of fluids on a regular
basis. Moved lawnmower, flushed gasoline and mopped area dry. Scolded lawn
mower and made it sit outside over night. Two problems already.
And during all this melee, Mickey, my beagle, makes another of his famous
escapes out the wide-open kitchen door. By this time, the grill’s charcoal
fire is slowly dying out and a choice sirloin is saved for another day.
Got in the Bimmer and found old Mickey tracking some wild Appalachian
critter. Got home, fixed the leak in the kitchen, gave Mickey a big hug,
apologized to the Jag, kicked the lawn mower, gulped down a peanut butter
sandwich and and retreated to my computer room.and wrung out a Warthog and
an F/A-18 Hornet. The government had better put this warning sticker on all
old Jags: “Owning an aging Jaguar may lead to serious heart ailments.”


From: Jason Philbrook jasonph@sidehack.gweep.net
Date: Mon, 2 Sep 1996 20:22:52 -0400 (EDT)
Subject: Re: 1985 XJS (finaly aquired)

I have it in my possesion now!!!

2)The car is too quiet.  I cant tell when the engine is running and have

twice tried to start an already running engine. I need to start looking at
the Tach before I try to start it. But I also would like the car to sound
like my E-Type. There are 6 mufflers (actualy two are CATs) Which pair of
mufflers should I remove to get a nice exhaust note out of the car?

My 89 XJS is quiet too, and I have to watch the tach when it starts to
know that I started it. Acceleration is very silent and respectable. I
like the way the V12 does that.

(But it is also fun at times to have a bit more noise and human
interaction when accelerating, like my brother standard hard-shifting saab
900s turbo, a fun 4-cylinder)

Wish I was more familair with how E-types sound :slight_smile:

3)Will removing the front license plate improve the cooling as it does

on an XJ6?

My license plate (a black plate with a raised silver jaguar) goes downward
from bumper and has no relationship to the grill, and probably little or
no effect on the airflow.

  • -jason

From: Steve Patchel spatchel@radford.com
Date: Mon, 2 Sep 1996 17:55:21 -0700
Subject: 70 E-Type No Start

Well my 70 E-Type decided to truly celebrate Labor Day (National Holiday in
US) by taking a “day of rest”.

I went to start the car this am and it behaved as if it had a dead/weak
battery. Turn key in ignition and only got a single "click "from the starter
solenoid. No horn, turn signals, but parking lights and map light worked.
Seemed like avery weak battery.

Hooked up battery charger and it indicated that the battery was fully
charged and I confirmed this with a battery tester. I concluded it wasn’t
the battery. Battery terminals looked ok, but I haven’t taken them off to
clean so it possible that it just a bad connection, but if that was the case
would not the battery be low as it was not receiving sufficient charge?

I then hooked up the jumper cables and the engine seemed to have difficulty,
at first turning over, but then it fired right up and I ran it till the car
heated up. during that time all of the electrical items functioned ok and
the battery meter was in the charge position, but no higher than “normal”.
Shut off the engine and you guessed it–same problem again.

My guess is the starter solenoid? But my experience with E-Types is very
limited and any advice is much appreciated.

Thanks

Stephen Patchel
Consulting Practice Leader
Radford Associates
voice: 408-321-2540
fax: 408-321-2650


From: “Robert Johnson, D.Sc.” bjomejag@sover.net
Date: Mon, 02 Sep 1996 21:00:53 -0500
Subject: Re: Condensation drain??

GORDON80@aol.com wrote:

I am getting water under the carpet on both sides of my 1986 XJ6. I thought
it was a result of our recent and long awaited heavy rains. However, after
getting it all cleaned up I once again got wet carpets on the passanger side.
Is there a common problem with A/C condensate backing up into the
compartment? I can’t seem to find a ready source for water leaks from the
A/C. Any suggestions will be appreciated.

I believe the problem is a blockage in the drain tubes from the
evaporator coil. These tubes come out beside the transmission. Blowing
compressed air up the drain tube usually frees the obstruction and
allows free flow. I have thought the problem can be caused by periods
of inaction of the AC. Without use mold spores grow in the moist area
and eventually block the drain pipes.

I hope this helps.

Bob Johnson
Brattleboro, Vt
XJ12L, XJ50


From: ee84287@goodnet.com (Weiss-Malik)
Date: Tue, 03 Sep 1996 21:29:35 -0700
Subject: 85 XJ-S ac condensate: Where has all the water gone?

Hi,

I’m probably going to sound paranoid but I’m worried as to what is
happenning to the condensate from the ac system in my 85 XJ-S (with all the
recent postings on this problem it got me thinking!!!)…

My problem is that I never see any condensate under the car! The ac works
fine, the windshield doesn’t fog up, there is no sloshing sounds, and the
carpet is not wet. Today I pushed a wire through both of the drain tubes
and didn’t get even a drop of water! Is it possible that the water
evaporates as it comes out of the tubes? (maybe it hits the cats or the
exhaust pipe?) Any ideas? Is this something to even worry about? (I know,
leave well enough alone;but, what is hapenning to the water?) Thanks

Rob W-M
85 XJ-S


End of jag-lovers-digest V2 #325


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jag-lovers-digest Tuesday, 3 September 1996 Volume 02 : Number 326

Tire wear and shocks
Cup holder for 85 XJ6?
Re: Any 420 owners?
Re: 1985 XJS (finaly aquired)
Re: Tire wear and shocks
Re: jag-lovers-digest V2 #325
Re: Knock-off wrenches
Re: 64 E-Type brake fluid leak
RE: XJ6 S III Door lock problem solved.
XK Engine Oil Filter
Bits and pieces
Re: Jag Lover Goin’ Down…
V-12 Air pump and XJ SIII rear seats
Radiator removal
RE: engine number
Rust converter
[S3 XJ6] Rear shocks/dampers
NE engine number - Mark Jacobsen
XJ-S Wiper Park / Removing Radiator
Re: About the ignition wire harness Card board and losening head nuts.
Re: XJ-S Wheel removal


From: ee84287@goodnet.com (Weiss-Malik)
Date: Tue, 03 Sep 1996 21:33:33 -0700
Subject: Tire wear and shocks

Hi,

I need some advice regarding the possible association between tire wear and
bad shocks…

My front shocks are gone and they need replacing. When checking the front
tires today I noticed that they are both wearing unevenly. The thread is
worn down along the inside edge of both front tires. Is the wear symptom
due to the bad shocks? Thanks for any help,

Rob W-M
85 XJ-S


From: SCleme519@aol.com
Date: Tue, 3 Sep 1996 00:44:09 -0400
Subject: Cup holder for 85 XJ6?

I checked out the “cup holder” web site at http://www2.spav.com/wilton/husco/
, but it appears that they don’t make a model for Jags. Has anyone fitted a
decent cup holder to a series 3 XJ6?

Steve


From: Jpscan@aol.com
Date: Tue, 3 Sep 1996 00:58:11 -0400
Subject: Re: Any 420 owners?

I have a 1967 420 which I have owned for about two years. I believe they were
only made from 1966 to 1968 so I would check out the 1965 year. I think they
are great cars. They still have the classic body of the compact saloons like
the Mark II and the S-type but they have most of the modern enhancements we
are used to such as independent rear suspension, power steering, and air
conditioning. Because they are a fully outfitted Jaguar saloon, any
restoration cost, particularly the interior, will be costly. Because the cars
are not as popular as Mark II’s and S-types, their value is considerably
lower. Consequently, money spent on a 420 will probably not be realized on
sale in the near future. The cars are quite rare in the U.S. There were only
some 900 imported in 1967 and 68 and only about 168 are registered today.
Things to look for are both the front and rear suspension - both expensive to
rebuild. Also, if you can, have any rust checked by a professional.
Significant rust repair on major body parts can be ruinously costly. Wood
refinish can be about $1500. A complete interior (leather, trim panels,
carpet, headliner, etc.) will set you back $8000-$10000 parts and labour to
do it properly. If the car is drivable and in reasonably decent shape, the
price seems reasonable. Be sure the XK engine is OK - no blue smoke from the
exhaust. Also check the shifting on the BW8 auto tranny to make sure it works
all right - few places can work on these.

Jim Scannell

'67 420 valentine beige
'89 XJ-40 BRG


From: “Kirbert” palmk@gcn.scri.fsu.edu
Date: Tue, 3 Sep 1996 01:15:01 -0005
Subject: Re: 1985 XJS (finaly aquired)

2)The car is too quiet.

My 89 XJS is quiet too, and I have to watch the tach when it starts to
know that I started it. Acceleration is very silent and respectable. I
like the way the V12 does that.

(But it is also fun at times to have a bit more noise and human
interaction when accelerating…

You guys might wanna consider opening up the INTAKES. Just saw off
the horns on the front of the air filter housings, and relocate the
temp sensor in the left one to the housing itself. This makes the
car roar when floored, but remains silent at part throttle.

As explained in my booklet, if you wanna find out what the sound is
like before sawing, just remove the housing covers, tie the filters
in place with some string or wire, unscrew the temp sensor and let it
hang from the wire, and take 'er for a spin.

– Kirbert | If anything is to be accomplished,
| some rules must be broken.
| - Palm’s Postulate


From: mfl@kheops.cray.com (Matthias FOUQUET-LAPAR)
Date: Tue, 3 Sep 1996 08:40:50 +0200 (MET DST)
Subject: Re: Tire wear and shocks

I need some advice regarding the possible association between tire wear and
bad shocks…

My front shocks are gone and they need replacing. When checking the front
tires today I noticed that they are both wearing unevenly. The thread is
worn down along the inside edge of both front tires. Is the wear symptom
due to the bad shocks? Thanks for any help,

Hi Rob,

I just replaced my front shocks with Koni’s. I found that one of the
old Boge shocks would stick from time to time when I tried it by hand.

I also have tire wear on the inner edges, although more noticable on the
right hand side. I guess this is a problem with the camber adjustement.
I’ll try to get this fixed. However, on our other car this kind of adjustement
took 3 sets of front tires over the years before finally a competent garage
fixed it.
I have noticed how many camber and castor alignment shims are on each site,
so I can check if the shop actually did some work. One thing I don’t understand
is that the car is supposed to have positive camber on the front wheels
(1/2 degree). I have checked with a builders tool (don’t know how they are
called) and found that both wheels have slight negative camber. But I
think camber measurements must be done with the suspension partly compressed.
However, the simple measurements I took were coherent with my tire wear
patterns.

Comments/suggestions anyone ?

Kind regards

    • Matthias

Rob W-M
85 XJ-S


From: Baard Th Hesvik baard@telesoft.no
Date: Tue, 3 Sep 1996 09:16:30 -0700
Subject: Re: jag-lovers-digest V2 #325

Matthias;

I had the same problem on my '88 XJ-S on one of the rear tires. It was
completed seized and only after brute force of 2 pairs of strong…

I don’t know what you mean by anti-seize. If it’s spray, forget it! It
evapourizes/burns. Te ensure easy unscrewing and/or removal of parts that are
prone to get warm, use Copa-slip (it has other names too, but I can’t remember
it from the top of my head).

BTW Matthias, it’s completely seized… :wink:

Cheers
Bard


______ _ ! Baard Th Hesvik, Telesoft AS
/ _ / _ _ _ / / ! Longhammarvn 7, N-5500 Haugesund
/ // / // /_ / / -/- -/- ! T: +47 52735000 F: +47 52717040
/ /_ / /_ / // / /_ ! E-mail: baard@telesoft.no


From: ifinlay@vossnet.co.uk (Ian Finlay)
Date: Tue, 3 Sep 1996 08:49:22 +0100
Subject: Re: Knock-off wrenches

On Aug 31, 1996 15:28:52, ‘“Kirbert” palmk@gcn.scri.fsu.edu’ wrote:

My MKII has knock-offs with very stunted “ears” and there is a brass
fitting
supplied which fits over these and is then hit with a hammer. Maybe you
can just change the spinners. Makes the wheels harder to steal, too.

Ian

On this topic, I was thinking of making a steel impact wrench attachment

with brass lined jaws that would fit knock-offs. I think a heavy duty
1/2"

impact gun would be sufficient, although a 3/4" might do the job better.

From what Ryan said, it sounds like he easily had 200+ lb-ft of torque
on

the thing without budging it. Any ideas?

Impact is not really comparable to steady torque. However, since
knock-offs are DESIGNED to be installed/removed with a HAMMER, I
kinda doubt if a 1/2" torque wrench will be very good for removal,
especially when stuck.

I used to work in a power plant, and the nuts holding the turbines
together (about a 4" diameter thread, the turbine was the size of a
mobile home) were tightened and loosened with what is called a
“sledging wrench”. Essentially this is a relatively short wrench
that fits the nut and has a block on the end of the arm for hitting
with a sledgehammer. Seems to me that such a device might be
adaptable to the knockoff problem. Fashion a wrench with soft jaws
that fits the knockoff and with a short arm, perhaps 8 inches, with
a spot on it to hit with a sledgehammer. If it doesn’t line up
right for hitting, just roll the car forward or back until it does.
I believe some of the mail-order outfits offer such a critter,
although they claim it’s to protect the tangs of the knockoff from
impact rather than to provide a better removal torque.

– Kirbert | If anything is to be accomplished,
| some rules must be broken.
| - Palm’s Postulate


From: ifinlay@vossnet.co.uk (Ian Finlay)
Date: Tue, 3 Sep 1996 08:49:18 +0100
Subject: Re: 64 E-Type brake fluid leak

On Aug 30, 1996 19:35:22, ‘rrichardson@eurekanet.com (Bob Richardson)’ wrote:

... I don't have floor >stands and I don't trust getting under the car with just the support of a >lift or jack, so I can't really can't check out the underside of the master >cylinder...

Go and find a high curb (kerb?), park two wheels on it. Instant lift!

Alternatively, buy some stands, or find somewhere with a “free” exhaust
check, or free brake check, and have a look while they’ve got it on
their ramp.

Ian

Bob “I hope somebody up “There” likes me.”


From: Frans HOEKEMEIJER hoekemei@ps.msm.cern.ch
Date: Tue, 3 Sep 1996 09:55 +0200
Subject: RE: XJ6 S III Door lock problem solved.

Sorry to disappoint you but Vaseline is about as bad as the grease you found=20=

in your lock and quickly will give you the same symptoms. The best is to=20
clean the lock barrel until totally dry and to lubricate with pure graphite=20=

or with WD40 (my choice). The advantage is that both give a dry but slippery=20=

surface on the metal parts. The lock barrel must be dry to avoid=20
accumulation of dust and dirt that can adhere to grease and vaseline. You=20
can do it without dismantling by spraying the WD40 in the barrel until the=20
grease or vaseline has been washed away together with the dirt. The excess=20
WD40 will flow out and the rest will dry out. Try it and your lock will like=20=

it!
Frans.

I replaced the grease with Vaselene (petroleum jelly) and the
internals don’t stick. Now its a little more secure. I don’t know
if Vaselene was a good choice but it was better than the only
other grease I had around (thick Castrol stuff) and I didn’t think
the liberal spraying of WD40 would be a good substitute.

Cosmo

83 XJ6 4.2
65 Mustang 289

=20


From: “Alastair Lauener” a.lauener@napier.ac.uk
Date: Tue, 03 Sep 96 10:57:58 gmt
Subject: XK Engine Oil Filter

I asked

On an XK Engine oil filter, can anybody say wether the oil flow through the
filter is from outside to inside, or the other way? I really can’t recall the
layout of all the oilways, and in particular the oil filter housing so that I
can decide, and I don’t want to remove it for such a small piece of knowledge

Does no-one really know the answer to this?
I have bought an oil filter conversion, and the recommended filter
to go with it has a non-return valve in it, and I want to bew sure
which way the oil flows through the filter?




From: “John Littler” auibmdak@ibmmail.com
Date: Tue, 03 Sep 1996 06:04:16 EDT
Subject: Bits and pieces

Hi guys,
A couple of miscellaneous bits, to the guy who asked about Pninfarina’s
involvement in the xj6 - he did the redesign (subtle changes) that
changed the SII to Series III, according to the book that came with the
car (the PO still had it when I bought mine).
A previous thread was discussing air conditioning gas for the SIII(and
probably earlier, I just got mine regassed with the original R12 (correc
me if the number’s wrong) for $90 AUD apparently although it’s no longer
legal to manufacture it in Austrlia there’s ton’s stockpiled, and freely
available.
John

Level 1, 29-57 Christie St.
St Leonards NSW 2065
Ph: +61-2-9937-8063 Fax: +61-2-9937-8100
Mobile +61-419-617-619


From: “Mark McChesney” mmcchesn@ford.com
Date: Tue, 3 Sep 1996 08:25:08 -0400
Subject: Re: Jag Lover Goin’ Down…

On Sep 1, 7:49pm, stephen kurtzman wrote:

Subject: Re: Jag Lover Goin’ Down…

Hey All Good Jaggers:


Not suspecting anything, I got behind the wheel of a 1996 Bonneville SSEi
Supercharged.

I’ll happily stay with my XJR.

Just say it! The XJR will leave the Bonneville for dead. Just cost 2.5x as
much…
Mark


From: “mark (m.d.) roberts” markdr@nortel.ca
Date: Tue, 3 Sep 1996 08:54:00 -0400
Subject: V-12 Air pump and XJ SIII rear seats

I am happy to report that Dennis Rockwood’s almost XJ SIII V-12
car has been purchased…by a friend of mine here in Ottawa.
Refer to “Canada-to-US Registration HELP” for Dennis’ trials
on trying to get this car into the States. The car is doing
well and adjusting rapidly to the new caretakers. This is their
third Jaguar, so they know what they are getting themselves
into. :slight_smile:

One of the problems that Dennis would have had to overcome
had he kept the car was that it would require and airpump.
At the time, I had thought this was odd, because, as far as I knew,
all Canadian/US cars are virually identical, except that the US
did not import any SIII V-12. That is to say, the SIII XJ6’s and
XJ-S’s are the same. Hence, I had not known of any 80’s on V-12 engine
not to have an airpump, unless it has been removed by some owner, or
PO, trying to get just a bit more power. :slight_smile: Well, I now know
something new, this car, a 1986 Canadian spec car, does not, and did
not ever have an airpump. I say did not, because the intake manifolds
should have holes drilled up near one set of mounting stud holes, for
the airpump lines for each cylinder, and these intakes do not have
those bespoken :slight_smile: holes. So a question to all those V-12 owners
out there, how rare is this, and why on this car ?

The second item of note on this car is that the rear seats are bucket
seats, and the armrest has a cubby box in it, whereas in ours, the
seat is more of a bench style, and the arm rest is just an armrest.
So for all you XJ SIII owners, what style of rear seats do you have,
bucket, or bench, or something else ?

Regards, Mark Roberts Phone: (613) 763-2924
Ottawa, Ontario, CANADA Fax: (613) 763-3970
1988 VDP - SIII V12 email: markdr@nortel.ca
1963 3.8L E-Type Coupe - 15 years into a 3 year project


From: “mark (m.d.) roberts” markdr@nortel.ca
Date: Tue, 3 Sep 1996 08:54:00 -0400
Subject: Radiator removal

Hi all !

I spent a wonderful long weekend replacing the radiator in
the SIII V-12. There sure is not alot of room to do anything
in that engine bay…and for those of you with V-12 XJ-S’s,
you think you have cramped working space, you aint seen the
SIII version. I helped a friend replace the rad on his XJ-S,
then did the SIII, and the XJ-S has loads more “empty” space.
:slight_smile: For those of you with XJ6’s, you must just be in Heaven
when you have to do something around the engine. :wink:

The job of removing the radiator was not hard, just time consuming.
The radiato can be taken out without touching the oil cooler, or
A/C condenser, but the two fans and the radiator shroud does
have to come out. For those with XJ-S’s, the fan shroud does
not need to be removed to get the radiator out, so the job
is much easier.

I took the opportunity to replace the fan belts, and inspect all
the hoses while the front of the engine was so accessible :-),
and sandblasted and repainted everything that should have been
black again, in an attempt to keep the tin worm at bay…loosing
battle I know, but every little bit helps. Total time, including the
painting, about 20 hours. Total cost, about $600.00 CDN, including
the new belts.

Regards, Mark Roberts Phone: (613) 763-2924
Ottawa, Ontario, CANADA Fax: (613) 763-3970
1988 VDP - SIII V12 email: markdr@nortel.ca
1963 3.8L E-Type Coupe - 15 years into a 3 year project


From: David Covert davecove@microsoft.com
Date: Tue, 3 Sep 1996 06:26:57 -0700
Subject: RE: engine number

You wrote:

My Mk II(61.mod) was imported from the US in 1991.The VIN-plate tells me
that the original engine number was LA 7878-9 (3.8 l). Both the BW gearbox
and the engine are not original. The new engine number (quotet from the
top) has the prefix NE (1351-8).I am not familiar with this prefix. "Jaguar
6 Cylinder Engine Overhaul (1948-1986) gives a survey of which prefix
belongs to the the spesific model. They do not mention “NE”. Can somebody
give me information?

My source lists ‘NE’ as the prefix for engines originally installed in
Mark IX 3.8
between 10/58 and 9/61.

Dave Covert
Reactive On-Site Services Lead

…Particle Man, Particle Man, doin’ the things a particle can…
They Might Be Giants


From: John Elmgreen 100353.1733@CompuServe.COM
Date: 03 Sep 96 10:07:42 EDT
Subject: Rust converter

I used to use this stuff. The snake oil is a better choice. A magazine test I
read years ago said the only stuff worth anything in this category was zinc rich
type primers. The “rust converter” kind of turned the rust into a hard crust
that eventually flaked off. Why not just scrape/brush it off anyway, and forget
about the “convertor”?


From: “Tracy A. Ferrell” tracy@brooktree.com
Date: Tue, 03 Sep 1996 07:14:51 -0700
Subject: [S3 XJ6] Rear shocks/dampers

Gunnar Helliesen wrote (in part):

Anyone ever tried replacing the rear shocks/dampers on a Series III XJ6
(mine’s an '86)?

I’m planning on doing this Real Soon Now™ and am wondering if I’ll
have to lower the entire rear subframe to get at the upper shock mounts.

I recently did mine and although a couple of the upper shock mounts are a
little ackward to get to, you do not need to drop the rear subframe. Buy or
borrow a sturdy spring compressor if you’re going to disassemble/assemble
the shock/damper assembly yourself.

Regards,
Tracy A. Ferrell tracy@brooktree.com in Sunny San Diego, CA, USA


From: John Elmgreen 100353.1733@CompuServe.COM
Date: 03 Sep 96 10:07:52 EDT
Subject: NE engine number - Mark Jacobsen

NE is a Mk IX engine number (3.8 litre).


From: jwh@mime.dw.lucent.com
Date: Tue, 03 Sep 96 08:19:00 PDT
Subject: XJ-S Wiper Park / Removing Radiator

On my 88 XJ-S, the wiper park does work & it does not work, just depends on
how it feels at that moment. If they do not park in the correct position (
not vertical in front of my face ), I pull the wiper stick toward me to move
the blades like I only want one wipe & hold until they are in position &
then release.

To Jim, I do not need to remove the bonnet to remove the radiator, but
having 2 people can help lift it out. ( 2 people really help placing it back
in, although I have only had help 1 of the 3 times I have done it ).

Question to the list: On the A/C pump label it states 4 - 6 lbs. Is this
stating that the freon charge should range between 4 - 6 lbs ?

John Himes
88 XJ-S 97K Miles :slight_smile:


From: “Mark McChesney” mmcchesn@ford.com
Date: Tue, 3 Sep 1996 10:33:29 -0400
Subject: Re: About the ignition wire harness Card board and losening head nuts.

Have you seen the D-type ignition wire harness that is available? Bolts on
at the right side valve cover and keeps the wires separated. Not standard, but
they were used on all the racing D & E-types. Looks cool too. See page 59 of
July/Aug Jaguar World, or the XKs Unlimited catalog. I am going to try to make
one - looks simple, just a piece of phenolic w/ some holes in it etc…

Mark McChesney

On Sep 2, 6:25pm, Gram@eumetsat.de wrote:

Subject: About the ignition wire harness Card board and losening head nuts
About the ignition wire harness Card board and losening head nuts.

Generally it is not a good idea to loosen head bol nuts when not needed. If
you must, wait until
the engine is stone cold. If possible loosen only one at a time.

Regards
– End of excerpt from Gram@eumetsat.de


From: Paul Peard 100025.1253@CompuServe.COM
Date: 03 Sep 96 10:36:59 EDT
Subject: Re: XJ-S Wheel removal

Five nuts (or bolts, I can’t remember which) are enough, it sounds like its
stuck on the hub. Try heating the wheel (v. hot water poured around the
offending mating surfaces), and try a north/south rocking motion (don’t pull the
car off the stands/jacks). Once it starts to move a bit, more water and more oil
and more brute force.

Good luck
Regards
Paul


End of jag-lovers-digest V2 #326


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jag-lovers-digest Tuesday, 3 September 1996 Volume 02 : Number 327

Another plug for Just Jags
Re: Dear Tommy, the lonely loner from Peterboro’,
Re: XJS - Wheel removal
XJ-40 VDP Starting problems
E-type on MTV/Nissan warm fuzzies
RE: 70 E-Type No Start
Re: Wind Shield wipers (XJ)
Worn schocks lead to increased and uneven tyre wear, and it extends the braking distance (by
Subwoofer cngo either under the front seats (eg. like what pioneer does offer) or you buy a
Hi Jim Isbell,
oil filter dircetion
Re: 1985 XJS (finaly aquired)
Re: Tire wear and shocks
Re: 85 XJ-S ac condensate: Where has all the water gone?
RE: SI E Alternator Conversion “Call for Papers”
Re: V-12 Air pump and XJ SIII rear seats
Re: XK Engine Oil Filter
To improve the sound of your Jag you dont remove ANY of the mufflers - it is supposed to be
Re[2]: chevy in jag
brake sleeves


From: Paul Peard 100025.1253@CompuServe.COM
Date: 03 Sep 96 10:37:00 EDT
Subject: Another plug for Just Jags

I’d like to echo Barrie’s plug for Just Jags, they have kept the XJ-S running
nicely (with regular injections of cash). The aren’t so hot (excuse the pun)
with A/C problems, OK for normal it’s broke type problems, but for anything
deeper I’d recommend Paul Taylor in Maidstone.

Regards
Paul Peard
86 XJ-S, Strood, Kent.


From: “Mark McChesney” mmcchesn@ford.com
Date: Tue, 3 Sep 1996 10:43:23 -0400
Subject: Re: Dear Tommy, the lonely loner from Peterboro’,

On Sep 2, 3:52pm, Gram@eumetsat.de wrote:

Subject: Dear Tommy, the lonely loner from Peterboro’,
Dear Tommy, the lonely loner from Peterboro’,

I don’t think we’re losing you, If you came this far with a Jag, and still
admires the deep lustre of
a Jag , not only on the outside, but also in the amazing cultured way the
drive is, then a
supercharged FORD

Uhh, how do I put this nicely… A BONNEVILLE IS NOT A FORD!!!

Mark


From: ifinlay@vossnet.co.uk (Ian Finlay)
Date: Tue, 3 Sep 1996 15:46:02 +0100
Subject: Re: XJS - Wheel removal

I had this on my Porsche. I jacked up the car after removing the wheel
nuts, then sat down and kicked the bottom of the tyre HARD with both feet.

Three kicks and off it came.

Ian

On Sep 02, 1996 08:15:14, ‘RWOODLIN@garfield.foods.indiana.edu’ wrote:

Help!

I am in the middle of a brake job - I’ve rebuilt the servo, master
cylinder, and replaced the rear brake pads. However, when I attempted
to remove the front wheels to gain access to the front brakes I
discovered that the wheel is frozen in position. I have removed the
five (5) lug nuts but the wheel will not budge! I surmise that either
there is another bolt somewhere, not shown in any of my manuals, or the
wheel was torqued so tight that the wheel has mated with the bearing
dust cover. I have applied penetrating oil around the dust cover and
banged on the back of the wheel with a rubber mallet to no avail!!

Has anyone encountered this situation before? This would have been
extremely frustrating had I had a flat and could not change the tire!

Robert Woodling
'84 XJ-S


From: hastings@frodo.eucom.mil (Craig R. Hastings)
Date: Tue, 3 Sep 1996 14:53:18 GMT
Subject: XJ-40 VDP Starting problems

Hello all,

I’m having problems with starting my 1988 XJ40 VDP. To make a long story
short the problem is that to get the starter to engage you must tap or bang
on the gear shift. This is while you have the key fully turned. This leads
me to believe that there is a sensor that checks if the transmission is in park
or not. Before I pull off the console I was wondering if anyone knows if this
sensor is inside the transmission (not fixable by me) or is it in the small
black box that sits right beside the shifter (possibly fixable by me). If any
one knows or has this problem before and knows the fix I’m all ears.

Another problem I am having is with the Low Brake Pad warning coming on alot.
The pads have been changed and are far from low. I have checked the wires which
run to the pads and they seem to be OK. I have even tried bypassing the pads
and just running a wire across the plug and still no luck. I think that there
is a break somewhere but can’t find where. If anyone knows of a way to bypass
this all together I’d be happy with that.

Thanks for all the advise

Craig


From: “Mark McChesney” mmcchesn@ford.com
Date: Tue, 3 Sep 1996 11:07:44 -0400
Subject: E-type on MTV/Nissan warm fuzzies

Hi,
My brother tells me that there is an advert on MTV that features an S1 E-type
ots. Has anyone seen it? It has a tennis player and a James Bond type chase
scene.

While I’m on the TV subject, has everyone seen the new Nissan TV ads (US)? I
think they are very cool - makes me want to adopt the little owner of Nissan
(is he really the owner/CEO or something?). Can’t see us doing that w/ Alex
Trotman. :slight_smile:

Mark


From: Ed Scripps 73200.2362@CompuServe.COM
Date: 03 Sep 96 11:09:28 EDT
Subject: RE: 70 E-Type No Start

Steve wrote:

No horn, turn signals, but parking lights and map light worked.
Seemed like avery weak battery.

My guess is the starter solenoid?

If there are other electrical problems such as those you describe above, it
could be something other than a starter solenoid. Perhaps something as simple
as lose or dirty electrical connections from the battery. No, then again,
nothing is that simple. :slight_smile:

Good luck,
Ed


From: Stefan Schulz jaguar@suaviter.demon.co.uk
Date: Fri, 30 Aug 1996 16:10:21 GMT
Subject: Re: Wind Shield wipers (XJ)

In message 199608301315.IAA31402@mail.utexas.edu Jim Isbell writes:

On my newly aquired XJS the windshield wipers park on the left side,
right in front of my face. Is this reversable?

If you have the same Electrolux motor in there as does my XJ-S, then yes,
it’ll only be a matter of opening the gear box and moving the rest position
switch cam by 180 degrees.

If you don’t, then I don’t know ;-(

Regards,


Stefan Schulz
jaguar@suaviter.demon.co.uk


From: Gram@eumetsat.de
Date: Tue, 03 Sep 1996 18:44:35 +0100
Subject: Worn schocks lead to increased and uneven tyre wear, and it extends the braking distance (by

Worn schocks lead to increased and uneven tyre wear, and it extends the braking distance (by
not providing maximum traction), and makes the car “nervous” and more sensitive to sidewind
impacts.

How the wear pattern looks depends on many factors, but can lead to uneven wear on the
inside, on the outside shoulder or across the thread, from rubber to rubber island , the forward
edge lower than the rear ward edge. In short not easy to say anything general about unless
youre an expert (and I’m not) and its different from make to make.

However similar symptoms can arise from incorrect camber caster and toe-in adjustments (the
wear out of the shoulders). Both my Jags eat the outer edge of the front tyres the last set lasting
30.000 km (Pirelli P-600 205/70 VR15), the rear lasting 50,000, the rear with absolute PERFECT
even wear.

It is not possible to use a “builders” water-level tool for accurate adjustment nor measurement.
The only way is a good and careful specialist shop. Note that Jaguar manuals specify quite
rigirously how the exact measures of the upper wishbones should be (when disassembled), and
the other measurements should be set accurately.(like all other cars…)

If the Jag book specifies 1/2 degree positive camber (top of wheel outwards) then that is as it
should be. The Jag front suspension is a double wishbone with un-equal length arms. This
causes a camber change with the motion of the wheel, and in the case of Jaguars, the camber
goes toward the negative when the spring is depressed (i.e moves into the wing). causing the
wheel the lean “in to the curve” just like a motorcycle rider does (althoug considerable less
pronounced). The camber also goes negative on extreme spring expansion. However there is
more to this issue since the castor angle ( the direction of the Crown pin attacted at the anchor
points of the upper and lower wishbones outer points) changes the camber whel the wheel is
turned left and right. Here the car manufactures have wildly differing opinions and solutions.

A Mercedes inner wheel in a curve goes Positive (and alot), and is part of the reasons for a
Mercedes being able to “turn on 5p coin”. The Jag is much much les pronounced, and the Jag
S3 XJ6/12 turning radius is appallingly large - room for some DIY’ing there - any takers ?

However all these issues are only interesting for vehicle dynamics engineering buffs - the
“normal” car driver does not need to know all this. Important is the setting is done by a real
professional, that knows what the issue is about and what affects what and how to read a
(Jaguar) Service manual the RIGHT way…

Regards Jeffrey Gram
'78 XJ6C S2 Coupe, (The RED spinner )
84 XJ12 S3 Sov. HE (The great grey whisperer)
'74 W116 Mercedes 280 SE (The silver shadow) - this should really have been a Jag, started as
a Jag-temporary-replacement-extra-car-but-has-cost-too-much-to-sell-so-I-Cant-so-I-wont
'93 Audi 80 Avant (The Audi) - wify’s car - according to her the only CAR we have.

Planned :
an Morris Minor 1000 Traveller (for Wify) - but only if she trades in that awfully perfectly
engineered Audi…
an e-type , Either an OTS or a Coupe 2+2,
an XJS V12 Convertible
a MK2
a MK7
a C- or D type (will be a replica I Guess)

Life is too short and not enough money (because of all these money guzzling wrecks…)


From: Gram@eumetsat.de
Date: Tue, 03 Sep 1996 18:51:29 +0100
Subject: Subwoofer cngo either under the front seats (eg. like what pioneer does offer) or you buy a

Subwoofer cngo either under the front seats (eg. like what pioneer does offer) or you buy a
bass-Tube-box , place it in the boot and attach it with a tube to the rear shelf (metal cutting
required), or put the woofers directly in the rearshelf . The metal cutting is REALLY difficult in
this area, but possible. The boot method gives deep wonderful bass.

You will however not be able to make sensible use of the rear mirror inside, since the bass
twacks shake the roof so vigorously that the image gets really blurred even at sensible (<120
dB) volumes…

Regards. Jeffrey Gram


From: Gram@eumetsat.de
Date: Tue, 03 Sep 1996 19:07:47 +0100
Subject: Hi Jim Isbell,

Hi Jim Isbell,

Footwell rust needs rustproofing, and the wirebrush method will work. Use it to a little bit outside
the infected area. The Rust Primer is a substance that converts the rust (Ironoxide) into some
other chemical “goe” which is not rust. Snakeoil or not, it does work, however so does good old
priming and painting.

I’m afraid I cannot recommend the spray can method, First it will leave paint spray everywhere,
secondly the paints are usually crap (honestly), thirdly the paintlayer is too thin (even if you use
a can on a square foot, fourthly the paints are not tough enough, and therefore the whole
exercise will be repeated in six months time, when new rust break out, this time just worse.

Use a proper primer with a handoperated hairbrush, to a thoroughly cleaned area, no dust, not
wet not greasy - in short clean enough to eat from. (dont test - or you will have to clean again…)

When dry (a day ?) sand down a bit with fine sandpaper and apply a topcoat with a brush .

The best is to use 2-component pack paints, these are more expensive, and you can only mix
what you need here and now since the stuff hardens, however these are tougher. You choice.

The rubber strips are simply to avoid the carpet to develop a pattern like the bottom plate.

These foam -rubber water absorbers are a real engineering feat. I replaced mine with a layer of
bitumen sound insulating thingies, undercarpet, and the original carpet on top. Works OK.

Regards Jeffrey Gram


From: LLoyd 3030P@vm1.cc.nps.navy.mil
Date: Tue, 03 Sep 96 10:14:54 PDT
Subject: oil filter dircetion

Out-to -inside. Check the holes around the outside. They have a one-way flap
to keep oil in the filter.

LLoyd - I think they are all the same -


From: Thomas Alberts talberts@aero.odu.edu
Date: Tue, 3 Sep 1996 13:28:04 -0400 (EDT)
Subject: Re: 1985 XJS (finaly aquired)

Kirby mentions that certain intake modifications increase the engine
sound at high speeds. Some people might think this sounds neat.

Thomas E. Alberts

2)The car is too quiet.  I cant tell when the engine is running and have

twice tried to start an already running engine. I need to start looking at
the Tach before I try to start it. But I also would like the car to sound
like my E-Type. There are 6 mufflers (actualy two are CATs) Which pair of
mufflers should I remove to get a nice exhaust note out of the car?


From: “Kirbert” palmk@gcn.scri.fsu.edu
Date: Tue, 3 Sep 1996 13:33:40 -0005
Subject: Re: Tire wear and shocks

My front shocks are gone and they need replacing. When checking the front
tires today I noticed that they are both wearing unevenly. The thread is
worn down along the inside edge of both front tires. Is the wear symptom
due to the bad shocks? Thanks for any help,

Maybe. Gas shocks that have lost gas pressure will cause the front
to sag, which in turn will cause the front tires to wear on the inner
edge. I don’t think I’d replace the shocks and call it fixed,
though; I’d have the alignment checked.

– Kirbert | If anything is to be accomplished,
| some rules must be broken.
| - Palm’s Postulate


From: Thomas Alberts talberts@aero.odu.edu
Date: Tue, 3 Sep 1996 13:42:38 -0400 (EDT)
Subject: Re: 85 XJ-S ac condensate: Where has all the water gone?

Trust me Bob, if you had clogged drain tubes there would be no question about
it. You get a foot bath whenever you corner. Yours may be draining so
well that there is no excess condensate by the time you stop. Where
do you live, Alaska? On hot humid days (every day here in VA) I usually
get a small puddle under the car after a long drive. The drain tubes are
supposed to drop the water on the exhaust pipes by the way. Anyway, if
you are not getting wet feet, then congratulations and quit worrying.

Best,
Thomas E. Alberts

My problem is that I never see any condensate under the car! The ac works
fine, the windshield doesn’t fog up, there is no sloshing sounds, and the
carpet is not wet. Today I pushed a wire through both of the drain tubes
and didn’t get even a drop of water! Is it possible that the water
evaporates as it comes out of the tubes? (maybe it hits the cats or the
exhaust pipe?) Any ideas? Is this something to even worry about? (I know,
leave well enough alone;but, what is hapenning to the water?) Thanks


From: “Lauren E. Pratt” pratt@its.bldrdoc.gov
Date: Tue, 3 Sep 96 11:37:00 PDT
Subject: RE: SI E Alternator Conversion “Call for Papers”

In Hunt Dabney’s post to the net he states he wants to replace
his generator with a alternator. If the replacement alternator
is a direct bolt in for the generator, will it not also be too
close to the heat of the exhaust?


Name: Lauren Pratt
E-mail: lpratt@its.bldrdoc.gov
Date: 9/3/96
Time: 11:37:00 AM

This message was sent by Chameleon



From: Volker Nadenau nadenau@ipers1.e-technik.uni-stuttgart.de
Date: Tue, 3 Sep 1996 19:50:50 +0200 (MST)
Subject: Re: V-12 Air pump and XJ SIII rear seats

Hi Mark,
I was wondering why only very few people report on SIII V12s. But you
gave the reason. Concerning the air pump I can tell you that my '81 V12
does not have an air pump either. I realized that during the removal of
the alternator, when the workshop manual recommended to remove the air
pump first. I really do not now what the air pump does. Has it something
to do with the air/fuel ratio and emmision control? If so, it is clear
that the german version like mine do not have the airpump. Catalytic
converters were introduced only in the last SIII V12s since '89, as far
as I know.

At the time, I had thought this was odd, because, as far as
I knew, > all Canadian/US cars are virually identical, except that the US

did not import any SIII V-12. That is to say, the SIII XJ6’s and
XJ-S’s are the same. Hence, I had not known of any 80’s on V-12 engine
not to have an airpump, unless it has been removed by some owner, or
PO, trying to get just a bit more power.

Mine has the bench type seat. As far as I know only the luxury versions
Daimler Double Six and VDP were fitted with the individually sculptured
seats in the rear.

The second item of note on this car is that the rear seats are bucket

seats, and the armrest has a cubby box in it, whereas in ours, the
seat is more of a bench style, and the arm rest is just an armrest.
So for all you XJ SIII owners, what style of rear seats do you have,
bucket, or bench, or something else ?

Regards, Mark Roberts Phone: (613) 763-2924
Ottawa, Ontario, CANADA Fax: (613) 763-3970
1988 VDP - SIII V12 email: markdr@nortel.ca
1963 3.8L E-Type Coupe - 15 years into a 3 year project

Regards

Volker


Volker Nadenau Phone: ++49 711 685 7200
University of Stuttgart Fax : ++49 711 685 7143
Institute for Physical Electronics Internet: nadenau@ipers1.e-technik.uni-stuttgart.de
Pfaffenwaldring 47
70569 Stuttgart
Germany


From: “Kirbert” palmk@gcn.scri.fsu.edu
Date: Tue, 3 Sep 1996 13:53:02 -0005
Subject: Re: XK Engine Oil Filter

On an XK Engine oil filter, can anybody say wether the oil flow through the
filter is from outside to inside, or the other way? I really can’t recall the
layout of all the oilways, and in particular the oil filter housing so that I
can decide, and I don’t want to remove it for such a small piece of knowledge

Does no-one really know the answer to this?

I only know the answer in the GENERAL case, not in the specific case
of the XK – hence I didn’t answer the first time. However, I have
never seen an oil filter, or any other filter for that matter, that
didn’t flow from the outside in. There are two reasons for this: 1)
more dirt can accumulate on the outside before plugging the filter than on
the inside. 2) The filter element can withstand more pressure
differential without tearing.

– Kirbert | If anything is to be accomplished,
| some rules must be broken.
| - Palm’s Postulate


From: Gram@eumetsat.de
Date: Tue, 03 Sep 1996 19:54:12 +0100
Subject: To improve the sound of your Jag you dont remove ANY of the mufflers - it is supposed to be

To improve the sound of your Jag you dont remove ANY of the mufflers - it is supposed to be
that way , not a bloody pain roaring down the road, with birds and old ladies stunned by fear of
the roar of the big cat.

If you must improve, then get an aftermarket damper system, with a glorious note, but with the
control over the pressures in the exhaust system, which are designed as part of the engine to
maximise also fuel economy (even in a gas-guzzling 12 cylinder overkill engine).

However the real good notes come from the inlet system as Kirbert writes, a sextet of weber
downdraughts will strike with a fabolous sound, clean up the messy engine bay as well with all
this emmission control garbage, fuel injection crap etc… A bit of re-engineering in the engine bay
with make the cat’s paws run faster than the hoves on the well known horse - you know the one
with another but different high-pitched squeal

But then you better take the car to the circuit - Beasts must be kept in closed areas - dont you
know that ? - only cultured and tame cats are let on the public road.

Stay tuned - but with modesty. Regards Jeffrey Gram


From: M.Cogswell@zds.com (Mike Cogswell)
Date: Tue, 3 Sep 1996 10:48:54 -0400
Subject: Re[2]: chevy in jag

 The Chevy gets the nod because, as high school kids have been 
 demonstrating for over 30 years, you can build a nice mouse motor with 
 plenty of hp and torque for very little money.  There are probably 
 more overhaul and performance parts available, at least in the US, for 
 the small block Chevy than every other engine put together.
 
 I'm not a Chevy lover and I wouldn't dream of replacing the V-12 in my 
 XJ-S or my E-Type. To me the engine is part of the very essence of a 
 Jaguar. The only small block Chevy I've ever owned is the one that's 
 in my Suburban.  However, I've worked as a professional mechanic, 
 owned a speed shop and built mouse motors for others.  They're cheap 
 to build, easy to maintain and very reliable.  Newer, more exotic 
 designs require more special tools and equipment to diagnose and 
 maintain and parts are more expensive and harder to come by.
 
 Mikec 

______________________________ Reply Separator _________________________________
Subject: Re: 90-93 xj3 canadian /chevy in jag
Author: palmk@gcn.scri.fsu.edu at INTERNET
Date: 08/30/96 09:28 PM

steven leamy:

    ok let's start a fight! I'm thinking about putting a chevy v8 in my 

87 jag

I only have one question: If you have decided an engine swap is the
way to go, why in HELL would the Chevy V8 come to mind? How about
the NorthStar, or Ford’s Modular V8, or any of the other dozens of
engines that would be a better choice? It completely escapes me why
the Chevy V8 seems to always get the nod.

– Kirbert | If anything is to be accomplished,
| some rules must be broken.
| - Palm’s Postulate


From: jpmanelis@ucdavis.edu (Joseph Manelis)
Date: Tue, 3 Sep 1996 11:07:12 -0700
Subject: brake sleeves

I am considering sleeving the hydraulic cylinders in the brake/clutch
systems of my '66 E-type. Any advice on brass vs stainless sleeves and
recommendations for a shop? I plan to switch to DOT 5 silicone fluid at
the same time.


End of jag-lovers-digest V2 #327


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jag-lovers-digest Wednesday, 4 September 1996 Volume 02 : Number 328

Re: Wind Shield wipers (XJ)
Re: Rust converter
Re: Re[2]: chevy in jag
Re[2]: E-Type mirrors
Re: Worn schocks lead to increased and uneven tyre wear, and it extends
Re: High oil-pressure on 84 XJ6
Palo Alto reminder
Re: Dear Tommy, the lonely loner from Peterboro’,
Re: brake sleeves
Re: Palo Alto reminder
Re: 64 E-Type brake fluid leak
Re: E-type on MTV/Nissan warm fuzzies
RE: SI E Alternator Conversion “Call for Papers”
Re: E-type on MTV/Nissan warm fuzzies
Re: V-12 Air pump and XJ SIII rear seats
Re: Jaguar XJ-S
Re: Subwoofer cngo either under the front seats (eg. like what
Re: Leather Dye Source
Introduction
Re: Stuck wheel, XJ-S
Series III XJ6 Lukewarm Starting Problem (fwd)


From: M.Cogswell@zds.com (Mike Cogswell)
Date: Tue, 3 Sep 1996 10:21:28 -0400
Subject: Re: Wind Shield wipers (XJ)

 You could move your steering wheel over to the right side where it 
 belongs . . .  
 
 <grin>
 
 mikec

______________________________ Reply Separator _________________________________
Subject: Wind Shield wipers (XJ)
Author: JISBELL@mail.utexas.edu at INTERNET
Date: 08/30/96 07:13 AM

My wind shield wipers park on the wrong side. Can this be cured?

On my newly aquired XJS the windshield wipers park on the left side,
right in front of my face. Is this reversable?


From: “Kirbert” palmk@gcn.scri.fsu.edu
Date: Tue, 3 Sep 1996 14:10:03 -0005
Subject: Re: Rust converter

A magazine test I
read years ago said the only stuff worth anything in this category was zinc rich
type primers.

We’re talking two different things here. The zinc primers are the thing
to use BEFORE the metal rusts.

The “rust converter” kind of turned the rust into a hard crust
that eventually flaked off. Why not just scrape/brush it off anyway, and forget
about the “convertor”?

Somebody wasn’t following directions. You’re supposed to
scrape/brush off anything that will come off, and THEN use the
convertor! That prevents any flaking problems, and prevents the
minor surface rust remaining from growing.

– Kirbert | If anything is to be accomplished,
| some rules must be broken.
| - Palm’s Postulate


From: “Kirbert” palmk@gcn.scri.fsu.edu
Date: Tue, 3 Sep 1996 14:10:03 -0005
Subject: Re: Re[2]: chevy in jag

 The Chevy gets the nod because, as high school kids have been 
 demonstrating for over 30 years, you can build a nice mouse motor with 
 plenty of hp and torque for very little money.

If any of these were valid issues, we wouldn’t be talking about a
Jaguar! All are EXCELLENT reasons to buy a Camaro!

– Kirbert | If anything is to be accomplished,
| some rules must be broken.
| - Palm’s Postulate


From: M.Cogswell@zds.com (Mike Cogswell)
Date: Tue, 3 Sep 1996 11:32:23 -0400
Subject: Re[2]: E-Type mirrors

My understanding was that breakaway mirrors were external (to avoid
impaling pedestrians). Of course, that may have been a misinterpretation
or misunderstanding on my part. There is no obvious breakaway point on my
inside mirror. However, the mirror shell is plastic and would probably
break at the ball and socket mount with only a modest impact. The mount to
the windscreen rod may also be designed to fail under a certain amount of
impact. For what it’s worth, the mirror itself appear identical to the one
in my '88 XJ-S. I haven’t removed the XJ-S mirror to compare the small
stub, but they are the same in all other respects.

MikeC

______________________________ Reply Separator _________________________________
Subject: Re: E-Type mirrors
Author: “George W. Cohn” gwcohn@AZStarNet.com at INTERNET
Date: 08/31/96 07:30 PM

Mike, just to satisfy my curiosity, does your interior mirror
appear to have some mechanism for “breaking away” from the rod
in an accident?


From: mfl@kheops.cray.com (Matthias FOUQUET-LAPAR)
Date: Tue, 3 Sep 1996 21:15:36 +0200 (MET DST)
Subject: Re: Worn schocks lead to increased and uneven tyre wear, and it extends

Hi,

It is not possible to use a “builders” water-level tool for accurate adjustment nor measurement.
The only way is a good and careful specialist shop. Note that Jaguar manuals specify quite
rigirously how the exact measures of the upper wishbones should be (when disassembled), and
the other measurements should be set accurately.(like all other cars…)

If the Jag book specifies 1/2 degree positive camber (top of wheel outwards) then that is as it

I was not suggesting to do any adjustements or so, I was just curious
why my front tires clearly have negative camber now which is coherent with the
wear pattern and I will check again after it’s back from adjustement.

Greetings from Berlin (where I am today) lots of Jags on the “Kurfuerstendamm”

    • Matthias

From: “albert (a.) cohoe” cohoe@nortel.ca
Date: Tue, 3 Sep 1996 13:43:00 -0400
Subject: Re: High oil-pressure on 84 XJ6

In message “Re: High oil-pressure on 84 XJ6”,
‘southern@sol.cgd.ucar.edu’ writes:

This seems very high. My '81 Daimler XJ6 (high compression pistons, 88C
themostat and non-working electrical fan) normally warms up to and stays
at 88C. It only creeps over 90C on the hottest of days.

Thanks for the reply. I’ll check the items you listed if I go back to this
car for another look. My hesitancy is based on some other symptoms (low
power, broken catalytic convertor, etc.) + a premium price. Oh well - another
winter without a toy won’t drive me too silly!

Regards - Albert Cohoe
Voice: 393-3440 or 613-763-3440 Email: cohoe@nortel.ca


From: Ryan Border rborder@hpspls16.cup.hp.com
Date: Tue, 3 Sep 1996 13:37:09 -0700
Subject: Palo Alto reminder

Hello Everyone-
Just a reminder about this weekends all-British car meet in Palo Alto,
this Sunday (9/8/96). It’s $15 to enter your car, and free for the public
to attend. Being right across the street (El Camino) from the Stanford
Shopping Center ensures a steady stream of people all day, making this
(IMO) about the most fun show of the year. Last year there were (I’m
guessing) at least 50 Jaguars attending.

Ryan.
http://www.best.com/~border/pages/jag/jag.shtml


From: “Mark McChesney” mmcchesn%ford.com@vm1.cc.nps.navy.mil
Date: Tue, 3 Sep 1996 10:43:23 -0400
Subject: Re: Dear Tommy, the lonely loner from Peterboro’,

Mark reminds us, with great vigor;

<Uhh, how do I put this nicely… A BONNEVILLE IS NOT A FORD!!!

I think he was just stating that it is more like a Ford, compared to a jag.
LLoyd


From: Merritt Smith mhsmith@hpfcms.fc.hp.com
Date: Tue, 03 Sep 1996 15:04:21 -0600
Subject: Re: brake sleeves

Greetings

You write:

I am considering sleeving the hydraulic cylinders in the brake/clutch
systems of my '66 E-type. Any advice on brass vs stainless sleeves and
recommendations for a shop? I plan to switch to DOT 5 silicone fluid at
the same time.

I had the wheel cylinders in a '59 Mk 1 resleeved in stainless by Imperial
Machine in Lincoln, Nebraska. They advertise in Hemmings. 2-week turn-
around, good quality, and their price was better than the places advertising
brass. A recent post on the Jag-Lovers suggests that brass tends to stick
to the rubber seals in the cylinders, and in extreme cases breaking loose
under braking. I have no idea how silicone brake fluid would effect this.

Merritt



| Merritt Smith OOOOOO / OOOOOO |
| Software Design Engineer OOOO /__ ___ OOOO Hewlett Packard |
| WSY Technical Consulting OOO / // / OOO MS 37 |
| (970) 229-2162 OOO / //__/ OOO 3404 East Harmony Road |
| (970) 229-3002 FAX OOOO / OOOO Ft. Collins, CO 80525 |

mhsmith@fc.hp.com OOOOOO / OOOOOO

From: stephen kurtzman stephen@kurtzman.com
Date: Tue, 3 Sep 1996 14:57:36 -0800
Subject: Re: Palo Alto reminder

Hello Everyone-
Just a reminder about this weekends all-British car meet in Palo Alto,
this Sunday (9/8/96). It’s $15 to enter your car, and free for the public
to attend. Being right across the street (El Camino) from the Stanford
Shopping Center ensures a steady stream of people all day, making this
(IMO) about the most fun show of the year. Last year there were (I’m
guessing) at least 50 Jaguars attending.

Ryan.
http://www.best.com/~border/pages/jag/jag.shtml

Ryan, is there any more online info about this event? Will you be showing
your MK1 there?


From: rrichardson@eurekanet.com (Bob Richardson)
Date: Tue, 3 Sep 1996 18:13:26 -0500
Subject: Re: 64 E-Type brake fluid leak

On Aug 30, 1996 19:35:22, ‘rrichardson@eurekanet.com (Bob Richardson)’ wrote:

... I don't have floor >stands and I don't trust getting under the car with just the support of a >lift or jack, so I can't really can't check out the underside of the master >cylinder...

Go and find a high curb (kerb?), park two wheels on it. Instant lift!

Alternatively, buy some stands, or find somewhere with a “free” exhaust
check, or free brake check, and have a look while they’ve got it on
their ramp.

Ian

Bob “I hope somebody up “There” likes me.”

Ian. So I find a high curb and get the old Jag tilted enough so I can
crawl under and along comes this bozo who is eyeing some floozy adjusting
her panty and Bingo! I’m history. Or it could be some whimp who has a
thing about those
“those danged furrin cars” and he deliberately writes my epitaph. Actually,
I am going to invest in stands and hopefully may run into a real garage
sale and pick me up a professional hydraulic jack for a steal. Thanks for
the idea. What I did was I wrapped the bottom master cylinder with T.P. and
I could see that the leakage was coming out of the operating rod’s rubber
dust excluder. So now I’m going to have the cylinder resleeved with
stainless steel.


From: rrichardson@eurekanet.com (Bob Richardson)
Date: Tue, 3 Sep 1996 18:19:57 -0500
Subject: Re: E-type on MTV/Nissan warm fuzzies

While I’m on the TV subject, has everyone seen the new Nissan TV ads (US)? I
think they are very cool - makes me want to adopt the little owner of Nissan
(is he really the owner/CEO or something?). Can’t see us doing that w/ Alex
Trotman. :slight_smile:

Mark
As an advertising pro of many, many years I just can’t agree with you on
the recent Nissan series. They waisted lots of dollars with all those
30-second teasers. I thought maybe the little fellow was brain dead. It’s
too syrupy for me. Kind of reminds me of all those Kodak spots with the
bleeding heart music and granpa and grandma “finally” getting up the
courage to visit their rotten son and the grandkids. Oh, well, to each his
own. But will this series sell Nissans. That’s the bottom line in
advertising.


From: rrichardson@eurekanet.com (Bob Richardson)
Date: Tue, 3 Sep 1996 18:24:18 -0500
Subject: RE: SI E Alternator Conversion “Call for Papers”

In Hunt Dabney’s post to the net he states he wants to replace
his generator with a alternator. If the replacement alternator
is a direct bolt in for the generator, will it not also be too
close to the heat of the exhaust?

Name: Lauren Pratt
E-mail: lpratt@its.bldrdoc.gov
Date: 9/3/96
Time: 11:37:00 AM

This message was sent by Chameleon

I had a Delco alternator installed on my 64 E-type Series One in 1978 and
it’s been doing a great job of keeping my battery fully charged since that
time. It sits flush against the left subframe steel tubing to keep it about
as far away from the exhaust manifold as was the generator. Trouble is, the
Type 1 E belt is too short and a 4.2 belt is too long. A Mark II belt is
the best substitute I could find.


From: “Kirbert” palmk@gcn.scri.fsu.edu
Date: Tue, 3 Sep 1996 18:32:06 -0005
Subject: Re: E-type on MTV/Nissan warm fuzzies

My brother tells me that there is an advert on MTV that features an S1 E-type
ots. Has anyone seen it? It has a tennis player and a James Bond type chase
scene.

Yeah, I saw it – on a regular network, not just MTV. Monica Seles
is the player, Nike is the sponsor. Really dumb ad, although the
car is pretty. It smokes, though, and they give us a close-up of it
smoking.

– Kirbert | If anything is to be accomplished,
| some rules must be broken.
| - Palm’s Postulate


From: “Gregory W. Price” gprice@mack.rt66.com
Date: Tue, 3 Sep 1996 16:30:22 +0700
Subject: Re: V-12 Air pump and XJ SIII rear seats

The second item of note on this car is that the rear seats are bucket
seats, and the armrest has a cubby box in it, whereas in ours, the
seat is more of a bench style, and the arm rest is just an armrest.
So for all you XJ SIII owners, what style of rear seats do you have,
bucket, or bench, or something else ?

My '85VdP has a rear bench seat that looks like two closely spaced
bucket seats. The fold-down armrest has a cubby in it as well.

Greg


From: “Kirbert” palmk@gcn.scri.fsu.edu
Date: Tue, 3 Sep 1996 19:07:17 -0005
Subject: Re: Jaguar XJ-S

MR RICHARD P HUSTA:

A few years ago we developed a neat combination armrest, cupholder
and phone message pad. Jaguar told us there wouldn’t be any demand
from their owners!

A quote from someone wise:

“There cannot be a demand until there is a supply.”
– boB Morris

Jaguar Corp. clearly doesn’t have a clue since Sir William croaked.
They don’t build a SWB XJ12; they don’t offer manual transmissions;
they don’t think a combo armrest/cupholder/message pad would have a
market. Screw 'em, offer the product anyway, I’ll mention it in my
XJ-S booklet, we can describe it on the jag-lovers discussion
group, and we can establish a link from the Jag-Lovers WWW site to
your site for a pic and online ordering info.

– Kirbert | If anything is to be accomplished,
| some rules must be broken.
| - Palm’s Postulate


From: “Kirbert” palmk@gcn.scri.fsu.edu
Date: Tue, 3 Sep 1996 19:07:17 -0005
Subject: Re: Subwoofer cngo either under the front seats (eg. like what

Jeffrey Gram:

Subwoofer cngo either under the front seats (eg. like what pioneer does offer) or you buy a
bass-Tube-box , place it in the boot and attach it with a tube to the rear shelf (metal cutting
required), or put the woofers directly in the rearshelf . The metal cutting is REALLY difficult in
this area, but possible. The boot method gives deep wonderful bass.

You will however not be able to make sensible use of the rear mirror inside, since the bass
twacks shake the roof so vigorously that the image gets really blurred even at sensible (<120
dB) volumes…

If your objective is maximum bass regardless of fidelity, all of the
above is applicable – and you can be proud of an unusable mirror.
But if your objective is good, listenable music, forget anything
having to do with tubes or ports; they trade fidelity for volume.

– Kirbert | If anything is to be accomplished,
| some rules must be broken.
| - Palm’s Postulate


From: “MarrioSD” marriosd@ccmail.apldbio.com
Date: Tue, 03 Sep 96 15:57:42 PDT
Subject: Re: Leather Dye Source

Hi All

Another good source for leather dye kits is a company called Croftgate in the
UK, there was an article recently in Practical Classics which compared about 6
kits available from various companies in the UK

Croftgate came out best, they also supply Rolls Royce (English car manufacturer)

Tel # for Croftgate 44 1706 216096

I have a copy of the article if anybody is interested. I will be buying a kit
and will keep you posted as to the results.

Regards

Steve


Subject: Leather Dye Source
From: Ed Scripps 73200.2362@CompuServe.COM at CCMAIL
Date: 8/28/96 7:46 PM

Jim try,

Gerard Coachworks Jaguar
12840 NE 21st Pl
Bellevue, WA
1(206)869-1747

They have a great reputation for their leather dye and they deal almost
exclusively with Jags.

  • -Ed-

From: Per Ove Asperud asperud@online.no
Date: Tue, 03 Sep 1996 23:41:35 +0200
Subject: Introduction

I joined the jag-lovers-list some days ago, and want to introduce my
self.I bought a 1973 XJ6 series 1, in may, this year, after wanting to
get a series 1 for some years.It�s a low mileage car, looking almost
as new inside.The first owner had the car until he died at the age of
88 in 1990. The second one did take well care of the car and among other
thing had it beautifully repainted (BRG).I�m the third.
I work as a computer engineer in an insurance company and live in the
middle of Oslo, Norway in a old restricted house (my hobby for the last
years). I have a wife and two children, who all love driving in the car.
I�m planning to overhaul the brakes and change the servo unit. And there
is something strange with the heating-system. Either too hot or no heat at
all. When the hot-air knob is almost at max. its too hot, when I turn the
knob only 1 mm(1/25 inch) to left there comes cold air only.
I will take at closer look at this soon, as the temperature starts
decreasing in a week or two.

Regards


From: BSherw@aol.com
Date: Tue, 3 Sep 1996 20:10:48 -0400
Subject: Re: Stuck wheel, XJ-S

Robert- Did you have any luck with the wheel? I hadn’t read my mail for a
couple of days (Busy weekend) and I see now you had a problem. Looks like
you had some good suggestions, but I’ll add my 2 cents:

  • -Did you pry the “Cat” out of the wheel center so the penetrating oil could
    get down into the hub area?
  • -On other vehicles I’ve used a sledge hammer against a block of wood on the inside of the wheel. Hit it a couple of licks, rotate the wheel half-turn, and hit some more. on one old truck, I loosened the lug nuts a turn or two, and drove crazy down the road (slow speed, of course, and it would be a last resort on the Jag!) BTW, i was in bloomington on Sunday- my father’s in the hospital there, had a knee joint replaced. Cheers, Brian Sherwood From: William F Trimble trimbwf@mail.auburn.edu Date: Tue, 3 Sep 1996 19:22:29 -0500 (CDT) Subject: Series III XJ6 Lukewarm Starting Problem (fwd) Dear Jag Lovers: I tried to send the following message over the weekend, but our e-mail system was down, so I don’t know if everyone got this or not. My apologies to those who already received this. Feel free to delete: I hate to bomb the list with another of my Jag problems, but this one’s been bugging me for a couple of months at least. Here’s the problem: The car (1985 XJ6 Series III) starts OK when cold, after sitting overnight, when the ambient temperature here in Alabama is about 70 degrees F. The car runs fine. And the car hot starts all right, although sometimes with a little cranking. It runs right at 90 degrees C, even on the hottest days with the AC on. Before replacing the thermostat in March, the car ran very cool, and I had no starting problems. The problem is that if the car sits all day in 90 degree plus temperatures, it will not start. Nor will it start after sitting for about 4-5 hours in cooler weather. Rick the mechanic and I have discussed this problem and played around with the thermotime switch, bypassing it and grounding out the cold start injector manually. The car starts instantly every time we do that. The thermotime switch is new, although it is 8 sec. rather than seconds at 35 degrees C. Could it be a broken wire leading from the thermotime switch to the cold start injector? I had to pull the injector harness out of the way back in March when I did the thermostat job, and I might have pulled something loose. The connections at the thermotime switch and at the cold start injector look OK, although the one at the thermotime switch is a little worse for wear, and the rubber boot is cracked from heat. It has always bothered me that the car, as long as I have owned it, has not started on the key, but has always needed some cranking. Could this in some way also be symptomatic of the problem? Any ideas would be greatly appreciated. Bill Trimble Auburn, Alabama End of jag-lovers-digest V2 #328 ******************************** Return-Path: @owner-jag-lovers-di1 Received: (from majordom@localhost) by ekeberg.sn.no (8.7.5/8.7.3/on4) id for jag-lovers-digest-out; Wed, 4 Sep 1996 13:47:47 +0200 (MET DST) Date: Wed, 4 Sep 1996 13:47:47 +0200 (MET DST) Message-Id: 199609041147.NAA09816@ekeberg.sn.no X-Authentication-Warning: ekeberg.sn.no: majordom set sender to owner-jag-lovers-digest using -f From: @owner-jag-lovers-di1 To: jag-lovers-digest@sn.no Subject: jag-lovers-digest V2 #329 Reply-To: jag-lovers@sn.no Errors-To: @owner-jag-lovers-di1 Precedence: bulk Status: O X-Status: X-Newsgroups: mail.jag-lovers-digest jag-lovers-digest Wednesday, 4 September 1996 Volume 02 : Number 329 61 Mk2 for sale Re: XJ-40 VDP Starting problems De-rusto Seeking '85 XJ6 A/C renewal advice Re:Series III XJ6 lukewarm starting problems Subwoofer cngo either under the front seats (eg. like what pionee Replacing shocks on 85 XJ-S Washington,DC area show, Jag club activity New England, USA area events Re: Seeking '85 XJ6 A/C renewal advice 61 E Alternator: Part I 1947 Mk IV Bass in an XJS XJS — Oops!!! (a.k.a. Chassis failure) Re: Tire wear and shocks XK Engine oil filter Re: Condensate drainDate: Mon, 2 Sep 1996 09:52:57 From: Bill Detelich bdetelic@nando.net Date: Tue, 20 Aug 1996 12:02:18 -0400 Subject: 61 Mk2 for sale I have a 61 3.8 Litre Mk2 that I need to sell. When I purchased this car I planned on keeping it but other things have come up. She has a completely rebuilt engine and was converted to 4 speed with overdrive. The body is very straight with a minimum of rust on the doors and rockers. The interior is nice but was redone in vinyl. The wood is in very good shape. I would like to get $6000 for this car but would consider all reasonable offers. The car is in North Carolina and stays in our dehumidified garage. Thanks Bill Detelich From: cobac@ix.netcom.com (Eric J Faber ) Date: Tue, 3 Sep 1996 17:46:30 -0700 Subject: Re: XJ-40 VDP Starting problems You wrote:

I’m having problems with starting my 1988 XJ40 VDP. To make a long
story
short the problem is that to get the starter to engage you must tap or
bang
on the gear shift. This is while you have the key fully turned. This
leads
me to believe that there is a sensor that checks if the transmission
is in park
or not. Before I pull off the console I was wondering if anyone knows
if this
sensor is inside the transmission (not fixable by me) or is it in the
small
black box that sits right beside the shifter (possibly fixable by me).

Hello,
Craig, I had a similar problem with my 1989 XJ40 VDP when I first
purchased it. The car wouldn’t start, and I heard a high
beep,beep,beep sound from the dash, which puzzled me. I had to jiggle
the shifter in park for it to start, then the beeping stopped, the “P”
indicator relight on the dash and shifter, and the car started.
To fix this embarassment, I pulled off the rubber shift surround
(carefull not to break the crhome/plastic surround), unscrewed the
shift knob, unscrewed the (4) screws on the shift indicator and pulled
it up. Then I carefully cleaned those now visible gold metal contacts
on the left of the shifter (black box), greased everthing up and put it
together. I’ve never had the problem again (Unless, the car is out of
Park! :slight_smile:
The problem could also be the solenoid inside the starter motor.
It may have gotten wet, and the solenoid may be sticking or not getting
good contact to start, this happened once to me after cleaning the
engine.
I don’t know about your brake pad problem though. But, on an Audi
I worked on, the wires to the pads had been slightly cut after I
installed new ones (they had hit the spinning brake rotor), this caused
the “Brake pad” light to turn on.
Maybe one of the wires under the dash had been crimped/cut. Also,
there are wires in the boot behind the spare wheel for the rear brake
pads. When I unplug these I can recieve a “Brake Pad low” on my Jag.
I would try jumping all 4 brake pad wires at the main harness (by the
fenders, and in the trunk) and see if the light goes away.
Hope all this talk helps,
Any questions? feel free to ask
cobac@ix.netcom.com
'89 XJ40 VDP


From: David J Shield David_J_Shield@ccm.fm.intel.com
Date: Tue, 03 Sep 96 13:34:00 PDT
Subject: De-rusto

 Jim Isbell asks about rust cures:
 > There was an area about half the size of the footwell where surface
 > rust was evident and some scale.  ............I am now going
 > to take a wire brush to the entire area then use something I found > 
 > at the auto parts store on it, says it will convert the rust into
 > primer, sounds like "snake oil" to me, but what the hell.  Has 
 > anyone had any experience with these products that turn rust to 
 >primer?
 
 I've used such stuff over the years with pretty good results.  One 
 example is the wheelbarrow, which lives outside.  About 10 years ago 
 the inside became really rusty.  I cleaned the loose rust with a wire 
 brush then gave it a couple of treatments with a 3M product.  It goes 
 on white, then turns black as it reacts with the rust.  Don't recall 
 the name, might be De-Rusto, or whatever the 3M equivalent is.  A 
 couple of coats of Red Rustoleum for good measure, and it's been fine 
 since.  The rust has only returned where the paint has been penetrated 
 (by rocks, shovels, etc.).  As for 'turning rust into primer', that 
 statement sounds a little strong, but I use it on any rusty metal and 
 it's been great.  
 
 David

From: Brian Chase btc00@eng.amdahl.com
Date: Tue, 03 Sep 1996 18:28:04 -0700
Subject: Seeking '85 XJ6 A/C renewal advice

Fellow jag lovers:

As you may recall, I’ve been restoring a series I E-type OTS for a
couple of years now (still making decent progress, though I have yet to
fire up the engine). Well, the wife recently decided she didn’t want to
drive her '90 Mazda MPV minivan around anymore… too many people
assumed that she could be the driver for group trips. When she
mentioned that, why I, being the good jag-lover that I am, immediately
suggested a series III XJ6.

Of course it didn’t take long to get her hooked, and now we own an '85
model. I figured that the cost of the XJ6 would about offset what we’d
get for the minivan (OK, so I’m a little optimistic… I prefer that
bias in general in life). And OK, the car was in the shop more that our
garage for the first 2 weeks, but now it’s pretty much ready to roll for
a while, with one exception: the A/C doesn’t work.

The shop (Jaguar Purrformance Center in Mt. View, CA) has determined
through testing that we have a couple of problems: first, the A/C
amplifier doesn’t work at all, and second, that the compressor and high
pressure hose both leak badly (needless to say, there is no longer any
freon in the system). Since they estimated close to $1500 US to fix
these problems, I thought I’d take a shot at doing at least the parts
replacement myself, then taking back to them (or another A/C shop?) to
recharge/retest. It looks like I can get all the parts (including a new
receiver/drier recommended with new compressor) thru XKs or other
suppliers for around $700 or less, so I could save a lot of $ by doing
some of this myself. Obviously, the replacement freon isn’t cheap
either, so that will eat into the savings.

What I’d likek to know is if any of you have had any experience
replacing these components, or any thoughts on the matter, before I
tackle this job. I know the compressor is a GM product - can a rebuilt
or new one be had for a lot less that $215 (XK’s price - I don’t have
any others handy)? I figure I can turn a wrench pretty well, and since
the system’s already empty, it should be ready for me to try.

TIA for any input/advice on the subject…

Regards,

Brian

  • at least there’s no A/C on my E-type to restore…

Brian Chase '66 E-type OTS (7/94 to present)
Amdahl Corp. '85 XJ6 (8/96 to present)
Sunnyvale, CA, USA btc00@eng.amdahl.com


From: DocJagry@aol.com
Date: Tue, 3 Sep 1996 21:30:25 -0400
Subject: Re:Series III XJ6 lukewarm starting problems

Bill, it sounds like you may be losing pressure in your fuel injection system
when the fuel pump is turned off. This results in easy starting when it’s
cold (the cold start injector provides a rich enough mixture) and for a short
time after the engine has been turned off (residual fuel in the injectors),
but lukewarm starts can be a humiliating series of long grinds.
I recently fixed this problem on my Series II XJ12 by replacing the
non-return valve (located near the fuel pump). You or your mechanic can
check for this problem by simply inserting a pressure gauge into the
injection system and observing the effect on the fuel pressure of turning off
the ignition. The pressure may drop slightly, then should stabilize at a
reasonable level (greater than 26 psi in my XJ12) thereafter. If it drops
like a stone, you’ve found the problem.
There are several other possible reasons for a pressure drop: an
injector may be leaking (suspect this if your oil level is rising and the
oil smells like gasoline) or a pressure regulator may be leaking. By looking
at a flow diagram of your injection system you should be able to figure out
which line to clamp to test each component.
If you’d like to tackle the job yourself I’ll be happy to help you with
any other information I can supply (based on my XJ12). I’m embarrassed to
admit how long I put up with this problem before tackling this relatively
simple diagnosis and repair.

Jon Schrock
1976 XJ12L
1965 E Type
1956 XK140


From: shanem@vnet.IBM.COM
Date: Tue, 03 Sep 96 22:41:00 EDT
Subject: Subwoofer cngo either under the front seats (eg. like what pionee

From: ** SHANE MANTOSZKO ** IBMA INVENTORY ANALYST **
*** Resending note of 09/04/96 06:02
*** SYDVM1(SHANEM) PH. (02) 354-4918 CUMBERLAND FOREST FE21
*** INTERNET - SHANEM@VNET.IBM.COM *** IBMMAIL - AUIBMSPM ****
Subject: Subwoofer cngo either under the front seats (eg. like what pionee

Subwoofer cngo either under the front seats (eg. like what pioneer does offer
or you buy a
bass-Tube-box , place it in the boot and attach it with a tube to the rear
shelf (metal cutting
required), or put the woofers directly in the rearshelf . The metal cutting
is REALLY difficult in
this area, but possible. The boot method gives deep wonderful bass.

Regards. Jeffrey Gram

I have a phillips catalogue here in front of me, and there is a great
looking bass speaker that fits inside the spare wheel. Just reverse
your wheel around, may take a bit of fiddling, and fit this speaker in.
Looks like a hell of a set up…hopefully it unplugs easily so you
can get the wheel out in a hurry. Trouble is that the sound will be
muffled by whatever cover you have over the wheel in the boot.


From: ee84287@goodnet.com (Weiss-Malik)
Date: Sun, 01 Sep 1996 19:47:46 -0700
Subject: Replacing shocks on 85 XJ-S

Hi,

On the off chance any of you out there have the inclination and the time… Could you walk me through the major steps in replacing fron and back shocks on my 85 XJ-S? I’ve never done this before and if any of you have you could make the adventure much easier !!! Thanks in advance, Rob W-M 85 XJ-S From: Michael Frank mfrank@westnet.com Date: Tue, 3 Sep 1996 23:31:53 -0400 Subject: Washington,DC area show, Jag club activity Someone was asking about club activity in the DC area. The “Nation’s Capital Concours” will be held Sept 15 in Rockville, MD at Montgomery College. Contact is Bill Moore 703-827-9509 From: Michael Frank mfrank@westnet.com Date: Tue, 3 Sep 1996 23:31:55 -0400 Subject: New England, USA area events Sept 8 Jag Club of Connecticut British Car Show Wickham Park, Manchester, CT Call 203-776-8148 Sept-20-22 British Invasion. Stowe, Vermont Sept 22 British MADDness Car show Bethlehem, CT 203-776-8148 Sept 29 Jaguar Assn. of New England Hill-Stead Museum Tour & Lunch Farmington, CT 860-928-9786 Mike Frank 1969 E-Type 2+2 From: Michael Frank mfrank@westnet.com Date: Tue, 3 Sep 1996 23:58:50 -0400 Subject: Re: Seeking '85 XJ6 A/C renewal advice Brian: I completely rebuilt the A/C on my 1969 E-type recently. I think what you are planning is very reasonable. A few pointers: 1. Since there is no Freon in the system, disassembly and reinstallation is a snap. Just lots of nuts and bolts. 2. When you get the new parts, they will be factory sealed. Keep the seals on until you are just ready to connect everything up. This will help keep moisture out of the system. As a rule of thumb, if you think it will take more than 5 minutes to complete a task, leave the part sealed. 3. Be sure the new hoses are ‘barrier’ type, if you have a choice…this is better than OEM. 4. Before you attach the fan belt, slowly turn the compressor for about a minute. This will distribute the lubricant properly. 5. Perfect opportunity to replace the fan belts. 6. Have the system recharged by a licensed technician. Be sure to use real R12, despite the cost. There are several reasons for this: the new R12 substitutes may or may not work-let someone else find out The technician can properly evacuate the system The technician will have electronic leak detection equipment which can save big $ down the road Unfortunately, a fill-up of R12 will cost you about $125, but act fast, supplies are limited, and prices are increasing. 7. I bet you can do much better on parts prices if you shop around. For example, having that old hose rebuilt would cost about $40. BTW, if one is leaking, and there is no obvious physical damage, I would bet that the others are about to go as well, so consider replacing all of them now. Try BPI 1-800-231-6563. I don’t usually deal with them, but they carry a good XJ6 line. And it may pay to try a Chevy dealer for the pump: you never know. 8. I have a detailed write up on XKE air conditioning…it may have some interest. If you would like a copy, e-mail me. Mike Frank 1969 E-Type 2+2 2At 06:28 PM 9/3/96 -0700, you wrote:
s.

What I’d likek to know is if any of you have had any experience
replacing these components, or any thoughts on the matter, before I
tackle this job. I know the compressor is a GM product - can a rebuilt
or new one be had for a lot less that $215 (XK’s price - I don’t have
any others handy)? I figure I can turn a wrench pretty well, and since
the system’s already empty, it should be ready for me to try.

TIA for any input/advice on the subject…


From: Hunt Dabney hdabney@earthlink.net
Date: Tue, 3 Sep 1996 21:48:09 -0700 (PDT)
Subject: 61 E Alternator: Part I

Well, I’ve begun. Today I took my (100 mile old) generator back to the
rebuild guy, who pronounced it slag. I’m having hime repair it anyway, so
that I have an original generator if I ever want it, but meanwhile, I am
elbow deep in the conversion process.

We poked around on his shelf of ready-rebuilt stuff, and came up with the
alternator for a '72-'79 MG miget, and early '74 MGB/GT, which is either a
36 or 43 amp Lucas 1 terminal alternator. It has a terminal for the idiot
light, and a pair for the battery, (both are B+). The mounting pattern and
offset are the same as the generator, and it will accept the generator
pulley, although I plan to order the alternator puley offered by Terry’s
Jaguar tomorrow, as it is slightly smaller diameter than the generator
pulley. (New belts, too.)

I am experimenting with mounting hardware. The middle bolt on the mounting
bracket interferes with the rear mounting ear on the alternator, unless I
remove the lock washer. I intend to look for a replacement to this bolt with
a low profile head. A 5/16 x 8" hex bolt will properly mount the alternator
to the bracket, clamping the front flange to the mounting bracket and
allowing the rear mounting ear to float, as is normal. I may use an
alternate method (which is harder to assemble but fits well), which is to
use a 5/16 x 1" bolt through the front mounting, into a split wahser, then a
5/16" x 1" threaded spacer, then insert a 5/16 x 6" bolt from the rear. This
also works, but boy, is it hard to get the parts under the alternator!

The upper (adjusting) bracket seems ok, but I will probably add a second
mounting hole about 1/2" in from the original one, so that the alternator
may be moved closer to the block. This seems necessary as the unit now
stands out just a bit more than required at minimum tension.

This alternator has very limited adjustment range installed as described.
The rear of the alternator is about 3" to 4" farther from the exhaust
mainifold than the generator. There is enough room to add a heat shield, so
I will look into that, too.

Once I deal with the mechanical issues, I’ll address the electrical. BTW, I
have already converted my car to negative ground.

Regards,
Hunt


From: “Arnold, Dave Dr.” davearno@sandton.senchem.co.za
Date: Wed, 04 Sep 96 07:59:00 PDT
Subject: 1947 Mk IV

Question 2 of many. Can anyone please tell me the correct fluid to use
when filling Girling and Armstrong shocks, the old lever-arm types? I
can’t seem to find it in the manual, and I have a mental block on what I
used to use in my 53 Morris Minor…(geriatric old fart)
Question 3 of many. What is the modern NGK equivalent of Champion L 10 S
spark plugs?
Question 4 of many. When you wire up a positive earth battery, is the
earth (ground) lead black or red, and the live negative red, or black?
Dave
80 XJ6 II
47 Mk IV


From: Martin.Fooks@internetdesign.com (Martin Fooks – Internet Design)
Date: Wed, 04 Sep 1996 09:59:53 +0200
Subject: Bass in an XJS

Dear Kirby & Jeff,

I run a 520w system in my XJs with loads of speakers hidden out of site,
with the exception of the 200w mono Sub-woofer.

I originally tried 2 Subs, with 1 under each front seat. This gave a
somewhat distorted base combined with a butt massage which meant that
females always seemed to climb out of my XJ with a smile on their face. I
did not like the sensation or the overall sound however, hence the change.

We found that it is possible to design a speaker enclosure which is under 1
foot square, that can be located where the central part of the rear seat
actually bolts the rear seat in place. The speaker can be removed from the
enclosure to allow you to bolt the box (and hence the seat) down, then
replaced to give you a strange middle rear armrest as well. My upholsterer
covered the box with the same leather he used on the rest of the car and as
a result it looks as good as it sounds.

The only mistake made on the installation of this new sub was the assumption
that a 200w sub could handle the output from a 200w Amp… Not for any
REAL length of time it can’t!

As a final note : The 2 legless adults who are designed to fit in the back
of an XJS also have to be on a diet now.

Martin


From: Martin.Fooks@internetdesign.com (Martin Fooks – Internet Design)
Date: Wed, 04 Sep 1996 10:18:26 +0200
Subject: XJS — Oops!!! (a.k.a. Chassis failure)

Hi all,

I can finally bring myself to talk about this last weekends’ events without
bursting into tears.

It all started on Saturday evening (The night before I was supposed to meet
up with Jeff Gram at the British Race Festival in Zandvoort, Holland) as my
better half and I were driving in the XJS back from a party. I had a good
evening, which included a now famous ride on a mechanical rodeo bull and was
enjoyong myself even more by letting “Infra-Red”(The XJ) off it’s leash
using my right foot, when suddenly the evenings rodeo ride started to feel
very tame indeed as the rear end of the car let go BIG-TIME.

The sudden realisation(I’m allowed to use the letter “s” as I am English)
that the rear of the car was doing it’s very own impression of a fish very
violently thrashing from one side to another led me to think that maybee all
was not well with my toy.

It’s strange how as you get out from the car and wonder how you managed not
to hit anything at a moment like this. I walked round to the rear with my
trusty torch, wondering if I would be able to see the problem. Any hope
that it was a minor fault soon went when I noticed that the right hand side
rear suspension arm (sorry, don’t know its’ techy name) had ripped itself
out of the chassis, taking about a 7 inch diameter chunk of chassis with it.
My wallet started to empty itself in my head.

The local Jaguar dealer have called in their boy specialists who have
diagnosed nearly 2500 Dutch Guilders as the estimate for the chassis
repairs…SOB! but hey!, does anyone know how to swap a trusty Chevvy
Chassis over in it’s place ? ;-}

Martin


From: robert.bradley@ey.se
Date: Wed, 4 Sep 1996 09:13:42 -0100
Subject: Re: Tire wear and shocks

Mathias-=20
My initial reply to this query from Rob W-M was as follows:
"More likely bad wheel alignment. Bad wheel alignment doesn’t alwasy make=20=
the=20
car pull to the left or right.

P.S. are you sure it’s the shocks and not just the top shocker mounts. The=
y=20
don’t seem to last long, I’ve replaced all six sets on my three cars. When=
=20
they start to go you first get a tapping noise which escalates to something=
=20
which sounds like the wheel is about to fall off every time you go over a b=
ump"

My further comment on the additional query from you is that my dealer says=20=
they=20
always do the front end alignment with the suspension “loaded” that is I=20
presume with weights in the front to simulate the normal passenger load. T=
his=20
might explain why it took three attempts for you to get it right.

Robert Bradley
87 XJS,82 XJ6,82 XJ6

mfl%kheops.cray.com @ Internet=20
03/09/96 11:42 AM
To: ee84287%goodnet.com @ Internet
cc: jag-lovers%sn.no @ Internet, mfl%kheops.cray.com @ Internet=20
Subject: Re: Tire wear and shocks

I need some advice regarding the possible association between tire wear a=
nd
bad shocks…
=20
My front shocks are gone and they need replacing. When checking the fron=
t
tires today I noticed that they are both wearing unevenly. The thread is
worn down along the inside edge of both front tires. Is the wear symptom
due to the bad shocks? Thanks for any help,

Hi Rob,

I just replaced my front shocks with Koni’s. I found that one of the
old Boge shocks would stick from time to time when I tried it by hand.

I also have tire wear on the inner edges, although more noticable on the
right hand side. I guess this is a problem with the camber adjustement.
I’ll try to get this fixed. However, on our other car this kind of adjustem=
ent
took 3 sets of front tires over the years before finally a competent garage
fixed it.
I have noticed how many camber and castor alignment shims are on each site,
so I can check if the shop actually did some work. One thing I don’t unders=
tand
is that the car is supposed to have positive camber on the front wheels
(1/2 degree). I have checked with a builders tool (don’t know how they are
called) and found that both wheels have slight negative camber. But I
think camber measurements must be done with the suspension partly compresse=
d.
However, the simple measurements I took were coherent with my tire wear
patterns.

Comments/suggestions anyone ?

Kind regards

    • Matthias

=20
Rob W-M
85 XJ-S
=20
=20
=20


From: “Alastair Lauener” a.lauener@napier.ac.uk
Date: Wed, 04 Sep 96 09:30:49 gmt
Subject: XK Engine oil filter

Lloyd, Kirby and Peter Carpenter,

Thanks, you all agree that the flow is out to in, which agrees with the filter I
bought. Just shows how wrong you can be, I thought it flowed the other way
until I started to think about it.




From: Michael Standley Michaelx@ozemail.com.au
Date: Wed, 04 Sep 1996 21:44:12 +1000
Subject: Re: Condensate drainDate: Mon, 2 Sep 1996 09:52:57

Re: Condensate leaking into car.

The drain pipes are too small on S111 XJ6s and get blocked with the
slightest bit of fluff or air bubble. I spent ages trying to find the
source of water on the floor ie. windscreen seal, scuttle vent etc.
Finally realized it was the drains, so now I carry a length of welding
wire in the boot and when I feel my foot getting wet I crawl under and
poke the wire up the two plastic pipes which emerge on either side of
the transmission tunnel works every time and generally fixes the
problem for about 6 months.

Michael Standley

S11 Soveriegn
XK 120 OTS 1950
Citroen 11BL 1951


End of jag-lovers-digest V2 #329


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jag-lovers-digest Wednesday, 4 September 1996 Volume 02 : Number 330

Re: De-rusto/POR15/Duro Extend
XJ-S wheel - unstuck
?British Car Festival?
Rust convertor
Mk IV shock absorbers
'85 XJ6 A/C renewal advice
Peculiar Series III VDP: '83 or '84?
Re: Palo Alto reminder…
Generator… Alternator migration
Re: jag-lovers-digest V2 #329
XJS – Suspension/Chassis Damage
Holiday Trip
Re: XJS – Suspension/Chassis Damage
Rust convertor
Re: Seeking '85 XJ6 A/C renewal advice
Re: Rust convertor
running hot
84 XJ6 Ongoing Overheating problem
XJ SIII Seats
Re: Generator… Alternator migration
Re: Connie’s Holiday Trip
XJ6 SIII A/C


From: “Mark McChesney” mmcchesn@ford.com
Date: Wed, 4 Sep 1996 08:19:15 -0400
Subject: Re: De-rusto/POR15/Duro Extend

On Sep 3, 1:34pm, David J Shield wrote:

Subject: De-rusto

 Jim Isbell asks about rust cures: sounds like "snake oil" to me, but

what the hell. Has

 > anyone had any experience with these products that turn rust to
 >primer?
 I've used such stuff over the years with pretty good results.

I have been using Duro Extend for a few years. What I can’t sand blast I treat
w/ the Extend. Seems to work ok as long as all the scale has been removed
first. If you do not top coat it the rust will come back. I hear that P.O.R 15
is better - and it needs no top coat, some guys have even coated the inside of
their exhaust systems with the stuff and had good results.

Mark


From: RWOODLIN@garfield.foods.indiana.edu
Date: 04 Sep 96 08:18:14 EDT
Subject: XJ-S wheel - unstuck

Many thanks to Robert Bradley, Richard Mansell, Matthias Fouguet-Lapar,
Rob Weiss-Malik, Ian Finlay, Paul Peard, and Brian Sherwood for their
helpful suggestions on how to unstick my wheels. The suggestion of
taking advantage of the differing expansion rates between steel and
aluminum (aluminium for my Brit friends :-}) proved to be the solution.
I tried everything else first but nothing would budge these wheels. A
carefull application of heat with a propane torch combined with
whacking the backside rim with a rubber mallet freed the wheels. The
amount of corrosion on the wheel and hub was extensive. As long as I
am at it I am pulling the hubs and renewing the wheel bearings. Oh,
yeah, the brakes - turns out the front pads are hardly worn! My rotors
do appear to be slightly warped. The wheels obviously have not been
off the beast in some time so I am surprised by the lack of wear. The
rear pads were fairly well history.

Kirby, I would suggest that you include removal of all wheels, cleaning
the mating surfaces and applying anti-seize compound to the hubs as
part of the maintenance to be performed on any older Jag in your
‘experience in a book’. This bit of preventive maintenance could be a
life saver if you have tire failure in the middle of nowhere.

Robert Woodling
'84 XJ-S
(Felix the Cat)


From: BSherw@aol.com
Date: Wed, 4 Sep 1996 09:22:43 -0400
Subject: ?British Car Festival?

Does anyone have any information regarding the “British Car Festival” in Des
Plaines, Illinois this weekend, at Oakton College? It is mentioned in the
SICP sales flyer, but there is no phone number-
I’d like to know more about it, before driving three hours to get there.
Thanks,-
Brian Sherwood
'85 XJ6
'84 XJ-S


From: John Elmgreen 100353.1733@CompuServe.COM
Date: 04 Sep 96 09:33:36 EDT
Subject: Rust convertor

Kirby, You can’t scrape/brush all the rust off. If you could, there wouldn’t
be anything left to “convert”. What is left turns into the crust over time. It
never worked as claimed. Regards, John Elmgreen.


From: John Elmgreen 100353.1733@CompuServe.COM
Date: 04 Sep 96 09:43:54 EDT
Subject: Mk IV shock absorbers

The workshop manual for the XK120 with lever rear shocks (Girling) says very
helpfully to use only Girling Piston Type Thin Oil. Work the lever while
adding the oil to avoid air bubbles.


From: BSherw@aol.com
Date: Wed, 4 Sep 1996 10:05:56 -0400
Subject: '85 XJ6 A/C renewal advice

Brian Chase asked about A/C repair-
Brian- I recently completed an A/C repair on my '85 XJ6: I had a local
automotive shop make a complete set of hoses; they cut the ends off the old
ones as necessary and swaged to new hoses, or put on new fitting if possible.
Cost for hoses and O-rings was about $120 US. I also replaced the expansion
valve and receiver-drier; less than $100 for the pair from SICP. The
compressor had previously checked OK for leakage and pressure, so I left it
in. I added about two tablespoons of refrigerant oil to the drier before
closing the system, had the system evacuated and charged with freon.
Everything is working great, now.
Cheers,
Brian Sherwood


From: nrichers@nexus.yorku.ca (Nikolaj Peddie-Richers)
Date: Wed, 4 Sep 96 10:35:09 EST
Subject: Peculiar Series III VDP: '83 or '84?

Dear fellow Jag-Lovers,

A few weeks ago, I introduced myself to this list as Jag-less
and looking to change.

Last night I checked out an '84 Jaguar Vanden Plas here in
Toronto and wondered what exact model year the car was: it had
the '84 and up trip computer, but the interior looked like
an early Series III: less wood, more flashy switch graphics, etc.
Production date was 7/83–is this a mongrel of two production
years? The last of the '83s sold as an '84), having already
received some of the later features? An '83-1/2?

I think somebody on this fantastic list also mentioned that
the model years at Jaguar aren’t that fixed–but I always thought
trip computer and updated interior were introduced together.
Was that a mid-run change, introduced gradually into
production?

It had the wrong speed-rated tires on it, the ‘Mars Special’
paint cracks and the hood needed to be aligned. It also had the
usual oil leak. But it had practically no rust, all original, the
engine ran beautifully and looked well-taken care of. The service
manual was with the car, but not stamped beyond the second
service (12’500km). Mileage is 96’000 kms or 60’000 miles. Asking
price: CDN$7000, certified. Is that a fair price? (An '85 with a
tad of rust, almost same mileage, and the Mars Special paint sold
for $5000 certified under my nose–$7000 seems on the high side).

I’m sorry to bother the list with my asking about the price.
But I did think the car was an interesting find…

Nikolaj

Nikolaj Peddie-Richers, North York, Canada, nrichers@nexus.yorku.ca


From: bill_clark@ccmail.rsco.com
Date: Wed, 04 Sep 96 06:43:08 PST
Subject: Re: Palo Alto reminder…

 Ryan... you're right... 50+... I counted 68 Jags there last year.
 
 Stephen.... if memory serves me correctly the gates officially open at 
 0900.  The reason for this late start is that the grass is watered 
 overnight and needs to dry out before being driven on...

From: bill_clark@ccmail.rsco.com
Date: Wed, 04 Sep 96 06:45:54 PST
Subject: Generator… Alternator migration

 One post mentioned doing something to the regulator... what exactly 
 was this ?  
 
 Catch me on the side if you like.
 
    Thanks.

From: “Thos. Carney” carney@vcn.bc.ca
Date: Wed, 4 Sep 1996 08:07:11 -0700 (PDT)
Subject: Re: jag-lovers-digest V2 #329

Re Dave Arnold’s Mark IV:

Dave: The manual for my Mark V states Newton Hydraulic Shocks (on the
vehicle’s front end–what my wife refers to as the “pointee end”) should
be filled with S.A.E. 10 Engine Oil.
Cheers…


From: Martin.Fooks@internetdesign.com (Martin Fooks – Internet Design)
Date: Wed, 04 Sep 1996 17:10:02 +0200
Subject: XJS – Suspension/Chassis Damage

Hi again All,

It looks like Lady Luck may be smiling in my direction after all. I have
just had a telephone call from the Jaguar Garage, who have informed me that
the “RAC” (Royal Automobile Club, which is an English version of the AAA)
are going to pick up the whole bill… all 2,500 DFL of it!!! That is
on top of the free car I have from them all this week.

It won’t surprise me if they refuse my membership next year, but with the
amount of money they have spent on me during my 3 (2 Transmissions and 1
Chassis) breakdowns this year I wouldn’t blame them.

Long live Jaguar… Long live the RAC… Cancel that Chevvy Chassis
conversion!!!

Martin “Tested To Destruction” Fooks


From: “Connie Vloutely” connie_vloutely@macmail.git.gulfaero.com
Date: 4 Sep 1996 10:04:49 -0500
Subject: Holiday Trip

Hi Jaglovers,

Just want to report on my trip from Savannah, Ga to Mattituck, NY.

I am happy to report that my 1990 XJ-S, with 27,000 original miles on,
transported me without a problem.

Total distance traveled was 2600 miles in a period of 14 days.

Fuel consumption was 17.1 mpg. All highway driving using cruise control.
I used 94 octane in my car. Average speed as 65 miles per hour. Max speed
was 80 mile per hour. I didn’t want to get any more speeding tickets.

Car used a half a quart of engine oil. I think this is due to small oil leak
at the engine/oil cooler hose interface.

I had the airconding system serviced before I left. It was low on freon.
I had it recharged with two pounds of R12. The R12 cost $25.00 USD.
Airconding system work very well. It was set it and forget. I did notice
that when my wife was driving the passenger’s side was cooler then the
drivers side of the car.

I must say this was the most comfortable trip I have taken since the time I
owned my 1964 Buick Riviera. I drove eight hours a day on this trip without
any physcial strain. The engine has plenty of power, engine and road noise
is very low too.

The front seats are comfortable with plenty of leg room. Trunk area had
plenty of room for our luggage too.

Now I know why I want to own a Jaguar!!!

Connie.


From: Thomas Alberts talberts@aero.odu.edu
Date: Wed, 4 Sep 1996 12:49:36 -0400 (EDT)
Subject: Re: XJS – Suspension/Chassis Damage

  • ----- Begin Included Message -----

From jag-lovers-owner@sn.no Wed Sep 4 12:31:11 1996

Martin.
Please send me application forms for RAC.
Thomas

It looks like Lady Luck may be smiling in my direction after all. I have
just had a telephone call from the Jaguar Garage, who have informed me that
the “RAC” (Royal Automobile Club, which is an English version of the AAA)
are going to pick up the whole bill… all 2,500 DFL of it!!! That is
on top of the free car I have from them all this week.


From: John Elmgreen 100353.1733%CompuServe.COM@vm1.cc.nps.navy.mil
Date: 04 Sep 96 09:33:36 EDT
Subject: Rust convertor

John says;

<Kirby, You can’t scrape/brush all the rust off. If you could, there wouldn’t
<be anything left to “convert”. What is left turns into the crust over time. I
<never worked as claimed. Regards, John Elmgreen.

You can scrape/brush/chip off all loose rust, leaving only the thin layer
on the surface of the metal. This rust will continue to dissolve the metal if l
eft untreeted, or even painted over. The rust converter or rust eater stuff
will keep the rust from dissolving the metal, and it helps to primer/paint
over it. I’ve had no rust problems on a trunk floor I treeted about 5 years
ago with this method.
LLoyd


From: rpeng@cadev6.intel.com
Date: Wed, 4 Sep 96 9:45:33 PDT
Subject: Re: Seeking '85 XJ6 A/C renewal advice

Brian:

I agree with Mike Frank. Try some other parts sources. XK’s Unlimited
tends to be more expensive.

Either BPI or Special Interest Car Parts have good prices.
BPI: 1-800-231-6563
Special Interest Car Parts: 1-800-556-7496

I usually use the latter, because they can ship stuff to me in 2 days
at no additional shipping cost (though there’s a weight limit).

I must admit though, ever since I sold my series II and got my XJ40,
I haven’t had to order any parts!

P.S. Ask for their excellent parts catalogues (free).



Roger Peng (408)765-7863
Intel Corporation
Design Technology, Physical CAD



From: “Mark McChesney” mmcchesn@ford.com
Date: Wed, 4 Sep 1996 13:13:38 -0400
Subject: Re: Rust convertor

On Sep 4, 9:33am, John Elmgreen wrote:

Subject: Rust converter
Kirby, You can’t scrape/brush all the rust off. If you could, there
wouldn’t
be anything left to “convert”. What is left turns into the crust over time.
It never worked as claimed.

Seems to work for me, I have a sandblaster so I have a good comparison between
a blasted/prepped part and a “converted” part. In 1989 I did a little
experiment, I sandblasted 1/2 of my convertible top frame (much surface rust)
and metal prepped and primed it, the other half I wirebrushed and used Duro
Extend, and primed as on the first side. I never found the right paint for the
part so it has sat in the damp basement for 7 years in just grey primer. The
blasted side is now actually showing rust through the primer. The converted
side is still clean. I do not think it is wise to leaving anything in primer,
yet the converter seems to have worked anyway. I can’t vouch for it in all
conditions, I did one of the wheel wells on the Etype with converter (a place
that I couldn’t get to with the sandblaster) and I can’t say I trust it 100%. A
blasted/primed/and PAINTED part is still probably the safest way to go, but I
think the converters are probably ok for areas that are hard to sandblast.
I can take photos of the top frame if anyone is really that interested. Also,
I have heard that POR 15 is better than a converter.

Mark McChesney


From: BD1Y0CA@NJMKTNG.BELL-ATL.COM
Date: Tue, 3 Sep 1996 17:17:19 -0400
Subject: running hot

      {     - Engine heat runs about mid way between 90C and 130C
      after an
      {     8-10 minute run on city streets + a mile or so at
      80kph. The temperature
      {     seemed normal (90C) after 5 minutes of idling before
      the road-test.

      I had a similar problem that was caused by a partially open
      thermostat,so that at speed the flow was too little to cool
      effectively. It would warm up normally since it did close,
      just never opened all the way.
      My gauge is usually on 90 or a little over(needle on 0 of
      the 90 on a hot day).
      Alex Lynch
      83 XJ6
      62 TR-3

From: Chris Howard christopher@netmanage.com
Date: Wed, 4 Sep 96 11:32:58 GST
Subject: 84 XJ6 Ongoing Overheating problem

After three weeks in the shop and both the thermostat and radiator
being replaced/rodded, my 1984 xj6 VDP is running hotter and overheating.

The mechanic checked the fan clutch and thinks its ok, he thinks the
water pump may be the culprit at this point, since there is adequate
air flow through he radiator. I really miss my car and am getting a
bit nervous about this situation since I took the car to a place
I wouldn’t normally go to because of a roommates recommendation.

Im not sure if my email is getting to everyone and I haven’t got
messages in two weeks, so if you could email me directly via
christopher@netmanage.com or my laptop address choward@ricochet.net
I would be very greatful, I am really really concerned about my
car right now.


Christopher Howard
E-mail: christopher@netmanage.com
9/4/96 11:32:58 AM

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From: “mark (m.d.) roberts” markdr@nortel.ca
Date: Wed, 4 Sep 1996 13:30:00 -0400
Subject: XJ SIII Seats

Thanks for the replies for my query on the XJ Series III seat styles.
With a bit of a prod from Gregory Andrachuk, and a little reading
last night…looking for info on another topic…I think I have
the answer.

The 1986 Canadian V-12 VDP had/has the correct Vanden Plas seats.
ie. they are the individual bucket seats for the front, and the
look-alike bucket seats in the rear. These were the seats used
for all the top-end models, so they are found in the US XJ6 VDP,
the Canadian XJ12 VDP, the Daimler Double Six VDP, then just the
Daimler Double Six when the VDP was dropped, and I imagine in the
VDP’s found in the rest of the world…my info is mainly North
American based.

The next step down was the Sovereign, and it had the fluted front
and rear seats. This is found in the US XJ6, and the Canadian
XJ6 and XJ6 Sovereign. My confusion was that we have an 1988
XJ12 VDP, hence it should have the VDP seats, but Gregory points
out that after the the XJ6 Series III cars were dropped, in favour
of the XJ40, the VDP seats were also dropped for some reason, hence
the Canadian XJ12 VDP from late '87 to '92 got the Sovereign fluted
seats…what we have. Mystery solved. I hadn’t picked up on this
before, because my wife, Catherine, and I were actually looking
for a very nice Sovereign to purchase when we saw and bought the
VDP. I now think it was the better purchase !

Alan A., would it be at all possible for you to find out why the
VDP seats were discontinued in 1987 ? Thanks.

Regards, Mark Roberts Phone: (613) 763-2924
Ottawa, Ontario, CANADA Fax: (613) 763-3970
1988 VDP - SIII V12 email: markdr@nortel.ca
1963 3.8L E-Type Coupe - 15 years into a 3 year project


From: charles daly cdaly@passport.ca
Date: Wed, 04 Sep 1996 16:48:23 +0100
Subject: Re: Generator… Alternator migration

At 06:45 AM 04/09/96 PST, Bill Clark wrote:

One post mentioned doing something to the regulator... what exactly 
was this ?  

One thing I love to do to a Lucas regulator is to fix it
with a hammer. In fact, Home Depot has this reallllly big
50 lb. sledge that I have my eye on…
;>)

Charles Daly, Toronto, Canada
'62 E-Type, ots


From: charles daly cdaly@passport.ca
Date: Wed, 04 Sep 1996 16:51:25 +0100
Subject: Re: Connie’s Holiday Trip

Total distance traveled was 2600 miles…
Car used a half a quart of engine oil.

Connie,
With respect, I think you don’t really know
the joys of jag ownership! I use more oil
than that while watching TV!

Glad you had fun!
:slight_smile:

Charles Daly, Toronto, Canada
'62 E-Type, ots


From: David J Shield David_J_Shield@ccm.fm.intel.com
Date: Wed, 04 Sep 96 14:06:00 PDT
Subject: XJ6 SIII A/C

 Brian,
 
 If the '85 XJ6 A/C is the same as the '84, then I just undertook much 
 of what you are about to.  If it isn't, skip this.
 
 My '84 XJ6 VDP blew the A/C compressor last winter, after about a year 
 of noisy operation. I finally decided to do something about it last 
 month.  I called around and found a shop here in Sacramento called AIR 
 (916.923.1234).  Probably there's a similar shop in Mt. View.  They 
 sold me a GM A-6 rebuilt for $85, including clutch.  The 
 receiver/dryer was inexpensive - ~$30 or so.  New seals were pennies.  
 They can do hoses by taking your old hoses and building new ones with 
 the old ends (or new ends to match the old ones, I didn't ask).  They 
 can make R134 hoses if you want, but you'd better get new R134 seals 
 all around.  I didn't bother since the hoses had been replaced about 3 
 years ago and they look like they'll last.
 
 The GM A-6 is almost a direct replacement - the threads on the 
 mounting holes are different, so you either need to retap the mounting 
 holes to match the old bolts, or get new bolts.  I did the former 
 since it was late at night and I didn't want to wait till the next day 
 and then start hunting for the right bolts.  The thermal fuse was shot 
 - a few bucks at the local auto parts house.  The big difference is in 
 an electrical connector at the back end (over or under pressure 
 switch, I guess).  The old Jag compressor has a post connector, the 
 new one has no post - just a flat connection - but there is enough 
 tension in the old connector body to make a good electrical 
 connection.  You can *probably* just buy a new wiring harness at the 
 parts store - it looks like a standard deal that is for some reason 
 different on a Jag.
 
 Welsh Jaguars in Ohio sells used (they say rebuilt) A/C amplifiers.
 
 If you're doing all this other stuff, you might as well replace the 
 expansion valve as well.  It's not expensive and it is easy to get at 
 -  mounted externally on the firewall. (Maybe you can just inspect it 
 - I don't know.)
 
 The local 76 Union recharged it for $140.  Total outlay was less than 
 $300 and about 3 hours of my time, plus another hour to scrub my 
 fingernails clean.  Next time I'd give that end of the engine a good 
 bath, first.  I thought I did pretty well on this deal.
 
 It's been incredibly hot here in Sacramento, and the A/C now works 
 great.
 
 I face the same task on the '70 E 2+2, but the hoses need replaced 
 too.  At least with the bonnet open it's all easy to get to.
 
 Regards,
 
 David

End of jag-lovers-digest V2 #330


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jag-lovers-digest Thursday, 5 September 1996 Volume 02 : Number 332

Where to locate fan relay?
RE: New Owner Finally
RE: Cup holder for 85 XJ6?
92 XJ40 Mud Flaps
Re: xjc question
Re: 92 XJ40 Mud Flaps
Security problem
Re: horn fault
Re: Rust convertor
Re: XK Engine Oil Filter
Re: Security problem
Re: 92 XJ40 Mud Flaps
Re: XJS – Suspension/Chassis Damage
Re: XJ-S wheel - unstuck
Brass vs Stainless–Brake Cylinder sleeve
Re: XJS AC controls
XJS Nose Paint Protection
Naming Conventions
Re: XJS AC controls


From: “Quang Ngo” quang@psnw.com
Date: Wed, 4 Sep 1996 21:11:29 -0700
Subject: Where to locate fan relay?

Hello everyone,

Summer is still around, and the AC in my 89 JX40 stops working. Some day
if I’m luckly it works, and the rest of the week I’m sweat. Where is the
relay for the AC fan located?

Thanks a million,

/*--------------------------------------------------------------------------

  • Quang Ngo
  • quang@valleynet.com
  • 89-XJ6 89-300E P90 A3000/25 A1000 SNES PSX C C++ UNIX NT WIN95
    ------------------------------------------------------------------------/

From: Lou Sabovic lsabovic@execpc.com
Date: Wed, 04 Sep 96 23:20:11 -0500
Subject: RE: New Owner Finally

Steve,
Thanks for the information. I spent Wednesday at a Jaguar dealer in Chicago. The parts personnel were helpful but not that knowledgeable. They handed me the latest brochure showing both the options you describe but …They advised me that the side mount is not available for any car prior to 1994. That was the year Jaguar provided a “connection” just below the ashtray on the center console, for connection, to Motorola cell phones. Does anyone know if this is indeed so ?
Thanks
Lou
averill@earthlink.net (Steve Averill)
RE: New Owner Finally

Averill replies…
Jaguar also markets a sidemount phone holder & it’s in the accessory
brochure along with the storage compartment lid version. The special phone
compartment lid is OK, but I’d rather get the cupholder storage lid, as on
the new X300 cars. You can’t have both, but you CAN get the cupholder lid
combined with the Jaguar sidemount so that you can spill coffee onto the
phone!


From: Lou Sabovic lsabovic@execpc.com
Date: Wed, 04 Sep 96 23:44:18 -0500
Subject: RE: Cup holder for 85 XJ6?

As a follow-up to my search for an aftermarket cup holder. I was finally able to see an installed cupholder sold by catalog by Automotion, 1-800-777-8881. In their catalog which is directed at the Porsche market, on page 30 they show a cup holder. This device bolts/screws to the door and also uses adhesives. The product is covered in leather (9 colors shown) and folds on itself when not in use. It holds containers from 2 3/8 inches to 3 1/2 inches. The product number is CH-9000 at $44.98. The installed product when not in use and folded looks like a leather covered rectangle case on the door panel. The one I saw was installed into the wood trim just below the window. Hope this helps. I don’t know if I am going to be ordering this one just yet I am still on the hunt. I really don’t want to have to drill into the door panel just yet.
Lou


From: SCleme519@aol.com
Sent: Monday, September 02, 1996 11:44 PM
To: jag-lovers@sn.no
Subject: Cup holder for 85 XJ6?

I checked out the “cup holder” web site at http://www2.spav.com/wilton/husco/
, but it appears that they don’t make a model for Jags. Has anyone fitted a
decent cup holder to a series 3 XJ6?

Steve


From: Lou Sabovic lsabovic@execpc.com
Date: Wed, 04 Sep 96 23:49:29 -0500
Subject: 92 XJ40 Mud Flaps

Hi,
After my last trip I notices that the slipstream design of the Jaguar really sprays back onto the rear quarter panels and also on the front doors. I found that Jaguar sells mud flaps made for the car. I was wondering if anyone had any experience with these ? Also how well do they do in winters slush and snow ?
Thanks
Lou


From: Jan Wikstroem Jan_Wikstroem@acp.com.au
Date: 5 Sep 96 18:11:59
Subject: Re: xjc question

For a final clearing-up of this question, the passenger space in the XJC is
EXACTLY the same as in a short-wheelbase four-door XJ, as it’s built on the
same floor pan and has the same rear seat, roof profile and rear window (just
wider C pillars).

Yes, rear seat access is fairly cumbrous in the C, but so what? I ride in the
front seat, and the front seat access is wonderful with those wide doors…

    • Jan

From: Jan Wikstroem Jan_Wikstroem@acp.com.au
Date: 5 Sep 96 18:41:23
Subject: Re: 92 XJ40 Mud Flaps

I find mud flaps essential to protect the paintwork on gravel roads and they
work well if you have standard-size tyres. If you have extra-wide tyres the
protection is impaired.

One problem with standard Jaguar mud flaps (at least S2) is that they’re held
by four small screws and a thin strip of sheet steel and rip off easily, as
when you back up against a curb. I lost one of mine to a car-chasing dog…

er… slush and snow? What they?

    • Jan
      Sydney, Australia
      formerly of Stockholm, Sweden…

XJ12L
XJ12C


From: Jan Wikstroem Jan_Wikstroem@acp.com.au
Date: 5 Sep 96 18:05:14
Subject: Security problem

A couple of days before going on holidays a bit over two weeks ago (Hi
everybody, I’m back…), I stopped getting jag-lovers mail. When I got back, I
sent a message to the majordomo program and started unravelling what had
happened.

Did you know that anybody - list member or not - can find out from Majordomo

  1. what lists are present on that server and
  2. the e-mail addresses of all members of those lists?

Having got that listing, the same anybody can then remove anybody at all from
any list by sending an e-mail containing UNSUBSCRIBE [address].

That may have been what happened to me, because my e-mail address was not on
the list Majordomo presented me with.

It is also possible that what happened is that the server had a system crash
and somebody restored it from an old backup copy from before I joined.

It was easy enough to restore myself to the list; I only had to send an e-mail
to Majordomo reading SUBSCRIBE. However, I’m a little bothered by the discovery
that it’s so easy for an outsider to peep into and tamper with the list. I’d
very much like to see the Majordomo authors introduce a modification that lets
anyone operate on his/her own name but password-protects other access to
restrict it to the list operator.

    • Jan

From: Jan Wikstroem Jan_Wikstroem@acp.com.au
Date: 5 Sep 96 18:26:58
Subject: Re: horn fault

Jim Isbell

2)The car is too quiet. I cant tell when the engine is running and have
twice tried to start an already running engine.

From (I think) about 1978, the S2 XJ got an improved steering/ignition lock. It
has to be turned back to ACC if you want to crank the engine again, precisely
to prevent trying to start a running engine. The improvement to the steering
lock is that it won’t latch until you pull the key out, keeping safe those
economy-minded citizens who switch off the ignition while coasting downhill.
This was the pattern of lock I got recently when I bought a new one (WASO
brand).

Incidentally, pulling the key out also operates the switch that controls seat
belt warning etc. As my car doesn’t have those, I’ve used it to operate a
“headlights on” warning buzzer.

  • -Jan

From: Jan Wikstroem Jan_Wikstroem@acp.com.au
Date: 5 Sep 96 17:47:03
Subject: Re: Rust convertor

John Elmgreen :

What is left turns into the crust over time. It never worked as claimed

All rust converter products I have seen are based on phosphoric acid in a
dilute solution, sometimes with a water-based lacquer added to form a skin. The
phosphoric acid converts various iron oxides to iron
phosphate, which is a good anti-corrosion coating.

I use plain 10-20% phosphoric acid myself; it’s cheaper. It may need two or
three applications; it foams visibly if there is anything left for it to react
with. Rinse residual acid off with water and rinse your brushes after…

What may have created your impression that these products don’t work, John, is
that any scale, loose rust, oil and grease interfere badly with the process.
Actually, it works best on bare metal, so the more rust you can remove, the
better. If you suspect any grease or oil contamination, wash liberally with
acetone first (don’t inhale and DON’T SMOKE!).

The phosphate coating is not mechanically strong and needs a paint coating for
protection. Something I’ve found great on the floor and similar situations is a
foaming spray-on under-chassis compound. When it’s tacky, you put a sheet of
heavy kraft paper on it to stop the carpets sticking (paint the kraft to
protect it from water). This makes perfect rust protection and provides extra
sound deadening.

    • Jan

From: ifinlay@vossnet.co.uk (Ian Finlay)
Date: Thu, 5 Sep 1996 09:10:33 +0100
Subject: Re: XK Engine Oil Filter

I had a look in my MKII shop manual last night, and it certainly looks like

outside -> inside is the way. The return pipe comes off the centre tube and

goes to the sump.

Ian

On Sep 03, 1996 13:53:02, ‘“Kirbert” palmk@gcn.scri.fsu.edu’ wrote:

On an XK Engine oil filter, can anybody say wether the oil flow through the filter is from outside to inside, or the other way? I really can’t recall the layout of all the oilways, and in particular the oil filter housing so that I can decide, and I don’t want to remove it for such a small piece of knowledge Does no-one really know the answer to this? I only know the answer in the GENERAL case, not in the specific case of the XK – hence I didn’t answer the first time. However, I have never seen an oil filter, or any other filter for that matter, that didn’t flow from the outside in. There are two reasons for this: 1) more dirt can accumulate on the outside before plugging the filter than on the inside. 2) The filter element can withstand more pressure differential without tearing. Kirbert | If anything is to be accomplished, | some rules must be broken. | - Palm’s Postulate From: Nick Johannessen nick@sn.no Date: Thu, 05 Sep 1996 10:21:33 +0200 Subject: Re: Security problem At 06:05 PM 9/5/96, Jan the Man wrote:
A couple of days before going on holidays a bit over two weeks ago (Hi
everybody, I’m back…), I stopped getting jag-lovers mail. When I got back, I
sent a message to the majordomo program and started unravelling what had
happened.

Did you know that anybody - list member or not - can find out from Majordomo

  1. what lists are present on that server and
  2. the e-mail addresses of all members of those lists?

Having got that listing, the same anybody can then remove anybody at all from
any list by sending an e-mail containing UNSUBSCRIBE [address].

This is not so. Any request to unsubscribe where the sender is
not the same as the name that is requested unsubscribed is
forwarded to the admin (me) for approval. I then have to manually
unsubscribe the person. And yes, I do get a few of these. Every day.

It is also possible that what happened is that the server had a system crash
and somebody restored it from an old backup copy from before I joined.

This is very likely what happened. When I noticed the error I
re-subscribed everyone that was on the week-old list I had at
home.

It was easy enough to restore myself to the list; I only had to send an e-mail
to Majordomo reading SUBSCRIBE. However, I’m a little bothered by the
discovery
that it’s so easy for an outsider to peep into and tamper with the list. I’d
very much like to see the Majordomo authors introduce a modification that lets
anyone operate on his/her own name but password-protects other access to
restrict it to the list operator.

Something along these lines has been mentioned on the British-car
list recently. There was talk of removing the “who” function that
potentially allows junk-emailers to collect email-addresses from
list-servers. I am following the development there and will
consider doing the same. Apart from getting the “who” list there
really isn’t much an outsider can do, unless they have somehow
found the admin-password.

Nick


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From: mfl@kheops.cray.com (Matthias FOUQUET-LAPAR)
Date: Thu, 5 Sep 1996 13:12:01 +0200 (MET DST)
Subject: Re: 92 XJ40 Mud Flaps

After my last trip I notices that the slipstream design of the Jaguar really
sprays back onto the rear quarter panels and also on the front doors. I found
that Jaguar sells mud flaps made for the car. I was wondering if anyone had
any experience with these ? Also how well do they do in winters slush and
snow ?

I bought a set (front and rear) for my '88 XJ-S. (at one of the big dealers
advertizing in the JEC magazine). The rear once are ok with even a “Jaguar”
signature on them.

The front ones did not work on my XJ-S (which has 235’s tires). This was
also on the package notice. Since shipping it back would be about the
same amount as the flaps, I tried to cut them off a bit to fit with the
wider tires, but it was too close.

Of course their advertisement did only say “XJ-S flaps” …

    • Matthias

From: mfl@kheops.cray.com (Matthias FOUQUET-LAPAR)
Date: Thu, 5 Sep 1996 13:14:30 +0200 (MET DST)
Subject: Re: XJS – Suspension/Chassis Damage

It looks like Lady Luck may be smiling in my direction after all. I have
just had a telephone call from the Jaguar Garage, who have informed me that
the “RAC” (Royal Automobile Club, which is an English version of the AAA)
are going to pick up the whole bill… all 2,500 DFL of it!!! That is
on top of the free car I have from them all this week.

I heard that a proper repair of this area is starting at > 500 pounds.

Lucky you, with your insurance !

    • Matthias

From: mfl@kheops.cray.com (Matthias FOUQUET-LAPAR)
Date: Thu, 5 Sep 1996 13:17:12 +0200 (MET DST)
Subject: Re: XJ-S wheel - unstuck

Kirby, I would suggest that you include removal of all wheels, cleaning
the mating surfaces and applying anti-seize compound to the hubs as
part of the maintenance to be performed on any older Jag in your
‘experience in a book’. This bit of preventive maintenance could be a
life saver if you have tire failure in the middle of nowhere.

When I had this problem on our XJ-S a while ago, I went off and bought
one of those cans which you blow into the tire and which “fix” small holes
for a while. I’ve never tried it, but maybe something usefull to have in
the trunk anyhow

    • Matthias

From: “Felts, Thomas L.” Thomas.Felts@alcoa.com
Date: Thu, 5 Sep 1996 07:57:01 -0400
Subject: Brass vs Stainless–Brake Cylinder sleeve

Someone questioned the use of brass in brake cylinders. I had mine done
in brass-----------3 of the four wheels had to be redone because the
brass sleeve slipped allowing fluid to leak past them. Suggest
stainless. I’m using Dot 5 fluid.
Tom


From: “Claus, Mike” claus@wg.com
Date: Thu, 05 Sep 96 07:59:14 EST
Subject: Re: XJS AC controls

    David -
    
    My experience is that the slider does not change the air flow, 
    but rather the temperature of the air that is flowing through 
    the upper vents.  In my car, the effect is not very 
    pronounced, but it may have a greater impact upon the warm air 
    in the winter - I haven't had the car long enough to test that 
    yet.
    
    - mclaus 
    
    '93 XJ-S Convertible 

______________________________ Reply Separator _________________________________
Subject: XJS AC controls
Author: David Engelbach widi@artnet.net at WG-RAL-SMTP
Date: 9/4/96 7:45 PM

I’ve now had my '96 XJS convertible a little over a month now, and I’m
still puzzled about the operation of the slide control for the A/C. The
handbook suggests that sliding it to the right (Blue) increases air to
the upper vents while sliding it to the left (red) increases air to the
footwells. Well, I’ve tried it and it doesn’t seem to make any
difference. Am I missing something?
Any experience with this would be appreciated. Thanks.

David - 96 XJS conv. The last of the breed.


David C. Engelbach E-mail - widi@artnet.net
Valley Village, CA 91601 Voice - 818.506.5441
USA Fax - 818.506.1011



From: “Claus, Mike” claus@wg.com
Date: Thu, 05 Sep 96 08:22:09 EST
Subject: XJS Nose Paint Protection

    Lately it seems to me that every time I take my beautiful new 
    car out for a ride it comes home with a new ding or chip in 
    the paint on her pretty nose.  The idea of spending a day or 
    two working with touch-up paint after every drive gets old 
    quickly.  
    
    So now I am considering an alternative.  This is going to 
    start a fight but .......
    
    Does anybody know if there is a bra which can be fit on the 
    car?
    
    Gasp!  Groan!  Please don't flame me.  I know it will not look 
    so great, but honestly, my car looks like it has dandruff in 
    front - I must have two or three dozen little white specs - it 
    doesn't look so great either.
    
    Of course, if anybody has another good suggestion, please let 
    me hear.
    
    - mclaus
    
    
    ' 93 XJ-S

From: “Claus, Mike” claus@wg.com
Date: Thu, 05 Sep 96 08:34:48 EST
Subject: Naming Conventions

    I want to thank everybody who replied to last weeks query 
    about how and why they name their cars.  I got a huge flood of 
    responses, more than I can thank individually.  Let it be said 
    that this is a topic about which there is a great deal of 
    passion among some of the list members!
    
    For me, I have decided not to name my car for right now - 
    perhaps I have not had it long enough for its personality to 
    show clearly to me.  I haven't been able to definitively sex 
    it yet - mostly it feels male to me, but other times decidedly 
    female.  We considered 'Damion' for the male side and 'Linda' 
    (after Linda Blair) for the female, since there is a good 
    chance the car is possessed by the Devil him/her self - but 
    that doesn't feel right either when the car is behaving 
    itself.
    
    Thanks again for all your input.  That's what makes this list 
    so great!
    
    - mclaus
    
    '93 XJ-S (nameless for the time being)

From: Robert Bradley Robert.Bradley@bh.eyi.com
Date: Thu, 5 Sep 1996 08:18:42 -0500
Subject: Re: XJS AC controls

The 87 XJS and XJ series III have a similar control, red on side blue the
other. The control is just below the radio and it changes the tempreture of
the air issued from the vents. It think it works on a tempreture sensor in the
air box. THIS IS DIFFERENT TO THE IN CAR THERMOSTATE which gets its readings
from the small vent above the glove box. So if for instance the car is still a
bit warm inside but the AC vent is freezing your fingers on the wheel then you
move the slide/lever towards red and the thermostate will still try to cool the
car but the actual air coming from the vent will be less chilled. Did that
make sense? Hope its the same on the 96.

Robert Bradley

widi%artnet.net @ Internet
05/09/96 07:12 AM
To: jag-lovers%sn.no @ Internet
cc:
Subject: XJS AC controls

I’ve now had my '96 XJS convertible a little over a month now, and I’m
still puzzled about the operation of the slide control for the A/C. The
handbook suggests that sliding it to the right (Blue) increases air to
the upper vents while sliding it to the left (red) increases air to the
footwells. Well, I’ve tried it and it doesn’t seem to make any
difference. Am I missing something?
Any experience with this would be appreciated. Thanks.

David - 96 XJS conv. The last of the breed.


David C. Engelbach E-mail - widi@artnet.net
Valley Village, CA 91601 Voice - 818.506.5441
USA Fax - 818.506.1011



End of jag-lovers-digest V2 #332


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jag-lovers-digest Thursday, 5 September 1996 Volume 02 : Number 333

MkII front end rebuild…
Vanity Plates Responses
Re: Mud flaps
Re: Passenger space in XJC
Steamboat Race Weekend
SIII XJ6 thingie on the fuel rail
Re: XJS AC controls
Re: Seeking '85 XJ6 A/C renewal advice
Re: A/C Controls
XJS Nose Paint Protection
RE:Brass vs Stainless–Brake Cylinder sleeve
Re: XJS wiring help needed
Re: Jaguar XJS Classic Rouge
Re: 96 XJS conv.
Re[2]: 96 XJS conv.
Re: XJS wiring help needed
[Pure BS] Re: XJS – Suspension/Chassis Damage
Re: XJS — Oops!!! (a.k.a. Chassis failure)


From: bill_clark@ccmail.rsco.com
Date: Thu, 05 Sep 96 07:21:20 PST
Subject: MkII front end rebuild…

 It's that time, need to replace all the bushes etc.
 
 Curious as to whether in the long run it is better to use stock rubber 
 ones or go for 'thane if they are available.
 
 Any thoughts appreciated.
 
 
 P.S. The general opinion seems to concur that XK's Unlimited are a 
 little more expensive and IMHO their service has dropped off, but 
 early next month they have an open house with a great barbeque and 20% 
 off all purchases - getting my wish list ready.

From: “Scott W. Phillips” phillips@mn.uswest.net
Date: Thu, 5 Sep 1996 09:38:47 -0500
Subject: Vanity Plates Responses

Mike C. put me to shame. I too received many, many responses to my query
regarding vanity plates on my '88 XJ40. THANKS TO ALL WHO RESPONDED. There
were many great ideas.

I too have decided to go with the one recommendation that stated the best
way to go is to just accept whatever the MOT gives you over the counter.

So for at least until I change my mind,

Scott Phillips
'88 XJ40 — Nameless and plated as 624 MLT
Minnetonka,mn,usa


From: Baard Th Hesvik baard@telesoft.no
Date: Thu, 5 Sep 1996 16:11:10 -0700
Subject: Re: Mud flaps

From the horses mouth; Norway, the land of slush & snow.

Yes Lou, Jaguar do sell mud flaps. Mine is a Series I XJ (as if you didn’t know
by now), but I suspect the concept to be the same for your XJ40. Without them we
would have a serious problem. Not only do we have slush and snow, we also have
all other sorts of dirt, grit, sand, pebbles and you name it. No problems at
all!

After I had the painted, I scrapped the rear mud flaps and fitted new ones. In
front the braces were badly rusted som I had a couple made but havn’t quite
finished them yet. I also had the small lids in which the flaps are fastened
made new, and havn’t got around to make the small square holes in them.

Inspecting the areas behind the road wheels, you will probably find the
mentioned square holes. Into these holes you prise the nylon plugs that come
with the mud flaps and fit the flaps. You may have to space out the flaps with
some washers between the flap and the panel. I don’t know why, but I had to.

Good luck.
Bard


______ _ ! Baard Th Hesvik, Telesoft AS
/ _ / _ _ _ / / ! Longhammarvn 7, N-5500 Haugesund
/ // / // /_ / / -/- -/- ! T: +47 52735000 F: +47 52717040
/ /_ / /_ / // / /_ ! E-mail: baard@telesoft.no


From: Baard Th Hesvik baard@telesoft.no
Date: Thu, 5 Sep 1996 16:18:48 -0700
Subject: Re: Passenger space in XJC

Correction to Jan;

The passenger space in an XJC is exactly the same as in the four door saloon
provided it is a Short Wheel Base four door saloon.

Also, I dare say that if your mud flaps are fastened by four screws only, they
weren’t factory fitted. When cornering heavily loaded I often scratch my flaps
in the road and, although it sounds rather nasty, they havn’t come loose yet.

Cheers,
Bard


______ _ ! Baard Th Hesvik, Telesoft AS
/ _ / _ _ _ / / ! Longhammarvn 7, N-5500 Haugesund
/ // / // /_ / / -/- -/- ! T: +47 52735000 F: +47 52717040
/ /_ / /_ / // / /_ ! E-mail: baard@telesoft.no


From: Dave Oxenreider daveox@av-imagineering.com
Date: Thu, 05 Sep 1996 11:30:11 -0700
Subject: Steamboat Race Weekend

I just wanted to echo what I think all of this list’s thoughts are
regarding Lawrence Buja’s wonderful article on the race weekend in
Steamboat Springs, Colorado.

Rarely do I get the opportunity to live vicariously the life of the
weekend Vintage British Sports Car racer. It has always been my lifelong
dream to experience the joys of what Lawrence wrote of, but the realties
of earning a living and paying existing bills keep it out of reach for
now. Since I am a young 28 I know I have time to organize my life so
that soon I can enjoy my dreams of racing my TR6 at such wonderous events
where great machines, great people, great scenery and great fun unite.
Until then, I can only hope that Lawrence Buja and all the other weekend
racers who truly remind us of the joys of motoring will continue to share
their experiences in such a beautifully lucid and involving way.

Lawrence, I can’t thank you enough for that brilliant article. It
reminds me why I work so hard to keep these living works of art as close
to what they were meant to be. It also reminds me about the joys of
being with truly great people who understand how important it is to
really live.

Thank you again.

Sincerely,
Dave Oxenreider - Orlando, Florida
73 XJ12
75 TR6


From: David J Shield David_J_Shield@ccm.fm.intel.com
Date: Thu, 05 Sep 96 08:58:00 PDT
Subject: SIII XJ6 thingie on the fuel rail

 >I would also like to understand the operation of the "thermal valve" 
 >on the fuel rail.  Does anyone know how this thing functions and how 
 >to check it?
 >Tony Gardner
 >1986 XJ6 Series III
 
 Tony,
 
 If you're speaking of the orange-colored device on the back end of the 
 fuel rail, with a vacuum inlet and outlet (outlet going to the fuel 
 pressure regulator), then I can describe it.  If it's something else, 
 then my '84 XJ6 VDP is different than the '86s.
 
 This is my empirical understanding of what it does and how it does it:
 That valve is for warm restarts.  I believe it senses the temperature 
 of the fuel rail and when warm, cuts the vacuum to the fuel pressure 
 regulator.  The fuel pressure regulator responds to vacuum as follows: 
 High vacuum (at idle) = lower pressure, low vacuum (full throttle) = 
 higher pressure.  When the engine is warm, the thermotime switch isn't 
 going to fire the cold start injector.  Short of re-engineering the 
 fuel injecion system, the engineers apparently found that things just 
 needed a little help.  Cutting the vacuum to the regulator increases 
 the pressure enough to get the car started, and didn't require major 
 re-engineering.  In typical Jaguar fashion, they solved a problem by 
 adding more parts (although maybe it was the Bosch or Lucas 
 engineers).
 
 On my car, that valve was leaking vacuum.  I bypassed it entirely and  haven't ever had difficulty on restarts.  I've never measured the fuel  pressure - it shouldn't be leaking down when the car is off, from what  I understand. Best regards, David '84 XJ6 VDP '70 XKE 2+2 and a Volvo From: "Kirbert" <palmk@gcn.scri.fsu.edu> Date: Thu, 5 Sep 1996 12:04:12 -0005 Subject: Re: XJS AC controls I've now had my '96 XJS convertible a little over a month now, and I'm  still puzzled about the operation of the slide control for the A/C.  The  handbook suggests that sliding it to the right (Blue) increases air to  the upper vents while sliding it to the left (red) increases air to the  footwells.  Well, I've tried it and it doesn't seem to make any  difference. As someone on this list once said:  If it doesn't make any  difference, it's working perfectly! It's supposed to vary the temperature relation between the upper and  lower vents.  One way, and the upper vents are COOLER than the lower;  the other way, and the upper vents are WARMER than the lower.   Difference is slight, and either way the control system is gonna vary  overall supply temperature to maintain the temperature in the car. Kirbert     |     If anything is to be accomplished, |     some rules must be broken. |          - Palm's Postulate From: "Kirbert" <palmk@gcn.scri.fsu.edu> Date: Thu, 5 Sep 1996 12:04:13 -0005 Subject: Re: Seeking '85 XJ6 A/C renewal advice Randy Wilson <randy@taylor.infi.net>: ...and hoses can be made by any local A/C shop. Having recently gone through this, I must differ with the above.  It turns out that some hoses are more difficult to rebuild than others, and the more difficult ones require a special crimp tool that, while reasonably priced as shop tools go (no power, hand operated), was only introduced a year or so back.  If the A/C shop is dealing with the older crimp tools, it cannot rebuild some hoses.  The usual result is that they will cut the fittings on your old hose and braze on sections of tubing that their tools can fit a hose to.  This looks like c__p when done, but does work. If the fittings on your hose happen to be aluminum, ONLY the newer  tool will work, since brazing is out and the older tool will crush  the tube. Now, does any of this apply to the Jaguar?  Well, probably not mine;  it appears to have standardized fittings made of steel, so perhaps  the older crimp tool will work.  But I dunno what fittings are used  on other Jaguars, so I thought I should clarify the situation.  I  have mid-80's Hondas that have unique, aluminum fittings on the  hoses; a shop with the new crimp tool can rebuild, a shop without it  will tell you that the hose is unrepairable and you must buy a new  one from Honda.  If the newer Jags have similar developments, take  note. Kirbert     |     If anything is to be accomplished, |     some rules must be broken. |          - Palm's Postulate From: "Kirbert" <palmk@gcn.scri.fsu.edu> Date: Thu, 5 Sep 1996 12:09:13 -0005 Subject: Re: A/C Controls Robert Bradley: The 87 XJS and XJ series III have a similar control, red on side blue the  other.  The control is just below the radio and it changes the tempreture of  the air issued from the vents.  It think it works on a tempreture sensor in the  air box.   THIS IS DIFFERENT TO THE IN CAR THERMOSTATE which gets its readings  from the small vent above the glove box. 'Fraid not.  BOTH sensors are used in the main temperature control of  the car.  The slider doesn't involve any sensors whatsoever, it  merely moves a link in the control linkage to vary the relationship  of upper and lower heating flaps. Kirbert     |     If anything is to be accomplished, |     some rules must be broken. |          - Palm's Postulate From: "Claus, Mike" <claus%wg.com@vm1.cc.nps.navy.mil> Date: Thu, 05 Sep 96 08:22:09 EST Subject: XJS Nose Paint Protection Re; paint chipping; <       Lately it seems to me that every time I take my beautiful new <       car out for a ride it comes home with a new ding or chip in <       the paint on her pretty nose.  The idea of spending a day or <       two working with touch-up paint after every drive gets old <       quickly. I paint my cars with the new epoxy type paints, the ones that you mix two parts paint, one part reducer and one part hardner. It is a very hard paint which doesn't chip and is easy to touch up. LLoyd From: jwbeckmeye@orion.branch-co.lib.mi.us Date: Thu, 05 Sep 1996 12:44:06 -0400 Subject: RE:Brass vs Stainless--Brake Cylinder sleeve Tom Felts wrote:

Someone questioned the use of brass in brake cylinders. I had mine done
in brass-----------3 of the four wheels had to be redone because the
brass sleeve slipped allowing fluid to leak past them. Suggest
stainless. I’m using Dot 5 fluid.

Tom,

May I ask, who did the brass resleeving job for you? Say it ain’t White Post.

FWIW, I had White Post do my brakes in the MK II. So far, so good (using
DOT 4).

Best regards,
Jim Beckmeyer
Union City, MI
90 Jaguar Sovereign
60 Jag MK II
jwbeckmeye@orion.branch-co.lib.mi.us


From: John Napoli jgn@li.net
Date: Thu, 5 Sep 1996 12:45:15 -0400 (EDT)
Subject: Re: XJS wiring help needed

You may have gotten replies to this by now, but I might be able to help
you out a bit:

On Sat, 31 Aug 1996, Jim Isbell wrote:

First, under the bonnet there are two wires comming out of a harnes
near the throttle “cam” where the throttle cable connects to the
“cam” and there is a microswitch on the side of the cable. These two
wires are Green and Green with a yellow tracer. The green one appears
to have been snipped off the microswitch with cutters (pourposefully)
the Green with Yellow tracer gives me no clue. What are these? Do I
need them? What is the microswitch? It doed not seem to be working
or at least I could not get it to “click”.

You definitely want this circuit to work. It richens the mixture when
more power is needed. If the microswitch is bad replace it with any
garden-variety microswitch – Radio Shack sells them. At most you might
have to redrill one of the mounting holes.

This switch is wired in parallel with a vacuum switch mounted on the right
rear of the engine. Low vacuum OR a wider throttle opening (the vacuum
switrch and the throttle linkage microswitch, respectivelly) can give more
fuel by, I believe, widening the pulse supplied to the injectors.

Third, in that same location is a rubber vacuum hose with what
appears to be an inline fuerl filter in the end of it. It too goes
nowhere. What is it and where should it go?

This sounds like the fresh air purge to the distributor cap. Make sure
the filter isn’t plugged and replace it with a garden-varieyt inline
filter if it is. I poke the free end of mine out past the upper radiator
tank.

Hope this helps.

John


From: rpeng@cadev6.intel.com
Date: Thu, 5 Sep 96 10:20:00 PDT
Subject: Re: Jaguar XJS Classic Rouge

I would appreciate if somebody could educate me what are the major differences
between this Jag and a regular XJS.
Please reply directly.
Thanks, Ilya.

All it is is a special edition with a few trim differences, the most notable
being that the leather seats are “piped” in red.



Roger Peng (408)765-7863
Intel Corporation
Design Technology, Physical CAD



From: rpeng@cadev6.intel.com
Date: Thu, 5 Sep 96 10:29:53 PDT
Subject: Re: 96 XJS conv.

David - 96 XJS conv. The last of the breed.

By the way, is this a 6 cylinder car? How does it compare
with the V12 cars (if you’ve test driven one)?

Anybody else with 6 cylinder XJS’s? Is the maintenance cost
lower? (ie comparable to a XJ40?)



Roger Peng (408)765-7863
Intel Corporation
Design Technology, Physical CAD



From: “Claus, Mike” claus@wg.com
Date: Thu, 05 Sep 96 15:49:57 EST
Subject: Re[2]: 96 XJS conv.

    My XJ-S is a 6.  While I was hunting for a car, I badly wanted 
    a 12, but late model 12's are relatively scarce since they 
    started offering them with 6 standard after '92.  Of the few 
    that I found, I was just not able to afford one.
    
    I did test drive a few 12's - they are definitely smoother, 
    quieter and have more feel of power than my car.  But they are 
    also a little heavier, and I could feel that difference in 
    handling too.  I've driven my car up to about 110mph - about 
    as fast as I am comfortable driving even in my neighbor's 
    Turbo Bently - so I don't think I really need the extra engine 
    power for any useful purpose.
    
    I'm not sure about maintenance costs - mine have been pretty 
    high so far - but I do not have any oil leaks, and so far have 
    not had any overheating problems - despite commuting regularly 
    in the car.  The commute includes about 15-20 minutes with 
    stop and go traffic, and Raleigh NC is pretty hot - many 90 
    degree + days, so the AC has been working hard.  If it were 
    going to overheat I think it would have by now.  Because I 
    have been reading this list, I do keep a very wary eye on my 
    temp gauge however!
    
    The mechanic at the local dealer (I did not buy the car there) 
    told me that I should be happy that I did not get the 12 - he 
    told me the maintenance costs are much higher, and that once 
    they start to get old it is very difficult to keep them from 
    leaking oil without constant attention.  The tune ups are a 
    little cheaper for the 6 than the 12.
    
    Isn't the 6 in the new XJ-S the same engine as in the sedans?  
    And aren't these just an updated version of the straight 6 
    that Jag has been producing for decades? We probably have more 
    folks with experience on this engine than on the 12's.
    
    - mclaus
    
    '93 XJ-S Convertible. 

______________________________ Reply Separator _________________________________
Subject: Re: 96 XJS conv.
Author: rpeng@cadev6.intel.com at WG-RAL-SMTP
Date: 9/5/96 10:29 AM

David - 96 XJS conv. The last of the breed.

By the way, is this a 6 cylinder car? How does it compare
with the V12 cars (if you’ve test driven one)?

Anybody else with 6 cylinder XJS’s? Is the maintenance cost
lower? (ie comparable to a XJ40?)



Roger Peng (408)765-7863
Intel Corporation
Design Technology, Physical CAD



From: Thomas Alberts talberts@aero.odu.edu
Date: Thu, 5 Sep 1996 16:11:50 -0400 (EDT)
Subject: Re: XJS wiring help needed

Several of you are giving Jim incorrect information. The micro with the
green wires, mounted on the throttle cable is the transmission kickdown
switch.

Thomas E. Alberts

First, under the bonnet there are two wires comming out of a harnes
near the throttle “cam” where the throttle cable connects to the
“cam” and there is a microswitch on the side of the cable. These two
wires are Green and Green with a yellow tracer. The green one appears
to have been snipped off the microswitch with cutters (pourposefully)
the Green with Yellow tracer gives me no clue. What are these? Do I
need them? What is the microswitch? It doed not seem to be working
or at least I could not get it to “click”.

You definitely want this circuit to work. It richens the mixture when
more power is needed. If the microswitch is bad replace it with any
garden-variety microswitch – Radio Shack sells them. At most you might
have to redrill one of the mounting holes.

This switch is wired in parallel with a vacuum switch mounted on the right
rear of the engine. Low vacuum OR a wider throttle opening (the vacuum
switrch and the throttle linkage microswitch, respectivelly) can give more
fuel by, I believe, widening the pulse supplied to the injectors.
make sure


From: Gunnar Helliesen gunnar@bitcon.no
Date: Thu, 5 Sep 1996 22:45:48 +0200 (MET DST)
Subject: [Pure BS] Re: XJS – Suspension/Chassis Damage

Martin.Fooks@internetdesign.com (Martin Fooks – Internet Design) wrote:

Long live Jaguar… Long live the RAC… Cancel that Chevvy Chassis
conversion!!!

Chevy Chassis conversion eh? Next thing you know we’ll have people on
this list talking about Chevy engine conversions.

Sheeesh! Some people…

:wink:

Gunnar


Gunnar Helliesen | Bergen IT Consult AS | NetBSD/VAX on a uVAX II
Systems Consultant | Bergen, Norway | '86 Jaguar XJ6 4.2 Sovereign
gunnar@bitcon.no | http://www.bitcon.no/ | Vicki who? What .sig virus?


From: John Napoli jgn@li.net
Date: Thu, 5 Sep 1996 16:49:52 -0400 (EDT)
Subject: Re: XJS — Oops!!! (a.k.a. Chassis failure)

Sorry about your loss!!

Have a question, though:

When you say ‘right side suspension’ do you mean the trailing arm that
locates the cage? Or the lower swing arm that locates the wheel?

If you mean the trailing arm, I’ve got a radical fix – just eliminate
them both!!

Cobra Replicars and many hot rods use Jag rear ends with big motors. The
cage is deep sixed, and the center diff is mounted sollidly to the frame.
There are NO trailing arms. The key is that the whole thing is solidly
mounted.

Now, as I recall, you had already solidly mounted the cage to the car. If
you have, you don’t need the trailing arms and maybe this is why it ripped
out (not enough slop in the system).

With this fix, just patch the hole in the floor and that’s it. Of course,
I don’t really know if this is your problem (if your cage is already
solid, why did the ripped out arm cause a wiggle?).

But at the risk of being flamed, if your problem is the trailing arms,
consider eliminating them altogether.

Oh, yeah, there is a middle ground here as well. Racing XJ-S’s often lose
the original trailing arms and replace them with new fabricated arms that
pivot closer to the center line of the car (next to the drive shaft and
longer, too). The cage is not solidly mounted. This supposedly gives
better equations than those provided by the stock trailing arms. If you
go this route, you also have an easier patch job!

Good luck and let us know how you make out.

John

On Wed, 4 Sep 1996, Martin Fooks – Internet Design wrote:

Hi all,

trusty torch, wondering if I would be able to see the problem. Any hope
that it was a minor fault soon went when I noticed that the right hand side
rear suspension arm (sorry, don’t know its’ techy name) had ripped itself
out of the chassis, taking about a 7 inch diameter chunk of chassis with it.
My wallet started to empty itself in my head.

The local Jaguar dealer have called in their boy specialists who have
diagnosed nearly 2500 Dutch Guilders as the estimate for the chassis
repairs…SOB! but hey!, does anyone know how to swap a trusty Chevvy
Chassis over in it’s place ? ;-}

Martin


End of jag-lovers-digest V2 #333


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jag-lovers-digest Friday, 6 September 1996 Volume 02 : Number 334

Re: Rust convertor
Re: XJS Nose Paint Protection
Re: XJ-S wheel - unstuck
Re: XJS Nose Paint Protection
More stories
Re: 92 XJ40 Mud Flaps
Re: Series III XJ6 Lukewarm Starting Problem
Re: De-rusto/POR15/Duro Extend
Re: XJS AC controls
No Jag content / Auto mailing lists
Re: XJ-S wheel - unstuck
Re: Where to locate fan relay?
Re: 92 XJ40 Mud Flaps
Re: De-rusto/POR15/Duro Extend
RE: XJS Micro switch on throttle
RE: The Drift King meets Capt’n Hook.
E gen->alt Heat Question
'61 E Alternator Conversion, 2nd installment (Success!)
RE: XJS — Oops!!! --------F.A.O. Kirby
Re: “Correction” to Jan.
RE:84 XJ6 Ongoing Overheating Problem


From: John Napoli jgn@li.net
Date: Thu, 5 Sep 1996 16:56:04 -0400 (EDT)
Subject: Re: Rust convertor

Primer is porous and will let water through. If you need to store a
primed part for any amount of time, spray a thin sacrificial coat of
lacquer over it. Sands off easily enough and protects what’s underneath.

On Wed, 4 Sep 1996, Mark McChesney wrote:

Extend, and primed as on the first side. I never found the right paint for the
part so it has sat in the damp basement for 7 years in just grey primer. The
blasted side is now actually showing rust through the primer. The converted
side is still clean. I do not think it is wise to leaving anything in primer,


From: Stefan Schulz jaguar@suaviter.demon.co.uk
Date: Thu, 05 Sep 1996 21:37:28 GMT
Subject: Re: XJS Nose Paint Protection

In message 9608058419.AA841937204@smtp.wg.com “Claus, Mike” writes:

    Lately it seems to me that every time I take my beautiful new
    car out for a ride it comes home with a new ding or chip in
    the paint on her pretty nose.

[snip]

    Of course, if anybody has another good suggestion, please let
    me hear.

[snip]

    ' 93 XJ-S

Yours, being a '93, should still be under warranty for the paintwork. I have
noticed the attraction to small stones and other debris of my '88 XJ-S as
well, in the same area of the nose. However, I also noticed that the paint
in that area is RIDICULOUSLY thick, 3mm in places. As a result, dings and
chips don’t go down to the primer or bare metal. It sounds like yours has
thinner layers of paint and therefore a manufacturing defect. Try that line
with your local Jag dealer. Good luck.

Regards,


Stefan Schulz
jaguar@suaviter.demon.co.uk


From: “Michael P. Neal” mneal@wco.com
Date: Thu, 05 Sep 1996 15:32:23 -0700
Subject: Re: XJ-S wheel - unstuck

Please make sure that your fix-a-flat in a can is the non flammable
type! Several techs have been injured badly when a spark was created
dismounting the tire. Also be prepared to pay extra to have all the
liquid residue removed during the repair. It makes it hard to get a
patch to stick. I would recommend that you buy yourself a good tire
plug kit and a mini compressor rather than use the fix-a-flat.

Also the stuck wheels are easily removed by prying between the lower
ball-joint and the wheel on the front or between the lower ends of the
shocks and the wheel on the rear. It’s amazing how a little pressure on
the proper fulcrum points will break the wheel loose. I also use a
copper anti-seize spray on the hub and lug nuts on reassembly.

Matthias FOUQUET-LAPAR wrote:

Kirby, I would suggest that you include removal of all wheels, cleaning
the mating surfaces and applying anti-seize compound to the hubs as
part of the maintenance to be performed on any older Jag in your
‘experience in a book’. This bit of preventive maintenance could be a
life saver if you have tire failure in the middle of nowhere.

When I had this problem on our XJ-S a while ago, I went off and bought
one of those cans which you blow into the tire and which “fix” small holes
for a while. I’ve never tried it, but maybe something usefull to have in
the trunk anyhow

  • Matthias

========================================================
Michael P. Neal ASE Master Technician, Jaguar Certified
'93 Ducati 900SS '83 Porsche 944 '85 Jaguar XJS
Home (707) 829-8464 Work (707) 577-0101
http://www.wco.com/~mneal (always under construction:-)


From: charles daly cdaly@passport.ca
Date: Thu, 05 Sep 1996 18:45:40 +0100
Subject: Re: XJS Nose Paint Protection

At 08:22 AM 05/09/96 EST, mclaus wrote:

   Does anybody know if there is a bra which can be fit on the 
   car?

Hi!,
The second post after this referred to the gender aspect of the
jag-u-awe, with most saying, “male”… Now a bra!
May I suggest we move this list to alt.sex.transvestite.jag(blush)
lovers!
:>)
Have fun!

Charles Daly, Toronto, Canada
'62 E-Type, ots


From: “Peter Rebbechi (03) 9275 3374” <"REBBECHI PETER"@A1.MEOC02.SNO.mts.dec.com>
Date: Thu, 05 Sep 1996 22:46:00 +0000 (GMT)
Subject: More stories

More stories like the Steamboat Springs stories.!
This is why we drive Jags!

Thanks to Lawrence Buja, It was entertaining and enjoyable.


From: Stefan Schulz jaguar@suaviter.demon.co.uk
Date: Thu, 05 Sep 1996 21:29:58 GMT
Subject: Re: 92 XJ40 Mud Flaps

In message 199609051112.NAA04318@turquoise.cray.com mfl@kheops.cray.com
(Matthias FOUQUET-LAPAR) writes:

I bought a set [of mud flaps] (front and rear) for my '88 XJ-S.

[snip]

The front ones did not work on my XJ-S

The original Jaguar ones don’t work at the rear right where they foul an
exhaust pipe. Can be solved with a pair of garden scissors, though :wink:

Yet another reason to go for non-Jaguar parts. Get the same hassle for
LESS money!

Regards,


Stefan Schulz
jaguar@suaviter.demon.co.uk


From: DocJagry@aol.com
Date: Thu, 5 Sep 1996 20:40:21 -0400
Subject: Re: Series III XJ6 Lukewarm Starting Problem

Tony,
I’m afraid I may have accidentally misled you slightly about the
pressure in the fuel system. The pressure in my system also falls very
slowly over a period of hours, but never gets low enough to cause difficulty
starting. Since reaching that point solved the problem for me, I didn’t
explore the slow leakage any further.
Also, since my Series II XJ12 operates on 30 PSI, the 26 PSI figure I
quoted is actually closer to spec than it may seem.
If you’re still having lukewarm start problems despite adequate
pressure, I’m afraid you may have to look elsewhere into realms I haven’t
explored.

Good luck,
Jon Schrock
1977 XJ12L
1965 E Type
1957 XK140


From: jello@dns.ida.net (Phil Bates)
Date: Thu, 5 Sep 1996 19:00:34 -0600
Subject: Re: De-rusto/POR15/Duro Extend

On Sep 3, 1:34pm, David J Shield wrote:

Subject: De-rusto

 Jim Isbell asks about rust cures: sounds like "snake oil" to me, but

what the hell. Has

 > anyone had any experience with these products that turn rust to
 >primer?
 I've used such stuff over the years with pretty good results.

I have been using Duro Extend for a few years. What I can’t sand blast I treat
w/ the Extend. Seems to work ok as long as all the scale has been removed
first. If you do not top coat it the rust will come back. I hear that P.O.R 15
is better - and it needs no top coat, some guys have even coated the inside of
their exhaust systems with the stuff and had good results.

Mark

I haven’t used the POR 15 for under car applications, but I have used their
gas tank coating stuff. It has worked well in 3 cars.

Phil Bates
67 MGB
75 Jaguar XJ12C
52 MG TD replicar (VW)


From: Stefan Schulz jaguar@suaviter.demon.co.uk
Date: Thu, 05 Sep 1996 21:33:19 GMT
Subject: Re: XJS AC controls

David Engelbach writes:

I’ve now had my '96 XJS convertible a little over a month now, and I’m
still puzzled about the operation of the slide control for the A/C.

It’s one of those traditional British things, you see. Wooden slabs on
dash and doors are a tip o’ the hat to the old coachbuilders. The a/c
slider you’re referring to is what’s known as a placebo control. All
British cars have them, particularly as they get older. In some cases
the ignition switch winds up being a placebo, too :wink:

Regards,


Stefan Schulz
jaguar@suaviter.demon.co.uk


From: Ed Scripps 73200.2362@CompuServe.COM
Date: 05 Sep 96 21:31:31 EDT
Subject: No Jag content / Auto mailing lists

Off topic a bit.

There used to be a ftp site for a complete list of automobile mailing lists.I
had it as: ftp://ftp.balltown.cma.com/misc/Autos/mailing-lists.text

but this doesn’t seem to work any more. Anyone have an updated site?

I’m looking for a Porsche mailing list. Porschephiles seems to be dead and
gone. It has been months and the home page is still down. Anyone know why?

Thanks,

  • -Ed-

From: Stefan Schulz jaguar@suaviter.demon.co.uk
Date: Thu, 05 Sep 1996 21:23:16 GMT
Subject: Re: XJ-S wheel - unstuck

In message 199609051117.NAA04336@turquoise.cray.com mfl@kheops.cray.com
(Matthias FOUQUET-LAPAR) writes:

When I had this problem on our XJ-S a while ago, I went off and bought
one of those cans which you blow into the tire and which “fix” small holes
for a while. I’ve never tried it, but maybe something usefull to have in
the trunk anyhow

Erm, with due respect, no. Not for a Jaguar XJ-S with humungous tyres anyway.
The problem with these cans is that they create a solid residue which
coagulates (?) on the inside of the tyre and the rim, especially near the
joint between the two. Near impossible to get off when you replace the
tyre, it’ll give you a slow leak on the new one and imbalance to boot.
The larger the tyre, the larger the badly sealed area and the larger the
imbalance. It gave me problems on a Volvo with relatively small wheels.

Carrying a spare is easier. And yes, the tyres on my XJ-S stick to the
hubs, too, but a good kick always gets them loose.

Regards,


Stefan Schulz
jaguar@suaviter.demon.co.uk


From: ajbeale@squirrel.com.au (A.J. Beale)
Date: Fri, 6 Sep 1996 12:35:15 +1000 (EST)
Subject: Re: Where to locate fan relay?

Quang Ngo writes

Summer is still around, and the AC in my 89 JX40 stops working. Some day
if I’m luckly it works, and the rest of the week I’m sweat. Where is the
relay for the AC fan located?

I am sorry to be the bearer of bad news, but the problem is unlikely to be
solved by locating a relay. There are a few of them and lots of other
control devices in the AC system. An intermittent fault, like you have,
could be caused by the water valve to the heater matrix not closing. This
valve is normally open, and is closed by vacuum from a reservoir via a
vacuum solenoid. On right hand drive cars, the valve is located on the left
hand side under the bonnet (hood) near the fire wall and just inboard of the
battery. It is easy to see and has a small plastic tube going to the top of
it. This tube is red, but has a black fitting on its end, so its colour
isn’t immediately obvious. First, disconnect the plastic tube and connect a
length of similar diameter plastic tube to it so that, with mouth suction,
you can check to hear if the valve appears to be closing under vacuum.
Next, run the car engine with the controls set for minimum temperature (with
a fairly high ambient temperature so that the AC should cool) and check that
you can feel suction on the tube which connects to the valve. If the valve
appears to be working alright, please get back to me, but that is my best
guess so far as these valves can also be a victim of the “Bars Leaks”
syndrome. Regards, Alan.


From: rs@telerama.lm.com (Rich Shehab)
Date: Thu, 5 Sep 1996 22:54:16 -0400
Subject: Re: 92 XJ40 Mud Flaps

Hi,
After my last trip I notices that the slipstream design of the Jaguar
really sprays back onto the rear quarter panels and also on the front doors.
I found that Jaguar sells mud flaps made for the car. I was wondering if
anyone had any experience with these ? Also how well do they do in winters
slush and snow ?
Thanks
Lou

Lou,

I had the same problem with my '88 XJ40. The road spray sandblasted the
paint right down to the primer behind both front and back wheels, so last
year I had the car re-painted in those areas by a Jaguar Dealer and also had
them install mud flaps. They work really well and also look pretty good.

I can’t comment on the winter slush since I don’t drive the car in the
winter, however I don’t think it would pose a problem. Besides, you would
be much better off with them than without them.

Rich Shehab
Pittsburgh, PA


From: Shane Gibson shane_gibson@qsp.co.nz
Date: Fri, 06 Sep 1996 14:50:38 -0700
Subject: Re: De-rusto/POR15/Duro Extend

I haven’t used the POR 15 for under car applications, but I have used their
gas tank coating stuff. It has worked well in 3 cars.

Phil Bates
67 MGB
75 Jaguar XJ12C
52 MG TD replicar (VW)

I am about to use POR 15 under the chassis of my newly painted Dailmer V8
250.

Has anybody got any comments good or bad about this product in this
application?

Thanks in Advance


Shane Gibson
1968 Daimler V8 250 (57% Restorartion Complete and only 150% over
budget)


From: “Phil Patton” ppatton@ibm.net
Date: Thu, 05 Sep 96 22:23:41 -0500
Subject: RE: XJS Micro switch on throttle

According to both the shop manual and the
wiring diagram this switch has nothing whatever to
do with the transmission. It would make no sense
for the transmission kickdown to operate from
such a switch. If this were actually the case,
then the car would NEVER shift into 3rd gear at
anything more than about half throttle. This
switch, in fact, goes to the ECU and richens the
mixture, which also occurs below certain levels
of vacuum. Furthermore, the switch is only used
on cars shipped to North America. At least this is
what Jaguar thinks.
Phil


From: “Richard Atherton (Entex)” a-richat@microsoft.com
Date: Thu, 5 Sep 1996 21:50:23 -0700
Subject: RE: The Drift King meets Capt’n Hook.

Clipped from the original post:

"Despite the very stiff competition, the ever
popular HomyLordwouldjalookatthose Cup for the most gargantuan silicon
breast implants went to the same threepeat winner who’s dominated the
event for the previous two seasons. "

Are there any Pictures ? ..........Of the cars of course  8-)    

Rich


From: Hunt Dabney hdabney@earthlink.net
Date: Thu, 5 Sep 1996 23:40:35 -0700 (PDT)
Subject: E gen->alt Heat Question

For those of you who have converted from generator to alternator,
1) What have you done to control heat to the alternator?
2) How reliable is your charging system?
Thanks!
Hunt


From: Hunt Dabney hdabney@earthlink.net
Date: Thu, 5 Sep 1996 23:40:20 -0700 (PDT)
Subject: '61 E Alternator Conversion, 2nd installment (Success!)

My new belts and pulley arrived today! As you may recall from yesterday’s
installment, I was quite pleased that the alternator that I chose mounted up
to my generator brackets unmodified. ('74 MGB alt.) Well, at least that was
the case yesterday. My new pulley came from Terry’s Jaguars - looks great,
and it’s an appropriate diameter, too. (Charges at or near 1000 RPM).
Unfortunately (I thought), it is 0.400" shorter than the original, which is
to say, the alternator now requires shimming toward the front of the car by
0.400" for the belt to align. I read on this list once something to the
effect that a Jaguar is an excuse to hold a lot of shims together, so for
now, I have precision washer stacks (glad I buy bulk hardware!). There turn
out to be two advantages to the offset:
1) Alt is a little farther from the exhaust system (psychological,
I’m sure)
2) Recalling from yesterday, the rear mounting ear on the alternator
was interfering with the middle mounting bolt on the generator bracket. This
fixes that problem.

My next suprise was the belt. the 3.8 MK II belt is too long, the 3.8 E belt
is just right, but next to impossible to put on. This is due to the
restricted adjustment range of the alternator, as the frame is a bit close.
I solved this by slightly modifying the adjustment bracket. I drilled a
5/16" hole about 0.5" closer to the slot, to use in place of the original
mounting hole, thus allowing a shorter total length. There is a trick to
installing the belt, too. Leaving the adjusting bracket unbolted, the hinge
bolt (bottom) is withdrawn from the rear of the generator bracket, so that
the alternator is only supported by the front of the bracket. Now it will
swivel freely and the belt will go right onto the pulley. Push the bolt back
through the rear of the bracket and the belt is on.

I’m on prototype wiring at the moment. THe alternator uses a 0.375 spade (2
of them, actually) to connect +output to the battery (via the ammeter), and
a 0.250" spade to run the idiot light. I made a temporary harness using 1/4"
split harness wrap, and 10AWG stranded for the alt. out, and 18AWG stranded
for the idiot lamp. This was routed to the regulator, where I used a male
spade on the idiot light wire and attached to the lamp wire, which I removed
from the regulator. I also removed the ground wire from the regulator, and
temporarily spliced the 10 AWG wire to the pair of terminals sourcing the
ammeter.

Start the car and… nothing (no charge, but is runs great!). Hmm… Oops,
idiot light terminal to wrong wire… Light works, no charge. After running
a few minutes (probably 30 seconds, but when waiting for smoke it seems an
eternity!), it’s charging! I guess the brushes needed to seat (no telling
how long that thing sat on a shelf). I just drove all over the neighborhood
with nice bright lights, and could not cause the ammeter to drop into
discharge no matter what I turned on! No noise in my radio and the engine
bay is quieter, too.

Next concern: HEAT! The good news in the .4" offset is that it is that much
farther from the exhaust manifolds. It still gets a lot hotter than I think
appropriate, though. I know that some 4.2L E’s have heat shields on their
alternators. On my car, the rearmost position on the alternator is fully
ahead of the front manifold, but it is still hot enough to soften the
insulation on my output leads (routed well away from the exhaust). SO, for
those of you who have done this, what (if anything) have you done to control
heat?

The plan, in order of priority is:
1) Find a way to moderate the heat!
2) Formalize the wiring
3) Locate proper spacers and hardware to clean up mounting (It
actually looks OK, but stacks of washers, even matching new ones, just
bother me!).
4) Document it well enough to be of use to others. For now, you will
just have to try to extract some intelligence from my ramblings!

Regards-
Hunt
'61 E FHC (no longer electron impaired)
'85 XJ-6 (also no longer electron or thermally impaired - it’s been a big week!)


From: Martin.Fooks@internetdesign.com (Martin Fooks – Internet Design)
Date: Fri, 06 Sep 1996 09:08:47 +0200
Subject: RE: XJS — Oops!!! --------F.A.O. Kirby

Hi Kirby,

As you suspected Kirby, there was rust inside the chassis rail, which had
weakened the unit enough to allow the torque through the radius arm to snap
a chunk of metal out. There was however some nice clean metal on about
50-60% of the break.

2,500 DFL is about $1,500 and whilst this is a little high I think it’s
about standard for a main dealer. Not having your engineering background I
am not willing to have someone just “Weld in a couple of bits of metal”, but
would much rather have a genuine Jaguar chassis rail replacement carried out
on a proper jig to make sure the chassis is still in proper alignment.

I spoke to David Manners Jaguar/Daimler spares in England and a new rear
chassis rail would set me back just over $450 so $1000 labour may be a
little high but I’m not paying.

Martin


From: Baard Th Hesvik baard@telesoft.no
Date: Fri, 6 Sep 1996 09:10:56 -0700
Subject: Re: “Correction” to Jan.

Dear all and Jan Wikstrom in particular!

My perseptions played a trick on me yesterday resulting in a nonsense correction
to Jan’s statement about passenger space in the XJC.

I assure you, I read the posting twice and still didn’t see that he specifically
mentioned short wheelbase. I guess I was looking for the initials; SWB.

Sorry Jan, naturally you’re right.

Eating humble pie.
Bard


______ _ ! Baard Th Hesvik, Telesoft AS
/ _ / _ _ _ / / ! Longhammarvn 7, N-5500 Haugesund
/ // / // /_ / / -/- -/- ! T: +47 52735000 F: +47 52717040
/ /_ / /_ / // / /_ ! E-mail: baard@telesoft.no


From: Barrie Dawson DAWSONB@btcec3.agw.bt.co.uk
Date: Fri, 06 Sep 96 10:19:40 -0700
Subject: RE:84 XJ6 Ongoing Overheating Problem

Christopher,

Have you checked the Jag Lovers Guide to Overheating Problems.

http://www.sn.no/home/nick/overheat.html

Seems to me that this room mates recommendation doesn’t quite know whats going
down here. To recap you’ve done the following work:

  1. Flushed out, forward & reverse, the entire system.
  2. Replaced Thermostat.
  3. Rodded/replaced Radiator.
  4. Confirmed fan clutch OK.
  5. Confirmed electric fan comes on when overheating occurs, if not check bottom of
    radiator, if cold radiator still blocked.
  6. I assume replaced system Pressure cap for 15 lbs unit.
  7. Checked no obvious signs of leak including water pump.

Don’t change the pump in desperation it’s far to expensive a job and quite often
you introduce a leak at the gasket that was never there before. I still think you
have a blockage somewhere.

Good luck

Barrie Dawson
Chatham, Kent England
1985 Jaguar Sovereign


End of jag-lovers-digest V2 #334


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jag-lovers-digest Friday, 6 September 1996 Volume 02 : Number 335

Re: 85 XJ-S ac condensate: Where has all the water gone?
Re : Security problem -no problem
SU carbe and angry jags.
Re: De-rusto/POR15/Duro Extend
Looking for XK120/140
RE: XJS Micro switch on throttle
Re: E gen->alt Heat Question
Re: '61 E Alternator Conversion, 2nd installment (Success!)
Re[2]: XJS Micro switch on throttle
XJ40 A/C intermittent
Series II E-type Engine Removal
overheating
RE: XJS Micro switch on throttle
Re: E gen->alt Heat Question
Re: '61 E Alternator Conversion, 2nd installment (Success!)
Re: Where to locate fan relay?
Re: No Jag content / Auto mailing lists
Hej Matthias,
RE; XJS Micro switch on throttle


From: Stefan Schulz jaguar@suaviter.demon.co.uk
Date: Tue, 03 Sep 1996 17:43:20 GMT
Subject: Re: 85 XJ-S ac condensate: Where has all the water gone?

In message 199609030431.VAA16907@goodguy.goodnet.com ee84287@goodnet.com (Weiss-Malik) writes:

Is it possible that the water
evaporates as it comes out of the tubes? (maybe it hits the cats or the
exhaust pipe?)

On mine the water from the right hand tube does hit the exhaust and evaporates
before it could ever make a puddle. The alignment of the tubes seems to be a
bit hit-and-miss, so perhaps you’ve got a car on which both drop on the
exhaust as you guessed.

leave well enough alone

Good advice with any Jaguar :wink:

Regards,


Stefan Schulz
jaguar@suaviter.demon.co.uk


From: Gram@eumetsat.de
Date: Fri, 06 Sep 1996 12:15:21 +0100
Subject: Re : Security problem -no problem

Re : Security problem -no problem

Hi Jan Wikstroem and other estemeed jaggers,

The problem is not as you describe it Jam. You can indeed send a message to Majordomo to
unsubscribe another username, however the unsubscribtion is NOT automatic, but requires the
manual intervention and checking by our list guardian. Thus thou shall not fear. Worse it is of
course if some one subscribes you to the the Mazda-owners list, … Talk about traffic…

To see the effect (and possibly but not likely the wrath of Nick) Try to unsubscribe Nick
Johannsen .

Jeffrey Gram.


From: Gram@eumetsat.de
Date: Fri, 06 Sep 1996 12:16:24 +0100
Subject: SU carbe and angry jags.

P.S. - I have finally given up trying to fix my @#$%^&* HIF7
SU carbs, on the 4.2 litre Engine running worse than a chevy
? firing on half the cylinders, or whatever causes this
non-stable idle, no power on flooring, erratic power surge
during accelaration. This Race-bred engine, rebuilt as well,
was supposed to pump out at least 200 BHP as the slightes
touch of my right (leaded) foot, with its 308 degrees
rallye-cams.

I am at my wits end. I sit and stare at those carbs on the
bench, thinking - I know you’re simple in design, but probably
quite complex air flows. Endless hours were spent at SU /
Jaguar back in the Dark Ages of mechanical engineering,
fiddling with shapes forms sizes , jets, needle curvatures,
vacumm chamber sizes and other breathtakingly difficult
tasks.

Honestly when you think about it it is quite astonishing, how
the damper / pinston / vacumm bell assembly is though out
to precisely meter the varying fuelling (with engine speed),
and provide acceleration enrichment, when you floor the pedal
to the metal, causing the engine to swallow, hopefully around
4.2 liter of air per two rounds. Now that is about 6000 liter of
air per minute at 3000 RPM - did anybody calculate the
Jet-effect of the sexily bend Stainless Jag-exhausts ??.

But these carbs, aint much you can fiddle with, had them
apart at least twice to check taht float level - all OK, Jets are
alike, and correct. Actually only real difference I found with
the carbs were that the FXZ1252F (the front one) carb needle
is about 1 - 1.5 mm shorter than the rear carb ?. I checked
that the needle neck was in the eaxct same place, these
being the springloaded needels leaning towards the jetwall in
direction throttledisc. The needle diameter at point and neck
were identical to a 0.05 mm. apert from this there wer no
differences.

Yesterday I drove the car to another garage, ashamed, a
jag-lover with engineering background and 7 years with Jags
gives in and drives to a garage to fix a minor problem - But I
just cant find the combination - the secret the cat has.
Maybe she is angry with me that I bought a bigger and
younger sister of hers and let red Jackie sit in the Garage for
months ??.

But today I phoned - Well Yes she runs much better. I took
the garage man for a ride showing him that She was not giving
herself completely. Still Angry. They will now care for her the
next week trying to find her little secret.

Then I shall ride her again .

Jeff


From: radiowsh@mindport.net (Vincent Chrzanowski)
Date: Fri, 06 Sep 1996 11:46:55 GMT
Subject: Re: De-rusto/POR15/Duro Extend

On Fri, 06 Sep 1996 14:50:38 -0700, Shane Gibson wrote:

I am about to use POR 15 under the chassis of my newly painted Dailmer V8
250.

Has anybody got any comments good or bad about this product in this
application?

A customer once painted the exterior of a car radio with POR (don’t
ask me why). When we tried to remove the stuff, we found it was
nearly like porcelain in hardness and durability. We had to change to
a more agressive abrasive in the bead blast cabinet . I hope never to
see POR on a radio again, but wouldn’t mind it on the frame of my Mark
IX.

Vince


Vince Chrzanowski radiowsh@mindport.net


“There is not a moment to be lost” - Jack Aubrey



From: Zoran Mitrovic 100136.3714@CompuServe.COM
Date: 06 Sep 96 08:54:41 EDT
Subject: Looking for XK120/140

Dear friends

I’m still on my quest for an XK120 or 140.

I will be in two weeks for vacation in Florida. I have already had contacts with
Vintage from Sarasota and with Classic Car Exporters. Can somebody advise me to
another place where I could find my dream car?

Best regards Zoran Mitrovic


From: John Napoli jgn@li.net
Date: Fri, 6 Sep 1996 09:32:09 -0400 (EDT)
Subject: RE: XJS Micro switch on throttle

On my '82 XJ-S HE there are two microswitches. The first is mounted such
that the rotating drum of the throttle pot closes it when the throttle is
opened past a certain point. This is the one that richens the mixture.
If this circuit doesn’t work, less performance (been there, done that).

The second one is mounted over towards the throttle cable, and is actuated
when an extra push on the accelerator cable (when already at wide open
throttle) forces the accelerator cable housing to move (the cable within
can’t move any more because you are already at WOT). This one gives
kickdown. If the cable housing is rusted up and not free to move easily,
no kickdown (been there, done that, too).

Question: will a pushbutton wired in parallel with this switch and
controlled somehow by the driver provide part-throttle kickdown? Or does
the electric kickdown only work if the transmission is also seeing zero
vacuum at the modulator (from WOT)?

On Thu, 5 Sep 1996, Phil Patton wrote:

According to both the shop manual and the
wiring diagram this switch has nothing whatever to
do with the transmission. It would make no sense
for the transmission kickdown to operate from
such a switch. If this were actually the case,
then the car would NEVER shift into 3rd gear at
anything more than about half throttle. This
switch, in fact, goes to the ECU and richens the
mixture, which also occurs below certain levels
of vacuum. Furthermore, the switch is only used
on cars shipped to North America. At least this is
what Jaguar thinks.
Phil


From: John Napoli jgn@li.net
Date: Fri, 6 Sep 1996 09:37:24 -0400 (EDT)
Subject: Re: E gen->alt Heat Question

Hunt, I’ve done this on several cars, although never on an E-Type.

Heat to the alternator has never been a problem – these things are much
better vented than generators. And charging system dependability is about
as good as can be provided you use a dependable alternator! I tend to
swap in good old Delco alternators – cheap, dependable, and parts or
replacements available anywhere. Select ones that are used in cars at
least ten years old for the best price/performance/availability.

John

On Thu, 5 Sep 1996, Hunt Dabney wrote:

For those of you who have converted from generator to alternator,
1) What have you done to control heat to the alternator?
2) How reliable is your charging system?
Thanks!
Hunt


From: John Napoli jgn@li.net
Date: Fri, 6 Sep 1996 09:42:12 -0400 (EDT)
Subject: Re: '61 E Alternator Conversion, 2nd installment (Success!)

Gee, Hunt, at this rate you’ll get your climate control system in the XJ6
running, too! :slight_smile:

John

On Thu, 5 Sep 1996, Hunt Dabney wrote:

'61 E FHC (no longer electron impaired)
'85 XJ-6 (also no longer electron or thermally impaired - it’s been a big week!)


From: “Larry Conrad” Larry_Conrad@Wstnres.com
Date: Fri, 06 Sep 96 08:48:46 CST
Subject: Re[2]: XJS Micro switch on throttle

 Phil,
 The switch that some of us are referring to is the microswitch on the 
 throttle cable!  It is indeed the transmission kickdown switch.  It is 
 activated when the gas pedal is stomped down (hard on my car).  The 
 pedal must hit the stop which causes the throttle cable housing to 
 "push back" actuating the switch. This switch may only be on the 
 GM400s or maybe HEs only, I don't know, someone more familiar can say.
 My repair manual shows decent pictures of it and describes it as well.
 
 Larry Conrad
 
 '51 MG TD 1965
 '83 XJ-S  1995

______________________________ Reply Separator _________________________________
Subject: RE: XJS Micro switch on throttle
Author: “Phil Patton” ppatton@ibm.net at INTERNET
Date: 9/5/96 10:23 PM

According to both the shop manual and the
wiring diagram this switch has nothing whatever to
do with the transmission. It would make no sense
for the transmission kickdown to operate from
such a switch. If this were actually the case,
then the car would NEVER shift into 3rd gear at
anything more than about half throttle. This
switch, in fact, goes to the ECU and richens the
mixture, which also occurs below certain levels
of vacuum. Furthermore, the switch is only used
on cars shipped to North America. At least this is
what Jaguar thinks.
Phil


From: viadata@interramp.com (David Hurlston)
Date: Fri, 06 Sep 1996 09:11:39 -0700
Subject: XJ40 A/C intermittent

Quang Ngo writes

Summer is still around, and the AC in my 89 JX40 stops working. Some day
if I’m luckly it works, and the rest of the week I’m sweat. Where is the
relay for the AC fan located?

Another possible cause is a bad microswitch in the A/C control assembly.
This is apparently quite common. The microswitch is located at the top of
the switch assembly in the console. Micheal Neal put me on to this and told
me how to get at the switch assembly. If you need instructions - let me know.

Dave
('90 XJ40, '91 Lotus Esprit)


From: Jim Van Riper jvr@informix.com
Date: Fri, 06 Sep 1996 09:13:55 -0500
Subject: Series II E-type Engine Removal

I understand that the best way to pull the engine from a Series II E-type
OTS is from the bottom. Is there any documentation available on the web
that covers this method?

Thanks,
jvr


From: mfl@kheops.cray.com (Matthias FOUQUET-LAPAR)
Date: Fri, 6 Sep 1996 16:26:47 +0200 (MET DST)
Subject: overheating

There have been several problems with overheating engines and questions
concerning radiators. Let me ask a simple question : Is it not enough
to measure the in and outlet temperature of the radiator to figure out
if the radiator is working correctly or not ? Somewhere I read in general
the radiator should drop the temperature by at least 10 degrees Celsius.

    • Matthias

From: cgaudi@gaudi.IExpress.Com (Charles Gaudi)
Date: Fri, 6 Sep 1996 10:33:55 -0400
Subject: RE: XJS Micro switch on throttle

Ok now I’m confused. My XJS (1984) has two micro-switches. One of them
definitley controls transmission kickdown. If you unplug it ( as I did
accidently) the transmission will not kick down from 3 to 2. I don’t er.
didn’t know whst the other one is for. Am I the only one with two switches?

X-Authentication-Warning: ekeberg.sn.no: majordom set sender to
owner-jag-lovers using -f
From: “Phil Patton” ppatton@ibm.net
To: “Jaguar Lovers” jag-lovers@sn.no
Date: Thu, 05 Sep 96 22:23:41 -0500
Reply-To: “Phil Patton” ppatton@ibm.net
Priority: Normal
Subject: RE: XJS Micro switch on throttle
Sender: owner-jag-lovers@sn.no
Precedence: bulk

According to both the shop manual and the
wiring diagram this switch has nothing whatever to
do with the transmission. It would make no sense
for the transmission kickdown to operate from
such a switch. If this were actually the case,
then the car would NEVER shift into 3rd gear at
anything more than about half throttle. This
switch, in fact, goes to the ECU and richens the
mixture, which also occurs below certain levels
of vacuum. Furthermore, the switch is only used
on cars shipped to North America. At least this is
what Jaguar thinks.
Phil


From: Hunt Dabney hdabney@earthlink.net
Date: Fri, 6 Sep 1996 08:19:17 -0700 (PDT)
Subject: Re: E gen->alt Heat Question

Thanks John-
Of course, my neeto Lucas alt. has a plastic back cover, we’ll see if it melts!
(It’s only money, right?)
Hunt

At 09:37 AM 9/6/96 -0400, John Napoli wrote:

Hunt, I’ve done this on several cars, although never on an E-Type.

Heat to the alternator has never been a problem – these things are much
better vented than generators. And charging system dependability is about
as good as can be provided you use a dependable alternator! I tend to
swap in good old Delco alternators – cheap, dependable, and parts or
replacements available anywhere. Select ones that are used in cars at
least ten years old for the best price/performance/availability.

John

On Thu, 5 Sep 1996, Hunt Dabney wrote:

For those of you who have converted from generator to alternator,
1) What have you done to control heat to the alternator?
2) How reliable is your charging system?
Thanks!
Hunt


From: Hunt Dabney hdabney@earthlink.net
Date: Fri, 6 Sep 1996 08:19:19 -0700 (PDT)
Subject: Re: '61 E Alternator Conversion, 2nd installment (Success!)

Maybe, maybe not! The pressure here is that the house is being remodeled, if
I don’t drive the E elsewhere, I’m dead!
Hunt

At 09:42 AM 9/6/96 -0400, John Napoli wrote:

Gee, Hunt, at this rate you’ll get your climate control system in the XJ6
running, too! :slight_smile:

John

On Thu, 5 Sep 1996, Hunt Dabney wrote:

'61 E FHC (no longer electron impaired)
'85 XJ-6 (also no longer electron or thermally impaired - it’s been a big
week!)


From: “Quang Ngo” quang@psnw.com
Date: Fri, 6 Sep 1996 08:52:19 -0700
Subject: Re: Where to locate fan relay?

A.J. Beale wrote:

Summer is still around, and the AC in my 89 JX40 stops working. Some day
if I’m luckly it works, and the rest of the week I’m sweat. Where is the
relay for the AC fan located?

I am sorry to be the bearer of bad news, but the problem is unlikely to
be
solved by locating a relay. There are a few of them and lots of other
control devices in the AC system. An intermittent fault, like you have,
could be caused by the water valve to the heater matrix not closing.
This
valve is normally open, and is closed by vacuum from a reservoir via a
vacuum solenoid. On right hand drive cars, the valve is located on the
left
hand side under the bonnet (hood) near the fire wall and just inboard of
the
battery. It is easy to see and has a small plastic tube going to the top
of
it. This tube is red, but has a black fitting on its end, so its colour
isn’t immediately obvious. First, disconnect the plastic tube and
connect a
length of similar diameter plastic tube to it so that, with mouth
suction,
you can check to hear if the valve appears to be closing under vacuum.
Next, run the car engine with the controls set for minimum temperature
(with
a fairly high ambient temperature so that the AC should cool) and check
that
you can feel suction on the tube which connects to the valve. If the
valve
appears to be working alright, please get back to me, but that is my best

guess so far as these valves can also be a victim of the “Bars Leaks”
syndrome. Regards, Alan.

Thanks for your reponse, Alan. That part seems to be working. The problem
is more likely be electrical rather than mechanical, as far as I can
tell. Normally, when it works you can see the LED labelled “AUTO” or
“MANU”
next to one of the knobs. However, when the problem occurs, the LED is not
ON, leading me into thinking that one of the relays is out. In fact,
sometimes
after driving a couple of hours it all the sudden kicks in and the LED
comes
on and cold air comes out; everything starts working again. Once, it works
I don’t dare to turn off the fan; I leave it at low level, and hit the 3rd
huminity button to turn off the compressor.

Many thanks,

  • -Quang

/*--------------------------------------------------------------------------

  • Quang Ngo
  • quang@valleynet.com
  • 89-XJ6 89-300E P90 A3000/25 A1000 SNES PSX C C++ UNIX NT WIN95
    ------------------------------------------------------------------------/

/*--------------------------------------------------------------------------

  • Quang Ngo
  • quang@valleynet.com
  • 89-XJ6 89-300E P90 A3000/25 A1000 SNES PSX C C++ UNIX NT WIN95
    ------------------------------------------------------------------------/

From: Greg DesBrisay gd@CellNet.com
Date: Fri, 06 Sep 1996 09:16:18 PDT
Subject: Re: No Jag content / Auto mailing lists

I’m looking for a Porsche mailing list. Porschephiles seems to be
dead and gone. It has been months and the home page is still down.
Anyone know why?

Not sure why the Porschephiles list went away, I wasn’t paying close
attention to that e-mail when it happened, so my only clue was that
the list e-mail just stopped arriving! Fortunately, most of the
Porschephiles group has migrated to the PorscheFans group at
PorscheFans-request@ioio.com. The list has been broken into several
lists according to car type: PorscheFans-356, PorscheFans-911, -914,

  • -924-944, and -928. I`ve attached instructions on how to register for
    the list below.

Greg DesBrisay
'70 Series II E-Type FHC
'62 AH Sprite
'67 Porsche 912

  • -=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-

From: PorscheFans-911@ioio.com (PorscheFans-911)
To: Greg DesBrisay gd@CellNet.com
Subject: Help for the PorscheFans-911 list.
Date: Wed, 21 Aug 1996 11:33:42 -0700
X-ListManager: Porschefans-request@ioio.com

To send a message to the list, send an email message to
PorscheFans-911@ioio.com

To leave this list, send an email message to PorscheFans-Request@ioio.com
with the body:
leave PorscheFans-911

If your email address has changed since you joined, you can append your
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A summary of list processor commands follows:
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The following PorscheFans lists are available:
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PorscheFans-928


From: Gram@eumetsat.de
Date: Fri, 06 Sep 1996 18:36:00 +0100
Subject: Hej Matthias,

Hej Matthias,

As you might realise, it is not enough to measure the difference between water radiator inlet and
outlet temperatures in order to judge whether the radiator is “good”. The reason is that such
measurement is not a quantitave measurement, but a relative one, and indeed without a
reference to further circumstantial fact, you cant use it for anything.

The amount of energy the radiator can transfer to the surroundings depend on several factors. :
Size, surface, temperature difference between ambient air and the coolant, air speed, air
density, and I’m sure many more.

If you should give a referential point to the 10 degrees difference, you would need to put a
number to all of above, and last but not the least, put a number on the amount of energy the
engine pumps to the radiator, and that is not insignificant.

I’m convinced the phenomenon of heat problem of jags lie not only in the “traditional” faults such
as radiator full of sediment, engine scaled up, incorrect ignition (V12 in particular), but also in a
too small margin, of cooling efficiency, but strongly I believe the arrangement of the waterpump
with too little capacity and a radiator with a fan which is not optimally moving air is a major
cause. I too find the cooling inferior. I will not, and I can not accept to have to turn the airco off in
town on a hot hot day, just because the V12 beast sweats itself to death.

My feeling is I will excahnge the radiator for a better efficiency rad (in the same “frame”) , mount
one two three or four high capacity electrical tornado-generators (fans) and later I will have the
bonnet louvred.
Kirby mentioned the louvres will have ad adverse effect on airco performance leading hot air into
the fresh air intake, but I’ll find a fix for that too.
Also I plan to install another thermostat system - electrically operated. However the last is the
last resort.

One day - One day I will get it to work alright…

Jeffey gram


From: Thomas Alberts talberts@aero.odu.edu
Date: Fri, 6 Sep 1996 12:48:53 -0400 (EDT)
Subject: RE; XJS Micro switch on throttle

  • ----- Begin Included Message -----

From daemon Fri Sep 6 12:44:42 1996
From: Mail Delivery Subsystem
Subject: Returned mail: User unknown
To: talberts
MIME-Version: 1.0
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Auto-Submitted: auto-generated (failure)
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Nobody ever argued that there is only one micro switch. Jim Isabelli’s
original question was about the switch on the throttle cable with green
wires connected to it. That one is the kickdown switch and there is
simply no point arguing over it.

Thomas E. Alberts

Ok now I’m confused. My XJS (1984) has two micro-switches. One of them
definitley controls transmission kickdown. If you unplug it ( as I did
accidently) the transmission will not kick down from 3 to 2. I don’t er.
didn’t know whst the other one is for. Am I the only one with two switches?

According to both the shop manual and the
wiring diagram this switch has nothing whatever to
do with the transmission. It would make no sense
for the transmission kickdown to operate from
such a switch. If this were actually the case,
then the car would NEVER shift into 3rd gear at
anything more than about half throttle. This
switch, in fact, goes to the ECU and richens the
mixture, which also occurs below certain levels
of vacuum. Furthermore, the switch is only used
on cars shipped to North America. At least this is
what Jaguar thinks.
Phil


End of jag-lovers-digest V2 #335


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jag-lovers-digest Friday, 6 September 1996 Volume 02 : Number 336

Wind Deflector
Re: XJS Micro switch on throttle
Re: XJS — Oops!!! (a.k.a. Chassis failure)
Re: SU carbe and angry jags.
RE: XJS Micro switch on throttle
Re: '61 E Alternator Conversion, 2nd installment (Success!)
Re: About the mysteries of the XJ series
Re: Hej Matthias,
Re: XJS Micro switch on throttle
Setting SU carbs with a UNISYN.
Service Manuals
Re: XJS — Oops!!! (a.k.a. Chassis failure)


From: rpeng@cadev6.intel.com
Date: Fri, 6 Sep 96 10:15:22 PDT
Subject: Wind Deflector

Has anyone installed a wind deflector for the sunroof of an XJ40?
Do they work? Meaning, do you get less wind noise and buffeting?
How easy was the installation? Does it require drilling any holes?
And finally, how much does it cost?

Thanks.



Roger Peng (408)765-7863
Intel Corporation
Design Technology, Physical CAD



From: radiowsh@mindport.net (Vincent Chrzanowski)
Date: Fri, 06 Sep 1996 17:16:03 GMT
Subject: Re: XJS Micro switch on throttle

On Fri, 6 Sep 1996 09:32:09 -0400 (EDT), John Napoli wrote:

The second one is mounted over towards the throttle cable, and is actuated
when an extra push on the accelerator cable (when already at wide open
throttle) forces the accelerator cable housing to move (the cable within
can’t move any more because you are already at WOT). This one gives
kickdown. If the cable housing is rusted up and not free to move easily,
no kickdown (been there, done that, too).

Question: will a pushbutton wired in parallel with this switch and
controlled somehow by the driver provide part-throttle kickdown? Or does
the electric kickdown only work if the transmission is also seeing zero
vacuum at the modulator (from WOT)?

When the kickdown switch on my '85 XJ-S went bad I couldn’t get the
transmission out of first gear, regardless of the speed of the car or
amount of throttle depression. The failure mode of the switch was
that the normal-open contacts never opened.

Vince


Vince Chrzanowski radiowsh@mindport.net


“There is not a moment to be lost” - Jack Aubrey



From: “Kirbert” palmk@gcn.scri.fsu.edu
Date: Fri, 6 Sep 1996 13:45:46 -0005
Subject: Re: XJS — Oops!!! (a.k.a. Chassis failure)

John Napoli jgn@li.net:

Cobra Replicars and many hot rods use Jag rear ends with big motors. The
cage is deep sixed, and the center diff is mounted sollidly to the frame.
There are NO trailing arms. The key is that the whole thing is solidly
mounted.

Oh, yeah, there is a middle ground here as well. Racing XJ-S’s often lose
the original trailing arms and replace them with new fabricated arms that
pivot closer to the center line of the car (next to the drive shaft and
longer, too). The cage is not solidly mounted. This supposedly gives
better equations than those provided by the stock trailing arms.

Both of these are workable plans, with differing results. The first
will result in a lot more differential noise inside the car, as well
as an increased feel for small bumps and rough road surfaces.

Both, however, are changes in suspension GEOMETRY. With the stock
system, as the rear wheel travels up and down, it is travelling
around an axis that is at a rather severe angle to the centerline of
the car. IOW, as the wheel moves away from level, it also moves
forward and turns in a little, providing a little rear-wheel
steering. The effect of the stock design is to provide a lot of
stability on the freeway, making the car impervious to crosswinds and
the like. (And you thought it was just because the car is heavy?
Get real)

In racing, such stability due to rear wheel steering is also
desirable, but to a much lesser extent – a lot of it tends to make
the car corner poorly. So, the arm is altered to pivot closer to the
centerline of the car. This reduces the rear wheel steering effect
and allows the driver more control over how the car drives at the
limit of adhesion.

The first option, eliminating the arm entirely and rigidly mounting
the diff, will work – but it makes for a rather poor suspension
geometry, with no rear wheel steering stability at all. On hot
rods, where this idea is often used, the idea is to make the
suspension LOOK pretty by eliminating any extraneous parts (arm and
cage) and chroming the ones that remain. And in both the hot rod
and Cobra applications, the suspension is normally sprung so stiffly
as to not move much anyway, you’re driving a go-kart rather than a
car, suspension geometry is not an issue.

The Jaguar is an excellent handling car even though it is softly
sprung. If you wish to maintain this, I would avoid eliminating the
radius arms. Rearranging them to closer to center is a possibility,
but I probably wouldn’t try it without replacing the cage mounts with
something stiffer like polyurethane; the flex of the stock system may
overpower the small amount of rear-wheel steering stability you end
up with.

– Kirbert | If anything is to be accomplished,
| some rules must be broken.
| - Palm’s Postulate


From: “Kirbert” palmk@gcn.scri.fsu.edu
Date: Fri, 6 Sep 1996 13:45:47 -0005
Subject: Re: SU carbe and angry jags.

Actually only real difference I found with
the carbs were that the FXZ1252F (the front one) carb needle
is about 1 - 1.5 mm shorter than the rear carb ?.

I thought about that, and have decided it ain’t right. Gotta feeling
one of your needles was intended for a different size carb. I would
do either of two things:

  1. Buy one new needle, and see which one it matches. Pitch the
    other.

  2. Buy two new needles, pitch both of the originals.

– Kirbert | If anything is to be accomplished,
| some rules must be broken.
| - Palm’s Postulate


From: “Kirbert” palmk@gcn.scri.fsu.edu
Date: Fri, 6 Sep 1996 13:45:47 -0005
Subject: RE: XJS Micro switch on throttle

“Phil Patton” ppatton@ibm.net:

According to both the shop manual and the
wiring diagram this switch has nothing whatever to
do with the transmission. It would make no sense
for the transmission kickdown to operate from
such a switch. If this were actually the case,
then the car would NEVER shift into 3rd gear at
anything more than about half throttle. This
switch, in fact, goes to the ECU and richens the
mixture, which also occurs below certain levels
of vacuum. Furthermore, the switch is only used
on cars shipped to North America. At least this is
what Jaguar thinks.

Hey, there are two microswitches on the throttle linkage, and one
DOES go to the transmission and operate the kickdown. However, this
discussion has suffered for a lack of clarity on which switch is
being discussed, and both have been described. One has its roller
follow a cam on the bellcrank, and the cam moves the roller at about
the half-throttle position; this operates the ECU, switching from
closed- to open-loop operation. The other is on the throttle cable
attachment, and the roller is moved by the cable HOUSING being
forcibly pulled toward the bellcrank – which only happens when the
pedal is mashed all the way to the floor. This switch operates the
kickdown relay within the GM400 transmission.
– Kirbert | If anything is to be accomplished,
| some rules must be broken.
| - Palm’s Postulate


From: “Kirbert” palmk@gcn.scri.fsu.edu
Date: Fri, 6 Sep 1996 13:45:48 -0005
Subject: Re: '61 E Alternator Conversion, 2nd installment (Success!)

    1) Alt is a little farther from the exhaust system (psychological,

I’m sure)

If heat is a concern – and if an electrical item is near a Jaguar
exhaust manifold, then heat IS a concern – then the thing to do is
provide a heat shield. Just fashion a piece of sheet metal to block
the line of sight between the manifold and the part being protected.
In this case, you could provide such a shield wrapped around the
alternator (careful not to block any ventilation holes), or you could
provide a cover over the manifold. Or both, if you really wanna cut
the heat.

Heat shields are VERY effective. Basically, all radiant heat is
blocked. If the metal is shiny, it is reflected. If not, it is
absorbed, but the shield itself is usually cooled well enough by
passing airflow that it itself doesn’t get hot enough to emit a lot
of radiant heat onward.

My next suprise was the belt. the 3.8 MK II belt is too long, the 3.8 E belt
is just right…

I keep hearing owners of older Jags talk this way. Why would anyone
refer to a “3.8 MK II belt” or a “3.8 E belt”? Belts is belts,
aren’t they? Don’t you just go to the parts store and say “I need a
V-belt this long”? Or is there something really unique about early
Jaguar belts?

– Kirbert | If anything is to be accomplished,
| some rules must be broken.
| - Palm’s Postulate


From: “David Tordoff” dtordoff@flash.net
Date: Fri, 6 Sep 1996 13:11:26 -0500
Subject: Re: About the mysteries of the XJ series

While we are discussing controls, A/C etc. Can anyone tell me what the
purpose is for the small hole on the underside of the top lip of the dash?
The hole is about 1/2 inch in diameter and is positioned directly above the
glovebox. It is definitely there for some sort of purpose that has
continued to elude me.

Additionally, I have noted that there is an indentation on the other side
of the car in the same basic location apparently where the hole would be if
the car were a RHD. This is on an 83 XJ6 SIII. (GOD I’m going to hate it
if it is for something perfectly obvious)


“Always remember, pillage BEFORE you burn!”
David Tordoff - Dallas, TX


From: John Napoli jgn@li.net
Date: Fri, 6 Sep 1996 14:50:18 -0400 (EDT)
Subject: Re: Hej Matthias,

Yes, I am interested in this myself.

Here’s a suggested experiment to see if the hot air exiting would affect
the air inlet.

Drive the car with the bonnet popped open. If you’ve got good struts, the
bonnet will be held up against the safety catch. Now see if you can
detect any change in A/C performance.

Not exactly the same air flow as if you punched louvers, but painless to
try.

I can’t wait to try this in the winter to instantly evaporate all of the
nasty ice and snow! :wink:

John

On Fri, 6 Sep 1996 Gram@eumetsat.de wrote:

My feeling is I will excahnge the radiator for a better efficiency rad (in the same “frame”) , mount
one two three or four high capacity electrical tornado-generators (fans) and later I will have the
bonnet louvred.
Kirby mentioned the louvres will have ad adverse effect on airco performance leading hot air into
the fresh air intake, but I’ll find a fix for that too.


From: John Napoli jgn@li.net
Date: Fri, 6 Sep 1996 14:53:15 -0400 (EDT)
Subject: Re: XJS Micro switch on throttle

OK, so I can get part-throttle kickdown by ading a push button?

John

On Fri, 6 Sep 1996, Vincent Chrzanowski wrote:

When the kickdown switch on my '85 XJ-S went bad I couldn’t get the
transmission out of first gear, regardless of the speed of the car or
amount of throttle depression. The failure mode of the switch was
that the normal-open contacts never opened.

Vince


From: southern@sol.cgd.ucar.EDU (Lawrence Buja)
Date: Fri, 6 Sep 1996 12:55:58 -0600 (MDT)
Subject: Setting SU carbs with a UNISYN.

Jeff moans…
{P.S. - I have finally given up trying to fix my @#$%^&* HIF7
{SU carbs, on the 4.2 litre Engine

Don’t give up. You can set these buggers if you put your mind to it.
Just think of them as big airbrushes which use petrol rather than paint.

First, once the site comes back up (it’s offline right now) download the
SU guide from http://www.team.net/sol/tech/su-tune.html

Below is another run thru the same thing, but requiring special tools
(you can buy both tools for less than what it’ll cost you to have a
pro set your carbs once).

/\ Lawrence Buja http://www.cgd.ucar.edu/cms/southern
_][ southern@ncar.ucar.edu National Center for Atmospheric Research
________________Boulder,Colorado___80307-3000

  • -Date: Tue, 8 Feb 94 12:43:02 PST
  • -From: sfisher@megatest.com (Scott Fisher)
  • -To: swedishbricks@me.rochester.edu
  • -Subject: Tuning Your SU Carburetors

I’ve been meaning to write this up for some time, ever since I did the
SU Performance Tuning 101 a few months ago. This one is more like Basic
SU Adjustment for Happy Driving.

The trick to tuning SU carbs is to understand that there are two things
you need to get right: the air flow, and the fuel mixture. While they
are interconnected, they are also independent, and need to be measured
and adjusted independently.

Special Tools

You will probably need to arrange to buy or borrow a Unisyn flow meter.
The Unisyn is the usual gauge for getting the air flow balanced between
the two carbs. This costs about $20 and is simple to use. It consists
of an adjustable opening (same size circumference, but with a disc on a
threaded rod that you can screw tighter or looser) that you use to
set the level of a little float that rises or falls in a glass tube at
the side of the gauge.

For the fuel mixture, I have become sold on a device called the Gunson
ColorTune (maybe ColourTune, as it’s a British co.). This is a spark
plug with a crystal pressure- and heat-resistant window in it that lets
you see into the combustion chamber while the motor is running. The
color of the flame indicates the mixture richness. It costs about $40,
and while it’s not absolutely essential, it makes life so much easier
that it’s worth the cost.

If you don’t have a Gunson, I’ve included the standard directions here
for determining correct mixture (step 4 of the Adjusting Mixture procedure).

To tune SU carbs, first locate the following components:

  • Throttle linkage nuts. These are the things that connect the
    throttle linkage (the bar connected to your foot through whatever
    means your car uses, cables or rods) to the carburetors’ throttle
    levers.

  • Throttle stop screws. These set the idle speed for each carb,
    and are located typically behind the dashpot, on the same side
    of the carb to which the throttle linkage connects.

  • Mixture adjusting nut. This is the lower of the two nuts at the
    very bottom of the carburetor. Later SU carburetors of the HIF
    type have integral float chambers, on which the mixture is
    adjusted by turning a screw. You’ll need to experiment (and I
    explain how) to see which way makes this richer and which way
    makes it leaner.

  • Lifting pins. These are little wobbly metal pins under the
    dashpot. When you push up on the pin, it raises the piston in
    the dashpot. Find these; they’re crucial if you don’t have a
    Colortune. If you don’t have or can’t find them, you can raise
    the piston with a flat-bladed screwdriver pushed down the throat
    of the carb and twisted to lift it.

  • The bridge. This is the part inside the carburetor, where the
    gas jet opens into the airstream. You’ll see a needle inside
    the jet, and the jet itself should be a few fractions of an inch
    down from the bridge itself. The jet is the brass tube that sits
    in the center of the bridge, with a tapered needle poking down
    into it.

  • The choke linkage nuts. Comparable to the throttle linkage nuts
    (and usually the same size), but on the linkage that goes between
    the choke cable and the mixture adjustment mechanism. They make
    sure that both carbs are enriched when you pull on the choke.

Balancing The Air Flow

  1. Start with the engine warmed up to operating temperature and
    perform your standard ignition tune-up (points gap, timing, spark
    plug gap, new condenser, etc.) first. If you’ve got a timing light
    and a dwell meter, you can verify all that stuff independent of the
    way the car is running. When it’s warm, shut the motor off and
    remove the air filters.

  2. Begin by balancing the air flow. To do this, first loosen
    the throttle linkage nuts. Leave them connected, just loosen them
    half a turn or so.

  3. Back out the throttle stop screws till you can see that they
    are just touching the throttle stop. Then open each carburetor
    (that is, lower the throttle stop screw) 1-1/2 turns of the throttle
    stop screw and start the engine. It will probably idle at about
    2000 RPM; don’t worry.

  4. Put the Unisyn over either carb and adjust the orifice in the
    Unisyn till the little float at the side rests at the middle of its
    graduated tube. (Pre-diagnostics: if the idle drops and the car
    wants to die when you slap on the Unisyn, the carb is too rich; if
    the idle soars upwards, it’s too lean.) Hold the Unisyn over the
    carb for only long enough to see the level of the float, then
    remove it.

  5. Place the Unisyn on each carburetor in turn to check its flow,
    adjusting the throttle stop screws until both carburetors register
    the same position on the graduated tube of the Unisyn. (The float
    will probably move either up or down in the tube, which is why you
    want to center it in Step 4.) When both carburetors flow the same
    amount of air, tighten the throttle linkage nuts, adjusting for
    the amount of free-play between the linkage and the throttle stops
    that your manual calls for (probably about 0.006"). Your goal
    should be to achieve the lowest possible idle with both carbs
    balanced and the engine running smoothly. (Note that the idle speed
    will very probably rise as you get the mixture correct.)

If you’ve taken more than five minutes to do this, rev the engine
to over 2500 RPM (assuming the idle isn’t already that high) for
thirty seconds or so to clear the spark plugs. Then adjust the
mixture.

Adjusting The Mixture:

Note: in the following procedure, one “flat” is the basic increment of
adjustment, and refers to 1/6 of a turn of the mixture adjusting nut.
This corresponds to the flat faces on the nut.

I’m going to give instructions for SUs with the separate float
chambers. If you have the HIF integral-float carbs, you’ll have
to look in a manual to see whether you turn the mixture screw to
the right or the left to make it richer or leaner; I’ve done that
once but I can’t remember. Alternatively, you can – with the
motor shut off – peer down the throat of the carb and turn the
mixture screw while watching the top of the jet. Remember that
moving the top of the jet up will lean out that carb, while moving
the top of the jet down will richen it.

  1. Shut the car off and loosen the choke linkage nuts.

  2. Adjust the mixture nuts (screws) fully lean.

For separate float-chamber cars, this means raising the mixture nut
all the way up against the bottom of the carb (or rather, against
the spring). For HIF carbs, you can try turning the screw while
looking down the throat to see which way the jet is moving. In either
case, the idea is to zero out the jet: raise it all the way up in
the bridge.

  1. Now drop the jet an equal amount – two full turns for HS-type carbs,
    two full turns (I believe) for HIFs. Then start the car.

Note: In the following step, you might want to consider adjusting the
carburetors one-half a flat too lean, as the mixture will be enriched
when you put the air filters (which restrict air flow) on at the end
of the tuning process.

  1. Raise the lifting pin (or use a screwdriver if you don’t have the
    pins) so that the piston rises no more than 1/16". Listen to the engine’s
    exhaust note and compare it to the following conditions:
  • If the exhaust note rises and stays high till you drop the piston,
    this carburetor is adjusted too rich. Turn the mixture nut one
    flat (one-sixth of a turn) up, moving the jet toward the bridge,
    then repeat Step 4.

  • If the exhaust note falls and the car sounds as though it is going
    to stall, this carburetor is adjusted too lean. Turn the mixture
    nut one flat (one-sixth of a turn) down, moving the jet away from
    the bridge, then repeat Step 4.

  • If the exhaust note rises briefly and then settles back down to
    something like the original RPM level, this carburetor is set
    correctly. When you have achieved this setting for both
    carburetors, continue with Step 5.

  1. Tighten the choke linkage nuts so that the choke cable will pull
    an equal amount on both mixture nuts when you pull the knob.

  2. At this time, I find I usually have to adjust the idle again because
    getting the fuel mixture right usually changes the idle speed. Since you
    know you have the throttles synchronized, I normally just adjust the
    idle without loosening the throttle linkage. The easiest way is to screw
    one of the screws out till it doesnt’ even touch the throttle stop, then
    use the other to get the idle speed right. When that’s done, you can screw
    the other stop screw down till it just touches the stop on that carb and
    you’re set.

  3. Replace the air filters and go for a test drive!

Notes

SU carburetors are most fuel-efficient when slightly lean, and provide
the most power when they are slightly rich. You can use this knowledge
to provide a certain amount of tuning for the kind of driving you do.
If you learn to read spark plugs, you can get a basic idea of what your
engine’s condition is and make fine adjustments to the mixture nuts
accordingly.

If you have a ColorTune, you simply install it in place of one of the
plugs, then adjust the carburetor that feeds that cylinder (the front
carburetor for 1 & 2, the rear for 3 & 4). The ColorTune will let you
see the color of the flame. White flashes mean too lean; yellow flame
means too rich. Blue (like a Bunsen burner) is correct, and blue with
a faint orangish tinge is the best for power.

You can also modify your car’s throttle response characteristics slightly
by adjusting the viscosity of the oil in the dashpot damper. SUs are
set up so that a thicker oil will resist the piston’s attempt to rise
in the dashpot for just long enough that the engine’s increased load
(when the throttle is opened) will pull more fuel across the bridge;
this enriches the mixture and temporarily bumps power up to help the
engine achieve higher speed more readily.

If you modify your engine, you will probably need to modify your needles,
as it is the needle profile that determines the mixture curve for different
air-fuel loads.

If you experience uneven idle, hunting, or an idle that changes (rises
or falls) as the engine’s temperature climbs or drops, you probably have
vacuum leaks. The most serious fault on most old SUs is wear in the
throttle shaft area. To test for this, spray some carburetor cleaner
on the outside of the throttle shaft; carburetor cleaner is non-combustible,
and if the engine speed drops, it means some of this is getting into the
air stream from outside the carburetor. You may also have leaks from
the manifolds, from tubing such as the vacuum advance line to the
distributor (if fitted), or from other places; the carb cleaner trick
works well for locating those leaks as well.

Other problems that SU carbs experience involve dirt in the dashpot
and occasionally in the float chamber. The dashpot is a precision
piece of machining that involves very close tolerances so that the
piston doesn’t stick or bind when it rises and falls. A little grit
between the piston and the dashpot can make the car jerk and sputter.
Take the dashpot off, wipe the insides down with carb cleaner and a
lint-free, clean rag, then reinstall it, getting the screws down
tight. Also, don’t swap the pistons between dashpots; they’re matched
to one another so that the clearance between the piston and the wall
of the dashpot makes a tight seal but permits easy rising and falling.

Dirt in the float bowl basically shuts off that carburetor (or can
make it flood open, depending on whether the dirt is wedging the
valve open or closed). You can try rapping on the float bowl with
the handle of a screwdriver, but your best bet is to take the cover
off, clean out the valve fittings, and reinstall everything, with a
new fuel filter for good measure.

Some older SU models also have adjustable floats, in which you need
to set the float height (which basically equals the fuel level in the
float chamber) by bending a brass rod. These carburetors were replaced
in the mid-1960s with carburetors that had fixed, plastic floats which
are basically trouble-free unless abused. The stop at the back of the
floats can break if they are installed badly, and the brass pin that
holds them in place can wear an oval hole in the float pivot. New
floats are fairly inexpensive and aren’t a bad idea if you’re doing
a rebuild.

Grose-Jets are very popular with some people and a big pain for others.
It appears – and this is just conjecture – that Grose-Jets work best
in cars with adjustable floats, as they are longer than the stock SU
float valves. The standard failure for Grose-Jets is to flood the
carburetor. I have never had problems with the stock SU float valves
or floats.

  • –Scott “I like SU carbs – they’re expert-friendly” Fisher

From: Michael Powers/TEIR/Thomson Michael_Powers@teir.com
Date: 6 Sep 96 15:05:09
Subject: Service Manuals

Hello there:

Has anyone used the factory service manual set for the 89 XJ6?
Is it worth the money? Any recommendations for better 3rd party service books
that contain wiring diagrams?

My local Jag dealer wants $185 for the complete set of manuals. Not a bad
price, but I hate to pay that much for something which may not
get used very often.

Thanks for the help,

Mike

/-----------------------------------------------------------------
| mpowers@teir.com
| (703) 736-1832
|
| Would somebody please explain to me those signs that
| say, “No animals allowed except for Seeing Eye Dogs?”
| Who is that sign for? Is it for the dog, or the blind person?
| -Jerry Seinfeld
*-------------------------------------------------------------------*/


From: John Napoli jgn@li.net
Date: Fri, 6 Sep 1996 15:04:32 -0400 (EDT)
Subject: Re: XJS — Oops!!! (a.k.a. Chassis failure)

Good reply. And it raises some questions:

  1. Is there a source for stiffer cage mounts? Or is it a case of using
    the stock setup or going solid?

  2. The XJ-S in question seems to be one of the more powerful ones out
    there. Is the stock setup just unable to absorb the extra power over an
    extended time? So to have more power must you forego the other benefits
    of the stock suspension?

  3. If the failure was hastened by rust in the tub, do we all face this
    problem? Where does the water get in from? How do you check (drill holes
    in some strategic location)? I have seen E-Type tubs cut open; they get
    looking pretty bad inside rust-wise. Do our XJ-S’s have the same
    proclivity?

On Fri, 6 Sep 1996, Kirbert wrote:

The first option, eliminating the arm entirely and rigidly mounting
the diff, will work – but it makes for a rather poor suspension
geometry, with no rear wheel steering stability at all. On hot
rods, where this idea is often used, the idea is to make the
suspension LOOK pretty by eliminating any extraneous parts (arm and
cage) and chroming the ones that remain. And in both the hot rod
and Cobra applications, the suspension is normally sprung so stiffly
as to not move much anyway, you’re driving a go-kart rather than a
car, suspension geometry is not an issue.

The Jaguar is an excellent handling car even though it is softly
sprung. If you wish to maintain this, I would avoid eliminating the
radius arms. Rearranging them to closer to center is a possibility,
but I probably wouldn’t try it without replacing the cage mounts with
something stiffer like polyurethane; the flex of the stock system may
overpower the small amount of rear-wheel steering stability you end
up with.

– Kirbert | If anything is to be accomplished,
| some rules must be broken.
| - Palm’s Postulate


End of jag-lovers-digest V2 #336


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jag-lovers-digest Saturday, 7 September 1996 Volume 02 : Number 337

AK Miller Auction (No Jag Content, but very interesting)
Re: About the mysteries of the XJ series
Re: 96 XJS conv.
Re: overheating
Re: XJS Micro switch on throttle
When the student surpasses the teacher…
'70 XKE intake manifold (dual Strombergs) - question
4.2l and transmission for sale
Re: overheating
Re: When the student surpasses the teacher…
Re: overheating
1985 XJ-S Blown Head Gasket
Hurricane Fran - XJS lowrider (R.I.P.)
Re: XJS Micro switch on throttle
Re: Hej Matthias,
Re: About the mysteries of the XJ series
Re: XJS — Oops!!! (a.k.a. Chassis failure)


From: Michael Frank mfrank@westnet.com
Date: Fri, 6 Sep 1996 16:18:38 -0400
Subject: AK Miller Auction (No Jag Content, but very interesting)

This weekend I will be at East Orange Village, Vermont. I will be attending
the AK Miller estate auction, run by Christies.

Consider if you will, Mr & Mrs AK Miller. No obvious means of support,
although he did something in aviation. After 60 years of frugal living, they
both pass on. When the trustees examine the house, they discover $1,000,000
in gold and silver bullion, some in safes, some hidden under floors, or in
the walls. Ok, so what should this interest the jag lovers? Well it seems
that this couple had a hobby: they went around the country collecting Stutz
automobiles, and building little barns on their property to house them.
There are 45 cars altogether, in original, driven condition: Bearcats,
Blackhawks, DV32 Supers, Vertical 6’s. Some of the greatest cars ever built
in America.

Oh, they will also be auctioning Mr & Mrs Miller’s daily drivers: Volkswagen
Beetles.

I will be taking plenty of photos, so if anyone would like copies, just
e-mail me with an address.

Mike Frank
1969 E-Type 2+2


From: John Napoli jgn@li.net
Date: Fri, 6 Sep 1996 16:23:18 -0400 (EDT)
Subject: Re: About the mysteries of the XJ series

Underneath the mysterious hole is (drumroll)…

… the interior temperature sensor for the automatic climate control
system!!! This betty reports inside temperature to the climate control
brain (that’s being generous). A similar sensor provides outside
temperature. The system notes the different temperatures, the temp you’ve
selected on the dial by the radio, and the operating mode (from the switch
on the other side of the radio) and decides what to do. It’s instructions
are carried out by the servo (flaps open/close, etc.).

It is always on the side with the glovebox.

If you want to annoy a Jag owner, slip a sliver of dry ice up there
on a summer’s day…

Regards,

John

On Fri, 6 Sep 1996, David Tordoff wrote:

While we are discussing controls, A/C etc. Can anyone tell me what the
purpose is for the small hole on the underside of the top lip of the dash?


From: David Engelbach widi@artnet.net
Date: Fri, 6 Sep 96 13:21:27 -0700
Subject: Re: 96 XJS conv.

It’s a 237 HP six. They stop putting the 12 in the XJS in '94 (could be
'95). This six is torquier than the older six even though the horsepower
rating is the same. It handles better than the 12 because it’s not
carrying an extra 200 lbs. As far as economy - are your kidding? It’s a
Jag.


David C. Engelbach E-mail - widi@artnet.net
Valley Village, CA 91601 Voice - 818.506.5441
USA Fax - 818.506.1011



From: “Kirbert” palmk@gcn.scri.fsu.edu
Date: Fri, 6 Sep 1996 16:30:39 -0005
Subject: Re: overheating

Matthias FOUQUET-LAPAR:

Let me ask a simple question : Is it not enough
to measure the in and outlet temperature of the radiator to figure out
if the radiator is working correctly or not?

No, it is not!

Somewhere I read in general
the radiator should drop the temperature by at least 10 degrees Celsius.

At least? You could as easily have said at most!

You see, there are two common problems with radiators. One is that
they get crudded up, both with deposits on the inner surfaces of the
tubes and with mud and bugs stuck on the outside. Either of these
problems will reduce the cooling of the water flowing through, and
the difference between inlet and outlet temperature will go DOWN –
it’ll be coming out nearly as hot as it went in. A reduction in
airflow – for whatever reason – will have the same effect, and
this may not even be the radiator’s fault, the fan may be defective.

The other problem with radiators is they get obstructed, blocking the
flow of the coolant through them. In this case, the flow drops way
off, meaning the radiator has more time to cool the small amount of
coolant that does go through. In this case, the difference between
the inlet and outlet temps will go UP – there won’t be much coolant
flowing, but it is getting really cool. Meanwhile, the engine is
dropping valve seats!

– Kirbert | If anything is to be accomplished,
| some rules must be broken.
| - Palm’s Postulate


From: Thomas Alberts talberts@aero.odu.edu
Date: Fri, 6 Sep 1996 16:43:57 -0400 (EDT)
Subject: Re: XJS Micro switch on throttle

It would be easy enough to try. I think kickdown can be inhibited
by the vacuum modulator and the trans governer. Otherwise I don’t
see how the kickdown servo can tell the difference between the
micro switch and you own pushbutton. (Possibly must be in open-loop
mode.)

Thomas E. Alberts

OK, so I can get part-throttle kickdown by ading a push button?


From: John Napoli jgn@li.net
Date: Fri, 6 Sep 1996 16:45:21 -0400 (EDT)
Subject: When the student surpasses the teacher…

I have a friend who is interested in automobiles, especially higher
performing luxury machines. For some time I’ve been urging him to
consider a Jag (and he has been kept up to date on my own XJ-S
adventures).

Two months ago, he called me up, telling me about a sweet '87 XJ-S he
had seen advertised for sale. It sounded like a low-miles creampuff. He
wanted to know what to look out for.

I spent an hour describing the known trouble spots, and additionally
encouraged him to bring the car in to an authorized Jag dealer for an
inspection. I didn’t hear anything more from him until recently, when he
showed up in my driveway with the car.

The thing is beautiful. Very low miles, garaged all its life: a real
mint example, and he got it for a song.

So now, of course, I’m feeling pretty bad: his car is a lot nicer than
mine! Not fair! But it gets worse!!!

It seems that he and his wife are regulars at a restaurant in New Jersey
also frequented by a senior Jag executive (apparently Jag has
offices somewhere in Northern Jersey). My friend and his wife are having
dinner, having driven up in their ‘new’ XJ-S. They brag about their car
to the proprietor, who introduces them to the Jag exec. She in turn shows
them the light blue XJ8 she had temporary custody of. Not fair!! But
wait, it gets worse!!!

My friend mentions to her that he was interested in obtaining service
manuals. And the next time he and his wife visit the restaurant, what do
you think is waiting for them??? Why, a gift-wrapped, complete and
complimentary set of factory manuals!

NOT FAIR!!!

Boy, how often does all your bragging about Jaguars fall on deaf ears??
This is one case where the student beat the teacher!!!

John


From: David J Shield David_J_Shield@ccm.fm.intel.com
Date: Fri, 06 Sep 96 14:04:00 PDT
Subject: '70 XKE intake manifold (dual Strombergs) - question

 Hi All,
 
 The other day I was looking at the engine of the '70 E 2+2 and I found 
 something strange.  I was inspecting the general integrity of the 
 vacuum hoses and wondering whether to replace them all as a matter of 
 course (as you recall, I just bought this car from the OO - Original 
 Owner).  I tugged on one of the hoses and here's where it fell off of, 
 and what I found:
 
 At the back end of the manifold (this strange thing that routes the 
 mixture through a long, heated path at low throttle and bypasses that 
 long path at high throttle), there are two coolant fittings.  In 
 between, there is a small (brass?) pipe, over which is a vacuum hose 
 that travels to the air cleaner box.  That particular fitting has been 
 crimped closed, and looks kind of corroded (blue).  The coolant 
 fittings are intact and look happy.
 
 What is this fitting and what function should it perform?
 
 This is an emission-controlled (kinda) car with dual Strombergs, if 
 that helps.
 
 I start my 8-week sabbatical on Monday PM.  I bought an E and air 
 tools for my birthday.  Ready for fun.
 
 Thanks.
 
 David 
 '70 XKE 2+2 with above-mentioned problem - maybe no problem?
 '84 XJ6 VDP 

From: rsgallo@ix.netcom.com
Date: Fri, 06 Sep 1996 16:44:58 -0700
Subject: 4.2l and transmission for sale

To all: I have a 4.2l I6 for sale with autotrans. It was removed for a
conversion (not by me). It has the typical head problems with fluid
leakage. I would like to find a good home. Make offer. Mid-Missouri, USA
location. Thanks Bob Gallo, rsgallo@ix.netcom.com


From: Peter Carpenter 106257.3334@CompuServe.COM
Date: Fri, 6 Sep 1996 17:44:50 -0400
Subject: Re: overheating

There have been several problems with overheating engines and questions
concerning radiators. Let me ask a simple question : Is it not enough
to measure the in and outlet temperature of the radiator to figure out
if the radiator is working correctly or not ? Somewhere I read in general
the radiator should drop the temperature by at least 10 degrees Celsius.

    • Matthias

Hi, I am sure none of you want to hear about my TVR again, but here it
comes. My temp measurements for input and output made it seem as though the
rad was behaving perfectly. The engine still overheated. But the rad was
partially blocked for water and air: the small air-flow cooled the small
water-flow just right.
As you say - there have been a lot of overheating problems recently, and
there just don’t seem to be any short cuts or easy fixes…

Peter Carpenter
1967 420
UK


From: “Lee Walden” lwalden@ebmud.com
Date: Fri, 6 Sep 1996 15:08:45 -0700
Subject: Re: When the student surpasses the teacher…

John wrote:


My friend mentions to her that he was interested in obtaining
service
manuals. And the next time he and his wife visit the
restaurant, what do
you think is waiting for them??? Why, a gift-wrapped,
complete and
complimentary set of factory manuals!

My brother told me that some guy offered Lotus a deal to put
all of the service manuals for the Esprit on a CD-ROM. They
“rewarded” him with a brand new Esprit Turbo. Talk about
not fair…
Lee


From: “Lee Walden” lwalden@ebmud.com
Date: Fri, 6 Sep 1996 15:17:14 -0700
Subject: Re: overheating

Kirby wrote:

You see, there are two common problems with radiators. One is
that
they get crudded up, both with deposits on the inner surfaces
of the
tubes and with mud and bugs stuck on the outside. Either of
these
problems will reduce the cooling of the water flowing through,
and
the difference between inlet and outlet temperature will go
DOWN –
it’ll be coming out nearly as hot as it went in. A reduction
in
airflow – for whatever reason – will have the same effect,
and
this may not even be the radiator’s fault, the fan may be
defective.

You also should state that you’ll transfer more heat energy by
increasing the flow through the radiator. e.g.

On a solar swimming pool heater, at a slow flow rate the temperature delta of the inlet vs. outlet will be very high, but you’ll get a better heat transfer rate at higher flow rates. The water temp at the outlet won’t be much greater than the inlet but the energy transfer will be greater for any given period of time. Best bet is to perform a reverse flush of the system and heater core at least every two years, and a refill with a good 50/50 mix of antifreeze. Lee From: Brent Eagling brent@filoli.com Date: Fri, 6 Sep 96 15:41:56 -0700 Subject: 1985 XJ-S Blown Head Gasket Ladies and Gents, I have an opportunity to purchase a 1985 XJ-S for $3,000 USD. It’s in excellent condition with 80,000 orginal miles. Is it worth it to mess with the blown head gasket? What cost would I be looking at to repair it? Is it a difficult job? Any inputs/recommendations would be greatly appreciated. Brent 1953 XK-120 OTS 1955 VW Beetle Convertible (36 wopping Horsies!) 1986 BMW 535i From: Juliansean@aol.com Date: Fri, 6 Sep 1996 18:41:33 -0400 Subject: Hurricane Fran - XJS lowrider (R.I.P.) Hurricane Fran To the Jag-lovers mailing list. I�ve never experienced a hurricane before so the feeling of powerlessness is strangely interesting. It�s 4:00 AM and the wind is still building. Nothing can stop it. Earlier this evening I deliberated on what to do to prepare for Fran�s landfall. I covered my XJS with the cover and two tarps� tied down really well with rope. I thought long and hard about where to position the car in the driveway to minimize the possibility of trees falling on it. I have lots of huge oak trees in the yard, but no garage. I would have driven the car elsewhere out of harm�s way but I can�t drive it. It just came back from the body restoration shop and I haven�t had chance to put the interior back in. So, I choose to move it to the end of the driveway furthest from the trees and then parked my Isuzu trooper an a vain protective stance thinking it could perhaps offer some protection as a sacrificial shield. Came in, settled in for the duration had a beer. Then the winds started building. Things started hitting the roof. I walked outside once and came back in because tree branches were flying everywhere. I knew that some of the trees were likely to fall. They were just too big, too old, and leaning just a bit too much. The first one sounded like distant thunder as it cracked then a horrendous fright as it hit the roof of the house. By now the power was off and there was no light outside. I peered out of the window and could barely see the Jag, but it looked OK. I scrambled up in the attic to bring down the seats, new carpet, dash etc. where I had been storing them. The tree had punctured the roof and rain was pouring in. While I was up there the storm intensified and I heard another tree fall. The wind seems to be going in cycles up and down with some regularity. Shingles were strewn inside the attic. I knew this was very serious now. I tried to time quick sprints into the attic to fetch parts during the lulls in the storm. When I opened the front door of the house I was greeted by a tree trunk. Part of the roof had been torn off and the side door was blocked by a tree. I was actually imprisoned in my own house with no power, no telephone, no radio. Isolated and powerless. I tried stabbing at the outside darkness with the flashlight through the broken glass windows, but the driving rain made it impossible to see what was going on. Strangely, the best way to see was to turn the flashlight off and wait for an occasional car to pass by (yes, some people were still driving!). This way I could make out the silhouette of the trees from the headlights and see what was still standing. Two 6 foot dia. oaks were not where they used to be anymore. One of them was lying squarely across the Jag. A wave of sickness swept over me. Each passing car produced a flash image of the crushed car until finally I believed it - it was gone. I cannot describe the feeling of knowing that all the hours of work and care to restore every bit of wood and leather rust and bolt and bushing had just been annihilated in 2 seconds. It has nothing to do with the money. I�m sure it�s totalled. The sickest part is that just last week my insurance agent told me that the car had to be 10 years old to get increased insurance coverage. I would have been 10 in January. Any feedback on advice, to keep for parts or not, market values (I�ll have to deal with insurance people) would be much appreciated. By the way, wasn�t someone selling a convertible XJS on this list not too long ago?? I forgot who it was but please contact me. Thanks for listening. Julian Mullaney 1987 XJS Convertible (now with VERY low ride height) From: “Kirbert” palmk@gcn.scri.fsu.edu Date: Fri, 6 Sep 1996 18:51:06 -0005 Subject: Re: XJS Micro switch on throttle Question: will a pushbutton wired in parallel with this switch and controlled somehow by the driver provide part-throttle kickdown? Or does the electric kickdown only work if the transmission is also seeing zero vacuum at the modulator (from WOT)? Of course, this begs the question: Why would you want to do such a thing? You can always just pull the shifter into 2nd. When the kickdown switch on my '85 XJ-S went bad I couldn’t get the transmission out of first gear, regardless of the speed of the car or amount of throttle depression. The failure mode of the switch was that the normal-open contacts never opened. Cool! At least your kickdown solenoid worked. Mine never made any difference at all, you could take the switch out and throw it over your shoulder for all the effect it had. Kirbert | If anything is to be accomplished, | some rules must be broken. | - Palm’s Postulate From: “Kirbert” palmk@gcn.scri.fsu.edu Date: Fri, 6 Sep 1996 18:51:06 -0005 Subject: Re: Hej Matthias, Jeffey gram: strongly I believe the arrangement of the waterpump with too little capacity… Hey, I’m the one with the XJ-S that has absolutely no tendency to overheat. One thing I suppose I should note: One time, while fiddling around with the water pump, I cracked the cast iron impeller. Too cheap and too stubborn to just fork over the $$$ for a new one, I went down to the local junkyard and got one off an OLD Chevy waterpump. The impellers themselves were very similar in size and shape, close enough that the Chevy one would fit. It was a tiny hair smaller in diameter, no more than 1/8" as I recall, which has an effect on centrifugal pumps but I wasn’t gonna sweat it. It also was not quite as deep as the Jaguar pump impeller; IOW, the vanes did not stand as tall, so the openings between them were a little smaller. Again, I was willing to try it anyway. The more startling difference, though, was in the arrangement of the vanes themselves. The original Jaguar impeller had radically backward-sloping vanes, while the Chevy part had nearly radial vanes with only a small amount of backward lean. For those unfamiliar with the nature of centrifugal pumps, I will explain the importance of the vane angle. When you use very backward-sloping vanes, you are looking for high flow but not necessarily a lot of pressure; they will, however, provide good flow at low RPM/low pressure. Going toward more radial vanes means you’re more interested in pressure – which may be necessary to achieve adequate flow. And most centrifugal pumps (not necessarily automotive coolant pumps, I mean centrifugal pumps in general) have FORWARD-sloping vanes, for maximum pressure – but most such pumps operate at a fixed speed and don’t have to worry about low speed/low pressure flow, which suffers somewhat. I have never mentioned this impeller substitute in my booklet, primarily because it was NOT a perfect fit. But seeing as how I seem to be the only one around here who lives in a hot climate and has no overheating problems, maybe there’s a clue here somewhere. The next time somebody has a pump off (or a spare laying around), take it down to the local parts store and compare the impeller with those on the various pumps on the shelf. Tell us if there appear to be any that would be an excellent fit, and if any have vanes that look like those on the Jag impeller. Jag impellers have steeply backward-sloping vanes, and nobody else does. Jaguars have a reputation for overheating, and nobody else does. Connection? Kirbert | If anything is to be accomplished, | some rules must be broken. | - Palm’s Postulate From: “Kirbert” palmk@gcn.scri.fsu.edu Date: Fri, 6 Sep 1996 18:51:05 -0005 Subject: Re: About the mysteries of the XJ series David Tordoff: While we are discussing controls, A/C etc. Can anyone tell me what the purpose is for the small hole on the underside of the top lip of the dash? The hole is about 1/2 inch in diameter and is positioned directly above the glovebox. It is definitely there for some sort of purpose that has continued to elude me. This is the air intake for the air temperature sensor for the A/C control. Rather than just put the sensor out there where it could just sense the air, they hid it and bring the air to it. There is a hose to one of the blowers, arranged so that the airflow blowing through a duct draws air through this opening, past the sensor and through the hose. Classic British overdesign with poor results, the system never seems to hold temp as well as you’d like. Kirbert | If anything is to be accomplished, | some rules must be broken. | - Palm’s Postulate From: “Kirbert” palmk@gcn.scri.fsu.edu Date: Fri, 6 Sep 1996 18:51:06 -0005 Subject: Re: XJS — Oops!!! (a.k.a. Chassis failure) John Napoli: 1) Is there a source for stiffer cage mounts? Or is it a case of using the stock setup or going solid? I have not seen any alternative mounts offered. A shame, too, I bet there’d be a market. But the more common fix is to ADD a support, usually some kind of link from the bottom center area of the cage forward, parallel to the drive shaft, to some bracket attached to the floorpan. Rubber doughnuts on both ends, like an anti-sway bar link. The result is that the cage is held much more securely without stiffening the existing mounts themselves, and there’s probably a lot less stress on some other components as well. I would like to take this opportunity to point out that if one was to go to totally solid mounts, it would be a good idea to toss the trailing arms at the same time. It would probably still work with the trailing arms, but only because of the rubber mounts at the end of them, which will be much more highly stressed than before. In order for the trailing arms to move through their arc, the cage must rock forward and back slightly. If it is rigidly mounted, the rear wheels can only go straight up and down, they cannot move forward with the arc of the trailing arm. So, the rubber joints would have to stretch and the arm is really doing more harm than good, might as well remove it. 2) The XJ-S in question seems to be one of the more powerful ones out there. Is the stock setup just unable to absorb the extra power over an extended time? So to have more power must you forego the other benefits of the stock suspension? It’s my understanding that any effort toward giving the XJ-S a serious hole-shot capability endangers the rear cage mounts. My own car hauls a__, but I don’t push it very often at all, probably have just avoided problems for myself. Again, the standard fix is that link holding the bottom of the cage; I’ll probably rig one for my car one of these days. In the case of the trailing arm forward mounts pulling out, I had asked about rust because I had heard about it being a problem here and sure enough, rust was involved. I can’t say I’ve ever heard of a stress failure at these mounts without a rust condition. 3) If the failure was hastened by rust in the tub, do we all face this problem? Where does the water get in from? How do you check (drill holes in some strategic location)? I have seen E-Type tubs cut open; they get looking pretty bad inside rust-wise. Do our XJ-S’s have the same proclivity? Some quote I heard recently, supposedly from some old-timer at Jaguar upon hearing a speech from somebody about rust protection in hidden sections of the body: “Y’know, if it didn’t show, we never bothered to paint it.” There are guys here more adept at anti-rust practices than I, and one of the discussions has been going on recently. I can only say that, clearly, this particular spot is one where attention is warranted. Kirbert | If anything is to be accomplished, | some rules must be broken. | - Palm’s Postulate End of jag-lovers-digest V2 #337 ******************************** Return-Path: @owner-jag-lovers-di1 Received: (from majordom@localhost) by ekeberg.sn.no (8.7.5/8.7.3/on4) id for jag-lovers-digest-out; Sat, 7 Sep 1996 17:02:37 +0200 (MET DST) Date: Sat, 7 Sep 1996 17:02:37 +0200 (MET DST) Message-Id: 199609071502.RAA25566@ekeberg.sn.no X-Authentication-Warning: ekeberg.sn.no: majordom set sender to owner-jag-lovers-digest using -f From: @owner-jag-lovers-di1 To: jag-lovers-digest@sn.no Subject: jag-lovers-digest V2 #338 Reply-To: jag-lovers@sn.no Errors-To: @owner-jag-lovers-di1 Precedence: bulk X-Newsgroups: mail.jag-lovers-digest jag-lovers-digest Saturday, 7 September 1996 Volume 02 : Number 338 1975 XJC Water light on XJS Re: Water light on XJS [XK Engines] Rebuild Questions Re: Service Manuals Re: E gen->alt Heat Question Re: [XK Engines] Rebuild Questions Re: E gen->alt Heat Question Re: '61 E Alternator Conversion, 2nd installment (Success!) Re: '61 E Alternator Conversion, 2nd installment (Success!) Re: Water light on XJS RE: About the mysteries of the XJ series RE:Hej Mathias Re: 1985 XJ-S Blown Head Gasket O2 Reset Button on XJ6 Re: Brass vs Stainless–Brake Cylinder sleeve Re: When the student surpasses the teacher JAG - Michigan Concours Re: Brake pedal to the floor Re: RE : Jump start and damages (long) From: Brent Eagling brent@filoli.com Date: Fri, 6 Sep 96 16:36:19 -0700 Subject: 1975 XJC Folks, Another opportunity I have: 1975 XJ12C with 65k original miles. Car is currently not running and the reason is unknown (could be a dead battery for all I know at this point) . The current owner is asking $3,000 USD or best offer. I have yet to see the car but he says it is in perfect shape. It’s been sitting in a garage for a bunch of years now and the guy just wants to get rid of it. The car is located about 2 hours away from me so it will take some effort to check it out. What do you current XJC owners recommend that I do? Brent From: terry_craig@mindlink.bc.ca (terry_craig) Date: Fri, 06 Sep 1996 16:37:13 -0700 Subject: Water light on XJS I hope someone out there will be able to answer my question about the “Water” light on the dash of my 1980 XJS. Even with the rad full, the reservoir full, the left-most lamp on the dash continues to blink. Nowhere in the manual can I find a reference to where this sensor is located and the local Jag shop thought it might be the windshield washer level. Anyone seen this before? thanks! regards, terry, the JagMan terry_craig@mindlink.bc.ca (604) 533-6728 home (604) 533-6729 fax (604) 645-5071 pager From: kew@hutch.com.au Date: Thu, 07 Sep 1995 11:39:34 +1100 Subject: Re: Water light on XJS terry_craig wrote:

I hope someone out there will be able to answer my question about the
“Water” light on the dash of my 1980 XJS.

Even with the rad full, the reservoir full, the left-most lamp on the dash
continues to blink. Nowhere in the manual can I find a reference to where
this sensor is located and the local Jag shop thought it might be the
windshield washer level.

Anyone seen this before? thanks!

regards, terry, the JagMan

terry_craig@mindlink.bc.ca

(604) 533-6728 home
(604) 533-6729 fax
(604) 645-5071 pager
Hi Terry,

I have an '85 XJ-S. My low coolant level warning light was coming on. I
was losing water from the cooling system. There is a probe in the
expansion tank that senses when water level is low and lights a warning
light on the dash. There may be a problem with the probe perhaps.
Unfortunately my expansion tank was rusted out and leaking and a
replacement (I found out yesterday) is AUD$300-00. Needless to say it
went to the radiator place for repairs. A second thought is that the
cooling system may not have been bled properly causing airlocks but
these are both guesses are for you to consider. Good luck.

Nathan Campbell
85 XJ-S


From: Kroppe kroppe@mich.com
Date: Fri, 06 Sep 1996 22:23:33 -0400
Subject: [XK Engines] Rebuild Questions

Greetings All -

My block is now at a machine shop and upon preliminary inspection, the
machinist said “it looks pretty good”.

Questions:

  1. Has anyone rebuilt an XK engine without needing to regrind the
    crankshaft
    main bearings and crankpins (big ends)? I’m looking for anyone with
    data
    which says their crankshaft journal measurements were within
    specifications
    after xxx,000 miles. (My engine has 96,000 miles on it.)

  2. How many of you out there have replaced the bronze bush which guides
    the
    oil pump driveshaft/distributor shaft? Are there inside diameter
    specifications
    for this component?

  3. How can I definitively tell what compression ratio my engine is? On
    page 05-2
    of my Series III Service Manual it says I should have 120psi -
    135psi compression
    pressure. I have a U.S. emissions, late 1982 vehicle. What
    compression ratio
    pistons do I have?

Thanks as usual for any and all replies.

B.J. Kroppe - '82 XJ6


From: “Robert Johnson, D.Sc.” bjomejag@sover.net
Date: Fri, 06 Sep 1996 22:46:46 -0500
Subject: Re: Service Manuals

Michael Powers/TEIR/Thomson wrote:

Hello there:

Has anyone used the factory service manual set for the 89 XJ6?
Is it worth the money? Any recommendations for better 3rd party service books
that contain wiring diagrams?

My local Jag dealer wants $185 for the complete set of manuals. Not a bad
price, but I hate to pay that much for something which may not
get used very often.

Thanks for the help,

Mike

/-----------------------------------------------------------------
| mpowers@teir.com
| (703) 736-1832
|
| Would somebody please explain to me those signs that
| say, “No animals allowed except for Seeing Eye Dogs?”
| Who is that sign for? Is it for the dog, or the blind person?
| -Jerry Seinfeld
*-------------------------------------------------------------------*/
I have had the updated 88 XJ6 (XJ40) factory manual. It is quite good.
Five volumns cover all aspects. When I received mine, I got two sets
of many pages. The changes were typically minor. I consider the
presentation redundant. Also, I would like to see more explanation of
function to help in diagnosis.

Bob Johnson
Brattleboro, Vt.
XJ40, XJ50


From: rrichardson@eurekanet.com (Bob Richardson)
Date: Fri, 6 Sep 1996 23:17:00 -0500
Subject: Re: E gen->alt Heat Question

For those of you who have converted from generator to alternator,
1) What have you done to control heat to the alternator?
2) How reliable is your charging system?
Thanks!
Hunt
I had my 64 E-Type converted nearly 20 years ago. I have had no heat
problems;the alternator is further from the manifolds than was the
generator. I get very reliable charges. I can see the full charge being
applied when I first start a run and very soon it will indicate a full
charge. It is important to have a top-of-the-line battery to insure good
starting in the middle of a cold spell. I recommend at least an 850-rated
battery.


From: Hunt Dabney hdabney@earthlink.net
Date: Fri, 6 Sep 1996 21:33:36 -0700 (PDT)
Subject: Re: [XK Engines] Rebuild Questions

The size of the dome on the piston is the clue. On my E, I determined that I
have 8:1 pistons (but due to machining, am back nearer 9:1). There are
pictures of both in my factory service manual, which made it easy.
Hunt

At 10:23 PM 9/6/96 -0400, Kroppe wrote:

Greetings All -

My block is now at a machine shop and upon preliminary inspection, the
machinist said “it looks pretty good”.

Questions:

  1. Has anyone rebuilt an XK engine without needing to regrind the
    crankshaft
    main bearings and crankpins (big ends)? I’m looking for anyone with
    data
    which says their crankshaft journal measurements were within
    specifications
    after xxx,000 miles. (My engine has 96,000 miles on it.)

  2. How many of you out there have replaced the bronze bush which guides
    the
    oil pump driveshaft/distributor shaft? Are there inside diameter
    specifications
    for this component?

  3. How can I definitively tell what compression ratio my engine is? On
    page 05-2
    of my Series III Service Manual it says I should have 120psi -
    135psi compression
    pressure. I have a U.S. emissions, late 1982 vehicle. What
    compression ratio
    pistons do I have?

Thanks as usual for any and all replies.

B.J. Kroppe - '82 XJ6


From: Hunt Dabney hdabney@earthlink.net
Date: Fri, 6 Sep 1996 21:33:34 -0700 (PDT)
Subject: Re: E gen->alt Heat Question

Bob-
Thanks! I have the same smooth charging performance. Heat and electronics
(unless contained in evacuated glass bottles), just don’t feel right, given
my professional background!
Hunt

At 11:17 PM 9/6/96 -0500, Bob Richardson wrote:

For those of you who have converted from generator to alternator,
1) What have you done to control heat to the alternator?
2) How reliable is your charging system?
Thanks!
Hunt
I had my 64 E-Type converted nearly 20 years ago. I have had no heat
problems;the alternator is further from the manifolds than was the
generator. I get very reliable charges. I can see the full charge being
applied when I first start a run and very soon it will indicate a full
charge. It is important to have a top-of-the-line battery to insure good
starting in the middle of a cold spell. I recommend at least an 850-rated
battery.


From: Hunt Dabney hdabney@earthlink.net
Date: Fri, 6 Sep 1996 21:33:31 -0700 (PDT)
Subject: Re: '61 E Alternator Conversion, 2nd installment (Success!)

At 01:45 PM 9/6/96 -0005, Kirbert wrote:

    1) Alt is a little farther from the exhaust system (psychological,

I’m sure)

If heat is a concern – and if an electrical item is near a Jaguar
exhaust manifold, then heat IS a concern – then the thing to do is
provide a heat shield. Just fashion a piece of sheet metal to block
the line of sight between the manifold and the part being protected.

Sounds good to me. I saw a wonderful little mod at the Monterey Historics,
by a fellow named Malcom Adams. He had fabricated a stainess shield,
louvered as the bonnet is, which mounted about 1" below the louvers, to
prevent damage to the bonnet paint. Worked great and looked right, too. This
is also on my list of things to do.

My next suprise was the belt. the 3.8 MK II belt is too long, the 3.8 E belt
is just right…

I keep hearing owners of older Jags talk this way. Why would anyone
refer to a “3.8 MK II belt” or a “3.8 E belt”? Belts is belts,
aren’t they? Don’t you just go to the parts store and say “I need a
V-belt this long”? Or is there something really unique about early
Jaguar belts?

Yes, there is. They’re more like “W” belts (notice the reference to grooved
pulleys in the catalogs). They are wider, flatter, and have a groove in the
middle for a ridge which is formed in the pulley. They are non-standard
(believe me, I checked Grainger’s!) So, the choice are the four standard Jag
belts: 2.4L or 3.8L Mk II, 3.8 or 4.2L E.

– Kirbert | If anything is to be accomplished,
| some rules must be broken.
| - Palm’s Postulate


From: “Kirbert” palmk@gcn.scri.fsu.edu
Date: Sat, 7 Sep 1996 02:15:26 -0005
Subject: Re: '61 E Alternator Conversion, 2nd installment (Success!)

Hunt Dabney hdabney@earthlink.net:

…is there something really unique about early
Jaguar belts?

Yes, there is. They’re more like “W” belts (notice the reference to grooved
pulleys in the catalogs). They are wider, flatter, and have a groove in the
middle for a ridge which is formed in the pulley. They are non-standard
(believe me, I checked Grainger’s!) So, the choice are the four standard Jag
belts: 2.4L or 3.8L Mk II, 3.8 or 4.2L E.

Considering what belts look like today, it appears once again that
Jaguar was decades ahead of its time!

Now all you guys need is a set of pulleys to convert those cars to
modern serpentine belts!

– Kirbert | If anything is to be accomplished,
| some rules must be broken.
| - Palm’s Postulate


From: “Kirbert” palmk@gcn.scri.fsu.edu
Date: Sat, 7 Sep 1996 02:15:26 -0005
Subject: Re: Water light on XJS

Terry Craig:

Even with the rad full, the reservoir full, the left-most lamp on the dash
continues to blink. Nowhere in the manual can I find a reference to where
this sensor is located and the local Jag shop thought it might be the
windshield washer level.

The leftmost indicator on the bottom row of the dash is the coolant
level warning light. The sensor on my '83 is on the front left edge
of the radiator, a few inches down from the top, where it’s REALLY
hard to see unless you have the hood removed! I understand it was
later moved to the header tank.

This sensor is really just a terminal in the coolant, measuring the
conductivity of the coolant itself. Therefore, there is a box
somewhere that takes this reading and decides if there is coolant in
there or air, and operates the warning light. You problem might be
in the box rather than the sensor, although I suppose if the sensor
itself is covered with crud it might give a false low coolant
indication.

Sorry, I dunno where the box is.

– Kirbert | If anything is to be accomplished,
| some rules must be broken.
| - Palm’s Postulate


From: Barrie Dawson DAWSONB@btcec3.agw.bt.co.uk
Date: Sat, 07 Sep 96 09:06:54 -0700
Subject: RE: About the mysteries of the XJ series

David,

You are going to hate this, that little hole you talk about is the in-car
sensor for the air-con. Your guess is correct about the blanking plug.

I think you are going to like jag ownership because they fit loads of
“obvious” things that elude just about everyone, at first.

Barrie Dawson
Chatham, Kent England
1985 series III Jaguar Sovereign


From: Barrie Dawson DAWSONB@btcec3.agw.bt.co.uk
Date: Sat, 07 Sep 96 09:21:05 -0700
Subject: RE:Hej Mathias

This radiator thing for series 3’s is a drag and there have been many good
suggestions but I think the point has been missed. From about 1985 Jaguar
had modified the cooling system such that there is only need for auxillary
cooling in extreme cases. Maybe older model owners having overheating
problems should look toward the later model for fixes.

I think the main changes were a slightly larger radiator, larger capacity header
expansion tank, higher pressure cap rating (15 lbs), low temperature thermostat. In
the hotter climates I belive these cars are fitted with 2 electric fans which come
on at around 85 C - 90 C measured at the lower quarter of the radiator core.

Barrie Dawson

Chatham, Kent England
1985 series III Jaguar Sovereign


From: Thomas Alberts talberts@aero.odu.edu
Date: Sat, 7 Sep 1996 08:07:12 -0400 (EDT)
Subject: Re: 1985 XJ-S Blown Head Gasket

I have an opportunity to purchase a 1985 XJ-S for $3,000 USD. It’s in
excellent condition with 80,000 orginal miles. Is it worth it to mess
with the blown head gasket? What cost would I be looking at to repair it?
Is it a difficult job?

My opinion is yes it is worth it and yes it is a fairly difficult job.
If you don’t feel comfortable working on it yourself it would still
probably be worth it to pay for the head gasket job although the job
requires very careful attention to detail and I must admit I’d have
difficulty with trusting it to anyone but a known and trusted Jag
mechanic. Actually I’ve never known anyone I’d trust with this job
although I knoe there are some good ones out there. One good thing is
that you can do it without releasing the A/C freon. Besides the obvious
things like removal of A/C compressor (right head only), fan, cooling
hoses, exhaust manifolds, etc. you have to deal with removal and resetting
of the camshaft, which in turn requires reshimming the valves. Camshaft
removal requires releasing the timing chain tension with “special tools”
which many of us have improvised. The hazard of this step is that the
chain tensioner is usually brittle and often breaks. At this point
substantial additional work is required to replace the tensioner and
extract its broken pieces as it is behind the timing case cover. Kirby’s
book talks about this.

Good luck,
Thomas E. Alberts


From: “Jim Isbell” JISBELLJR@mail.utexas.edu
Date: Sat, 7 Sep 1996 07:47:05 +0000
Subject: O2 Reset Button on XJ6

I am putting the finishing touches on the XJ6 book and need some
information from anyone that knows.

On the US series 3 there is an O2 sensor in the exhaust system. The
reset for one model is in the trunk and there is another under the
hood. Can someone describe this reset unit location and operation?

The Haynes manual only says that you have to go to the dealer to get
it done. I know that is only because they wont tell you how.

On the later model series 3 the reset is in the trunk and I am told you stick a allen wrench in a hole to reset it though I have never done it myself. Anyone have the answer? From: jwbeckmeye@orion.branch-co.lib.mi.us Date: Sat, 07 Sep 1996 10:02:38 -0400 Subject: Re: Brass vs Stainless–Brake Cylinder sleeve At 08:06 PM 9/6/96 -0400, Rrrroxxo@aol.com wrote:

Thanks for asking who did the other sleeves, and how satisfied were you with
White Post as far as service, quality and price. Thanks SS

I’m very satisfied with the work White Post did. The cylinders came back
all rebuilt, re sleeved and powder coated…really look nice…and work well.

FYI, White Post said that the warranty would be voided if I used DOT 5 so
that’s why I went w/ DOT 4. However, this winter the MK II will be off the
road and the jury is still out on how well the new brakes will be working
next spring after sitting all winter.

BTW, the turnaround time at White Post was about a week!

Best regards,
Jim Beckmeyer
Union City, MI
90 Jaguar Sovereign
60 Jag MK II
jwbeckmeye@orion.branch-co.lib.mi.us


From: “BJ Kroppe” wkroppe@ford.com
Date: Sat, 7 Sep 1996 10:04:57 -0400
Subject: Re: When the student surpasses the teacher

John Napoli jgn@li.net wrote:

It seems that he and his wife are regulars at a restaurant in New Jersey
also frequented by a senior Jag executive (apparently Jag has
offices somewhere in Northern Jersey).

Yes, Jaguar North American marketing has their headquarters in Mahwah,
New Jersey, USA.

My friend mentions to her that he was interested in obtaining service
manuals. And the next time he and his wife visit the restaurant, what do
you think is waiting for them??? Why, a gift-wrapped, complete and
complimentary set of factory manuals!

Only marketing people throw around trinkets like that! I rave all the time
about how good my SIII XJ6 to my bosses (some of them Jaguar employees)
and I just get warm smiles and pats on the back! (I don’t mind, tho!)

B.J. Kroppe - '82 XJ6



From: AHDNN1A.RREID01@eds.com
Date: Sat, 7 Sep 1996 10:12:28 -0400
Subject: JAG - Michigan Concours

From: Robert Reid
The Jaguar Affiliates Group of Michigan will be holding its 29th
annual Concours d’ Elegance on Saturday September 14, 1996 at the
Hyatt Regency - Dearborn (Across from the Ford Motor Company
World Headquarters). For more information, please contact:
Marilyn Marcrum Concours d’ Elegance Chairperson
Jaguar Affiliates Group of Michigan
P.O. Box 530432
Livonia, Mi. 48153-0432

 Telephone: (313) 427-1043

Robert J. Reid
65 E Type FHC


From: Jeffrey Gram 101454.2570@CompuServe.COM
Date: 07 Sep 96 10:55:42 EDT
Subject: Re: Brake pedal to the floor

Hi Dave,

Interesting theory you have on the behaviour of partly rusted / uneven surfaced
Master cylinder, posted
on 28/8-96

I cant jugde, since its been a while I fiddled with them, but do continue the
searh for the culprit.

Consider this : If the pedal goes to the floor or “sinks” with slow or low
pressure applied, scouring
past the pitted wall, when do you think it will be worn out). You may not be
able to tell us :frowning: when it
happen going ari\ound thar right bend with screeching TR6 tyres … and the
pedal goes :
+plop+

I would not trust my life on a pitted master brake cylinder wall. Surely a
stainless relined in UK does not cost 200 US dollars ?

Classic Spares in UK tel +44 (0)1992 716236 / fax - 788424, sell Stainless lined
Dunlop brake cylinder
parts starting at 43 Pounds for a MK II, They also have stainless pistons…

I love to look at Jags as well, Somehow the older Series 2 XJ’s look more
“jaguar” than the newer Series 3
?

Regards Jeffrey Gram


From: Jeffrey Gram 101454.2570@CompuServe.COM
Date: 07 Sep 96 10:55:39 EDT
Subject: Re: RE : Jump start and damages (long)

Hi list

I fell over the note from Russ Lehman from 28/8/96 13:34 CET on this issue. A
few corrections and more comments :

On the jump start issue… If I were to jump anothers car, my engine running to send in my alternator charge current into the other’s dead battery, this is no problem. BUT if he (jumpee) then starts his car, his charging system would compete with my charge system and damage my electrical system. Russ , there is no problem here. When jump starting the idea is to fill the jumpee’s battery. By letting the donor car run a little while say 5 to tem minutes, the chance of succesful start is greater. When the receiving car cranks, the power comes from 1) the donor car battery (most) and 2) from the donor car alternator. The split is according to the balance that Ohm’s law prescribes. When the receiving car starts and runs the alternator produces energy and charges the receiving cars battery (to a great extend) and only if the receiving cars alternator voltage is higher than the donor car’s alternator, will a small current flow from the “receiving” car. It is however unlikely, but quite posssible that the receiving cars alternator is able to sustain both charging the dead battery, and still have enough “residual” voltage superiority left to also "charge the donor car. Importantly however , the donor car and the receiving car does not suffer any electrical damage from this (or at least should not). What is very important when jumpstarting (apart from getting the polarity right), is to ensure you have BEEFY cables. It is completely un-understandable, how many useless jump start cables are sold. A car jump start cable should be about 16 square millimeters of crosssection cobber. The handles should be of a powerful “beek” preferably with the cable connecting to both sides of the “teeth”. If a Jump start cable is too wimpy it will : 1) cause a SIGNIFICANT voltage drop and the donor car does only turn slowly or not at all. 2) the cable will melt its insulation, start smoking and whats the use oif that ? I don’t think you can harm the car with the dead battery, because his alternator will send out gobs more current into his dead battery and thus into my system, not the ============= ==== Well , not “thus”, but possible as described above. other way around (unless of course, I’m wrong). A related alternator question: If my engine is running and I disconnect my battery, will: the engine stop, no damage My alternator diodes fry massive electrical damage First : if the alternator is “bad” the engine may stop. Possibly no damage. Some cars will suffer damage (to electrical systems and the alternator) if the battery is taken out while the engine is running. I once had to do this to get the V12 started (left the ligth on for 6 hours - wimpy battery…) I borrowed another mans battery (had no jump cables), undid my battery, and dropped the donor battery in. - started the Jag, turned lights on (to create a load for the alternator and then with 2 helpers :. one held the battery cables firmly attached to the donor battery (by hand) . then on command he disconnects these , and second helper pulls out the donor battery, and I put the original flat battery back in, and first helper connects battery cable terminals immediately. Operation is less than 5 seconds. Now - if the car would be of a kind that would suffer electrical damage when taking the battery out of a running engine, even 5 seconds only could be a killer - so do this at your own risk. The jag manual tells you not to do this, however being an electronics engineer (about 12 years ago), I reasoned that the headlight on will sink enough energy to let the alternator “think” the battery was still in. The alternative for me was to walk home or at least a trouble some way and expoensive way to get professional help. My alternator diodes fry Diodes fry when they are overloaded. By rule this should not be possible, since it would require the alternator to deliver more Amperes than the diodes can handle - which would be a really bad design… Diodes die the overvoltage death mostly, or simply age and then die (tough environment). Massive electrical damage Depends on the car. However note that power charge from a powerful external charger can cause electrical damage to electronics by overvoltage . Batteries should generally not be charged by an Ampere rating above about 10% ot the Ampere hour rating (rule of thump), refer to battery manual or the specifications. For the same reason most cars specify to disconnect the battery leads before welding (to protect the alternator diodes). Many regulators control the field winding to the alternator, won’t the regulator see the high voltage and shut the feed to the alternator off? …all regulators control the field winding, and answer is : In principle Yes, but lets be precise, there is much more to this seeminly “simple” example. : If The donor car alternator regulator “sees” the (marginally higher) voltage from the receiving and started cars alternator, the donor car regulator “thinks” its own battery is fully charged, and regulates the current accordingly lower. However the donor regulator does not see the voltage of the receiving cars regulator voltage. There is namely all the wiring from donor alternator to donor battery and from here through the jumper cables to receiver battery etc. When these wires carry current there is a voltage drop along them. The donor car produces a certain current to its own battery which has just been “partly” surged when the receiving car was cranking. The donor car then charges its battery according to the voltage seen. This causes a voltage drop along the line from donor alternator to donor battery. When the total voltage seen from donor battery + drop along donor regulator (alternator)/donor battery line is less than the voltage regulator setting (13.9 - 14.2 Volts) then the donor alternator will continue to produce the current that satisfies the equation of Ohms law. So if the receiving cars regulator is set to 14.2 volts and the donor car regulatore is set to 13.9, the likely scenario is that the donor car charges its own battery, the receiving car charges its own battery, and a small current might flow from receiving vehicle to the donor vehicle. The Beefier the jump cables the more current will flow but still small and insignificant. If the receiving cars regulator is set to 13.9 and the donor vehicle is set to 14.2 , basically the same scenario take place, however the small current flow from donor to receiver vehicle. Boaters with two batteries have problems if they OOPS! switch batteries when the engine is running. I’m not a boater, so I dont know what “special” system they may have. But basically Ohm’s law is the same in boats. The reason why damages may occur is that the alternator and regulator circuit may be so (stupidly) engineered that the voltage rises on seeing a no-load or open-circuit. The voltage rises then with lightning speed (microseconds) and this may kill the alternator diodes. Such switches (with such sensitive circuits) should be of contact before break type to ensure a continious load during the flick over of the switch There could be more to this topic. Please Join in. Should I have made errors or incorrect assumptions, I pardon, but please respond. I intend to shape this into a FAQ entry. Regards Jeffrey Gram End of jag-lovers-digest V2 #338 ******************************** Return-Path: @owner-jag-lovers-di1 Received: (from majordom@localhost) by ekeberg.sn.no (8.7.5/8.7.3/on4) id for jag-lovers-digest-out; Sun, 8 Sep 1996 15:01:02 +0200 (MET DST) Date: Sun, 8 Sep 1996 15:01:02 +0200 (MET DST) Message-Id: 199609081301.PAA05980@ekeberg.sn.no X-Authentication-Warning: ekeberg.sn.no: majordom set sender to owner-jag-lovers-digest using -f From: @owner-jag-lovers-di1 To: jag-lovers-digest@sn.no Subject: jag-lovers-digest V2 #339 Reply-To: jag-lovers@sn.no Errors-To: @owner-jag-lovers-di1 Precedence: bulk X-Newsgroups: mail.jag-lovers-digest jag-lovers-digest Sunday, 8 September 1996 Volume 02 : Number 339 Re: '61 E Alternator Conversion, 2nd installment (Success!) Re: O2 Reset Button on XJ6 Re: [XK Engines] Rebuild Questions E-Type Stainless Sleeve Pricing Re: Hurricane Fran - XJS lowrider (R.I.P.) Re: 1985 XJ-S Blown Head Gasket back in the fold Oil additives Jaguar XK140 Can You Help 87 XJ6-III for sale/new photos! Re: E-Type window winders XJ40: How does your A/C operate? Exhaust Heat Shield Re: Where to locate fan relay Re:E-Type engine removal RE:Jump start and damages (long) RE: Oil additives Subject: RE: XJ40:How does your A/C operate Re: Water light on XJS From: Hunt Dabney hdabney@earthlink.net Date: Sat, 7 Sep 1996 08:14:25 -0700 (PDT) Subject: Re: '61 E Alternator Conversion, 2nd installment (Success!) Jeez Kirby- Then we could have “Belt Lump” discussions - probably use up all the available internet bandwith. Sure would be nice to be able to get any length, though! Hunt At 02:15 AM 9/7/96 -0005, Kirbert wrote:
Hunt Dabney hdabney@earthlink.net:

…is there something really unique about early
Jaguar belts?

Yes, there is. They’re more like “W” belts (notice the reference to grooved
pulleys in the catalogs). They are wider, flatter, and have a groove in the
middle for a ridge which is formed in the pulley. They are non-standard
(believe me, I checked Grainger’s!) So, the choice are the four standard Jag
belts: 2.4L or 3.8L Mk II, 3.8 or 4.2L E.

Considering what belts look like today, it appears once again that
Jaguar was decades ahead of its time!

Now all you guys need is a set of pulleys to convert those cars to
modern serpentine belts!

– Kirbert | If anything is to be accomplished,
| some rules must be broken.
| - Palm’s Postulate


From: Hunt Dabney hdabney@earthlink.net
Date: Sat, 7 Sep 1996 08:18:06 -0700 (PDT)
Subject: Re: O2 Reset Button on XJ6

Jim-
Pull the access panel from the back of the trunk (oops - boot), and (far) to
the left of the ECU there is a device that looks like it has a motor under
the cover (there is a cylindrical moulding protruding from the case).
Somewhere on this is a little white button that you push. I need to do it
this weekend, and have done it before, so I will post better detail after I
do it.
Hunt

At 07:47 AM 9/7/96 +0000, Jim Isbell wrote:

I am putting the finishing touches on the XJ6 book and need some
information from anyone that knows.

On the US series 3 there is an O2 sensor in the exhaust system. The
reset for one model is in the trunk and there is another under the
hood. Can someone describe this reset unit location and operation?

The Haynes manual only says that you have to go to the dealer to get
it done. I know that is only because they wont tell you how.

On the later model series 3 the reset is in the trunk and I am told
you stick a allen wrench in a hole to reset it though I have never
done it myself.

Anyone have the answer?


From: “Gregory W. Price” gprice@mack.rt66.com
Date: Sat, 7 Sep 1996 09:14:26 +0700
Subject: Re: [XK Engines] Rebuild Questions

From: gprice@rt66.com
To: jag-lovers@sn.no
Subject: Re: [XK Engines] Rebuild Questions
Date: Sat, 7 Sep 1996 09:10:33 +0700

> 1. Has anyone rebuilt an XK engine without needing to regrind the > crankshaft main bearings and crankpins (big ends)? I'm looking for anyone with > data which says their crankshaft journal measurements were within > specifications after xxx,000 miles. (My engine has 96,000 miles on it.)

Though I haven’t rebuilt an XK engine (yet), I have rebuilt
others. I read in a service manual (Haynes, I think :-\ ) that you can just replace
the XK bearing shells after 120,000 miles. However, as far as your
crank goes, it doesn’t matter what anyone else has found on their engine
rebuilds or what the manual says. It all boils down to the condition of
your crank’s journals. If your machinist has mic’d your journals and found them
still within initial specs (see below), free of scoring and pits, no taper or
out-of-roundness on any rod or main journal, then you may get by
without regrinding the crank. On an engine which has been well-cared
for, this is possible. On an engine which has been abused or
neglected, it’s unlikely.

In my SIII service manual, the specs for the crank are as follows:

3.4l engine:

Mains 2.7502 - 2.7497 in (69.855 - 69.842mm)
Rods 2.0861 - 2.0865 in (52.987 - 52.974mm)
(maximum regrind is -.020in (-0.51mm)

4.2l engine:

Mains 2.7500 - 2.7505 in (69.85 - 69.86mm)
Rods 2.0860 - 2.0866 in (52.984 - 53.00mm)
(maximum regrind is -.020in (-0.51mm)

Racers will usually not undercut their cranks, but instead have the
journals built up with welding rod, then recut to the original
manufacturing specs. Street engines (including street rods) can
usually tolerate a .010 - .020 undercut. If you have the journals built up
then recut to the original specs, then be sure that the machinist
rebalances the crank. Balancing the entire reciprocating assembly is
something I do routinely and doesn’t add much to the entire machine
job (~120USD).

It is usually understood, but I’ll repeat it anyway, but find the
best machinist you can. ( I have to travel 75 miles to get to a good
one). Shops that continually upgrade their
equipment and spend a substantial portion of their time doing machine
work for race cars are a good place to start.
Good luck and let us know what you find and how it turns out.

Greg Price
recently purchased '85 VdP
(just beginning to look and behave as it should :-> )
G. W. Price & Company, Ltd
Santa Fe, New Mexico

      Probabilistic Record Linkage Services
Consultants in research, information management 
             and program evaluation

From: rrichardson@eurekanet.com (Bob Richardson)
Date: Sat, 7 Sep 1996 11:29:13 -0500
Subject: E-Type Stainless Sleeve Pricing

Thanks to Meritt Smith, I got a much better price for resleeving a brake
master cylinder in stainless steel from Imperial Machine in Lincoln,
Nebraska, than I did from Stainless Steel Corp. in New York. Imperial
charges $60 plus shipping cost and normally takes two weeks to do the job.
Stainless wants $175 with a four-week wait period. Merrit said Imperial did
a first-class job for him. Anyone else on the list who has experience with
Imperial?
I only got a quote for E-Type resleeving. Imperial’s phone number is:
1-402-488-9450
The mailing address is:

    Imperial Machine Co.
    621 S. 112th St.
    Lincoln, NE  68520

Credit cards not accepted. You must enclose a check with the master cylinder
including shipping cost. In my case (Ohio) I was told $5 would cover a UPS
return shipment. Thus, my total cost will be $65 to have the master
cylinder sleeved in stainless steel.


From: Greg Meboe meboe@mulder.scs.wsu.edu
Date: Sat, 7 Sep 1996 12:22:42 -0700 (PDT)
Subject: Re: Hurricane Fran - XJS lowrider (R.I.P.)

Julian,
My condonlances. Having lost two British sports cars earlier this
year in the house fire, I konw the feeling of helplessness.

	Greg
                        Greg Meboe     meboe@mont-blanc.scs.wsu.edu
		  Web site>> http://www.scs.wsu.edu/~meboe
		    Mechanical Engineer  Boeing Payloads Division
		    '85 XJ-12 H.E. (daily)  '67 Spit-6 '74 TR-6

From: “Kirbert” palmk@gcn.scri.fsu.edu
Date: Sat, 7 Sep 1996 17:43:36 -0005
Subject: Re: 1985 XJ-S Blown Head Gasket

Thomas E. Alberts:

Besides the obvious things like removal of A/C compressor (right
head only), fan, cooling hoses, exhaust manifolds, etc. you have to
deal with removal and resetting of the camshaft, which in turn
requires reshimming the valves.

I think we’re talking about a head gasket replacement here. In that
case, the above is not true. The head can be unbolted, removed, the
gasket replaced, and the whole thing reassembled without ever taking
the camshaft off of the head or fiddling with the valve shims.

It’s not like any of us would actually try this, since once we’re in
there we’d be adjusting the valve clearances anyway. However, the
last time I was there, the valve clearances were ALL WITHIN
TOLERANCE, so I left them alone!

– Kirbert | If anything is to be accomplished,
| some rules must be broken.
| - Palm’s Postulate


From: Licensed jshuck25@mailhost.cinet.co.cn
Date: Sat, 7 Sep 1996 13:34:31 ±900
Subject: back in the fold

greetings from Beijing, China. I’m back and it feels good. Missed all =
the clatter…have only seen two jags here in a month. Capitalism is =
here, but not quite. Did see one guy in an xj40 with a phone stuck to =
his head, so there is hope. The cars around here are a mess. Some of =
the taxis are a loose group of parts all going down the road in the same =
direction. Rode in one that had a worn out horn…We have a car and =
driver. He has a chinese made Audi. Like an old 5000 with a 4 cyl vw =
motor and 5 speed. No British cars on the street, but many new Audi, =
Beemers and Mercs. Yep the BMW’s have their fog lights on. Love it and =
it is an adventure every day. Bottled water is 4 RMB and beer is 2 =
RMB…hmmmmm. 8 RMB to the USD. There are no phone books, no Yellow =
pages, and no checks. I’m coming at you at 26. something so things are =
getting better. Give me a buzz off line…anyone. See Ya…


From: scoleman@pcl.net (Steve Coleman)
Date: Sat, 07 Sep 1996 19:45:06 -0500
Subject: Oil additives

I wonder if there are any opinions out there about certain oil
additives. I have two in mind, one being the one that is supposedly for
“older” engines, purporting to increase compression by filling in the
wear and scratches on the moving parts; the other being the one that
claims to suppress leaks by sealing leaky gaskets. Do they do what they
claim, and does their use pose any risk of damage to the engine?

Steve Coleman, Gadsden, Alabama
1987 XJ6 x2
1989 XJ40


From: cppceng@richmond.infi.net (neville laing)
Date: Sat, 7 Sep 1996 21:23:33 -0400 (EDT)
Subject: Jaguar XK140 Can You Help

I have an early (1955) Jaguar XK 140 Roadster and I am experiencing some
difficulty identifying what model engine it has in it.
Facts making me believe it is a “C” type head are the engine and Chassis
numbers are prefixed with a “S”.Also the car has duel exhausts from the
manefold to tail pipes passing through cross member in chassis.
Facts that indicate I might not have a “C” type head are no badges on cam
covers and no “C” cast into head. Books on Jaguars have mentioned the fact
that early cars did not come with cam cover badges, but I have not heard of
heads not having “C” cast in them. I do not want to strip head to measure
valve size and would appreciate any comments or help in determining what
head I have and what color it should be painted.


From: “David A. Gruber” atlantic@cyberenet.net
Date: Sat, 07 Sep 1996 22:05:22 +0000
Subject: 87 XJ6-III for sale/new photos!

Many thanks to those of you who stopped by my web page at:

http://www.cyberenet.net/~atlantic

The xj6 is still looking for a good home. Price has been reduced to
$8300. I’ve added a few more pictures to the web page - check 'em out!

Thanks,
Dave


From: “Barry Cooper” b.w.cooper@acslink.aone.net.au
Date: Sun, 8 Sep 1996 12:03:06 +1000
Subject: Re: E-Type window winders

Anyone know whether the Series 2 E-Type window winder mechamism is used on
any other Jaguar model or British car? My Series 1 1/2 E has odd winders
with a Series 2 winder on one door and a Series 1 winder on the other
fitted by a PO. I have established that the Series 2 is correct for my car
and the change
to the mechanism is obvious after dismantling. The Series 2 type has a
square
section shaft with a thin hexagon clamped to the end to provide the
drive for the winder handle. The handle is secured by a screw into the end
of the square section shaft. One of the XJ models has a similar appearance
but does not have the hex drive. Would make it easier to fix if I could
obtain the shaft and hexagon but it would be possible for a machine shop to
modify the existing one. Very few notice the mismatch but I do, so I want
to fix it while all
is apart.
Thanks
Barry Cooper



From: cobac@ix.netcom.com (Eric J Faber )
Date: Sat, 7 Sep 1996 19:02:26 -0700
Subject: XJ40: How does your A/C operate?

Hi again!,
I don’t have the owners manual and would like to know how the A/C
works in the cars of other XJ40 owners.
What vents get cold/warm air and how is the AUTO mode supposed to
work? My AUTO mode turns opens & closes the center vents when the car
is cold (air is then sent to footwells). Just wondering if the system
is operating like it should (according to the owners manual). Also the
‘FACE’ control varies the center vent temperature slighlty. I assume
this works like it should.
Would be grateful if someone would be kind enough to share how
their Jag’s A/C works (technichal or non-technical).
Thanks!
-Eric
cobac@ix.netcom.com

P.S. I’d like to thank Randy Wilson for his help about the “blower
speed controller”, but I’m unable to send mail to his E-Mail address.
Thanks for all the help! I was able to fix this part, now the A/C
works great in all Fan speeds. Thanks again!


From: John Whitehead bcf@tir.com
Date: Sat, 07 Sep 1996 22:43:28 -0400
Subject: Exhaust Heat Shield

On Fri, 6 Sep 1996 Hunt Dabney wrote;

< I saw a wonderful little mod at the Monterey Historics, by a fellow named
Malcom Adams.
< He had fabricated a stainess shield, louvered as the bonnet is, which
mounted about 1" below
<the louvers, to prevent damage to the bonnet paint. Worked great and looked
right, too. This
<is also on my list of things to do.

I have had similar problems with the bonnet paint blistering above the
exhaust manifolds of my '67 E-Type. I purchased a used manifold heat
shield taken from a SIII, XJ6 (from Welsh Jaguar). The fit was perfect
of course as the manifolds are basically the same for all years of the 4.2L
engine. Only some minor creativity was required for making a mounting
bracket. The shield now protects the bonnet paint and reduces the heat on
the alternator and it’s associated wiring. This fix looks very good but my
not be satifactory for Concours condition cars. The porcelain finish, on my
exhaust manifolds,were so cracked that a cover up was a major improvement.


From: ajbeale@squirrel.com.au (A.J. Beale)
Date: Sun, 8 Sep 1996 12:51:49 +1000 (EST)
Subject: Re: Where to locate fan relay

Summer is still around, and the AC in my 89 JX40 stops working. Some day
if I’m lucky it works, and the rest of the week I’m sweat. Where is the
relay for the AC fan located?

Another possible cause is a bad microswitch in the A/C control assembly.
This is apparently quite common. The microswitch is located at the top of
the switch assembly in the console. Micheal Neal put me on to this and told
me how to get at the switch assembly. If you need instructions - let me know.

Dave:

I would also be very interested in these instructions. In fact, I think
that anyone with an XJ40 of about 1989 vintage would also be. Could you
please oblige. Many thanks. Alan.


From: “Barry Cooper” b.w.cooper@acslink.aone.net.au
Date: Sun, 8 Sep 1996 16:18:40 +1000
Subject: Re:E-Type engine removal

My Haynes E-Type manual (1987 edition) has a supplementary chapter devoted
to engine removal from below.

Barry Cooper
1968 E-Type FHC


From: Jim Van Riper jvr@informix.com
Date: Fri, 06 Sep 1996 09:13:55 -0500
Subject: Series II E-type Engine Removal

I understand that the best way to pull the engine from a Series II E-type
OTS is from the bottom. Is there any documentation available on the web
that covers this method?

Thanks,
jvr


From: Barrie Dawson DAWSONB@btcec3.agw.bt.co.uk
Date: Sun, 08 Sep 96 10:47:44 -0700
Subject: RE:Jump start and damages (long)

Just a short offering on the subject but one I have found extremely useful.

When I first came across a non-starter, battery failed, with an alternator
I was concerned that I may cause damage jumping. I had read somewhere that
jump starting these vehicles could result in alternator damage once the dead
one had started.

Since then I have followed a simple but extremely safe procedure.

  1. Connect donor to receiver using heavy guage cables.
  2. Allow donor to run for about 5 minutes to build up a basic charge in receiver.
  3. Where there are 2 people doing this 1 needs to be ready to remove cables
    as soon as then receiver starts, allowing own alternator to charge 1 battery, the
    receiver alternator WILL try and charge donor.
  4. NEVER allow the receiver to be on the starter for more than 5 seconds. This
    WILL bring the donor cars charging system into full swing and may not produce
    sufficient charge to start the receiver.
  5. Once started run at about 1500 RPM for no less than 10 minutes.
  6. Finally find out what caused the problem and FIX IT.

Jeffrey Cram, in his offering has given a detailed account which I support and
in my 24 years in the communications business have applied in smaller systems.
He is quite right refering to stupidly engineered systems but then thats the
motor industry for you.

Barrie Dawson

Chatham, Kent England
1985 series III Jaguar Sovereign


From: Barrie Dawson DAWSONB@btcec3.agw.bt.co.uk
Date: Sun, 08 Sep 96 11:05:45 -0700
Subject: RE: Oil additives

There is no amount of oil additive that will satisfactorily “fill in wear” on
an older engine, for that matter any engine. once the wear has reached the
state where something needs to be done only replacing the defective part will
do. There is only one way to keep moving metal against metal parts in good
condition and that is regular oil/filter changes FROM NEW.

Regarding leaks from gaskets, anything introduced into the engine to seal leaks
WILL cause a blockage somewhere else and that WILL cause damage to the engine.
The best way to cure leaks is to remove the old gasket and thoroughly clean the
mating surfaces, then replace with a new gasket and sealing compound. Where
this does not cure the leak the mating surfaces need to be checked for flatness
and the necessary repair should be carried out. When the leak is from a bearing/
seal these should be replaced as soon as possible.

In answer to the question “do they do what they claim”, briefly, but ulimately at
the expense of the engine for the reasons I point out above.

My own car has had regular oil/filter changes in its 76300 miles and there are no
obvious signs of mechanical wear, no smoke/knocks or rattles. As for leaks, well
it is a Jaguar so what do you expect, I have had a couple and these have been due
to joints having worked loose over the years, easily fixed with a screwdriver or
spanner. On the subject of leaks the previous owner had used a sealing compound
in the cooling system and that cost me #500.00 to fix.

Conclusion: Repair or replace don’t cover up you’ll pay in the end.

Barrie Dawson

Chatham, Kent England
1985 series III Jaguar Sovereign


From: “Dawson, Barrie” dawsonb@btcec3.agw.bt.co.uk
Date: Sun, 08 Sep 96 11:46:00 GMT
Subject: Subject: RE: XJ40:How does your A/C operate

The Jaguar A/C is complicated and unlike any other system I have come
across.
Apparently if you can hear clicks, wheezes and whirring form behind the dash
and you get hot or chilled air when required the system is working. I have
noticed on my series III that the air flow changes are so subtle that they
are hardly noticed except in extreme circumstances, e.g. high fan speeds.

With regard the centre vents I believe only chilled air is directed through
them.
The face control I believe allows for fine tuning of the chilled air so as
not
to
cause discomfort from an icy blast.

I don’t think there is a great difference between XJ6 and XJ40 but there
will
be
slight changes I’m sure.

Barrie Dawson

Chatham, Kent England
1985 series III Jaguar Sovereign

------------------------------ End of forwarded message 1


From: “Richard.Mansell” Richard.Mansell@psemail.ps.net
Date: Sun, 8 Sep 1996 12:52:00 +0100
Subject: Re: Water light on XJS

 The low coolant sensor control unit is behind the passenger scuttle. 
 
 On the pre-HE it is square in shape and appears to be bolted to the 
 fan motor. On the HE it is a cylindrical in shape  and is attached to 
 the 'B' component panel. The manual says that if the white and red 
 lead from the sensor unit are disconnected the warning lamp should 
 flash. 
 
 I guess if the sensor is ok check continuety of these two wires.
 
 Hope this helps.
 
 Richard

______________________________ Forward Header


Subject: Re: Water light on XJS
Author: /S=owner-jag-lovers@sn.no/O=SMTP/P=PSC/A=MCI/C=US/ at ccx400uk
Date: 07/09/96 03:10

Terry Craig:

Even with the rad full, the reservoir full, the left-most lamp on the dash

continues to blink. Nowhere in the manual can I find a reference to where

this sensor is located and the local Jag shop thought it might be the
windshield washer level.

The leftmost indicator on the bottom row of the dash is the coolant
level warning light. The sensor on my '83 is on the front left edge
of the radiator, a few inches down from the top, where it’s REALLY
hard to see unless you have the hood removed! I understand it was
later moved to the header tank.

This sensor is really just a terminal in the coolant, measuring the
conductivity of the coolant itself. Therefore, there is a box
somewhere that takes this reading and decides if there is coolant in
there or air, and operates the warning light. You problem might be
in the box rather than the sensor, although I suppose if the sensor
itself is covered with crud it might give a false low coolant
indication.

Sorry, I dunno where the box is.

– Kirbert | If anything is to be accomplished,
| some rules must be broken.
| - Palm’s Postulate


End of jag-lovers-digest V2 #339


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jag-lovers-digest Monday, 9 September 1996 Volume 02 : Number 340

Re XJ-S workshop manuals
Re: Looking for XK120/140
Oil aditives
Radiator removal XJS
Re: Where to locate fan relay
Re: Radiator removal XJS
Re: Back in the fold
Jaguar XK-120 for sale (CT, USA) (fwd)
Re: Radiator removal XJS
Jag Cooling
Re: XJ40: How does your A/C operate?
could use advice regarding tire brands for 85 XJ-S
420G/General questions
Re: Security problem
Re: XJS wiring help needed
RE: XJS Micro switch on throttle


From: “Richard.Mansell” Richard.Mansell@psemail.ps.net
Date: Sun, 8 Sep 1996 13:15:00 +0100
Subject: Re XJ-S workshop manuals

  • ------ =_0_MIME_Boundary_1845.3232c2e2.imsukk50.eurh021.eur.ps.net

  • ---------------------------- Forwarded with Changes


From: M.Cogswell@zds.com%smtp at ccx400uk
Date: 9/3/96 9:00PM
To: Richard Mansell at Not-Cop5
Subject: Re[3]: XJS Wiring Help Needed/workshop manuals



  • ------ =_0_MIME_Boundary_1845.3232c2e2.imsukk50.eurh021.eur.ps.net
    Content-Type: text/plain; charset=iso-8859-1
    Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable

    Mike

    I am not ignoring you=2c my reply to you appears to have bounced =

    therefore I am replying via the list=2e

    I guess you have got to go for the earlier 4 volume set=2e I received =
    my =

    88 onwards manuals yesterday but they really are geared towards the =

    facelift model=2e =

    =

    I was interested in the later manuals because they contain the info =

    for the Mirelli ignition which I assume you do not have because it was=
    =

    introduced in '89=2e

    Now that I have the manuals in my hot little hands it appears to be =

    more complicated than I thought=2e

    The pre-HE to 87=2f88 manuals =28JJM 10 04 06=29 appear to be based ar=
    ound =

    the pre-HE with extra sections to cover the differences between these =
    =

    and the HE =28pretty logical so far=29

    The new manuals=2c up to 91=2c =28JJM 10 04 06=2f20=29 come in 5 volum=
    es rather =

    than the earlier 4 but only appear to cover the additions since the =

    earlier manuals for the 5=2e3 plus a random selection of the original =
    =

    information=2e Oh and it covers the 4=2e0 engine too=2e =

    =

    In otherwords if you have an '89 to '91 5=2e3 and you want to know abo=
    ut =

    the new ignition etc you will need both sets as the later volume set =

    refer to many sections that only exist in the earlier set e=2eg=2e Und=
    er =

    the heading Cylinder heads overhaul it says=3a- =

    =

    Remove left and right hand cylinder heads=2c see 12=2e29=2e01=2e =

    =

    Where is 12=2e29=2e01=3f only in the earlier set=21

    Since the five volume set costs =a33 more than the earlier one =28=a31=
    05=29 I =

    assumed it would be a complete guide to the later cars=2e Wrong=21

    I understand that there are add-ons =28approx=2e =a325 each=29 =

    JJM 10 04 06=2f201 and 202 that cover models '92 to '96=2e 6=2e0L engi=
    ne =

    plus other changes=2e

    For the earlier cars =28up to '84=29 the 1 volume Repair Operation Man=
    ual =

    is available either hard bound or soft bound=2e This is a lot cheaper =
    =

    but more condensed and although not so well laid out it does contain =

    most information needed=2e

    Then of course there is the Haynes Manual=2c people do joke about thes=
    e =

    but they do give useful timesaving tips=2e They are also less expensiv=
    e =

    to replace when they are soaked in oil=21

    =

    The other reading material I bought this week was the Jan '87 to late =
    =

    '89 parts book =28RTC9900CA =a319=2e99=29 IMHO this is laid out a lot =
    better =

    than the earlier parts manuals as it has a description for each item =

    on the same page as the pretty picture=2e If you have an '87 to '89 3=2e=
    6 =

    or 5=2e3 XJ-S this guide is well worth getting especially to aid =

    reassembly =3a-=29 Why do I always have one washer left after working =
    on =

    the car=3f

    I hope this info is of use =28and correct=21=21=29=2e

    Richard

=5f=5f=5f=5f=5f=5f=5f=5f=5f=5f=5f=5f=5f=5f=5f=5f=5f=5f=5f=5f=5f=5f=5f=5f=5f=
=5f=5f=5f=5f=5f Forward Header =

=5f=5f=5f=5f=5f=5f=5f=5f=5f=5f=5f=5f=5f=5f=5f=5f=5f=5f=5f=5f=5f=5f=5f=5f=5f=
=5f=5f=5f=5f=5f=5f=5f=5f=5f
Subject=3a Re=5b3=5d=3a XJS Wiring Help Needed=2fworkshop manuals
Author=3a M=2eCogswell=40zds=2ecom=25smtp at ccx400uk
Date=3a 03=2f09=2f96 21=3a00

Can you tell me what the break point is within the '88 model year=3f I hav=
e =

an
'88 that I would like to buy a manual set for=2e
=

MikeC

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From: Gerry Leumann glueman@collano.ch
Date: Sun, 8 Sep 1996 16:25:22 GMT
Subject: Re: Looking for XK120/140

I am also looking for an XK 120 OTS for a friend of mine who
wants to participate in the Mille Miglia. As only pre 1957 cars
are eligible, this means - if my very limited knowledge about
XK-jags does not deceive me - that also an XK 140 would be OK.

Thing is: A Lagonda Tickford Drop Head Coupe 3 Litre, 1953,
should be traded in. Otherwise no deal.

Any offers, preferable from European source?

At 08:54 06.09.96 EDT, Zoran Mitrovic wrote:

Dear friends

I’m still on my quest for an XK120 or 140.

I will be in two weeks for vacation in Florida. I have already had contacts
with
Vintage from Sarasota and with Classic Car Exporters. Can somebody advise me to
another place where I could find my dream car?

Best regards Zoran Mitrovic

Glue Man
glueman@collano.ch (former address: gleuma@dial.eunet.ch)


From: “Jim Isbell” JISBELLJR@mail.utexas.edu
Date: Sun, 8 Sep 1996 12:35:53 +0000
Subject: Oil aditives

There is nothing to do once it is already worn, but before it is worn
there are aditives that you can add that make a difference. You want
one with Teflon in it, the more the better.

There are those who say Teflon will not help a car, but they are full
of shit. Dupont says, “It wont help” but they are trying to cover
their butt and I think damage their competitors until they can put
their own Teflon aditive on the market.

My experience is 300,000 miles on a Mercedes 220D using Teflon every
40,000 and changing the oil every 10,000 miles. Yes I said 10,000
miles and this IS a diesel!!!

I also have 120,000 miles on an XJ6 without ever removing the head and it
still has oil pressure of 50 psi at cruise at temperature.
I race this engine and turned 100,000 miles while passing a Ferrari
at 100mph in the first turn at Texas World Speedway. On the race
track it never exceeds 80C on the temp guage. My wife recently
totaled the car and we are having the engine and transmission
transplanted into a new body. It will race again! It is treated with Metalon every 40K.
Used to use another product, Lubrilon, the first one
that started the whole Teflon thing, but they are no longer
available.

I got well over 240K on a 6cyl 64 mustang that I treated with Teflon.

On a 1985 Escort with the cheap sidwinder 4 cly engine that everyone
knows is a “throw away” at 70K, I got 187,000miles before I gave it
away because I was tired of it. It is still running fine and has
never had the head or oil pan off of it. I have no idea how many
miles it has on it now. I treated it every 40K with
Lubrilon.

Dupont can po-po it if they want, but I think my experience shows
that it works. I dont know what Dupont is up to because you know
they know better.


From: “Jim Isbell” JISBELLJR@mail.utexas.edu
Date: Sun, 8 Sep 1996 12:46:02 +0000
Subject: Radiator removal XJS

I am in the process of removing the radiator from my XJS and have
found several errors in the Haynes manua. So whats new? The big
error is that they say you have to discharge the AC. It aint so!
The second is that they say you need to remove the bonnet. It aint
so. Just remove the grill and one end of the lift struts and the
bonnet will lean back very happily on the bumper, well out of your
way.

I will have more news on the radiator/waterpump renewal in a few
days. I am looking for a replacement impeller, as Kirby suggested, to
put on my new water pump before I install it.

Anyone know how important the sponge rubber inserts around the
ratiator are. Mine are rotted away.

What does the air dam look like on the 85 XJ-S? Anyone have one to
sell, trade, give away? I have only a piece of mine left on the
right side. Is it supposed to go all the way across the center?

It looks like the front license plate does alot of damage to the air
flow into the lower grill, and with that dam gone, that might be a
big part of my overheating problem. Any comments on removing the
licnseplate?


From: “Quang Ngo” quang@psnw.com
Date: Sun, 8 Sep 1996 13:27:29 -0700
Subject: Re: Where to locate fan relay

Summer is still around, and the AC in my 89 JX40 stops working. Some day
if I’m lucky it works, and the rest of the week I’m sweat. Where is the
relay for the AC fan located?

Another possible cause is a bad microswitch in the A/C control assembly.
This is apparently quite common. The microswitch is located at the top of
the switch assembly in the console. Micheal Neal put me on to this and
told
me how to get at the switch assembly. If you need instructions - let me
know.

Dave,

Would you please post the instructions.

Thanks,
/*--------------------------------------------------------------------------

  • Quang Ngo
  • quang@valleynet.com
  • 89-XJ40 89-300E P90 A3000/25 A1000 SNES PSX C C++ UNIX NT WIN95
    ------------------------------------------------------------------------/

From: Thomas Alberts talberts@aero.odu.edu
Date: Sun, 8 Sep 1996 16:38:28 -0400 (EDT)
Subject: Re: Radiator removal XJS

Anyone know how important the sponge rubber inserts around the
ratiator are. Mine are rotted away.

It is difficult to quantify how important they are. They serve
an obvious purpose and should be replaced. SICP has them at
a reasonable price.

Any comments on removing the licnseplate?

Mine runs well below N with the license plate in place. I have
heard several accounts of the license plate flow obstruction
theory but personally I doubt that it matters very much. What
happened to the air dam? Never mind, I guess you bought the
car without it. I’d be inclined to want to replace that, but
I think the car should run cool without it when the cooling
system is healthy.

About removing the radiator without purging the freon, what
did you do? Move the condensio
condensor out of the way with the hoses still connected?

Thomas E. Alberts


From: Roger Peng rpeng@cadev6.intel.com
Date: Sun, 8 Sep 96 13:41:52 PDT
Subject: Re: Back in the fold

Very interesting to hear your report from Beijing, China.
I heard that Jaguar began selling cars there a couple of
years ago. Amazing that you actually saw an XJ40 there. I
saw plenty of Lexus and German makes in Canton, but no British
cars whatsoever. Personally, I would never own a luxury car
there. The traffic is just too terrible; gasoline is not
always of assured quality once you get out of the city,
and car maintenance is not yet a pervasive concept. Just
imagine a British car without proper maintenance!



Roger Peng (408)765-7863
Intel Corporation
Design Technology, Physical CAD



From: Gunnar Helliesen gunnar@bitcon.no
Date: Sun, 8 Sep 1996 23:26:06 +0200 (MET DST)
Subject: Jaguar XK-120 for sale (CT, USA) (fwd)

Folks,

I received this email today. If anyone is interested, please reply to
John Krewalk jkrewalk@worldnet.att.net directly.

Disclaimer: I do not know John or his car. I’m simply forwarding his
message as I thought it might be of interest to someone on this list.

Gunnar


Gunnar Helliesen | Bergen IT Consult AS | NetBSD/VAX on a uVAX II
Systems Consultant | Bergen, Norway | '86 Jaguar XJ6 4.2 Sovereign
gunnar@bitcon.no | http://www.bitcon.no/ | Vicki who? What .sig virus?

  • ---------- Forwarded message ----------
    Date: Sun, 08 Sep 1996 00:20:34 -0400
    From: John Krewalk jkrewalk@worldnet.att.net
    To: virtualwheels@bitcon.no
    Subject: Jaguar XK-120

I live in Connecticut and own a 1954 XK-120 Jaguar Convertible that has
been in storage for more than 20 years. If you are interested in this
beautiful classic auto or know of someone who might be, please contact
me by email or phone at 860-242-4005.

John Krewalk (jkrewalk@worldnet.att.net)
Bloomfield, CT


MZ�


From: “Kirbert” palmk@gcn.scri.fsu.edu
Date: Sun, 8 Sep 1996 17:42:31 -0005
Subject: Re: Radiator removal XJS

I am looking for a replacement impeller, as Kirby suggested, to
put on my new water pump before I install it.

Anyone know how important the sponge rubber inserts around the
ratiator are. Mine are rotted away.

What does the air dam look like on the 85 XJ-S? Anyone have one to
sell, trade, give away? I have only a piece of mine left on the
right side. Is it supposed to go all the way across the center?

So: You’re missing the sponge inserts AND the front air dam, and you
think the impeller is the reason your car is overheating? Tsk, tsk.

– Kirbert | If anything is to be accomplished,
| some rules must be broken.
| - Palm’s Postulate


From: TR8XLR8@aol.com
Date: Sun, 8 Sep 1996 19:46:24 -0400
Subject: Jag Cooling

There was a thread the other day about Jag Cooling that led to the topic of
WaterPump Impellers. I’m not familiar with the one on my XJS but thought I’d
share what I learned about my TR8. I live in very hot climate and was
concerned about cooking the all-aluminum V8. After trying most of the normal
things (Radiator flush, etc.), Woody Cooper of the WedgeShop suggested a
unique solution. Install a waterpump impeller from a mid-60’s Buick 215 cid
(This is actually the engine that spawned the 3.5L.) he said. The Buick
impeller had twice as many fins, which also were more sharply raked…
Intuitively, it seemed the Buick impeller would allow faster coolant flow.
The charge was $10 and now I run the AC on 95 degree days without any
problems.

One other thing I learned, RedLine Inc. makes a product called Waterwetter
which dramatically reduces max engine temperature. I’m not normally a fan of
gimmick additives but this is one of the few I’ve tried that really work.

Tony Blevins
80 TR8 Conv
85 XJS-HE


From: ajbeale@squirrel.com.au (A.J. Beale)
Date: Mon, 9 Sep 1996 10:13:16 +1000 (EST)
Subject: Re: XJ40: How does your A/C operate?

Eric writes:

I don’t have the owners manual and would like to know how the A/C
works in the cars of other XJ40 owners.
What vents get cold/warm air and how is the AUTO mode supposed to
work? My AUTO mode turns opens & closes the center vents when the car
is cold (air is then sent to footwells).

I agree with Barrie’s remarks. Although I have a (brief) description of the
system in the workshop manuals, I am still unable to fully understand how
some things that have happened to me can be possible. The description, with
diagrams, gives the impression that hot air from the heater matrix and cold
air from the evaporator are mixed together in proportions determined by the
in-car and ambient temperatures and the control settings and this is then
discharged at both foot and face levels. If this is so, then with the
possible exception of the changes made by the face level temperature
control, there should be no difference between the temperature of air from
all of the outlets. This face level control is (I think) only supposed to
change the temperature by a few degrees, but I cannot notice any change. I
once had hot air at face level and cold air at foot level with the controls
set to cool. I couldn’t find any fault and it didn’t recur. As regards the
difference between the AUTO and MAN modes, I read the description to mean
that with AUTO the system maintains the set temperature but in MAN it works
as a non-climate control system. The side vents on my car always have a
good volume of air but the volume from the centre vent varies considerably.
If anyone can give a detailed description of the system, or preferably a
fault finding list, I would be very interested. Alan


From: ee84287@goodnet.com (Weiss-Malik)
Date: Fri, 06 Sep 1996 17:10:23 -0700
Subject: could use advice regarding tire brands for 85 XJ-S

I am facing the task f buying new tires for my 85 XJ-S. I’d be interested in
anyone’s feedback regarding the following apparent three brands that I have
as a choice for 215/70 VR15:

  1. Dunlops. At around $150/tire.
  2. Pirellis (I’m told that there is a new P4000 that replaces the previous
    vintage). Best price so far; $115/tire including mounting, stems, and
    balancing.
  3. Bridgestones (my current set, gave a great ride but didn’t last very
    long). At around $145/tire.
    Any other ones I should consider? Are the Pirelli’s any good and is the
    price aboput right? Your opinions regarding the above will be much
    appreciated, and thanks in advance,

Rob W-M
85 XJ-S


From: shanem@vnet.IBM.COM
Date: Sun, 08 Sep 96 20:59:36 EDT
Subject: 420G/General questions

From: ** SHANE MANTOSZKO ** IBMA INVENTORY ANALYST **
*** SYDVM1(SHANEM) PH. (02) 354-4918 CUMBERLAND FOREST FE21
*** INTERNET - SHANEM@VNET.IBM.COM *** IBMMAIL - AUIBMSPM ****
Subject: 420G/General questions

Fellow jag-lovers,

Raquel (my 420G) is still awaiting her body repair.

In the meantime, I bought the factory repair manual, and after flicking
through it briefly, discovered a few things. I also have some other
questions :-

  1. The 420G came out with a factory power window option. Raquel does
    not have this, however whilst my sister was in England, I had her buy
    four brand new power window motors to suit an XJ6 series 2.
    Can anybody confirm whether or not these can be fitted to the 420G ?

I know I will have to shop around for the window control switches, which
appear in the manual to be totally different from the xj6 ones. Are there
any club members or other mkX/420G owners out there who can help me ?

Is it a big job to install the motors, remove the manual winders, and
fit all of the electric switches ? I plan on joining the jag drivers
club here in Sydney when she is road worthy. Since some of you use
this list, can you confirm whether there is a good support base for
things like this from the club ?

  1. Since this car has no air-conditioning, I would like to fit a
    Webasto sunroof. I have seen that they make roofs which are in panels
    that fold back, as opposed to a vinyl ‘tarp’ which just pulls back like
    a curtain. Does anyone out there have a similar type roof ? I plan
    on using this car for weddings, and would love to have the front
    and rear passengers enjoy the sunshine. Can the roof panels come
    completely off, and make the car like a cabriolet ? Is there more
    road noise with this type of webasto sunroof ?
    Does anybody in Sydney know which companies do quality webasto
    sunroof installations ?

  2. I would love to fit air conditioning. I don’t want it integrated
    with the heating as it is with the climate control systems in later
    jags. The heater works fine, so all I want to do is fit a stand alone
    air-con system, that has it’s own fans, and a wide thin outlet that
    can fit inside the parcel shelf in the bottom of the 420G dash.
    Are there aftermarket systems like this available ? I guess I can use
    a compressor, condensor, receiver dryer from an XJ6 or later. The main
    problem is fitting the outlet assembly into the dash. Maybe someone has
    played around with old mk 1/2’s or 420’s in the past and rigged up
    some neat after market aircon system. I’d love to find out from anybody
    who has done it successfully. Maybe the ‘factory’ air-con assembly
    that was available can be tracked down. Anybody know who made this for
    Jaguar ? Probably hard/impossible to find one in a spare parts place.

  3. The engine was completely reco’d on this car. When I start it cold,
    the accelerator seems to be restricted to stop the engine from
    revving out. I push it, but the engine revs do not go up. If I push it
    too hard, the engine starts to stall. After a minute or so, the car will
    rev normally. Is this some type of cold start control that the triple
    carbies and throttle governor use to stop over-excessive revving when
    cold ? I can see that the throttle rods/cables have a governor set up
    also. Is this there to restrict revving when cold, or is it there
    because the 420G was a limo, and thus had a throttle governor to make
    take-offs smooth and slow ?

Thats about it for now…hope someone can help with some of my
queries…cheers.



REGARDS…Shane


From: Jan Wikstroem Jan_Wikstroem@acp.com.au
Date: 9 Sep 96 11:28:43
Subject: Re: Security problem

Thanks for the reassurance, Nick. I’m glad to see our list does have a degree
of security!

By the way, how’s the kitty (and I don’t mean the four-wheeled one)? Do we need
to kick in another subscription soon, or are the costs covered?

Thanks for all the work you’re putting in, Nick.

  • -Jan

From: Jan Wikstroem Jan_Wikstroem@acp.com.au
Date: 9 Sep 96 12:57:15
Subject: Re: XJS wiring help needed

On Sat, 31 Aug 1996, Jim Isbell wrote:

First, under the bonnet there are two wires comming out of a harnes
near the throttle “cam” where the throttle cable connects to the
“cam” and there is a microswitch on the side of the cable. These two
wires are Green and Green with a yellow tracer.

As an add-on to John Napoli’s answer, the description sounds exactly like the
kick-down switch on my S2 XJ12s. I’m assuming this XJS is a V12 with a GM400
box…
If that’s the switch we’re talking about, it operates when full pressure is put
on the throttle pedal; after the butterflies open fully, the cable sheath moves
half an inch or so toward the throttle wheel against a very strong spring; a
thicker portion of the throttle cable ferrule comes under the microswitch lever
and operates it. The microswitch lever can get damaged and may need bending to
operate properly.

Jim, if your kick-down isn’t working, that’s what it is. If the kick-down is
working, John has the right of it.

  • -Jan

From: Jan Wikstroem Jan_Wikstroem@acp.com.au
Date: 9 Sep 96 13:14:36
Subject: RE: XJS Micro switch on throttle

John Napoli :
Question: will a pushbutton wired in parallel with this switch and
controlled somehow by the driver provide part-throttle kickdown? Or does
the electric kickdown only work if the transmission is also seeing zero
vacuum at the modulator (from WOT)?


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jag-lovers-digest Monday, 9 September 1996 Volume 02 : Number 341

Re: Wind Deflector
Re: Hole in dash SIII
AK Miller Auction (Only a bit of Jag content/No Mopar content)
HIF carbs
Re: XJS brake fluid reservoir cap
Re: overheating
Re: O2 Reset Button on XJ6
Getting at the A/C microswitch - XJ40
Re: Brake pedal to the floor
XJC12 purchase
Re: Radiator removal XJS
XJ S I Corner window
XJC - Oops!
[none]


From: Randy Rice rice@onramp.net
Date: Sun, 08 Sep 1996 21:33:25 -0500
Subject: Re: Wind Deflector

Roger Peng rpeng@cadev6.intel.com:

Has anyone installed a wind deflector for the sunroof of an XJ40?
Do they work? Meaning, do you get less wind noise and buffeting?
How easy was the installation? Does it require drilling any holes?
And finally, how much does it cost?

I installed a wind deflector on my previous XJ40 (an 88 1/2 XJ6). The
installation is simple and results in reduced wind noise. Seems like the
cost was around $90.

Installation is quite simple. The deflector is held in place by two
clips that wedge themselves into the forward drain holes of the sun roof
(no drilling required). Be sure to clean and wax the area in front of
the sunroof before starting.

Adding the wind deflector does change the appearance of a
lighter-colored car (mine was Artic Blue). Another caveat: the gasket
for the deflector made an impression in the finish so I left it on the
car when I sold it.

I am planning an adding one to the current XJ40 (93 BRG VDP) one of
these days.

Randy


From: “David Tordoff” dtordoff@flash.net
Date: Sun, 8 Sep 1996 21:11:56 -0500
Subject: Re: Hole in dash SIII

Many thanks for the inf. on the climate control sensor. Makes perfect
sense.

BTW, is there any satisfactory rebuild for a viscous fan coupler or is it
cheaper/wiser to just replace it? Any idea of cost (US)? I noticed a
distinct roaring sound the other day and have discovered it is apparently
being caused by the fan being in constant service rather than varying as it
should.


“Have you ever seen a plumber bite his nails?”
David Tordoff 83 XJ6 SIII, Dallas, TX.


From: Michael Frank mfrank@westnet.com
Date: Sun, 8 Sep 1996 22:56:36 -0400
Subject: AK Miller Auction (Only a bit of Jag content/No Mopar content)

To all those interested:

Just back from the AK Miller Auction in Vermont. To recap for those who
missed my first post, AK Miller was an eccentric recluse whose hobbies were
collecting gold bullion and Stutz automobiles. In all, there were 49 classic
cars, mostly Stutz’s, with a few odd cars thrown in. Among the oddballs: a
Locomobile town car, a Stanley 7-passenger tourer, a couple of Franklins,
and a Springfield Rolls Royce. Also a couple of lots of Volkswagen parts
cars (his daily drivers).

There are so many stories about this guy it is hard to separate truth from
fiction. The consensus is that he came from a wealthy family: grandfather
was a commodity trader, papa was a Wall Streeter. When and where he
developed a passion for Indiana-built cars is not known, but he had already
collected many as a young man. His profession was aviation: he flew a
delivery service using autogyros. (Autogyro parts, manuals, and training
films were auctioned in one huge lot - I would have loved to get some of
those films). Somewhere along the way, he met his like-minded wife, and
moved to a remote farm in Vermont. His cars, which had been stored in an
airplane hangar in New Jersey, came with him. In Vermont, he housed his
collection in purpose built barns, which sprung up as his collection grew.

When Stutz went out of business in 1932, he bought the contents of the
factory, and stuffed his barns with spare parts. From that point on, he
seems to have made his living selling spares, often at outrageous prices. I
say ‘seems’, because there really is no record. Neither he or his wife had a
social security number, and they never paid income taxes. They must have had
some serious influence on that little community, since it seems to have
grown all around them.

People who dealt with him report that he was a very shrewd negotiator. He
claimed not to have a phone, and preferred contact by letter. When a deal
was concluded, payment sometimes had to be made in a peculiar manner: gold,
or silver coins minted before 1964. He would then ship the parts, which
might be original, or might be copies which he made himself, or maybe he
would forget to send any parts at all.

When he and his wife died, the assumption made was that they were destitute,
since they lived so frugally. The town paid for their funerals. When the
house was opened, millions of dollars of gold and silver bullion was
discovered. Also stocks and bonds worth over a million. The house contents
were auctioned earlier this year. One of the local folks bought a picture at
the sale, planning to reuse the frame. When the picture was removed, they
found $150,000 in bonds which had been used for backing…

The first day of the auction was devoted to the cars, and it was a major
media event. It was a beautiful day, and close to 1500 people turned out.
Also lots of reporters from the newspapers and TV. The cars were all over
the place. So many cars, so many barns, so many people, it was bewildering.
Most of these cars needed full restoration, but for the most part they were
amazingly complete and original. My favorite of the sale was a 1916 Stutz
Bearcat…I think it was Miller’s favorite, as well, judging by how it was
cared for.

As for buying any of these cars, well, this was definitely not my day. With
so many buyers present, and several big money buyers on the phone, there was
just no chance for yours truly to own a Stutz. Prices were as much as 50%
higher than Christies generous catalog estimates. In all, $1.5 million was
raised on cars alone. The ‘16 which I covet went for $155,000, plus
Christies’ 15% buyers premium. Every car set a new record. One pile of junk,
identifiable only by a Stutz radiator badge, went for $6,000. The
Springfield Rolls Picadilly Roadster went for $115,000 to a telephone
bidder, rumored to be a famous celebrity.

The second day of the auction was devoted to automobilia, and was much less
crowded. Whole barnfuls of Stutz spares were sold, along with 100 lots of
papers and books. One lot consisted of correspondence which Miller had had
with…Jaguar Cars. It seems he owned a Mark VII, which had a faulty
speedometer, and which leaked oil incessantly. He had sent so many letters,
that Jaguar sent him a set of gaskets for free. Not satisfied, he tried to
get them to install a Mark VIII engine and tranny. There was no indication
in the correspondence of how this story ended. However, there was certainly
no Mark VII at the sale, so we must assume that he never stopped the leak. A
sad end to Mr. Miller’s Jag days, and a lesson to us all.

Prices were actually more outrageous the second day than the first.
Formless piles of Stutz junk went for thousands of dollars. I was, however,
able to hit paydirt in the form of a salesman’s award watch. These watches
were typically given to salesmen who achieved certain sales targets. They
carry a Stutz logo on the face, and a Stutz watch fob. The crowd, which
consisted mostly of antique auto parts dealers, seemed to assume that this
was an inexpensive Ingersoll movement, when in fact it was a high grade
Elgin. For once my horological background served me well, and I confidently
outbid the crowd. I am very, very happy with my Stutz pocket watch!

As to photographs, I took many. We will soon see how well I was able to deal
with the dim light in those barns! If they come out at all, I will try to
upload them to a Web site to share with those who have read thru my
ramblings, and still have some interest in the topic…

Mike Frank
1969 E-Type 2+2
1966 Plymouth Barracda
1927 Stutz/Elgin Pocket Watch


From: Dave Oxenreider daveox@av-imagineering.com
Date: Sun, 08 Sep 1996 22:57:20 -0400
Subject: HIF carbs

Hello Jeff,

In response to your ‘wits-end’ message regarding HIF carbs, I too went
through the same trial-by-fire on my TR6 as you are (apologies to
everyone for always referring to my TR6 adventures, but it turns out
that A LOT of what I’ve learned on the 6 transfers to my Jag).

A couple years back I decided I wanted better air flow to the engine. I
had a chance to get two VERY cheap sets of 1.75 SUs - two HIFs and two
HS6s. I quickly tore off the CD2s (which I hated. Not sure why though,
probably because they were borne out of emissions) and with some slight
mods to the linkage, put on the HIFs. The HIFs were the first choice
due to their slightly more modern design of an integrated bowl and
temperature mixture compensator. Once on, they idled great! I thought
“geez, that wasn’t too hard”, washed my hands and hopped in. It made it
down the street OK, but seemed a little weird. I got out onto the
highway and opened him up. Good power until about 4k and then…chaos.
It fealt as if half the engine decided it needed more (or less) fuel (or
air). No matter WHAT I did to the mixtures, dashpot oil or even the air
cleaner density - I could not rid this strange occurance.

I soon gave up on the HIFs and turned to the HS6s. Basically, these did
the same thing! Very frustrating. I knew both of these sets were off 4
cylinders and probably Volvos, so I did some figuring and determined
they needed more fuel (due to the long stroke of the 6). But, I could
not come up with a good mixture setting that would give me tolerable
idle mixture (10:1) and proper acceleration (1:1) due to the needle and
the spring. The damper spring in these carbs appears almost more
critical than the actual needle. It’s obvious job is to regulate the
ventury size (and thereby the depression) during running and
acceleration. The oil then determines how long the ventury stays at
that size before opening up. This is a very critical balance since the
ventury size determines the depression, air speed and fuel flow rate -
these must all change in the correct non-linear sloping way the engine
demands change. I realized the ONLY way to get these carbs to work
properly was to obtain a set of needles and springs TOGETHER. This was
difficult since SUs in any form were not offered on the 2.5L Triumph
motor. I managed to find a setup similar on the BJ8(?) Austin Healey
motor that ended up working perfectly (only for the HS6s though, the
HIFs have no equivalent setup :-(.

The point to all of this is you mentioned that one needle was slightly
shorter than the other. This is a SURE sign that someone (the PO?) has
been playing - trying to make a perfectly good carb work better (when
they should have been concentrating on cams first anyway). If these
carbs are not original you will never get them to perform properly on
anything but the original setup’s motor. Your best bet is to determine
the absolutely correct type of carbs and call Joe Curto (address at
bottom) to obtain the proper setup needles and springs. He was my
saving grace in a dark time. Another good idea is the Haynes SU
manual. It helps you properly identify, tune, adjust and care for these
carbs - invaluable.

BTW, I plan to keep my Strombergs on my XJ12 :wink:

					Dave Ox.

‘’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’
SU parts:
Joe Curto, Genuine SU Spares
22-09 126th Street
College Point, NY 11356
718-762-SUSU
‘’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’

Dave Oxenreider
Audio Visual Imagineering, Inc.
Orlando, FL USA
73 XJ12
75 TR6


From: “Ivan S Kirkpatrick, PE” isk00@visi.net
Date: Sun, 08 Sep 1996 23:20:48 -0400
Subject: Re: XJS brake fluid reservoir cap

I am now replacing the cap on the brake fluid reservoir for the second
time. the two previous units failed in a similar manner. It appears
that the modl used for the caps has a section near the top of the
threads and the top surface that is too thin. The cap has separated
into a threaded piece and a top piece.

Has anyone else seen this problem and is there a better replacement
part? Did I overtighten it? She leaks a bit of fluid and I have too
replenish the fluid about every month. Is it possible to replace the
entire reservoir with a better designed unit?

While I’m thinking of it, it seems there are many items on our cars that
could be better designed and or manufactured. Would there be any
support in compiling a list of replacement parts/suppliers that would
potentially give better service? It seems like almost everyone has
some experience in this respect. I have seen Kirby’s XJS book but
don’t recall a specific section on better replacement parts. Items like
a good GM alternator conversion kit for those with heavier electrical
demands and things like that.


Ivan | The meek shall inherit the Earth
http://users.visi.net/~isk00 | The rest of us will head for the Stars


From: Jan Wikstroem Jan_Wikstroem@acp.com.au
Date: 9 Sep 96 13:43:31
Subject: Re: overheating

Matthias Fouquet-Lapar :
Is it not enough to measure the in and outlet temperature of the radiator to
figure out
if the radiator is working correctly or not ?


That’s not a simple as it sounds - it’s a pressurised system, and running near
the upper end of the range, the coolant would be hot enough to boil instantly
if you release the pressure, so you’ll have to install properly calibrated
thermometers in pressure-tight fittings at suitable points.

The measurement would tell you that the temperature drop across the radiator
isn’t sufficient, which you already know as the system is overheating. It won’t
tell you what the cause is, such as 1) there isn’t enough cooling air coming
through or 2) there isn’t enough coolant flowing through or 3) some tubes are
blocked so the perfectly adequate coolant flow doesn’t have enough transfer
area exposed to the perfectly adequate air flow.
The air flow is easy enough to check - you can see the fans turning and you can
feel the flow. If the fans are turning and you can’t feel the flow, the air
side of the radiator is blocked. S1 and S2 XJ12s also have a problem with air
flow restriction at speed, which can be partly cured by moving the number
plate, horns and fog lights out of the main (below the bunmper) intake.

Water flow is harder to check without introducing flow meters into the system;
about all you can do is check the thermostats, inspect the water pump (the
impeller can lose much of its vanes to corrosion over the years) and (on the
V12) make sure that the bypass seats behind the thermostats, which are supposed
to be closed when the thermostat opens, aren’t seriously eroded. Sometimes an
elderly water hose can develop a loose flap inside, which impedes the water
flow. It’s anyway a good idea to replace any old, swollen and perishing hoses
before they pop 1,216 km from the nearest workshop…

Case 3 has in my experience been the most common with older cars (two cars,
both partly blocked when bought), which also is the impression I get from the
list. Unfortunately, there’s no simple way to check this; the radiator has to
be opened up and rodded.

Of course you can also have overheating due to seriously incorrect ignition
and/or fuel/air mixture settings, but if you have those, the engine will be
running very badly even before overheating, so that would be the first thing
you fix, anyway.

    • Jan

From: Randy Wilson randy@taylor.infi.net
Date: Sun, 8 Sep 1996 23:37:36 -0400 (EDT)
Subject: Re: O2 Reset Button on XJ6

I am putting the finishing touches on the XJ6 book and need some
information from anyone that knows.

On the US series 3 there is an O2 sensor in the exhaust system. The reset for one model is in the trunk and there is another under the hood. Can someone describe this reset unit location and operation? First off, this reset has nothing to do with the O2 sensor itself. It is merely a mantainance “reminder” light, required by our dear government, Telling you it’s time to do the x0,000 mile service. It’s driven by the speedo, and turns on a light on the dash after a cetain milage has passed. In the case of JAg, the light says Ox sensor. Other brands had the light labeled “EGR” or “Service” or … The early cars with mechanical speedo had a Smiths unit in the middle of the speedo cable. It’s a white box mounted in the engine bay at the bulkhead. This unit has an odometer looking counter that shows the percentage of mileage that has passed. It is reset by turning the recessed knob on the side until the counter shows 0000. The knob has two holes in it to turn it. Smiths makes (made?) a little key that fit. I have sucessfully reset them with a set of small circlip pliers, though this is a pain. The later cars with electronic speedos use a different system. This is one of my favorite examples of British parts bin engineering. The box, as you mentioned is mounted in the boot on the foreward bulkhead. This box is black, and has a push button to reset it. That’s it. Push the white button (it is recessed behind a guard), and kerchunk, it’s reset for another 30K miles. What makes this such a favorite of mine is the box. It’s a VDO pieces that, like the Smiths, is designed to go inline with the speedo cable. Jaguar, unlike most everyone else, did not go the all electronic route when they converted to the electronic speedo. They made a interface that takes the signal from the pulse generator, and drives a stepper motor attached to this mechanical counter. Hey, it works… :> Randy K. Wilson randy@taylor.infi.net From: viadata@interramp.com (David Hurlston) Date: Sun, 08 Sep 1996 22:41:47 -0700 Subject: Getting at the A/C microswitch - XJ40 Alan Beale asks… Another possible cause is a bad microswitch in the A/C control assembly. This is apparently quite common. The microswitch is located at the top of the switch assembly in the console. Micheal Neal put me on to this and told me how to get at the switch assembly. If you need instructions - let me know. Dave: I would also be very interested in these instructions. In fact, I think that anyone with an XJ40 of about 1989 vintage would also be. Could you please oblige. Many thanks. Alan. Looking back at my notes, it was Micheal Neal who told me what the problem was likely to be (where is Michael anyway? he has been absent from this list for quite a while) - and the instructions for getting at it were courtesy of one Donald McGregor. Here goes, it’s actually pretty easy to do… 1. Take out the center console ashtray - 2 screws in the armrest storage. 2. Unclip the gear shift selector surround. There is one clip in the middle of each. 3. Unscrew the 2 plastic wingnuts under the veneer by the ashtray. Don’t drop 'em. You have to reach under the veneer to do this, but it’s easy. These nuts are on screws that slide out of the veneer mounting. Don’t drop these either. 4. Push the veneer upwards and clear of the gear shift knob. This takes some courage, but the veneer will flex OK without breaking anything. 5. Remove the 4 or 6 panel screws that hold the A/C controls assembly and the whole thing will come out. 6. The microswitch in question is at the top of the switch assembly. It may be dirty and cleaning with contact cleaner will help, or it may be toasted (as mine was) and need to be replaced. Jaguar sells the microswitch as a separate item for 25 bucks, but an electronics parts store will probably have something suitable for a buck or so. It pays to put a cloth over the gear shift knob while you’re messing around, so it doesn’t get scratched. Good luck … Dave From: Dave Oxenreider daveox@av-imagineering.com Date: Sun, 08 Sep 1996 23:53:16 -0400 Subject: Re: Brake pedal to the floor I feel pretty confident after rebuilding the master cylinder that it will never leave me completely without brakes, but it is in the back of my mind when hammering and I never run completely to the edge. I would like to replace it soon and I will look for a rebuilt, sleeved unit. I’m not sure Girling is as supported as Dunlops, though. Also, I’m not sure who mentioned it before, but the fact that when the rear brakes were unhooked the pedal never sunk is curious. How could the piston go to the floor without the fluid going somewhere? Unless the fluid is leaking out of the rear calipers, there is no way that unhooking them could prevent it. Plus, for the piston to go to the floor means that either BOTH the front and the rear are leaking or the master cylinder is leaking. The reason the front and back are kept seperate is to regulate pressure and prevent total brake failure. If one system fails the other part of the master cylinder will still be partially functional. Let me know what you find. Dave Ox. 73 XJ12 75 TR6 From: Dave Oxenreider daveox@av-imagineering.com Date: Mon, 09 Sep 1996 00:06:11 -0400 Subject: XJC12 purchase I own a 73 XJ12 after many months of searching for a unique Jag that I could afford (I paid $5,000). I would have fealt fortunate to find what you’ve found for 3,000 USD. If you like working on the V12 (tight confines, lots of plumbing, etc) then I would go for it - if it’s everything the seller says… Good luck, let us know what you find. Dave Ox. 73 XJ12 75 TR6 From: “Kirbert” palmk@gcn.scri.fsu.edu Date: Mon, 9 Sep 1996 00:16:37 -0005 Subject: Re: Radiator removal XJS Thomas E. Alberts: Mine runs well below N with the license plate in place. I have heard several accounts of the license plate flow obstruction theory but personally I doubt that it matters very much. I agree. However, the XJ-S might have less trouble in that regard than the XJ12, which was where the suggestion came from. Just intuitively, I can’t see a front tag making much difference on an XJ-S, but it does look like trouble on an XJ12. What happened to the air dam? I’d be inclined to want to replace that, but I think the car should run cool without it when the cooling system is healthy. You MIGHT be wrong. The air dam has a significant effect on airflow through the engine compartment, and these cars are marginal to begin with. Of course, the indication might be the speed at which problems occur; the air dam is important only while moving, has no effect at idle, so if the car overheats at idle the problem is elsewhere. Meanwhile, I will NOT be volunteering to remove my air dam to try it! About removing the radiator without purging the freon, what did you do? Move the condensio condensor out of the way with the hoses still connected? The radiator comes out upward, not forward; the condensor stays put. The issue, apparently, is the dryer, which is bolted to the top crosspiece over the radiator, but it is easy enough to unbolt and leave hanging there while the radiator is out. It appears the Haynes manual suggests purging the freon in order to leave the dryer attached to the crosspiece when it is removed. Totally pointless. By the way, the official Jaguar manual ALSO says the freon must come out! Suggest that all XJ-S owners take note, and scribble some comments in their repair manuals to avoid extra work if the radiator ever has to come out in the future. Kirbert | If anything is to be accomplished, | some rules must be broken. | - Palm’s Postulate From: Dave Oxenreider daveox@av-imagineering.com Date: Mon, 09 Sep 1996 00:35:44 -0400 Subject: XJ S I Corner window To All, I have a Series I XJ12 that the driver’s small corner window opener knob is stripped, thus allowing the window to be pressed open from the outside. Is this an easy fix? Has anyone successfully repaired this mechanism (or possibly just locked it from inside the door)? I am not interested in necessarily having it function properly as much as I am in having it secured. Also, has anyone ever added an aftermarket power antenna to an XJ? Any particular brands that fit nicely? Thanks in advance to all your collective knowledge. Dave Ox. 73 XJ12 75 TR6 From: Jan Wikstroem Jan_Wikstroem@acp.com.au Date: 9 Sep 96 15:18:01 Subject: XJC - Oops! I thought I’d better draw the attention of the group to a nasty design error in the XJ (at least S1 and S2) rear suspension. My attention was drawn to it when the left rear wheel started rubbing the wheel arch on tight right-handers; when I jacked the car up to investigate, the wheel flopped over about 45 degrees… The stub axle in the hub carrier (the bit that turns in the rear wheel bearings) is splined for the hub and has a large thread and castellated nut on its outer end. This thread comes right down to the splined part with no fillet whatever and creates a horrendous stress concentration at the end of the thread. Mine suffered a fatigue fracture in consequence; my local parts pusher tells me this is not uncommon, as one would expect from such an elementary error, especially if the nut is overtightened. Accordingly, I ground and polished a shallow rounded groove at the base of the thread of the new part and the unbroken old part. This may not look sensible, as the shaft appears thinner, but it makes it better able to carry the load by reducing the stress concentration. A bit of home-made Magnafluxing indicated that the right-hand stub axle was OK. I didn’t really mind doing this job, as the rear sub-frame was due to come out anyway to correct an ailing diff (PO ran it without oil) and clapped-out rear disks (now replaced with extremely expensive and not very good ventilated ones from GT Jag). I suspect this problem is the reason why the workshop manual specifies putting Loctite Stud-Lock on the outboard half of the splines, as this would take up the backlash and reduce twisting fatigue loading on the axle end. It may be an idea for those of you with older XJs to check that this has been done: 1. Jack up one side. 2. Take the hub cap off. 3. Remove the split pin and slacken the nut a couple of turns. 4. Twist the wheel back and forth and see if it’s loose on the spline. If it is, I’d recommend a generous application of Loctite Super Wick-In without taking the hub off. Allow it enough time to set. 5. Retighten the nut to the specified torque (73-77 lb/ft, but it might vary according to series and model, so look it up) and back it off slightly until you can get the split pin in. Do NOT tighten it down further to get the pin in. And the next time you do the rear wheel bearings or U-joints, I strongly recommend having the stub axles checked and modified; any competent engineering shop will know about stress relief. Modifying parts of the Jaguar may be sacrilege to some of us, but fine as the design is, it isn’t perfect… Jan From: sfisher@sola.com.au (Scott Fisher) Date: Tue, 10 Sep 96 00:03 CST Subject: [none] To: jag-lovers@sn.no From: sfisher (Scott Fisher) Subject: Re: Water light on XJS Kirby writes… This sensor is really just a terminal in the coolant, measuring the conductivity of the coolant itself. Therefore, there is a box somewhere that takes this reading and decides if there is coolant in there or air, and operates the warning light. You problem might be in the box rather than the sensor, although I suppose if the sensor itself is covered with crud it might give a false low coolant indication. Sorry, I dunno where the box is. In my 82 XJ6 the box is a black plastic canister about the size of the cardboard tube from a toilet roll. It has three or so wires comming out of one end. It in the passenger side fuse box area. Have a look in both sides if you don’t see it there. This beastie is about $130 Aus…ouch ($1 Aus = 0.78 US). Regards Scott. __________________________________________________________________________ Scott Fisher [sfisher@sola.com.au] PH: +61 08 329-28341. |\ N SOLA / \ W + E International Holdings Research Center _.–_/ S Adelaide, South Australia. v Joy ia a Jaguar XJ6 with a flat battery, a blown oil seal and an unsympathetic wife, 9km outside of a small remote town, 3:15am on a cold wet winters morning. __________________________________________________________________________ SOLA?- Opthalmic Lens Manufacturer, unless all those transparent disks we make are part of some secret conspiracy to make transparent disks! __________________________________________________________________________ End of jag-lovers-digest V2 #341 ******************************** X-UIDL: 7e63d37fb2f7d520a2cb41c1978cb2c7 Return-Path: @owner-jag-lovers-di1 Received: (from majordom@localhost) by ekeberg.sn.no (8.7.5/8.7.3/on4) id for jag-lovers-digest-out; Mon, 9 Sep 1996 17:30:09 +0200 (MET DST) Date: Mon, 9 Sep 1996 17:30:09 +0200 (MET DST) Message-Id: 199609091530.RAA21079@ekeberg.sn.no X-Authentication-Warning: ekeberg.sn.no: majordom set sender to owner-jag-lovers-digest using -f From: @owner-jag-lovers-di1 To: jag-lovers-digest@sn.no Subject: jag-lovers-digest V2 #342 Reply-To: jag-lovers@sn.no Errors-To: @owner-jag-lovers-di1 Precedence: bulk Status: RO X-Status: X-Newsgroups: mail.jag-lovers-digest jag-lovers-digest Monday, 9 September 1996 Volume 02 : Number 342 Re: XJS brake fluid reservoir cap Radiator Removal XJS Re: jump starting [XK Engines] Rebuild Questions Re: After market power antenna. CWW Repair E-Type V12 floor panel Imperial Machining Re: Radiator removal XJS Re: jag-lovers-digest V2 #337 From: “Kirbert” palmk@gcn.scri.fsu.edu Date: Mon, 9 Sep 1996 01:27:30 -0005 Subject: Re: XJS brake fluid reservoir cap Ivan S Kirkpatrick, PE isk00@visi.net: I am now replacing the cap on the brake fluid reservoir for the second time. the two previous units failed in a similar manner. It appears that the modl used for the caps has a section near the top of the threads and the top surface that is too thin. The cap has separated into a threaded piece and a top piece. This is the first I’ve heard of a problem here. Can anybody confirm? By the way, which system are we talking about? ABS? Is it possible to replace the entire reservoir with a better designed unit? If you find a way, please send it to me for inclusion in the XJ-S book. Would there be any support in compiling a list of replacement parts/suppliers that would potentially give better service? It seems like almost everyone has some experience in this respect. I have seen Kirby’s XJS book but don’t recall a specific section on better replacement parts. Items like a good GM alternator conversion kit for those with heavier electrical demands and things like that. The GM alternator conversion is in there, as well as several other suggestions. They are not in a separate section, but in the sections talking about the various parts themselves. Perhaps that isn’t ideal for some purposes, but every arrangement I could think of had pros and cons. For those who have my booklet: I have been thinking of eliminating the separation between “Maintenance” and “Modifications”. Some of my suggestions for maintenance are to replace a stock part with a non-stock part, which technically is a modification. And some modifications I suggest be considered even by those who don’t modify the car, such as the installation of aftermarket steering rack bushes. As a result, I have quite a few references back and forth between the sections. Do you guys think it would be a better idea for that to be one large section, where you can look up the thing you’re concerned about and find the maintenance suggestions and the suggested modifications at the same place? Kirbert | If anything is to be accomplished, | some rules must be broken. | - Palm’s Postulate From: “John Littler” auibmdak@ibmmail.com Date: Mon, 09 Sep 1996 02:02:59 EDT Subject: Radiator Removal XJS Jim spake thusly What does the air dam look like on the 85 XJ-S? Anyone have one to sell, trade, give away? I have only a piece of mine left on the right side. Is it supposed to go all the way across the center? It looks like the front license plate does alot of damage to the air flow into the lower grill, and with that dam gone, that might be a big part of my overheating problem. Any comments on removing the licnseplate? Unless I’ve misunderstood the readings I’ve been doing over the last month your lack of an air dam is probably the reason you’re having over- heating problems. My understanding is that the vast majority of cooling air flow comes up and in from the air dam and that the area of the grille actually contributes very little to the (air) cooling of the engine.If that dam is missing it would therefore follow that air flow around your engine is going to be neccessarily limited and will therefore at the least hamper you radiator’s cooling efforts. In a conversation with Jan Wikstrom on the weekend about handling characteristics he mentioned that on the Series II XJC (i.e his car) that the air was actually relatively stagnant around his radiator (correct me if I’ve misquoted you Jan). John SIII XJ6 Sovereign 4.2 Level 1, 29-57 Christie St. St Leonards NSW 2065 Ph: +61-2-9937-8063 Fax: +61-2-9937-8100 Mobile +61-419-617-619 From: Don Tracey dont@echuca.net.au Date: Sun, 08 Sep 1996 19:24:55 -0600 Subject: Re: jump starting From: Barrie Dawson DAWSONB@btcec3.agw.bt.co.uk Subject: RE:Jump start and damages (long) Just a short offering on the subject but one I have found extremely useful. When I first came across a non-starter, battery failed, with an alternator I was concerned that I may cause damage jumping. I had read somewhere that jump starting these vehicles could result in alternator damage once the dead one had started. Since then I have followed a simple but extremely safe procedure. 1. Connect donor to receiver using heavy guage cables. 2. Allow donor to run for about 5 minutes to build up a basic charge in receiver. 3. Where there are 2 people doing this 1 needs to be ready to remove cables as soon as then receiver starts, allowing own alternator to charge 1 battery, the receiver alternator WILL try and charge donor. 4. NEVER allow the receiver to be on the starter for more than 5 seconds. This WILL bring the donor cars charging system into full swing and may not produce sufficient charge to start the receiver. 5. Once started run at about 1500 RPM for no less than 10 minutes. 6. Finally find out what caused the problem and FIX IT. There are available jumper leads with prevents voltage surge when hooked up ,I believe these are essential boot gear to anyone with a computer car,I use a similar device that hooks across the battery when welding on cars and have had no problems. Regards Don Tracey AUSTRALIA 58 XK150,59 Mk2,50 Mk5. From: “Alastair Lauener” a.lauener@napier.ac.uk Date: Mon, 09 Sep 96 09:51:52 gmt Subject: [XK Engines] Rebuild Questions B.J. Kroppe asked 1. Has anyone rebuilt an XK engine without needing to regrind the crankshaft main bearings and crankpins (big ends)? I’m looking for anyone with data which says their crankshaft journal measurements were within specifications after xxx,000 miles. (My engine has 96,000 miles on it.) My 3.4 S-Type engine had 112,048 miles. It didn’t get a rebore, or a regrind. The crank had less than 1/2 thou wear on, and was not oval. The bores had less than 3thou wear, with about 1/2 thou ovality. All measured myself. The (lump) :slight_smile: went together with new rings and shells all round. 2. How many of you out there have replaced the bronze bush which guides the oil pump driveshaft/distributor shaft? Are there inside diameter specifications for this component? Yes, but sorry, I just replaced it without much examination. Much like a clutch release bearing, because I was in there. 3. How can I definitively tell what compression ratio my engine is? Should be able to tell from your engine number, ************************************************************************ * Alastair Lauener Work Phone +44 131 455 2458 * * 1964 3.4 S-Type story at http://www.sn.no/home/nick/alas.html * ************************************************************************ From: Baard Th Hesvik baard@telesoft.no Date: Mon, 9 Sep 1996 12:08:38 -0700 Subject: Re: After market power antenna. Dave, I’ve fitted a power antenna on my XJ Series I. Mine didn’t have a power antenna at all as standard. I used a Bosch antenna because it is very compact, although not like the cheap Japanese ones that literally shoots out. I fitted the unit in the left rear wing, between the tank and the light cluster. The lower quarter panel was removed and the unit fixed to the lower edge of the wing. It was a tight fit! I had to slightly bend one of the bulb holders in the light cluster. Having checked the positioning in advance, and found it close to perfect, I decided to go for this easy/cheaper solution as opposed to get the original antenna ($$$). Good luck. Bard ______ _ ! Baard Th Hesvik, Telesoft AS / _ / _ _ _ / / ! Longhammarvn 7, N-5500 Haugesund / // / // /_ / / -/- -/- ! T: +47 52735000 F: +47 52717040 / /_ / /_ / // / /_ ! E-mail: baard@telesoft.no From: brownd@filon.ml.com (Dave Brown - London Dev X1818) Date: Mon, 9 Sep 96 13:37:36 BST Subject: CWW Repair Hi, My better half was driving the Daimler on Friday whilst our “normal” car was in for a service. As luck would have it she had a puncture which resulted in total rapid deflation. It also resulted in one completely buggerred tyre and one partially buggerred chrome wire wheel… I’m not sure how bent the rim is, but I’ve definitely lost a couple of spokes. Can anyone reccomend someone/somewhere (in the UK, preferably around the London area) that can repair CWW’s (assuming it IS possible to repair CWW’s) ? Further to my previous post a few weeks back about bodywork restoration, I still haven’t decided what to do. I’m in the process of getting another quote which I think will be cheaper than the 8K (sterling) I was quoted, but probably still around the 5.5K mark. One day soon I’ll have to make up my mind… Cheers, David P.S. My deepest comiserations to the poor guy who watched his XJS being destroyed in the hurricane! And we complain about OUR weather!! David Brown '67 Daimler 250 V8 brownd@ml.com ///_/_/_/_/////_///_ /_/_//_/_/_/_/_/___ /_/_/_/_/______/_/_/_/______ /_/_/_/_/_/_/________/_/_____ ___/_/_/////_/_/_/_/_/______ /_/___/_/_//_/_/_/_______ ///_/_/_/_/////_///_________ From: hastings@frodo.eucom.mil (Craig R. Hastings) Date: Mon, 9 Sep 1996 13:34:22 GMT Subject: E-Type V12 floor panel Just a quick question for the E-Type Gurus out there. I’m looking at a 1973 V12 E-Type Coupe for possible purchase. One thing I noticed in a cursery inspection via pictures was that the floor panels underneath the carpets were a reddish color. Is this typical of the color painted? The car is painted Silver and I’m told that is the original color. If any more information is needed let me know. For those looking for an XK120. I have seen sveral listed on the net at www.specialcars.com Good Hunting. Craig Hastings 88 VDP From: traver@vnet.IBM.COM Date: Mon, 9 Sep 96 09:58:55 EDT Subject: Imperial Machining I used Imperial to sleeve several wheel cylinders and master cylinder on my Series 1. I am very satisfied with their quality of work and service. From: “Jim Cantrell” jimc@sysdiv.sdl.USU.edu Date: Mon, 9 Sep 1996 09:14:54 MDT Subject: Re: Radiator removal XJS Jim Isbell wrote:

Anyone know how important the sponge rubber inserts around the
ratiator are. Mine are rotted away.

You should replace these. They are rubber isolation mounts. If you
don’t, then two bad things will happen over time: 1) the metal to
metal contact will wear through your new radiator tanks eventually
springing a leak and 2) the direct mechanical mount transmits more
vibration to the core and your solder joints will prematurely debond
(primarily around the tak to frame pieces).

Kind Regards,

Jim Cantrell


From: “MarrioSD” marriosd@ccmail.apldbio.com
Date: Mon, 09 Sep 96 08:21:04 PDT
Subject: Re: jag-lovers-digest V2 #337

The following is an attached File item from cc:Mail. It contains
information that had to be encoded to ensure successful transmission
through various mail systems. To decode the file use the UUDECODE
program.

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end

OUT OF OFFICE AT EUROPEAN SERVICE MEETING.

Will not be able to answer ccmail until I return.


End of jag-lovers-digest V2 #342


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jag-lovers-digest Tuesday, 10 September 1996 Volume 02 : Number 343

Thanks and XJ6 Radiator Foam Blocks
Re: Hole in dash SIII
How smooth thy jag?
Re: Radiator removal XJS
XJS repail manual
Re: XJ40: How does your A/C operate?
Heat Shield, E-type bonnets.
FW: could use advice regarding tire brands for 85 XJ-S
Re: Radiator Removal
Re: XJS — Oops!!! (a.k.a. Chassis failure)
'88XJ6 transmission “clunk”
(Fwd) Rad for Jaguar E type
1986 XJ6 Battery
96 XJS Conv
RE: [XK Engines] Rebuild Questions
Rear Brakes on an 89 XJS with ABS
64 3.8 S-type automatic transmission shfiting hard
Re: Michael Powers/TEIR/Thomson - XJ40: Owners Manual


From: “BJ Kroppe” wkroppe@ford.com
Date: Mon, 9 Sep 1996 11:44:45 -0400
Subject: Thanks and XJ6 Radiator Foam Blocks

Greetings All -

Thanks to Hunt Dabney and others who replied to my XK engine
rebuild questions. Very helpful.

On the subject of XJ6 foam blocks, I cannot find replacements
in any of the usual parts catalogs. I have seen XJS and
XJ6/12 S1/S2, but no Series 3 XJ6 radiator foam blocks.
(I’m referring to the foam pieces which seal around the radiator.)

Can anyone refer me to a source for these foam bits?
Thanks in advance for any replies.

B.J. Kroppe - '82 XJ6



From: “Kirbert” palmk@gcn.scri.fsu.edu
Date: Mon, 9 Sep 1996 12:13:07 -0005
Subject: Re: Hole in dash SIII

BTW, is there any satisfactory rebuild for a viscous fan coupler or is it
cheaper/wiser to just replace it?

I’ve never seen one that would come apart short of a saw!

Any idea of cost (US)?

Generic, $30. Anything that would fit a Jag, $100+.

– Kirbert | If anything is to be accomplished,
| some rules must be broken.
| - Palm’s Postulate


From: David Covert davecove@microsoft.com
Date: Mon, 9 Sep 1996 09:22:44 -0700
Subject: How smooth thy jag?

Finally got my Uni-Syn to work. Mfg defect… the passage from the
throat to the float assembly was not drilled deep enough. A dead end if
you will. I fixed that and now it works as advertised…

Anyway, I balanced and adjusted the mix (best I could)* on my '73 XJ12
and got the idle speed while in gear down to about 750rpm. The exhaust
note is clean and steady.

But when I sit in her, it is like sitting in a Chevy 350 muscle car…
by that I mean she is not smooth. She has a heavy, idle that shakes the
car. At 1000rpm, she is smooth as glass.

Is this normal? How smooth are these engines at low idle? I mean, I
could see that a big displacement engine could do everything big…

  • Anybody know where I could get one of those fabled ColorTunes?

Dave Covert
Reactive On-Site Services Lead

…Particle Man, Particle Man, doin’ the things a particle can…
They Might Be Giants


From: “Kirbert” palmk%gcn.scri.fsu.edu@vm1.cc.nps.navy.mil
Date: Sun, 8 Sep 1996 17:42:31 -0005
Subject: Re: Radiator removal XJS

HUH?

Anyone know how important the sponge rubber inserts around the
ratiator are. Mine are rotted away.

What does the air dam look like on the 85 XJ-S? Anyone have one to
sell, trade, give away? I have only a piece of mine left on the
right side. Is it supposed to go all the way across the center?

The rubber inserts are, I believe, to keep the air from sneaking araound
the sides of the radiator. Gotta keep it going through the radiator or it
does no good.
Air dam missing? Doesn’t that force air through the radiator at low speeds
whenthe fan is the primary cooling device?
LLoyd


From: “Sang Oh” sango@ecg.csg.mot.com
Date: Mon, 9 Sep 1996 11:45:34 -0500
Subject: XJS repail manual

I’m looking for XJS repair manual. I own 89 XJS and I’m planning to
replace shock absorbers all the way around and replace all the rubber bushings.

If you have XJS repair manual for sale(for 89) or information on where I could
buy the repair manual please let me know.

Thanks in advance

  • –Sang

Sang Oh

Motorola
Cordless Product
Cellular Subscriber Group
1900 W. Winchester Road
Libertyville, IL 60048
Phone:(708) 523-4725
Fax:(708) 523-2499
E-mail: sango@ecg.csg.mot.com


From: Michael Powers/TEIR/Thomson Michael_Powers@teir.com
Date: 9 Sep 96 13:07:35
Subject: Re: XJ40: How does your A/C operate?

I just purchased a “drivers manual” for my 89 XJ6. I’d
more than happy to scan and post the section on Climate control.
Just tell me what format you need (jpeg, bmp, etc.).

  • -Mike

PS - It’s pretty good reading. It explains all the buttons that seem to have
no purpose.
Plus it only $15 (US) at your local Jag dealer.

ajbeale @ squirrel.com.au (A.J. Beale) 

09/09/96 10:13 AM
To: jag-lovers @ sn.no @ Internet
cc:
Subject: Re: XJ40: How does your A/C operate?

Eric writes:

I don’t have the owners manual and would like to know how the A/C
works in the cars of other XJ40 owners.
What vents get cold/warm air and how is the AUTO mode supposed to
work? My AUTO mode turns opens & closes the center vents when the car
is cold (air is then sent to footwells).

I agree with Barrie’s remarks. Although I have a (brief) description of the
system in the workshop manuals, I am still unable to fully understand how
some things that have happened to me can be possible. The description, with
diagrams, gives the impression that hot air from the heater matrix and cold
air from the evaporator are mixed together in proportions determined by the
in-car and ambient temperatures and the control settings and this is then
discharged at both foot and face levels. If this is so, then with the
possible exception of the changes made by the face level temperature
control, there should be no difference between the temperature of air from
all of the outlets. This face level control is (I think) only supposed to
change the temperature by a few degrees, but I cannot notice any change. I
once had hot air at face level and cold air at foot level with the controls
set to cool. I couldn’t find any fault and it didn’t recur. As regards the
difference between the AUTO and MAN modes, I read the description to mean
that with AUTO the system maintains the set temperature but in MAN it works
as a non-climate control system. The side vents on my car always have a
good volume of air but the volume from the centre vent varies considerably.
If anyone can give a detailed description of the system, or preferably a
fault finding list, I would be very interested. Alan


From: Bill Graham BGraham@rdc.noaa.gov
Date: Mon, 09 Sep 1996 13:37:28 -0400 (EDT)
Subject: Heat Shield, E-type bonnets.

John,

We have a 68 E-type FHC which badly discolored paint over the entire
louvered areas and the center raised section up to where the raised
section flows into the bonnet nose. We are planning a repaint this winter
and the mainfold heat shield idea sounds as if it will provide some badly
needed protection. What did the used XJS series III shield cost from
Welsh? Can you describe the minor creativity of the mounting bracket?

Bill Graham
68 XKE FHC (hers)
71 MGB (his)


From: Aaron Burnett aaron.burnett@attws.com
Date: Mon, 9 Sep 1996 11:04:17 -0700
Subject: FW: could use advice regarding tire brands for 85 XJ-S

Just purchased a set of P4000s for my '85 XJ-S. So far, performance has
been great and were, only minimal (6,000 miles). Your price ($115
including mounting etc.) is excellent. I paid $125 plus mounting and
balancing.

Aaron
'85 XJ-S


From: ee84287@goodnet.com[SMTP:ee84287@goodnet.com]
Sent: Friday, September 06, 1996 5:10 PM
To: jag-lovers@sn.no
Subject: could use advice regarding tire brands for 85 XJ-S

I am facing the task f buying new tires for my 85 XJ-S. I’d be
interested in
anyone’s feedback regarding the following apparent three brands that I
have
as a choice for 215/70 VR15:

  1. Dunlops. At around $150/tire.
  2. Pirellis (I’m told that there is a new P4000 that replaces the
    previous
    vintage). Best price so far; $115/tire including mounting, stems, and
    balancing.
  3. Bridgestones (my current set, gave a great ride but didn’t last very
    long). At around $145/tire.
    Any other ones I should consider? Are the Pirelli’s any good and is
    the
    price aboput right? Your opinions regarding the above will be much
    appreciated, and thanks in advance,

Rob W-M
85 XJ-S


From: “Jim Isbell” JISBELLJR@mail.utexas.edu
Date: Mon, 9 Sep 1996 11:07:15 +0000
Subject: Re: Radiator Removal

checked, and not only does the Haynes manual state the A/C must be
discharged to remove the radiator, but the official Jaguar manual
does too!

They are both wrong, in fact it doesnt even make it any easier to do
it that way!

You’ve apparently tried it, I haven’t. So, for final confirmation:
You had no trouble getting the radiator out without disturbing the
freon circuit? I presume you merely left the dryer hanging there by
the tubes? Any tricks involved, or is it as obvious as it looks?

Actualy the dryer is fastened to a cross brace in front of the
condenser and there is no stress on it to leave it there. You just
have to slightly bend the brackets up enough to remove the radiator
top piece after remove 4 small nuts (real small!).

OK heres the skinny. First, the hood. Remove the Grill and then
pull the hoot into its upright position. Unscrew the bolts that holt
the lift struts to the fenders. Lift the hood up untill it is
resting on the bumper (if you dont have a rubber bumper like I do put
a towel there to protect the paint on the hood from chipping) The
compress the struts one at a time and place the end/bolt against the
end of the drip lip in the inside of the fender. This will hold
pressure against the hood to hold it open. It WILL NOT be in the way
when it is fully extended this way.
Next follow the following description from John Himes. I didnt do it
quite this way since I was done by the time I got his post, but his
description is good.

I found it was very easy to do, but unlike John I did remove the fan,
clutch, and shroud first. I had to anyway since I am also replacing
the water pump.

I didnt need a friend to do any of it, but it might have been easier.

=========================================================
You have got to be kidding about the A/C discharge. On mine, and I
doubt that they are that different, the A/C radiator ( can’t remember
the name at present ) sits infront of the radiator. There are 2
mounting straps that hold a large round part of the A/C system ( in
front of the A/C radiator, I hate when my mind goes blank on part
names ) that is held by 4 nuts on the plate that covers both
radiators. Unscrew these 4 nuts & move the straps up & out of the
way, takes a little force. This plate is held by 4 screws, 2 on each
side, remove these, remove the thin bypass tubing by undoing the 3
c-clams on the hoses, remove the bolt on the right side this tubing is
also held in by, there are some copper washers there you may want to
replace. There are also 2 nuts that hold the A/C radiator in place.
These have rubber under the washer. You also need to do remove the
nuts that hold the shroud that the electrical fan is attached to and
move back as far as you can. ( oh yea, also remove the 3 main
radiator hoses from the radiator if you have not already done so. )

Now with the help of a friend ( easier if the shroud is not there, but
you can’t remove it with the clutch driven fan & radiator in place. I
have remove both of mine and the shroud & gone to 2 electrical fans
mounted to the radiator ) Lift the empty radiator up & out. Watch
out for your hands. If the shroud is in the way & you cant jimmy out
the radiator, then you will need to remove the 4 bolts that hold in
the clutch driven fan & clutch.
Then you should be able to get the shroud out of the way. If the hood
is in
the way, you can just un-hook the struts to give you more room to move
the hood with out removing the hood. If you are going to remove the
hood, you are correct that it is MUCH easier with two people. One to
hold the hood & one to remove the bolts.

I probably dont need the radiator rodded, I found over 1/3rd of the
surface blocked with leaves and such so it probably only needed to
have those cleaned out.

Hope this will find its way into the XJ-S book. BTW, this was on a
1985 XJ-S

Another note, the Haynes manual (both the one for the XJ6 and the one
for the XJ-S) says that the XJS clutch was first 4
bolt then 1 bolt, but my 85 which is after the change by 3 years has
a four bolt clutch. So both Haynes manuals seem to be incorrect on
this point.


From: “Mark McChesney” mmcchesn@ford.com
Date: Mon, 9 Sep 1996 15:35:55 -0400
Subject: Re: XJS — Oops!!! (a.k.a. Chassis failure)

On Sep 6, 6:51pm, Kirbert wrote:

Subject: Re: XJS — Oops!!! (a.k.a. Chassis failure)
John Napoli:

  1. Is there a source for stiffer cage mounts? Or is it a case of using
    the stock setup or going solid?

I have not seen any alternative mounts offered. A shame, too, I bet
there’d be a market.

There are hard rubber mounts available from SNG Barratt, also, Terry’s is now
selling a full kit to convert to a diagonal radius link (with diff cage
supports). I’m not sure the kit will work on an XJS, I think it’s intended for
E-types.

Mark McChesney


From: Kramer Mike MIKE@dscmsmail.docscience.com
Date: Mon, 09 Sep 96 12:27:00 PDT
Subject: '88XJ6 transmission “clunk”

Driving in Southern Cal frequently presents the opportunity for freeway
commutes at low speeds. I have noticed lately that when I am bumper to
bumper, starting to accelerate from 1st to 2nd at a low speed, it will
engage with a very healthy “clunk.” I never notice this from a dead stop
acceleration, but rather from a rolling start at a low speed. Is this an
indication of a near term transmission diaster, some required maintanence,
or anything to worry about?

Mike in San Diego
'88 XJ6 with 77K


From: “Mark McChesney” mmcchesn@ford.com
Date: Mon, 9 Sep 1996 15:45:11 -0400
Subject: (Fwd) Rad for Jaguar E type

From: GriffinRad@aol.com
Date: Wed, 4 Sep 1996 22:36:40 -0400
To: mmcchesn
Subject: Re: Rad for '65 Jaguar E type

Hi Mark,
Yes we do have a radiator for your Jaguar the only problem is that I don’t
have the cost. So I will get that information to you by mail. Thanks for
checking with us…

To anyone interested, Griffin Radiator has rads for E-types (and other Jags?).
I understand that they have a higher cooling capacity. I’ll post the price when
I get it.

Mark McChesney


From: “William F. Stickney” picker1@ix.netcom.com
Date: Mon, 09 Sep 1996 16:33:11 -0400
Subject: 1986 XJ6 Battery

Greetings all;
I have a need to check my battery. It appears to be not holding
a charge. When I test the draw it seems to be minimal (computer draw
only), therefore it would appear to be a battery problem. 2 questions
does this seem to be a correct procedure, and where might I find a
proper battery in the Northeastern section of US?

Thanks in advance for any information regarding these items.

Bill Stickney


From: jackb@epix.net (Jack Bednarski)
Date: Mon, 09 Sep 1996 15:31:47 -0400
Subject: 96 XJS Conv

I have a 95 XJS Conv. Believe it or not, I have no Maintenance problems at
all. Regular oil changes, lube and add gas is all that is required so far.
I test drove a 95 XJS Conv 6 cyl. The car is lighter and a lot less power.
I think it’s the torgue. I have a 71 XKE V12 so I’m used to 12 cyl power.
The 6 cyl XJS is faster than the sedan. I like the heavier feel of the 12
and the car handles great! Gas milage is 12.5 to 13.5 city and no more than
18 mph on the highway. Once I got 7 mph on the highway. You guess the speed.

Jack Bednarski
71 XKE V12
90 XJ6 VDP
95 XJS V12


From: “White, Dick” white@msgate.ColumbiaSC.NCR.COM
Date: Mon, 9 Sep 1996 17:15:00 -0400
Subject: RE: [XK Engines] Rebuild Questions

B.J.,

I rebuilt my 3.8 litre S-Type engine at 99,000 mi. and did not have to
have the crankshaft re-ground. The block and crank were checked by the
machine shop which did the boring for me (one new sleeve and bore all
cylinders +.030").

I did not replace the bronze bush on the distributor/oil pump shaft.

After rebuilding the S-Type engine (9:1) I have 175-180 psi in all
cylinders. On my XK150 (8:1) I have ~150 psi on all cylinders. I don’t
know how long ago it was rebuilt.

Regards,
Dick White
Columbia, SC
'64 3.8 S-Type
'58 XK 150 FHC

  1. Has anyone rebuilt an XK engine without needing to regrind the
    crankshaft
    main bearings and crankpins (big ends)? I’m looking for anyone with
    data
    which says their crankshaft journal measurements were within
    specifications
    after xxx,000 miles. (My engine has 96,000 miles on it.)
  1. How many of you out there have replaced the bronze bush which guides
    the
    oil pump driveshaft/distributor shaft? Are there inside diameter
    specifications
    for this component?

  2. How can I definitively tell what compression ratio my engine is? On
    page 05-2
    of my Series III Service Manual it says I should have 120psi -
    135psi compression
    pressure. I have a U.S. emissions, late 1982 vehicle. What
    compression ratio
    pistons do I have?

Thanks as usual for any and all replies.

B.J. Kroppe - '82 XJ6


From: pbowers@ilk.com (Patrick J. Bowers)
Date: Mon, 9 Sep 1996 18:34:38 -0400 (EDT)
Subject: Rear Brakes on an 89 XJS with ABS

I have overhauled the rear brakes on the above car and while I was under there I
had planned to replace the flexible brake line which goes to the T connector.
However, on the flexible line in the car there is what appears to be a mini-
c-clamp that cross clamps the flexible line in the middle. Is this factory?
If so
what purpose does it serve? I was planning to simply remove it and replace
the line.
Are there any problems with this?

Patrick Bowers


From: “albert (a.) cohoe” cohoe@nortel.ca
Date: Mon, 9 Sep 1996 15:26:00 -0400
Subject: 64 3.8 S-type automatic transmission shfiting hard

One of the local Jag club members has a 1964 3.8 S-type with a problem:
when hot, the Borg-Warner DG250 transmission shifts are delayed and abrupt.
Comments or pointers to an FAQ would be appreciated.

Here’s the details:

    • cold operation (first 15-20 minutes) is fine.
    • when hot and refusing to shift as expected, shifts can be triggered by
      reducing the amount of throttle slightly.
    • the transmission has been rebuilt twice without solving the problem.

Related to this problem is a question about the amount of ATF that this
transmission needs. If the amount in the literature is installed, the
dipstick is dry or has only a tiny amount showing on it. To get the
correct level showing on the dipstick, an extra 1.5 litres of ATF has
to be added. What’s the correct amount? Note that the transmission operation
doesn’t change with the amount of ATF.

Regards - Albert Cohoe
Voice: 393-3440 or 613-763-3440 Email: cohoe@nortel.ca


From: cobac@ix.netcom.com (Eric J Faber )
Date: Mon, 9 Sep 1996 12:04:42 -0700
Subject: Re: Michael Powers/TEIR/Thomson - XJ40: Owners Manual

Mike wrote:

I just purchased a “drivers manual” for my 89 XJ6. I’d
more than happy to scan and post the section on Climate control.
Just tell me what format you need (jpeg, bmp, etc.).

Mike,
Thanks for the offer! If you could please post the section on the
Climate control in jpeg format, I would be very grateful.
Also, thanks for mentioning the price and availabilty of the manual
from the dealer. I figured it would be $100+, like the owners manual
cost me on the Mercedes I owned prior to the Jag. I’ll have to add
this to my next list of things to buy from the dealer.
Thanks again! This information you may send, will surely tide my
curiousity over until I am able to order my “shopping list” of little
parts from the dealer.
-Eric
cobac@ix.netcom.com


End of jag-lovers-digest V2 #343


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jag-lovers-digest Tuesday, 10 September 1996 Volume 02 : Number 344

Re: Radiator Removal
Re: FW: could use advice regarding tire brands for 85 XJ-S
Knockoff tool - Marston Motors
Porcelain Manifolds at the Palo Alto meet
Re: XJ40: How does your A/C operate?
short Palo Alto report
XK-140 - early C Type Cylinder Heads
XJ40- caught again!
Re: XJ40: How does your A/C operate?
Special Car Journal
88xjs idle
remove
Re: Wind Deflector
Re: Subject: RE: XJ40:How does your A/C operate
Re: XJS brake fluid reservoir cap
Re: could use advice regarding tire brands for 85 XJ-S
I saw “old #25” today and the XJ-S is getting better too.


From: “Jim Isbell” JISBELLJR@mail.utexas.edu
Date: Mon, 9 Sep 1996 11:07:15 +0000
Subject: Re: Radiator Removal

checked, and not only does the Haynes manual state the A/C must be
discharged to remove the radiator, but the official Jaguar manual
does too!

They are both wrong, in fact it doesnt even make it any easier to do
it that way!

You’ve apparently tried it, I haven’t. So, for final confirmation:
You had no trouble getting the radiator out without disturbing the
freon circuit? I presume you merely left the dryer hanging there by
the tubes? Any tricks involved, or is it as obvious as it looks?

Actualy the dryer is fastened to a cross brace in front of the
condenser and there is no stress on it to leave it there. You just
have to slightly bend the brackets up enough to remove the radiator
top piece after remove 4 small nuts (real small!).

OK heres the skinny. First, the hood. Remove the Grill and then
pull the hoot into its upright position. Unscrew the bolts that holt
the lift struts to the fenders. Lift the hood up untill it is
resting on the bumper (if you dont have a rubber bumper like I do put
a towel there to protect the paint on the hood from chipping) The
compress the struts one at a time and place the end/bolt against the
end of the drip lip in the inside of the fender. This will hold
pressure against the hood to hold it open. It WILL NOT be in the way
when it is fully extended this way.
Next follow the following description from John Himes. I didnt do it
quite this way since I was done by the time I got his post, but his
description is good.

I found it was very easy to do, but unlike John I did remove the fan,
clutch, and shroud first. I had to anyway since I am also replacing
the water pump.

I didnt need a friend to do any of it, but it might have been easier.

=========================================================
You have got to be kidding about the A/C discharge. On mine, and I
doubt that they are that different, the A/C radiator ( can’t remember
the name at present ) sits infront of the radiator. There are 2
mounting straps that hold a large round part of the A/C system ( in
front of the A/C radiator, I hate when my mind goes blank on part
names ) that is held by 4 nuts on the plate that covers both
radiators. Unscrew these 4 nuts & move the straps up & out of the
way, takes a little force. This plate is held by 4 screws, 2 on each
side, remove these, remove the thin bypass tubing by undoing the 3
c-clams on the hoses, remove the bolt on the right side this tubing is
also held in by, there are some copper washers there you may want to
replace. There are also 2 nuts that hold the A/C radiator in place.
These have rubber under the washer. You also need to do remove the
nuts that hold the shroud that the electrical fan is attached to and
move back as far as you can. ( oh yea, also remove the 3 main
radiator hoses from the radiator if you have not already done so. )

Now with the help of a friend ( easier if the shroud is not there, but
you can’t remove it with the clutch driven fan & radiator in place. I
have remove both of mine and the shroud & gone to 2 electrical fans
mounted to the radiator ) Lift the empty radiator up & out. Watch
out for your hands. If the shroud is in the way & you cant jimmy out
the radiator, then you will need to remove the 4 bolts that hold in
the clutch driven fan & clutch.
Then you should be able to get the shroud out of the way. If the hood
is in
the way, you can just un-hook the struts to give you more room to move
the hood with out removing the hood. If you are going to remove the
hood, you are correct that it is MUCH easier with two people. One to
hold the hood & one to remove the bolts.

I probably dont need the radiator rodded, I found over 1/3rd of the
surface blocked with leaves and such so it probably only needed to
have those cleaned out.

Hope this will find its way into the XJ-S book. BTW, this was on a
1985 XJ-S

Another note, the Haynes manual (both the one for the XJ6 and the one
for the XJ-S) says that the XJS clutch was first 4
bolt then 1 bolt, but my 85 which is after the change by 3 years has
a four bolt clutch. So both Haynes manuals seem to be incorrect on
this point.


From: DisneyPors@aol.com
Date: Mon, 9 Sep 1996 15:21:58 -0400
Subject: Re: FW: could use advice regarding tire brands for 85 XJ-S

When I used to have my '84 XJ-6 I was unimpressed with the pirelli tires that
came with it. I went with Yokohama AX-321 tires and saw a drastic increase in
performace. of course, the XJ-S is a different car, but I would take a look
at those or any Yokohama tires. I have had them on a couple of cars and they
always produce fantastic performance. Of course, they are softer than other
tires and do wear a bit quicker but the are great. I have always found
Pirelli to be a disapointment the tires that came on my Porsche were Pirelli
and I got rid of them after only 3000 miles, they just arent great (IMHO) -
Doug


From: Patrick Krejcik pkr@SLAC.Stanford.EDU
Date: Mon, 09 Sep 1996 11:29:03 -0700
Subject: Knockoff tool - Marston Motors

Picked up a few interesting tips at the Palo Alto British Car meet this
weekend.
The meet was very well attended and a huge turnout of Jaguars as well,
which gave lots of opportunity for comparing notes with other owners.
I saw a nice tool for removing eared knockoffs without damaging them. It
was a 20 inch length of aircraft plywood with a milled out center
section that snugly fits over the knockoff. You hit the plywood with the
hammer and get an additional factor of 5 in leverage.
An E-Type owner (Chuck Rockhold) told me he got it from Marston Motors
at Bradford in the UK at a cost of about $US25 including shipping to the
US.
Apparently they advertise in Jaguar World, so can somebody look up their
telephone and/or fax number and tell me.
It seems a reasonable price and is a nice tool that fits in easily with
the spare tire.

Cheers, Patrick.
1965 E-Type 4.2 Series I FHC


From: Patrick Krejcik pkr@SLAC.Stanford.EDU
Date: Mon, 09 Sep 1996 11:43:31 -0700
Subject: Porcelain Manifolds at the Palo Alto meet

At the Palo Alto meet there were a few success and failure stories to
compare on the porcelaining of exhaust manifolds. One E-Type owner who
claimed success (even with sustained high speed driving) had his
manifolds done at Parkeys in the Los Angeles area. Suprisingly, he
claimed that it cost him only about $120. But another E-Type owner had
his done a few years ago at Parkeys for well over $200 and the porcelain
only lasted a very short time. Has their process improved? Anyone else
had experience with them? Anyone know their phone number?

Cheers, Patrick.
1965 E-Type 4.2 Series I FHC.


From: ajbeale@squirrel.com.au (A.J. Beale)
Date: Tue, 10 Sep 1996 09:02:14 +1000 (EST)
Subject: Re: XJ40: How does your A/C operate?

Mike writes:

I just purchased a “drivers manual” for my 89 XJ6. I’d
more than happy to scan and post the section on Climate control.
Just tell me what format you need (jpeg, bmp, etc.).

Thanks, Mike, but I have both the drivers manual and the workshop manual.
The problem is that while the drivers manual tells you what each of the
buttons does and the workshop manual gives a brief description of the
system, neither gives a sufficiently detailed description of the system to
allow accurate fault finding. Almost any fault can be caused by at least
half a dozen components and you need the experience of someone like Michael
Neal, to avoid checking the least likely first. Regards, Alan.


From: Ryan Border rborder@hpspls16.cup.hp.com
Date: Mon, 9 Sep 1996 16:41:38 -0700
Subject: short Palo Alto report

Hello-
Thought a quick report from this Sunday’s Palo Alto meet was in order:

Jag’s rolled on and off of the grass all day, but the local club made a
high-water count of 73 Jaguars. Quite a good showing I thought. The
earliest car I saw, was an SS 3.5L Saloon; with just about every model
represented from there to a couple of new XJS convertibles. I’d heard
that there was an XK8 or 2 in the area… (didn’t Michael Neal say there
were 1 or 2 here to do mechanics training on?), and was sort of hopeful one
might show up, but I guess it just wasn’t to be :-(.

Anyway, there were XK’s XJ’s E-types, S-types, Big Saloon’s, and Little
Saloon’s, of all shapes and sizes. The event was advertised as open to
all cars- from trailer queens to works in progress; but I must say that nearly
every Jaguar there was looking very very good. A few Jag’s for sale; including
a pair of MK2’s at ~$5K each, and a nice looking MKX- looking for offers at
around $7K. With so many Jaguars in one place, it was neat to compare one
model to the next and see how the styling evolves from one car to the next.
There was a total of 1 MK1 in the group, parked way out in the corner :slight_smile:

In addition the the Jags, there were Triumphs, MG’s, Aston Martin’s, Austin
Healey’s, Land Rovers, Lotus’s (or is it Lotii?), Bentley’s and RR’s,
Nash Metropolitans, Mini’s, and countless other more obscure marques. In
total, I’d guess 5 or 6 hundred cars. Weather was bright sunshine, though
a tad hot (>90 degrees).

A personal thanks to all the jag-lovers who stopped by to say hi, it’s
always nice to put a face to an email address :-). And, apologies to
anyone who I missed, stopping by while I was away taking in the show.
===== __ ============================================================== |> ===
/_\ Ryan Border o~_ o~_ | *
/ / / Hewlett Packard Company, Inc. >/-.>/’
/o| *
/ / /
_______ Software Design Engineer ( )—(*)-( )’ *
/ / /
/_____\ email: rborder@cup.hp.com or border@best.com *
/ / __ / / __ / 19111 Pruneridge Ave. mailstop 42LX, Cupertino, CA 95014 *
/ / / / / / // / (408) 447-2496 FAX: (408) 447-0641 *
/
/// / _____/ WWW: http://www.best.com/~border/pages/jag/jag.shtml *
===== / / / ==================================================================
/
/


From: Brian Pel BPEL@mccarthy.ca
Date: Mon, 09 Sep 1996 20:22:20 -0400
Subject: XK-140 - early C Type Cylinder Heads

This is a MIME message. If you are reading this text, you may want to
consider changing to a mail reader or gateway that understands how to
properly handle MIME multipart messages.

  • –=_05560EDF.17761A1B
    Content-Type: text/plain
    Content-Disposition: inline

Here’s my reply to Neville Laing’s recent question about early XK-140 C-Type
cylinder heads.

  • –=_05560EDF.17761A1B
    Content-Type: message/rfc822

Date: Mon, 09 Sep 1996 09:09:58 -0400
From: Brian Pel BPEL@mccarthy.ca
To: cppceng@richmond.infi.net
Subject: XK-140
Mime-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain
Content-Disposition: inline

Neville: Saw your message. I am currently restoring a 140 DHC Sepecial
Equipment Model which bears chassis # s817002DN. This is the second left
hand drive 140 DHC and according to Jaguar records is the first 140 with a C
Type head. The car has no cam cover badges and no cast “C” in the plug well.
The the original well colour appears to have been silver and I plan on leaving it
that way. For $40 you can get a Jaguar Daimler Heritage Trust certificate for
your car which should confirm that it has a C Type head: contact Karen Miller
at Jaguar in Mahweh, N.J.

Hope this helps and that we can share further insights. Regards.

Brian Pel
Toronto, Ontario
(bpel@mccarthy.ca)

  • –=_05560EDF.17761A1B–

From: “Peter Rebbechi (03) 9275 3374” <"REBBECHI PETER"@A1.MEOC02.SNO.mts.dec.com>
Date: Mon, 09 Sep 1996 21:27:00 +0000 (GMT)
Subject: XJ40- caught again!

That will teach me to tell people that my car doesn’t let me
down.
For the third time in 3 yrs, I have had a ‘broken’
thermostat, that has resulted in overheating.
The first time I caught it, no damage.
The second time, well, I replaced 4 valves, and generally
rebuilt the head.
Last night, whilst driving in traffic, I noticed the guage
suddenly climb. It usually sits at 90, and hardly moves.
This time it was moving, up, fast.
I pulled over, switched off, and popped the bonnet.
The radiator cap was just starting to expunge water. I
waited some time, made some phone calls, read a book, etc,
and released the cap.
Then I undid the housing, and removed the thermostat. The
thermostat was well and truly busted. Some silastic around
the housing, and more water, and I was away. When I got
home, I retightened the housing, and checked for leaks.
After 2-3 hrs, I checked again, and topped up the water.
The car runs fine, but does not reach operating temperature
without the thermostat.
Every 6 Months, replacement of this will be done from now.
I will take a leaf out of the aviation book, and if life is
about 12months, then I will replace every 6 just to make
sure from now on.

Ah well, Gotta spice up ya life somehow!


From: rpeng@cadev6.intel.com
Date: Mon, 9 Sep 96 18:24:37 PDT
Subject: Re: XJ40: How does your A/C operate?

Guys,

I think when a bunch of people wonders about how to use the
A/C controls, the manufacturer has done a lousy job of designing
it! My opinion on the A/C controls in my XJ40 is that it’s
very confusing, and very stupid.



Roger Peng (408)765-7863
Intel Corporation
Design Technology, Physical CAD



From: rpeng@cadev6.intel.com
Date: Mon, 9 Sep 96 18:44:42 PDT
Subject: Special Car Journal

Check out the Jaguar articles on the Special Car Journal Homepage:

http://SpecialCar.wwa.com/



Roger Peng (408)765-7863
Intel Corporation
Design Technology, Physical CAD



From: “Ernie Laprairie” lapraire@enterprise.cybersurf.net
Date: Mon, 9 Sep 1996 20:02:20 MST
Subject: 88xjs idle

I have an 88xjs that idles between 900 and 1100 when warm, the jag
dealer here tells me that it will require a heater on the throttle
mechanism to cure the erratic idle and $600.00 Any ideas or parts
for sale. Also hard to find here plastic seat hinge covers with no
leather on that can be recovered with original leather.
From: Ernie Laprairie
http://www.jayman.com
88 xjs
lapraire@cia.com


From: TPatton111@aol.com
Date: Mon, 9 Sep 1996 21:59:48 -0400
Subject: remove

signoff


From: Randy Rice rice@onramp.net
Date: Mon, 09 Sep 1996 21:10:14 -0500
Subject: Re: Wind Deflector

Donald R. Farr wrote:

Hi Randy,

The weather in Arizona is about to turn nice again…and I’ll open the
sun roof after four months (grin). I’d love to have a wind deflector
added to my 91 Sovereign, can you tell me where you bought yours?

Thanks

don

Donald R. Farr
Paradise Valley, AZ 85253
91 Sovereign
d.farr@phx.cox.com - e-mail
http://people.phx.cox.com/dfarr/dfarr.htm - Don’s Homepage
http://people.phx.cox.com/dfarr/jetta1.htm - Jetta Notebook Computers
http://people.phx.cox.com/dfarr/march10.htm - Wireless products
http://people.phx.cox.com/dfarr/ncs1.htm - National Consulting Services

Hello, Don,

I don’t quite understand why you have not opened the sunroof for four
months; after all, everyone tells me that it is a “dry heat” from which
Arizona suffers. In spite of the other kind of heat in the Dallas
area, I open the roof and roll down all the windows every opportunity I
get.

But now to answer your question: I obtained the wind deflector at the
local dealership. It is a standard accessory and was shown in the
accessory brochure around 1993. It is so official that it even has a
leaper embossed in the center (wonder how much I paid for that?)

Randy


From: “Michael P. Neal” mneal@wco.com
Date: Mon, 09 Sep 1996 19:58:53 -0700
Subject: Re: Subject: RE: XJ40:How does your A/C operate

Just for the record; The XJ40 A/C system is completely different than
the S3 XJ6.

Dawson, Barrie wrote:

The Jaguar A/C is complicated and unlike any other system I have come
across.
Apparently if you can hear clicks, wheezes and whirring form behind the dash
and you get hot or chilled air when required the system is working. I have
noticed on my series III that the air flow changes are so subtle that they
are hardly noticed except in extreme circumstances, e.g. high fan speeds.

With regard the centre vents I believe only chilled air is directed through
them.
The face control I believe allows for fine tuning of the chilled air so as
not
to
cause discomfort from an icy blast.

I don’t think there is a great difference between XJ6 and XJ40 but there
will
be
slight changes I’m sure.

Barrie Dawson

Chatham, Kent England
1985 series III Jaguar Sovereign

------------------------------ End of forwarded message 1


========================================================
Michael P. Neal ASE Master Technician, Jaguar Certified
'93 Ducati 900SS '83 Porsche 944 '85 Jaguar XJS
Home (707) 829-8464 Work (707) 577-0101
http://www.wco.com/~mneal (always under construction:-)


From: “Michael P. Neal” mneal@wco.com
Date: Mon, 09 Sep 1996 20:01:51 -0700
Subject: Re: XJS brake fluid reservoir cap

This is a problem and tends to reoccur if you dont modify the
reservoir. This is on the pre-abs XJS brake reservoirs. Usually just
flattening the sharp vertical ridge on the reservoir with a file will do
it.
Kirbert wrote:

Ivan S Kirkpatrick, PE isk00@visi.net:

I am now replacing the cap on the brake fluid reservoir for the second
time. the two previous units failed in a similar manner. It appears
that the modl used for the caps has a section near the top of the
threads and the top surface that is too thin. The cap has separated
into a threaded piece and a top piece.

This is the first I’ve heard of a problem here. Can anybody confirm?

By the way, which system are we talking about? ABS?

Is it possible to replace the
entire reservoir with a better designed unit?

If you find a way, please send it to me for inclusion in the XJ-S
book.

Would there be any
support in compiling a list of replacement parts/suppliers that would
potentially give better service? It seems like almost everyone has
some experience in this respect. I have seen Kirby’s XJS book but
don’t recall a specific section on better replacement parts. Items like
a good GM alternator conversion kit for those with heavier electrical
demands and things like that.

The GM alternator conversion is in there, as well as several other
suggestions. They are not in a separate section, but in the sections
talking about the various parts themselves. Perhaps that isn’t ideal
for some purposes, but every arrangement I could think of had pros
and cons.

For those who have my booklet: I have been thinking of eliminating
the separation between “Maintenance” and “Modifications”. Some of my
suggestions for maintenance are to replace a stock part with a
non-stock part, which technically is a modification. And some
modifications I suggest be considered even by those who don’t modify
the car, such as the installation of aftermarket steering rack
bushes. As a result, I have quite a few references back and forth
between the sections. Do you guys think it would be a better idea
for that to be one large section, where you can look up the thing
you’re concerned about and find the maintenance suggestions and the
suggested modifications at the same place?

– Kirbert | If anything is to be accomplished,
| some rules must be broken.
| - Palm’s Postulate


========================================================
Michael P. Neal ASE Master Technician, Jaguar Certified
'93 Ducati 900SS '83 Porsche 944 '85 Jaguar XJS
Home (707) 829-8464 Work (707) 577-0101
http://www.wco.com/~mneal (always under construction:-)


From: mkenrick@golder.com (Michael Kenrick)
Date: Mon, 9 Sep 1996 19:04:50 -0700
Subject: Re: could use advice regarding tire brands for 85 XJ-S

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    Under advice from a friend and motoring “expert”, I bought a set of
    Goodyear GA’s about 3 years ago. I had become very nervous about the
    ageing Pirellis that would lose grip at the slightest suggestion of
    torque or wetness.

    Well, the GA’s were OK for a while, but after 35k miles, they don’t
    have much tread left, and they are starting to lose grip, just like
    the Pirelli’s :-((

    Another thing: these humungous tires seem to go out-of-round almost as
    soon as they go on the car. Test drive any new tires on a nice very
    smooth road at 10 to 20 mph. If you think you are running over a herd
    of hedgehogs, then your new babies are as bad as mine: Take em Back!

    Michael Kenrick
    86 XJ-S, Seattle USA

  • –IMA.Boundary.143123248–


From: JISBELLJR@mail.utexas.edu (James A. Isbell)
Date: Tue, 10 Sep 1996 22:38:07 -0500
Subject: I saw “old #25” today and the XJ-S is getting better too.

Tomorrow I will pick up “old #25” from the cat house. She looks prety good
with a new body.

I looked at the old body and I still can’t see how my wife walked away from
it without a bruise. Someone up there was watching over her.

One of the mechanics that didn’t know me walked up while I was looking under
the hood at the engine and said, “They put a used engine in it.” I replied,
“I know, it was a heart transplant.” I then explained who I was and that
that engine had done 120 at TWS with me on the gas and I thought we could do
it again in our new body.

Tomorrow she is well enough to go home so we will see just how good she
feels when we hit the open road.

Except for a mildly leaking steering rack and a slow leak from the rear seal
everything else looks great. I guess I will have to do two new bellows on
the steering rack. The mechanic didn’t even offer, so I guess it’s a real
bitch of a job.

The Radiator of the XJ-S (Mabaline) went to the clinic today. The doctor
said the arteries were partialy blocked and the flow was down about 30%.
With the 33% blockage due to the leaves that means the efficiency of that
radiator was .7 X .67 = .469 or less than 50%. So its no wonder she was
getting hot in traffic.

Tomorrow I will begin putting her back together and soon we will take her
for a romp at Texas World Speedway.


                                                        Jim

“Better an outlaw than not free.”
Nance O’Neil


End of jag-lovers-digest V2 #344


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jag-lovers-digest Tuesday, 10 September 1996 Volume 02 : Number 345

Re: Rear Brakes on an 89 XJS with ABS
Re: 1986 XJ6 Battery
Re: I saw “old #25” today and the XJ-S is getting better too.
64 3.8 S-type automatic transmission shfiting hard
Fair price for SIII V12 Sovereign
RE: Knockoff tool - Marston Motors
RE: Getting at the A/C microswitch - XJ40
XJ sIII V12 price
1952 MK V
Re: viscous coupler
Re: Fair price for SIII V12 Sovereign
JPI - Jaguar Price Index
Re: XJ40: Owners Manual - Climate Control section
XK140 C type heads
Knock-Off tools…
FOAM not rubber & air dam on XJ-S
XK40 Pwr Door locks
Water Pump Removal
Air Pump
re: air dam on XJ-S
Oil Cooler/AC Condenser – XJ-S


From: “Kirbert” palmk@gcn.scri.fsu.edu
Date: Tue, 10 Sep 1996 00:53:58 -0005
Subject: Re: Rear Brakes on an 89 XJS with ABS

I have overhauled the rear brakes on the above car and while I was under there I
had planned to replace the flexible brake line which goes to the T connector.
However, on the flexible line in the car there is what appears to be a mini-
c-clamp that cross clamps the flexible line in the middle. Is this factory?
If so
what purpose does it serve? I was planning to simply remove it and replace
the line.
Are there any problems with this?

Y’know, you may find that this is an aluminum tag with the part
number of the hose assembly on it!
– Kirbert | If anything is to be accomplished,
| some rules must be broken.
| - Palm’s Postulate


From: Hunt Dabney hdabney@earthlink.net
Date: Mon, 9 Sep 1996 22:53:11 -0700 (PDT)
Subject: Re: 1986 XJ6 Battery

The S-III XJ-6 battery is common, so should be available most anywhere. If,
while running the car, the dashboard voltmeter is indicating near (or very
slightly below) 13 volts, the charging circuit is working. If the voltage is
substantially above 13, the battery probably has an open cell, while below
12 volts would tend to indicate no output from the alternator. You might try
charging the battery, disconnect the ground lead from the car to the
battery, wait for some (fairly long) time, then test for charge (reattach to
car, if you like).
Good luck! (The alternator isn’t fun – just did that).
Hunt

At 04:33 PM 9/9/96 -0400, William F. Stickney wrote:

Greetings all;
I have a need to check my battery. It appears to be not holding
a charge. When I test the draw it seems to be minimal (computer draw
only), therefore it would appear to be a battery problem. 2 questions
does this seem to be a correct procedure, and where might I find a
proper battery in the Northeastern section of US?

Thanks in advance for any information regarding these items.
Bill Stickney


From: “Kirbert” palmk@gcn.scri.fsu.edu
Date: Tue, 10 Sep 1996 02:54:26 -0005
Subject: Re: I saw “old #25” today and the XJ-S is getting better too.

Jim Isbell:

Except for a mildly leaking steering rack and a slow leak from the rear seal
everything else looks great. I guess I will have to do two new bellows on
the steering rack.

Yo, Jim! Do I have to tell you that the bellows are not the problem?

– Kirbert | If anything is to be accomplished,
| some rules must be broken.
| - Palm’s Postulate


From: “Alastair Lauener” a.lauener@napier.ac.uk
Date: Tue, 10 Sep 96 09:26:18 gmt
Subject: 64 3.8 S-type automatic transmission shfiting hard

Albert Cohoe asked

One of the local Jag club members has a 1964 3.8 S-type with a problem:
when hot, the Borg-Warner DG250 transmission shifts are delayed and abrupt.
Comments or pointers to an FAQ would be appreciated.

    • cold operation (first 15-20 minutes) is fine.
    • when hot and refusing to shift as expected, shifts can be triggered by
      reducing the amount of throttle slightly.
      If the gearbox changes up due to the throttle being released, this would
      indicate to me the lever from the throttle to the gearbox is in need of
      adjustment. By this I mean that the gearbox thinks the throttle is pushed
      further than it actually is, and is thus delaying the gearshift. Often, these
      boxes move off in second instead of first (with interestinmg slushy noises), and
      this is due to the same lever with incorrect adjustment in the other direction.
      The lever also actuates the kickdown.

Related to this problem is a question about the amount of ATF that this
transmission needs. If the amount in the literature is installed, the
dipstick is dry or has only a tiny amount showing on it.
I just filled mine (last year) until I got the correct dipstick measurement.
Much less, and the gearbox won’t engage, slippage occurs. Don’t actually know
how much I put in. Bear in mind the amount in the book quoted is probably for a
change of oil, not for a fill from dry, which will take a few pints extra.




From: brownd@filon.ml.com (Dave Brown - London Dev X1818)
Date: Tue, 10 Sep 96 09:37:46 BST
Subject: Fair price for SIII V12 Sovereign

Hi,

My local garage has a quite beautiful 1987/88 SIII V12 Sovereign for sale at
6395 pounds. The car is in mint condition, the PO (company director) having
spent thousands 9I believe over 15K !!) on the car over the last few years
getting everything perfect. The car has 85K miles on it with FSH.

Assuming they would let it go for a straight 6000, is this a fair price for this
model in this condition? I’m toying with the idea as I’ve always fancied a V12!

TIA for any advice/comments.

Cheers,
David

David Brown
'67 Daimler 250 V8
(and maybe a V12 SIII!!)

brownd@ml.com
///_/_/_/_/////_///_
/_/_//_
/_/_/_/_/___
/_/_/_/_/______/_/_/_/______
/_/_/_/_/_/_/________/_/_____
___/_/_
/////_/_/_
/_/_/______
/_/___/_
/_//_/_/_/_______
///_/_/_/_
/////_///_________


From: Frans HOEKEMEIJER hoekemei@ps.msm.cern.ch
Date: Tue, 10 Sep 1996 11:13 +0200
Subject: RE: Knockoff tool - Marston Motors

Hi everyone, no need to import these from Europe as you can get them from=20
British Autos USA.
Frans.

Picked up a few interesting tips at the Palo Alto British Car meet this
weekend.
The meet was very well attended and a huge turnout of Jaguars as well,
which gave lots of opportunity for comparing notes with other owners.
I saw a nice tool for removing eared knockoffs without damaging them. It
was a 20 inch length of aircraft plywood with a milled out center
section that snugly fits over the knockoff. You hit the plywood with the
hammer and get an additional factor of 5 in leverage.
An E-Type owner (Chuck Rockhold) told me he got it from Marston Motors
at Bradford in the UK at a cost of about $US25 including shipping to the
US.
Apparently they advertise in Jaguar World, so can somebody look up their
telephone and/or fax number and tell me.
It seems a reasonable price and is a nice tool that fits in easily with
the spare tire.

Cheers, Patrick.
1965 E-Type 4.2 Series I FHC

=20


From: Graham Watson grahamw@microsoft.com
Date: Tue, 10 Sep 1996 02:42:00 -0700
Subject: RE: Getting at the A/C microswitch - XJ40

Does anybody have the info on how to change the range of the temperature
control on the XJ40 air con - mine is too warm even on full cold if it’s
running in automatic mode, although it’s OK on manual - I know there is
a rheostat in the control panel I can twirl, but dunno which one.

BTW, feedback for those kind souls who gave me advice on the AC system
“fumigating” me - it turned out to be a leak in the water system. I now
have a constantly slightly fogged up passenger side of the windscreen,
and the coolant level has gone down a fraction. Many Thanks for the
helpful advice.

Graham


From: Gram@eumetsat.de
Date: Tue, 10 Sep 1996 13:09:58 +0100
Subject: XJ sIII V12 price

XJ sIII V12 price

6000 pounds is very ok for a Mint condition. What are you waiting for ?

Regards Jeffrey Gram


From: cs12@cornell.edu (C-Selvarajah)
Date: Tue, 10 Sep 1996 08:39:56 -0500
Subject: 1952 MK V

   Folks,
        I have a friend who has a Mk V Jaguar for sale. The car is all

original except for the upholstery which has been replaced with vinyl. The
car
appears to be above average condition. Any idea what the going price is for such
a car? The body does not show any rust and the chrome looks decent. The woodwork
inside is excellent and it has a sliding sunroof.


From: “David Tordoff” dtordoff@flash.net
Date: Tue, 10 Sep 1996 07:24:45 -0500
Subject: Re: viscous coupler

Kirby,
Thanks. I have not removed one before and did not realize that there was no
accomidation for rebuild.


“Have you ever seen a plumber bite his nails?”
Dt Dallas, TX 83 SIII XJ6


From: David Wood David.Wood@durham.ac.uk
Date: Tue, 10 Sep 1996 13:55:08 PDT
Subject: Re: Fair price for SIII V12 Sovereign

David,

Sounds like a good price. Are you sure everything is perfect!!??

Not wishing to put a downer on things, but remember that this car is
still depreciating. No matter what you do, it will drop in value by a
grand a year for the next three years. At present prices tend to level
off at 3 grand for a good XJ6/12, regardless of age, and will drop from
there according to condition. Also, this one owner car will instantly
become a two owner when you get it!

On the positive side, we all know the XJ6/12 is a classic car. It’s now
beginning to be noticed by the rest of the classic car fraternity, with
the SIII 12 cylinder the most desirable. If you keep it ten years, it
might be worth more than you paid for it!!

Go for it, keep some money aside for when it bites (as it surely will),
and let us know how you get on. Whenever I can afford it, a SIII ‘12’
will be on my short list for another Jag.

Cheers,

Dave Wood.


From: Robert Bradley Robert.Bradley@bh.eyi.com
Date: Tue, 10 Sep 1996 08:13:40 -0500
Subject: JPI - Jaguar Price Index

Since there has been a bit of chat lately about particular car prices perhaps
this is a good time to ask about prices in general. I am thinking of leaving
my current location in the Middle East. Possible destinations are UK or around
Dallas in the US. Can any offer advice on the following.

What is the going rate for

  1. Series III XJ4.2 circa 82-85 model
  2. XJS V12 coupe circa 86/87
    in UK pounds / $US

Could I take any of my existing (left hand drive) fleet of pussies with me to
the US (or the UK for that matter but I presume not).

Thanks, Robert Bradley

87 XJS V12 coupe, 82 XJ4.2 Series III, 82 XJ4.2 Series III Daimler.


From: Michael Powers/TEIR/Thomson Michael_Powers@teir.com
Date: 10 Sep 96 9:23:01
Subject: Re: XJ40: Owners Manual - Climate Control section

I’ll scan this and send it off tomorrow. If anyone else would like a copy,
email me at mpowers@teir.com
and I’ll send you one.

  • -Rgds
    Mike

From: John Elmgreen 100353.1733@CompuServe.COM
Date: 10 Sep 96 09:20:49 EDT
Subject: XK140 C type heads

Dear Brian (Pel), My information also agrees that the earliest XK140 C type
heads had no C type badge and were silver (not red). We have recorded that the
following engines on 140s had no badges: G1161-8S, G1268-8S, G1369-8S. Your car
has engine no. G1022-8S and was despatched from the factory on 14 Oct 54, same
day as the car with G1021-8S. They were the earliest cars with C type engines
to leave the factory. There was a lower engine number G1015-8S but the car was
not despatched from the factory until 20 Oct 54. Terry McGrath wrote at letter
published in the Classic Jaguar Assn journal of March 96 to the same effect as
what you are saying. I will add you to our XK group, but please advise if you
do not want this.
Regards, John Elmgreen


From: bill_clark@ccmail.rsco.com
Date: Tue, 10 Sep 96 07:11:24 PST
Subject: Knock-Off tools…

 FWIW - Was talking with Bruce Erfer of British Wire Whewels at Palo 
 Alto All British last Sunday and he made the observation that there is 
 an element of risk in the use of these.
 
 i.e. the torque thus applied may over-ridede the holding power of your 
 handbrake, meaning you need another person to stomp on the brakes, if 
 on a jack stand - may pull you car off (true story), if it slips may 
 cause knuckle and/or panel damage (true stories).
 
 The good old soft lead hammer ($15 at BWW coincidentally) has always 
 worked for me. 

From: jwh@mime.dw.lucent.com
Date: Tue, 10 Sep 96 09:39:00 PDT
Subject: FOAM not rubber & air dam on XJ-S

Jim Cantrell replied to this message:

Jim Isbell wrote:

Anyone know how important the sponge rubber inserts around the
ratiator are. Mine are rotted away.

You should replace these. They are rubber isolation mounts. If you
don’t, then two bad things will happen over time: 1) the metal to
metal contact will wear through your new radiator tanks eventually
springing a leak and 2) the direct mechanical mount transmits more
vibration to the core and your solder joints will prematurely debond
(primarily around the tak to frame pieces).

I believe Mr. Isbell is talking about the foam rubber that sandwiches
between the radiator & the fender well by the light housing, not the 4
rubber mounts, 2 top & 2 bottom that the radiator sits inside with “pins” on
the radiator going into the center of these. Yes I agree these rubber
mounts or bushings are very important, but how important is the foam rubber
on the sides? Dose this only prevent engine heat from being sucked through
the radiator at low speed? Is this even a problem with the fan shroud in
place?

On the subject of the air dam, are we talking about the $450 US piece of
plastic that mounts just under the black grill under the bumper and a larger
$250 US larger piece of plastic that attaches to the air dam and continues
under the front of the car just under the radiator? Is this not designed &
intended to direct air away from the underside of the car to create a
“vacuum” or low pressure under the vehicle for better handling ? How would
this scoop any significant air up into the radiator? I can see how this does
deflect some air upward, but including the ram force of air by the vehicles
forward movement, does it really make that much difference?

John Himes
88 XJ-S 97K Miles :slight_smile:


From: Michael Powers/TEIR/Thomson Michael_Powers@teir.com
Date: 10 Sep 96 11:41:20
Subject: XK40 Pwr Door locks

Any help on figuring out this puzzle would be appreciated:

On the drivers side:
outside keylock operates all locks except the for the front passenger lock
inside lock stalk only works once after use of window/lock button OR use of
external keylock

On the passenger side outside keylock operates all locks OK inside lock stalk operates all OK Window/Lock button: operates all locks except front passenger lock I’d swear everything worked OK before I blew the 15 amp power lock fuse. What am I missing? Is there some elusive relay somewhere that needs to be reset? Thanks for any help, Mike /-----------------------------------------------------------------\ | mpowers@teir.com | (703) 736-1832 | | Would somebody please explain to me those signs that | say, “No animals allowed except for Seeing Eye Dogs?” | Who is that sign for? Is it for the dog, or the blind person? | -Jerry Seinfeld *-------------------------------------------------------------------/ From: JISBELLJR@mail.utexas.edu (James A. Isbell) Date: Wed, 11 Sep 1996 10:09:26 -0500 Subject: Water Pump Removal I finaly got the damned thing off. That was worse than the radiator removal! Anyone have any suggestions on how to get the short (3") hose on the top of the temp sender housing into place when I go back on? I had to cut it off to get the pump off and dont see how I am going to get it back on with that hose in there unless I remove the crossover pipe. Second question, there is a pair of wires that comes from below the right side intake manifold (couldnt trace it any further back) and comes around to the area of the temp sender housing on the waterpump. It has two wirws, one black and one white with push connectors on it. Doesnt seem to go anywhere. The temp sender has a pair od green and green/yellow wires on it so thats not what they are for. I am stumped. Kirby, here are the measurementss of the stock impeller: Six blades “A” Outside Diameter = 3.592 inches “B” shaft Diameter = 0.625 inches “C” Height (deck to bottom)= 0.660 inches “D” Height (inside height of impeller blades to bottom)= approx 0.8 inches That last one was hard to measure without removing the impeller. | |<— “B” / | | \ /_ | | \ ___________ | // | || || | \ ^ V// ||| ||| \ |_____ / | | \ | “C”|||_|____V"D" ^ | | | |<---- “A” ------>| | | Obviously the drawing is not to scale…#:sunglasses: Jim “Better an outlaw than not free.” Nance O’Neil From: “Jim Isbell” JISBELLJR@mail.utexas.edu Date: Wed, 11 Sep 1996 10:17:54 +0000 Subject: Air Pump I am checking things out under the hood while all the front is accessable. The Air pump seems to make alot of noise. I realise it is a pump so should make some, but how much? From: Ryan Border rborder@hpspls16.cup.hp.com Date: Tue, 10 Sep 1996 10:01:58 -0700 Subject: re: air dam on XJ-S piece of plastic that mounts just under the black grill under the bumper and a larger $250 US larger piece of plastic that attaches to the air dam and continues under the front of the car just under the radiator? Is this not designed & intended to direct air away from the underside of the car to create a “vacuum” or low pressure under the vehicle for better handling ? How would this scoop any significant air up into the radiator? I can see how this does deflect some air upward, but including the ram force of air by the vehicles forward movement, does it really make that much difference? Air which flows through the radiator, into the engine bay, has to exit somewhere. Assuming your bonnet is in place, the exit point for most of this air is out the bottom. The lower the pressure under the car, the easier it is for the air to “get out”. Decreasing the pressure under the car with an air-dam can increase the airflow through the engine bay and the radiator, thus improving the cooling. Just a guess- but I don’t think cars go nearly fast enough for an airdam under the bumper to significantly increase the pressure in front of the radiator grille. At speed, the contribution from the fan is pretty insignificant. Ryan. From: “Kirbert” palmk@gcn.scri.fsu.edu Date: Tue, 10 Sep 1996 13:29:20 -0005 Subject: Oil Cooler/AC Condenser – XJ-S The official Jaguar repair manual and the Haynes manual for the XJ-S both contain the same illustration showing the oil cooler being BELOW the radiator. It’s not that way in my car; the oil cooler is in front of the radiator, and below the condenser. The illustrations in the SICP catalog seem to indicate that all cars were like mine. It has occurred to me that perhaps the oil cooler being under the radiator may be the configuration for cars not equipped with air conditioning. Having the oil cooler in front of the radiator when there is no condenser above it – so the airflow can either go through the oil cooler or simply go around it – probably wouldn’t work too well. Is there ANYBODY out there with an XJ-S that didn’t come with air conditioning? I don’t think it was ever even an option here in the US, they all came with it. If anybody has one, how about checking the location of the oil cooler? Kirbert | If anything is to be accomplished, | some rules must be broken. | - Palm’s Postulate End of jag-lovers-digest V2 #345 ******************************** Return-Path: @owner-jag-lovers-di1 Received: (from majordom@localhost) by ekeberg.sn.no (8.7.5/8.7.3/on4) id for jag-lovers-digest-out; Wed, 11 Sep 1996 00:58:04 +0200 (MET DST) Date: Wed, 11 Sep 1996 00:58:04 +0200 (MET DST) Message-Id: 199609102258.AAA13394@ekeberg.sn.no X-Authentication-Warning: ekeberg.sn.no: majordom set sender to owner-jag-lovers-digest using -f From: @owner-jag-lovers-di1 To: jag-lovers-digest@sn.no Subject: jag-lovers-digest V2 #346 Reply-To: jag-lovers@sn.no Errors-To: @owner-jag-lovers-di1 Precedence: bulk X-Newsgroups: mail.jag-lovers-digest jag-lovers-digest Wednesday, 11 September 1996 Volume 02 : Number 346 Brake Sleeves FWIW XJ40 hard starts Re: '86 XJ6 Battery Re: Water Pump Removal XJ-40 Hard Stsrts Local Jag-lovers Re: Oil Weight A/C Systems Re: XJ6 S3 Fan Clutch $ Mk2 steering column rebuild Re: Knockoff tool - Marston Motors Re: When the student surpasses the teacher… Re: Hurricane Fran - XJS lowrider (R.I.P.) 88-89 XJ40 Low Brake Pressure?? Re: XJS — Oops!!! (a.k.a. Chassis failure) Re: XJS Micro switch on throttle Re: Hej Matthias, Re: Radiator removal XJS RE: XJS Micro switch on throttle Re: XJS brake fluid reservoir cap re: air dam on XJ-S From: “KENNETH M GILSON” kgilson@ccmail.unl.edu Date: Tue, 10 Sep 96 12:30:58 CST Subject: Brake Sleeves FWIW The company you suggested “Imperial Machine Co. in Lincoln, Ne USA” to resleeve the master cylinder and/or the brake cylinders is owned and ran by an acquaintance of mine. He is a top notch machinist and does excellent work. I would recommend him to do anyone’s work. From: Michael Powers/TEIR/Thomson Michael_Powers@teir.com Date: 10 Sep 96 13:34:54 Subject: XJ40 hard starts I have a 89 XJ6 that takes about 4-6 seconds to start after it has sit for about an hour. It starts fine when the engine is cold and it starts fine immediately after it has been turned off. Also, I never use the gas pedal when cranking the engine (per the manual). Any areas I can starting looking? Any component failures that this might point to? As always, thanks for any input, Mike /-----------------------------------------------------------------\ | mpowers@teir.com | (703) 736-1832 | | Would somebody please explain to me those signs that | say, “No animals allowed except for Seeing Eye Dogs?” | Who is that sign for? Is it for the dog, or the blind person? | -Jerry Seinfeld *-------------------------------------------------------------------/ From: BSherw@aol.com Date: Tue, 10 Sep 1996 13:39:34 -0400 Subject: Re: '86 XJ6 Battery "William F. Stickney >picker1@ix.netcom.com< wrote:

I have a need to check my battery. It appears to be not holding a charge.<

William- before buying a new battery, I suggest you check alternator output,
should be about 13.5 to 14 volts, measured across battery terminals with
engine at
idle. Also good to check battery with engine off: turn on lights and see if
battery
residual voltage (12 V) drops quickly under load (not good).
Good luck-
Brian Sherwood
'85 XJ6
'84 XJ-S


From: Thomas Alberts talberts@aero.odu.edu
Date: Tue, 10 Sep 1996 14:26:14 -0400 (EDT)
Subject: Re: Water Pump Removal

I finaly got the damned thing off. That was worse than the radiator removal!

One of the reasons I recommended taking the hood off even though it
is not strictly necessary. Removing and replacing the hood is not
difficult. Working on the water pump/radiator ect is a lot
easier with the hood out of the way. One recommendation: be careful
when you reinstall the pump. I understand that a lot of people
break the pump housing by over-tightening that one countersunk
head allen bolt.

Anyone have any suggestions on how to get the short (3") hose on the top of
the temp sender housing into place when I go back on? I had to cut it off
to get the pump off and dont see how I am going to get it back on with that
hose in there unless I remove the crossover pipe.

Why don’t you want to remove the crossover pipe? That is the way to do it.
Do remove the crossover pipe and replace the little hoses on each end too.

Thomas E. Alberts


From: PLacey@swri.edu
Date: Tue, 10 Sep 96 13:15:30 CDT
Subject: XJ-40 Hard Stsrts

I had this same exact problem with my 88 XJ-40 and several others on the list
have reported the same. Hard starting with a hot engine that has sat for a
while. It was due to failure of the non-return valve at the fuel pump. This
allowed the fuel vapor pressure to push the fuel back to the tank and the
system to vapor-lock. The non-return valve is cheap and easy to replace.

Paul Lacey, Texas


From: “Gregory W. Price” gprice@mack.rt66.com
Date: Tue, 10 Sep 1996 12:22:57 +0700
Subject: Local Jag-lovers

Are there any other Jag-lovers in the Northern New Mexico area?

Greg Price


From: JimJag@aol.com
Date: Tue, 10 Sep 1996 14:55:15 -0400
Subject: Re: Oil Weight

until recently, i have been using Castrol 10W-40 oil in my 1985 Vanden Plas
with 136,000 miles on the engine. yesterday, i took the car to an authorized
jaguar dealer in frederick, maryland for some gasket repairs to fix a major
oil leak. the mechanics there impressed me as being extremely knowledgeable
about jaguar cars (or extreme bullshit artists; its too early to tell).
those mechanics recommended using Castrol 20W-50 in order to burn less oil.
they think that the “proper” weight oil, coupled with the gasket repair,
should curb my cat’s appetite (100 +/- miles/quart!!!) for the viscuous
petrol stuff. even though they make a convincing argument, i have NEVER
heard of using that weight of oil in an automobile.

my question to the auto handymen of the jaguar persuasion is: does this
sound reasonable? is 20w-50 the correct weight oil? if so, how does
temperature and seasonality affect this oil in my 4.2 liter? all insights
and opinions are appreciated.

thanx - jim


From: Carlos Madero/Intl/Corp/Tyson Carlos_Madero/Intl/Corp/Tyson.TYSON@mislnx.tyson.com
Date: Tue, 10 Sep 1996 13:50:24 -0500
Subject: A/C Systems

I have read with interest the discussion in regard to Jag A/C systems and all
the hassles and problems associated with them. The reports I have read on the
A/C on early 70’s XJ cars don’t have much good to say about it either. Has
anyone exchanged / upgraded components (evaporator, expansion valve, etc) to
make the system perform better? I know it must be a pain to gain access to
these components under the dash, but with current technology and parts
available, there must be a way to upgrade the system so that it cools better.
Since I still intend the remove the dash to refinish it, I also will look into
upgrading the A/C while everything is apart.

Carlos Madero
'73 XJ6 (since '86)
'53 Chev PU
'86 Caprice (with COLD air and a strong V8 which is scheduled to go in the Jag
soon)


From: hdrsons@iamerica.net (Hal Rogers)
Date: Tue, 10 Sep 1996 15:42:55 -0600
Subject: Re: XJ6 S3 Fan Clutch $

Don’t recall the originator but someone asked about an XJ6 Fan Clutch. The
Original part number for the Series 3 is EAC4751. The XJ40 is different
incidentally. If anyone wants an aftermarket alternative, I sell them for
$69.95 each.

Best Regards,
Hal

Hal Rogers
H.D. Rogers & Sons
Import Auto Specialists
3418 Barksdale Blvd.
Bossier City LA 71112
(318) 742-3651 voice
(318) 742-5044 fax

Serving Auto Enthusiasts since 1959


From: “Patrick O’Neill” patrick.oneill@premierusa.com
Date: Tue, 10 Sep 1996 14:00:18 -0700
Subject: Mk2 steering column rebuild

I am in the middle of rebuilding the steering column on my 1963 LHD Mk2
3.8L MOD, actually I am just putting in new nylon bushings.

Has anyone done this before? My car had a nylon bushing in the top of the
column but it has a felt bussing in the bottom. I purchased the top and
bottom nylon bushings and I will us the nylon in the bottom unless some one
has a good reason not to.

Are you supposed to use any kind of lubricant on these nylon bushings?

Are there any other jobs I should do as I have the column out?

On a side note a few months back there was a discussion about Mk2’s RHD vs.
LHD with regard to a U-joint or a rubber “flex” joint into the steering
box. I believe the general thinking was that RHD cars had the U-joint and
LHD cars had the flex-joint, well my LHD car has a U-joint and it is a
original Power steering car.

Kind Regards,

Patrick D. O’Neill
1963 MK2 3.8L MOD
Rolling Hills Estates, California
www.beachnet.com/~patricko

PS I have just added some cool Jaguar Animated GIF files to my Web site


From: nick@sn.no (Nick Johannessen)
Date: Tue, 10 Sep 1996 23:05:19 +0200
Subject: Re: Knockoff tool - Marston Motors

[ Patrick Krejcik pkr@SLAC.Stanford.EDU ]
|
| An E-Type owner (Chuck Rockhold) told me he got it from Marston Motors
| at Bradford in the UK at a cost of about $US25 including shipping to the
| US.
| Apparently they advertise in Jaguar World, so can somebody look up their
| telephone and/or fax number and tell me.

This would be The Hutson Motor Company. They have incidentally
just opened a web-page at http://www.jagweb.com/hutson/

Nick


<<< Nick Johannessen | nick@sn.no | nickj on IRC >>>
<<< Jaguar XJ6 4.2 '70 MOD & '82 Auto >>>

The JagWeb http://www.sn.no/~nick/jaguar.html <<<
The Jaguar Specialists Web http://www.jagweb.com <<


From: John Napoli jgn@li.net
Date: Tue, 10 Sep 1996 17:22:41 -0400 (EDT)
Subject: Re: When the student surpasses the teacher…

And second prize is two Esprits…

John

On Fri, 6 Sep 1996, Lee Walden wrote:

My brother told me that some guy offered Lotus a deal to put
all of the service manuals for the Esprit on a CD-ROM. They
“rewarded” him with a brand new Esprit Turbo. Talk about
not fair…
Lee


From: John Napoli jgn@li.net
Date: Tue, 10 Sep 1996 17:37:37 -0400 (EDT)
Subject: Re: Hurricane Fran - XJS lowrider (R.I.P.)

My condolences to you and your family on the damage to your house and
property and XJ-S. This is a terrible thing to go thru and I only hope
that you are treated fairly by the insurance adjusters.

Consider using an agent to negotiate on your behalf. They charge a fee
but in the experiences of several friends that went thru similar losses
during local storms, they end up getting you far more than you would have
on your own. Since many of the Jag parts were in the house and possibly
damaged, perhaps that can be counted as ‘personal property’ rather than as
part of the car.

It seems that you are all ok physically, and of course that is the most
important, but nevertheless thius is a terrible thing to go thru.
Especially the waste ofthe car.

Consider keeping the hulk if it is not repairable and parting it out.
Perhaps you will find enough buyers on the list to help with the loss.

Regards,

John

On Fri, 6 Sep 1996 Juliansean@aol.com wrote:

Hurricane Fran
To the Jag-lovers mailing list. =20
I=92ve never experienced a hurricane before so the feeling of powerlessne=
ss is
strangely interesting. It=92s 4:00 AM and the wind is still building. N=
othing
Any feedback on advice, to keep for parts or not, market values (I=92ll h=
ave to
deal with insurance people) would be much appreciated. =20
By the way, wasn=92t someone selling a convertible XJS on this list not t=
oo
long ago?? I forgot who it was but please contact me.
Thanks for listening.
=20
Julian Mullaney
1987 XJS Convertible (now with VERY low ride height)
=20
=20


From: Michael Powers/TEIR/Thomson Michael_Powers@teir.com
Date: 10 Sep 96 17:46:41
Subject: 88-89 XJ40 Low Brake Pressure??

My VCM Low Brake Pressure light ALWAYS comes on for a minute
or so after I start my XJ6. It also seems to appear once in a while when I put
the
car in park What’s up with this thing? The brakes seem like they are in
perfect working
order.

Any ideas and/or experience with this?

  • -Mike
    /-----------------------------------------------------------------
    | mpowers@teir.com
    | (703) 736-1832
    |
    | Would somebody please explain to me those signs that
    | say, “No animals allowed except for Seeing Eye Dogs?”
    | Who is that sign for? Is it for the dog, or the blind person?
    | -Jerry Seinfeld
    *-------------------------------------------------------------------*/

From: John Napoli jgn@li.net
Date: Tue, 10 Sep 1996 17:48:24 -0400 (EDT)
Subject: Re: XJS — Oops!!! (a.k.a. Chassis failure)

On Fri, 6 Sep 1996, Kirbert wrote:

John Napoli:

  1. Is there a source for stiffer cage mounts? Or is it a case of using
    the stock setup or going solid?

I have not seen any alternative mounts offered. A shame, too, I bet
there’d be a market. But the more common fix is to ADD a support,
usually some kind of link from the bottom center area of the cage
forward, parallel to the drive shaft, to some bracket attached to
the floorpan. Rubber doughnuts on both ends, like an anti-sway bar
link. The result is that the cage is held much more securely without
stiffening the existing mounts themselves, and there’s probably a
lot less stress on some other components as well.

I have not heard of this solution previously but it makes a lot of sense.
It would keep the cage from rocking back and forth.

I would like to take this opportunity to point out that if one was to
go to totally solid mounts, it would be a good idea to toss the
trailing arms at the same time.

Yes, this is an absolute. The trailing arms might not even have enough
flex if the cage was solid.

  1. The XJ-S in question seems to be one of the more powerful ones out
    there. Is the stock setup just unable to absorb the extra power over an
    extended time?

It’s my understanding that any effort toward giving the XJ-S a
serious hole-shot capability endangers the rear cage mounts. My own
car hauls a__, but I don’t push it very often at all, probably have
just avoided problems for myself. Again, the standard fix is that
link holding the bottom of the cage; I’ll probably rig one for my car
one of these days.

I am interested in this mod myself. But one of my plans was to route the
exhaust pipes under the center of the cage to be able to go to a larger
diameter and remove some of the heat from the rear disks. I wonder if you
can do both?

  1. If the failure was hastened by rust in the tub, do we all face this
    problem? Where does the water get in from? How do you check (drill holes
    in some strategic location)? I have seen E-Type tubs cut open; they get
    looking pretty bad inside rust-wise. Do our XJ-S’s have the same
    proclivity?

There are guys here more adept at anti-rust practices than I, and one
of the discussions has been going on recently. I can only say that,
clearly, this particular spot is one where attention is warranted.

They seemed to discuss rust in areas easily accessible. We are talking
about, I think, hidden sections. I wonder if there is a stabilization
technique that can be effectively used on hidden box sections. Maybe
spritz in a rust neutralizer followed by a resilient coating followed by a
closed-cell foam that expands just the right amount and that does not
absorb water.

John


From: John Napoli jgn@li.net
Date: Tue, 10 Sep 1996 17:56:25 -0400 (EDT)
Subject: Re: XJS Micro switch on throttle

On Fri, 6 Sep 1996, Kirbert wrote:

Question: will a pushbutton wired in parallel with this switch and
controlled somehow by the driver provide part-throttle kickdown? Or does
the electric kickdown only work if the transmission is also seeing zero
vacuum at the modulator (from WOT)?

Of course, this begs the question: Why would you want to do such a
thing? You can always just pull the shifter into 2nd.

Faster than struggling with the detents.

John


From: John Napoli jgn@li.net
Date: Tue, 10 Sep 1996 17:55:00 -0400 (EDT)
Subject: Re: Hej Matthias,

What year range did the donor impeller come from? I presume that it was
from a Chevy small-block V8.

My water pump is very accessible (mechanical fan drive long gone) and I
have a lot of instrumentation (TWO mechanical water temp gauges installed
in different locations in addition to the stock gauge) so my car might
make a great experiment. I’m willing to do it, but don’t want to kill my
perfectly fine water pump to try it. Anyone got a dead water pump to lend
me? I don’t think I’d have trouble in getting one of the impellers Kirby
describes.

My car could be the guinea pig, and I will be able to report quantified
results.

John

On Fri, 6 Sep 1996, Kirbert wrote:

I have never mentioned this impeller substitute in my booklet,
primarily because it was NOT a perfect fit. But seeing as how I
seem to be the only one around here who lives in a hot climate and
has no overheating problems, maybe there’s a clue here somewhere.
The next time somebody has a pump off (or a spare laying around),
take it down to the local parts store and compare the impeller with
those on the various pumps on the shelf. Tell us if there appear to
be any that would be an excellent fit, and if any have vanes that
look like those on the Jag impeller.

Jag impellers have steeply backward-sloping vanes, and nobody else
does. Jaguars have a reputation for overheating, and nobody else
does. Connection?


From: John Napoli jgn@li.net
Date: Tue, 10 Sep 1996 18:22:51 -0400 (EDT)
Subject: Re: Radiator removal XJS

On Sun, 8 Sep 1996, Jim Isbell wrote:

I am in the process of removing the radiator from my XJS and have
found several errors in the Haynes manua. So whats new? The big
error is that they say you have to discharge the AC. It aint so!
The second is that they say you need to remove the bonnet. It aint
so. Just remove the grill and one end of the lift struts and the
bonnet will lean back very happily on the bumper, well out of your
way.

On my car, with the replacement struts we talked about on the list a long
time ago, I don’t even have to do that. Just remove the top panel and
hoses.

Anyone know how important the sponge rubber inserts around the
ratiator are. Mine are rotted away.

Very important. As Kirby points out in his book, the radiator absorbs
vibrations from the rest of the car and it can’t do this unless properly
mounted.

It looks like the front license plate does alot of damage to the air
flow into the lower grill, and with that dam gone, that might be a
big part of my overheating problem. Any comments on removing the
licnseplate?

My XJ-S has never had an air dam (PO must have killed it) and it has not
made any difference (car never overheats). It will run a few degrees
hotter at high speeds (I can track this on the tertiary mechanical water
temp gauges I have recently installed) and presumably if I had a front air
dam this would not be the case.

John


From: John Napoli jgn@li.net
Date: Tue, 10 Sep 1996 18:29:13 -0400 (EDT)
Subject: RE: XJS Micro switch on throttle

Thanks. Another thing to try.

John

On 9 Sep 1996, Jan Wikstroem wrote:

John Napoli :
Question: will a pushbutton wired in parallel with this switch and
controlled somehow by the driver provide part-throttle kickdown? Or does
the electric kickdown only work if the transmission is also seeing zero
vacuum at the modulator (from WOT)?


From my own experience when the arm on the microswitch decided to bend past the
critical point, I can report that it’s the switch alone that operates the
kickdown subject to governor settings, regardless of vacuum.
-Jan


From: John Napoli jgn@li.net
Date: Tue, 10 Sep 1996 18:37:07 -0400 (EDT)
Subject: Re: XJS brake fluid reservoir cap

Yes, I like that idea. Makes it less likely to miss something.

John

For those who have my booklet: I have been thinking of eliminating
the separation between “Maintenance” and “Modifications”. Some of my
suggestions for maintenance are to replace a stock part with a
non-stock part, which technically is a modification. And some
modifications I suggest be considered even by those who don’t modify
the car, such as the installation of aftermarket steering rack
bushes. As a result, I have quite a few references back and forth
between the sections. Do you guys think it would be a better idea
for that to be one large section, where you can look up the thing
you’re concerned about and find the maintenance suggestions and the
suggested modifications at the same place?


From: John Napoli jgn@li.net
Date: Tue, 10 Sep 1996 18:54:46 -0400 (EDT)
Subject: re: air dam on XJ-S

On Tue, 10 Sep 1996, Ryan Border wrote:

Air which flows through the radiator, into the engine bay, has to exit
somewhere. Assuming your bonnet is in place, the exit point for most of
this air is out the bottom. The lower the pressure under the car, the easier
it is for the air to “get out”. Decreasing the pressure under the car
with an air-dam can increase the airflow through the engine bay and
the radiator, thus improving the cooling.

Just a guess- but I don’t think cars go nearly fast enough for an airdam
under the bumper to significantly increase the pressure in front of the
radiator grille.

Your response raised an interesting question. My XJ-S has no air dam.
Some time ago, as an experiment, I disconnected my hood struts, popped the
hood latch, and went out for a drive. By 30 mph or so the hood was firmly
pulled up against the hood safety latch. Conclusion: much higher
pressure underneath, even at that low speed. I wonder what the results
would be on a car with an air dam?

John


End of jag-lovers-digest V2 #346


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jag-lovers-digest Wednesday, 11 September 1996 Volume 02 : Number 347

Re: Oil Weight
re: air dam on XJ-S
Re: 88-89 XJ40 Low Brake Pressure??
XJ40: ‘Coolant level low’ indication
Re: FOAM not rubber & air dam on XJ-S
Re: Water Pump Removal
Panic in the forest
Re: XJ40: ‘Coolant level low’ indication
1986 XJ6 Series III - Fuel pressure regulator.
Re: air dam on XJ-S
Rear Brakes on 89 XJS
Re: 1986 XJ6 Battery
fuel for the “air dams on the XJ-S” controversy
XJ rear suspension behaviour
Wire wheel repair in merry old England


From: “Robert Johnson, D.Sc.” bjomejag@sover.net
Date: Tue, 10 Sep 1996 19:02:21 -0500
Subject: Re: Oil Weight

JimJag@aol.com wrote:

until recently, i have been using Castrol 10W-40 oil in my 1985 Vanden Plas
with 136,000 miles on the engine. yesterday, i took the car to an authorized
jaguar dealer in frederick, maryland for some gasket repairs to fix a major
oil leak. the mechanics there impressed me as being extremely knowledgeable
about jaguar cars (or extreme bullshit artists; its too early to tell).
those mechanics recommended using Castrol 20W-50 in order to burn less oil.
they think that the “proper” weight oil, coupled with the gasket repair,
should curb my cat’s appetite (100 +/- miles/quart!!!) for the viscuous
petrol stuff. even though they make a convincing argument, i have NEVER
heard of using that weight of oil in an automobile.

my question to the auto handymen of the jaguar persuasion is: does this
sound reasonable? is 20w-50 the correct weight oil? if so, how does
temperature and seasonality affect this oil in my 4.2 liter? all insights
and opinions are appreciated.

thanx - jim

20W50 is the recommended oil for the V12 engine except for operating
conditions below freezing. I believe the reason is the high expansion
coefficient of the Al block and the resulting increased clearances of
a hot engine.

Bob Johnson
XJ12l, XJ50, XJS


From: Ryan Border rborder@hpspls16.cup.hp.com
Date: Tue, 10 Sep 1996 16:31:47 PDT
Subject: re: air dam on XJ-S

Hi John,
Lets see if all those aerodynamics classes I took can be useful
here in the real world:

Bernouli’s equation for for incompressible inviscid fluid:

P + (r/2) * V*V = K

P= static pressure
r= density: constant for our case… unless your radiator’s really
doing a good job :slight_smile:
V= velocity
K= some arbitrary constant.

What this says: as V goes up, P goes down (proportional to the square of V)

The faster the air is flowing over a surface, the less the pressure is
on that surface. That’s why convertible tops bow up off their frames
at speed. That’s why your hood tried to lift… airflow over the top
of it was going much faster than the air under it. It’s why (sort
of) airplanes can fly :-).

Adding an airdam may indeed decrease the pressure under the car, increasing
the speed of the air through the engine bay; BUT, I don’t think you
could ever get the hood to be sucked down, short of some very special
air channelling under the hood, combined with a big upright windshield
to stagnate the flow over the top of the hood :-). You might be able
to increase the speed where the pressure differential across the hood
overcomes the weight of the hood slightly though.

Your response raised an interesting question. My XJ-S has no air dam.
Some time ago, as an experiment, I disconnected my hood struts, popped the
hood latch, and went out for a drive. By 30 mph or so the hood was firmly
pulled up against the hood safety latch. Conclusion: much higher
pressure underneath, even at that low speed. I wonder what the results
would be on a car with an air dam?

Ryan.


From: ajbeale@squirrel.com.au (A.J. Beale)
Date: Wed, 11 Sep 1996 09:28:19 +1000 (EST)
Subject: Re: 88-89 XJ40 Low Brake Pressure??

My VCM Low Brake Pressure light ALWAYS comes on for a minute
or so after I start my XJ6. It also seems to appear once in a while when I
put
the car in park What’s up with this thing? The brakes seem like they are in
perfect working order.

Michael Neal sets out tests to determine if the system is working OK and if
not, what is wrong. It is well worth reading, so here is what he says:-

"Check Accumulator

Run car at 2000+ RPM for 30 seconds. Shut motor off and turn key on to
activate VCM. Pump pedal slowly, 3 count intervals, check the number of
times before the low brake pressure warning light comes on. A fully charged
accumulator will go 9 pumps. 4 pumps necessitates system check out,
probable accumulator bladder failure.

Check Charge Solenoid

Continue pumping down system after previous test until pedal is rock hard.
Start car and stopwatch, run at idle, observe VCM. Stop timer when low
brake pressure indicator goes out. A red border can be seen if a different
warning is reading on the inner screen. The red border is a background
indicator of this warning. Test several times. 9 to 15 seconds is a good
reading. Any longer and pump pressure could be low or charge (load)
solenoid may not be seating. Common probable fault is the charge solenoid.

Pump, Charge Solenoid, Accumulator Combo Test

Run car at 2000+ RPM for 30 seconds. Return to idle. Pump brake pedal
firmly and swiftly until low brake pressure light comes on. Stop at 30 pumps.
Roughly 10 pumps usually signals a faulty charge solenoid (not seating). It is
less likely but possible for low pump pressure or a completely discharged
accumulator to fail this test. See pump test.

Hydraulic Pump Test

Disconnect line to valve block. Check pressure. Most failed pumps can be
stopped off with thumb pressure. Check flow of ??? per minute???

Check Valve Test

To check discharge of hydraulic ride leveling system, charge system and
measure ride height at fender lip. Recheck height after 12 hours. More than
1/8"??? sag is a sign of a faulty check valve located behind the up solenoid."

Michael, I hope you don’t mind me reproducing this, but it is necessary
reading for all XJ40 owners. Alan


From: “Rennick, Kim (AS01)” KRennick@p03.as01.honeywell.com.au
Date: Wed, 11 Sep 96 09:27:00 EST
Subject: XJ40: ‘Coolant level low’ indication

Folks,

Some time ago I posted this message to jag-lovers:

My 3.6L XJ40 Sovereign is reporting ‘Coolant Level Low’ on the VCM. It was
originally an intermittent >indication but has progressed to being
constantly ‘on’.

I checked the condition of the level sensing float in the header tank - it
seems to be OK. I then >checked the resistance across the two wires
connected to the sensor . When the float is in the ‘low’ >position, the
switch goes open circuit (as expected). When the float is in the ‘full’
position, the >resistance was 250 ohms. (Actually in the space of 30
minutes or so, this reading gradually increased >to 450 ohm.)

The circuit diagram is unclear on this, but I would have expected this
sensor to be a simple >open/closed contact - either open circuit (for
‘empty’) or 0 ohm (for ‘full’) . Can anyone confirm this?

If so, can anyone tell me if the sensor switch is serviceable? ( haven’t
yet been brave enough to pull it >out of the header tank to check!) Are the
switch contacts accessible for cleaning once the switch is >removed?

Any other ideas as to the cause?

Well, time goes by, and I slowly learn more about this little gadget!
Firstly, it is easy to remove from the expansion tank (just pull it out,
like a tooth!). The sensor is (I presume) a magnetic switch, with all the
electrical side totally encapsulated, hence not able to be worked on
(viewed, cleaned etc). I assume that when the float is ‘up’ the magnetic
fields align and cause the electronic switch to close. When the float is
‘down’ the switch opens.

However I still need help! (some things never change!) On the bench the
switch read some 3K ohms in its ‘closed’ state - which is a long way from 0
ohms, you will agree.

Since I hadn’t purchased the replacement part, I re-installed the switch,
and sure enough, it still reported ‘coolant level low’, even though the
level was OK. However, over the succeeding 2 days (yep, you guessed it) the
system has seen the error of its ways and has stopped the false indication,
even though I did nothing substantive to correct the problem!!

Just for the record, can someone tell me:

  1. Is my understanding (!) of the circuit correct?
  2. What is the resistance across the terminals when the sensor is reading
    ‘full’?
  3. Will the instrument ECU be harmed if I short the terminals to simulate a
    closed switch?

Any comments would be most appreciated - the workshop manual doesn’t get
within a hundred miles of this sort of detail!

Kim Rennick


|
| XJ40 3.6L Sovereign -
| Citroen BX 19 GTI -
|…(English and French rapprochement in my garage!)
|__________________________________________________


From: “Kirbert” palmk@gcn.scri.fsu.edu
Date: Tue, 10 Sep 1996 20:38:51 -0005
Subject: Re: FOAM not rubber & air dam on XJ-S

John Himes:

I believe Mr. Isbell is talking about the foam rubber that
sandwiches between the radiator & the fender well by the light
housing… how important is the foam rubber on the sides? Dose
this only prevent engine heat from being sucked through the
radiator at low speed? Is this even a problem with the fan shroud
in place?

This sponge prevents air from bypassing the radiator AND fan shroud
at speed. If the problem is overheating at speed but not at idle,
these sponge items are important.

On the subject of the air dam, are we talking about the $450 US piece of
plastic that mounts just under the black grill under the bumper and a larger
$250 US larger piece of plastic that attaches to the air dam and continues
under the front of the car just under the radiator?

Gee, I only paid $175 for the spoiler a few years back, and I MADE
the other part.

Is this not designed &
intended to direct air away from the underside of the car to create a
“vacuum” or low pressure under the vehicle for better handling ? How would
this scoop any significant air up into the radiator?

We have located yet another jag-lover who has not read my booklet!

The spoiler is VERY important for cooling at speed. Without it, the
pressure under the front of the car is higher. Since that is where
any air coming through the radiator has to go (this car has no hood
louvers), this high pressure backpressures air coming THROUGH the
radiator, reducing cooling airflow considerably. Basically, the
spoiler missing allows air to bypass the radiator AND the engine
compartment and go directly under the car.

– Kirbert | If anything is to be accomplished,
| some rules must be broken.
| - Palm’s Postulate


From: “Kirbert” palmk@gcn.scri.fsu.edu
Date: Tue, 10 Sep 1996 20:38:52 -0005
Subject: Re: Water Pump Removal

Jim Isbell:

Anyone have any suggestions on how to get the short (3") hose on the top of
the temp sender housing into place when I go back on? I had to cut it off
to get the pump off and dont see how I am going to get it back on with that
hose in there unless I remove the crossover pipe.

Methinks you just answered your own question! Why didn’t you pull
the crossover pipe to begin with? It’s only held by the 3 hoses
(well, plus one tiny one), is a cinch to remove, and makes it easier
to work on the pump!

Kirby, here are the measurementss of the stock impeller:

Six blades

“A” Outside Diameter = 3.592 inches
“B” shaft Diameter = 0.625 inches
“C” Height (deck to bottom)= 0.660 inches
“D” Height (inside height of impeller blades to bottom)= approx 0.8 inches

That last one was hard to measure without removing the impeller.

         --->| |<--- "B"

        /    | |    \
       /_   _| |_   _\ ___________         
  |   // |  || ||  | \\      ^ 

V// ||| ||| \ |______
/ | | \ |
“C”|||_|____V"D"
^ | |
| |<---- “A” ------>|
| |

Obviously the drawing is not to scale…#:sunglasses:

This data may be useful for finding substitutes, but then again, it
might not be. Take the D dimension, for example; a substitute
impeller might have vanes that extend farther INWARD. Since the
housing is conical, they would also be taller, since the D dimension
is taken at a radially inward spot.

This data is still not very useful for determining if the impeller
vane SHAPES are the problem. Of course, I dunno how we’d determine
that, other than to have someone with an overheating problem replace
his impeller with one from a Chevy and make NO OTHER CHANGES and his
overheating problems go away. Still, I’d appreciate qualitative
observations/comments about the shape of the Jag impeller vanes vs.
the shape of other water pump impeller vanes.

By the way: Once, while replacing the water pump on a Citation (!),
I happened to notice that the impeller vanes on the rebuilt pump
angled the opposite direction from those on the original pump. Took
it back to the store and compared against the other pumps on the
shelf for the same car, and found I had the ONLY one with the
impeller vanes the opposite way. I think someone at the rebuild shop
had accidentally installed the wrong impeller. I traded for one that
looked right, and suggested the store send that one back. The
lesson, of course, is that if you’re looking for a substitute
impeller for the Jag, make real sure to get an impeller that is
designed to turn the right way! Apparently there are some that turn
the other way, for some reason.

– Kirbert | If anything is to be accomplished,
| some rules must be broken.
| - Palm’s Postulate


From: RMac@aol.com
Date: Tue, 10 Sep 1996 21:36:44 -0400
Subject: Panic in the forest

I spent a long time finding my first Jaguar, a 1990 XJ40 VDP Majestic which I
purchased in May. One of my criteria (besides a low enough price that the
payments would not bankrupt me) was a “fresh” interior with good wood…

I wound up with a very nice car which cost me only $2,200 to repair due to
the PO’s dwindling interest in maintenance. The only fault in the wood was a
severely deteriorated ash receiver cover on the console; this has actually
fractured into several pieces.

It would appear that the rest of my wood trim is deteriorating rapidly. It
looks great from arm’s length, but getting real close reveals many tiny
light-colored “fractures” appearing in the finish. Have I just noticed them,
I wonder, or is something horrible happening? What can I do to prevent this
deterioration? Is refinishing or replacement the only option?

I hesitate to ask what it would cost to replace this all.

Robert MacLeay
1990 XJ40 VDP Majestic


From: “Donald R. Farr” d.farr@phx.cox.com
Date: Tue, 10 Sep 1996 19:06:10 -0700
Subject: Re: XJ40: ‘Coolant level low’ indication

Can’t help with the technical aspects of your problem…but this came
through the jag-lovers list several weeks ago, and if you haven’t seen
it, I believe it applies to your situation nicely. I’ve had one or two
of those with my 91 Sovereign too.

There are four engineers traveling in a car; a mechanical engineer, a
chemical, an electrical engineer and a computer engineer.

The car breaks down.

“Sounds to me as if the pistons have seized. We’ll have to strip down
the engine before we can get the car working again”, says the
mechanical engineer.

“Well”, says the chemical engineer, "it sounded to me as if the fuel
might be contaminated. I think we should clear out the fuel system.

“I thought it might be an grounding problem”, says the electrical
engineer, “or maybe a faulty plug lead.”

They all turn to the computer engineer who has said nothing and say:
“Well, what do you think?”

“Ummm - how about if we all get out of the car and get back in again?”

Mike Frank

If you can’t fix em…enjoy em!

Don Farr


Donald R. Farr
Paradise Valley, AZ
91 Sovereign
d.farr@phx.cox.com - e-mail
http://people.phx.cox.com/dfarr/dfarr.htm - Don’s Homepage
http://people.phx.cox.com/dfarr/jetta1.htm - Jetta Notebook Computers
http://people.phx.cox.com/dfarr/march10.htm - Wireless products
http://people.phx.cox.com/dfarr/ncs1.htm - National Consulting Services


From: “A. Gardner” gardnera@SLUVCA.SLU.EDU
Date: Tue, 10 Sep 1996 21:16:12 -0600 (CST)
Subject: 1986 XJ6 Series III - Fuel pressure regulator.

Hello the list. I want to revisit a subject i mentioned briefly in a
previous post.

The Bosch FI book by Charles Probst (1991 Ed) states on page 9 that a “neat”
method of relieving fuel pressure is to “connect a hand vacuum pump at the
pressure regulator, when you pump vacuum the regulator will dump pressure to
the fuel tank”. Mine pulls 62 Hg with no effect. Has anyone on the list
tried this? A fuel gauge is not necessary. Just pump up the system using
the air flow meter vane (with the ignition on). Squeeze the hose to the
fuel rail and apply vacuum to the regulator, the hose will relax if the
pressure drops significantly. Go on, try it.

Therefore, is the Bosch FI oracle wrong, the Jag L-jetronic system different
(its a Bosch regulator), or some function of my regulator, to use a quaint
British (engineering) expression, just buggered? Assuming the latter, I
took regulator and vacuum pump to a local Bosch parts purveyor. After much
sucking, blowing and pumping they declined to relieve me of the eighty or so
dollars to order a new one saying that it was “probably OK”. Unfortunately,
they did not have an equivalent in stock to make a comparison, so I am still
not sure, but for now I will look elsewhere for the cause of my pressure leaks.

Tony Gardner

XJ6 Series III 1986


From: Juliansean@aol.com
Date: Tue, 10 Sep 1996 22:27:48 -0400
Subject: Re: air dam on XJ-S

In a message dated 96-09-10 19:03:40 EDT, jgn@li.net (John Napoli) writes:

<< By 30 mph or so the hood was firmly
pulled up against the hood safety latch. Conclusion: much higher
pressure underneath, even at that low speed. I >>

John, this was surely due to the Bernoulli effect. Faster airflow over the
outside of the hood = lower pressure on outside of hood than underneath. Not
necessarily higher pressure underneath. This caused the bonnet of my MG to
lift up once and crease itself over the windshield. It was worse than an XJS
though…
Julian Mullaney


From: pbowers@ilk.com (Patrick J. Bowers)
Date: Tue, 10 Sep 1996 23:18:51 -0400 (EDT)
Subject: Rear Brakes on 89 XJS

    > I have overhauled the rear brakes on the above car and while I was

under there I

had planned to replace the flexible brake line which goes to the T
connector.
However, on the flexible line in the car there is what appears to be a mini-
c-clamp that cross clamps the flexible line in the middle. Is this factory?
If so
what purpose does it serve? I was planning to simply remove it and replace
the line.
Are there any problems with this?

Y’know, you may find that this is an aluminum tag with the part
number of the hose assembly on it!
– Kirbert

Nope,
I’ve looked closely. It actually cross clamps the line!!!

Any Ideas? Any reason why it would hurt the ABS system if I removed it?

Patrick Bowers


From: Jan Wikstroem Jan_Wikstroem@acp.com.au
Date: 11 Sep 96 13:40:21
Subject: Re: 1986 XJ6 Battery

It’s fairly simple to test if the battery holds charge. Disconnect the battery,
charge it fully, let it stand an hour to settle down, then use a hydrometer to
check the density of the electrolyte in all cells. Leave the car parked for a
couple of days, then repeat the electrolyte test. There should be no visible
change to any cell. If there is, the battery is being discharged.
The battery can be discharged by an external load (typically, a damaged diode
in the alternator) or an internal one. What happens is that with age, the lead
paste in the grids gradually falls out and accumulates in the bottom of the
battery. This not only gradually reduces the capacity of the battery; the paste
on the bottom of the container eventually builds up to where it reaches the
grids and draws a leakage current.

  • -Jan

From: ee84287@goodnet.com (Weiss-Malik)
Date: Sun, 08 Sep 1996 19:40:53 -0700
Subject: fuel for the “air dams on the XJ-S” controversy

Here’s my two cents worth on the air dam controversy:

  • -The front spoiler helps to create a low pressure zone under the car at
    higher speeds.
  • -At low speeds, the “spoiler undertray” prevents flow of the “air being
    blown into the engine bay by the radiator fan” under the car, through the
    opening that exists between the front of the engine and the back of the
    radiator.
  • -The impact of this opening is really obvious on a car like mine which
    currently lacks the “undertray” as well as the dam (I’m looking for a
    reasonably priced used set if anyone knows of one). If the undertray is not
    there, then the path of least resistance for the flow of air (once it hits
    the mammoth front of the engine) is to go down through the opening created
    by the absent undertray, rather than around the engine bay (big obstacle).
  • -If the undertray is there then the air is forced to flow through the engine
    bay (actually around the engine) and to exit at the back end of the engine bay.
  • -At high speed, and if both the dam and undertray are there, they help each
    other. The dam creates a low pressure zone under the front of the car that
    helps to suck-out the air flowing to/out-of the back of the bay.
  • -I also suspect, that if both the dam and undertray are present, they
    probably reduce the amount of heat that accumulates (and radiates from) the
    transmission tunnel.

Any other thoughts?

Rob W-M
85 XJ-S


From: Jan Wikstroem Jan_Wikstroem@acp.com.au
Date: 11 Sep 96 13:58:51
Subject: XJ rear suspension behaviour

Some measurements that may interest you:

In the process of overhauling the rear suspension on my XJC, I took the
opportunity to study the suspension geometry in detail, since we’ve just been
having a few comments on that. Kirby made the point that the torque arms will
tend to tilt the rear sub-frame as they move up and down, giving rise to some
rear-end steering - which sounds reasonable. So I did some linkage moving with
the torque arms fitted but no shock/spring units (hey, I’m not that strong!)
and a dial gauge set up longitudinally against the rear middle of the rear
subframe. Keep in mind that this car is 19 years old and the torque arm
bushings look original; they certainly have plenty of surface cracking and
appear soft. Measurements on another car with fresher rubber may be different.

The subframe tilts visibly as you move the suspension up and down as far as it
will go - however, this mostly seems to happen at the bottom end of the travel,
and mostly outside the possible range as the complete suspension will not go
beyond where the shock absorbers are fully extended.

Now for simulated cornering: moving the suspension on the notional outside in a
corner through the roughly 80 mm (3 1/4 in) of travel from the static ride
height (sedate cornering) to full bump stop (yeeee-haa!) the subframe doesn’t
move visibly - 0.11 mm (4.3 thou) forward by the dial gauge. Simulating
cornering roll by leaving the outside suspension fully compressed and moving
the notional inside wheel halfway down to maximum shock absorber extension,
there’s again no visible movement - hard to read the dial gauge but say 0.04 mm
(1.6 thou) forward. That’s what you’d get under very hard cornering indeed; if
the inside rear wheel lifts (which I can’t make it do in real driving) there’s
a sharp forward kick by all of 1.9 mm (75 thou) in the last inch or so of
extension.

The conclusion is that under mere brisk cornering, the rear sub-frame tilts
very slightly base-forward, with the outside leading. Under all-out race
cornering, the tilt on the inside may become larger than on the outside. What
does this mean at the wheels, except of course that movement at the centre
corresponds to twice as much movement at the wheel? Well, we have deflected the
outside wheel to where its axis is mere millimetres below the subframe mounting
rubbers; with the subframe probably tilting about a virtual axis close above
those rubbers, the leverage effect would reduce the forward movement to
effectively zero. On the inside, the wheel axis is close to the base of the
subframe, so the wheel gets the full effect of the forward movement. This would
move the inside wheel slightly forward of the outside one. Net effect: very
slight steering effect except right close to the limit of adhesion - and let’s
not forget the rear wheel toe-in (nearly 3 mm on my car), which would tend to
counteract that.

I can’t measure what might happen under acceleration and braking torque loads,
as this requires resources I don’t have - but the XJ is a fine exponent of
classical rear wheel drive behaviour, meaning that giving extra gas in a corner
tends to tighten the line slightly and increase perceived grip. “Tightening the
line” means of course that the rear wheels steer out slightly, going from
neutral steering to slight oversteer. I don’t think that effect comes from
anything to do with suspension geometry; it’s adequately accounted for by the
fact that applying driving force to the wheel/road interface reduces the
proportion of total adhesion left to resist cornering force.

Sure, applying increased torque to the final drive unit would tend to twist the
rear sub-frame base forward and top back against the rubber mounts and torque
arm rubbers, equally on both sides. The only effect on cornering I can see in
that is that the pushing of the hub carriers against the torque arms flexes the
lower suspension arms, hubs and pivot bearings slightly backward from the
centre, counteracting the toe-in. Since this would have the greatest effect on
the much more heavily loaded outside tyre, there would be a slight outward
steering. However, those suspension parts are enormously strong, and I can’t
imagine any deflection that matters.

Anyway, all these slight deflections I’m talking about may well be swamped
utterly by wholesale rubber flexing in real-life driving on a bumpy real-life
road - but all in all, I’m left with a strong impression that the Jaguar XJ
rear suspension is pretty damn’ good even by today’s standards.

    • Jan

From: Michael Frank mfrank@westnet.com
Date: Tue, 10 Sep 1996 23:26:16 -0400
Subject: Wire wheel repair in merry old England

Earlier this week, someone was asking about wire wheel repairs in England.
This month’s issue of Jaguar Enthusiast carries an ad from “Peter Rees
Wheels”, 01342 850551/0468 573005. They list locations in London, Manchester
and Cardiff. Hope it works out for you.

Mike Frank
1969 E-Type 2+2


End of jag-lovers-digest V2 #347


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jag-lovers-digest Wednesday, 11 September 1996 Volume 02 : Number 348

Fire extinguisher/XJ
Re: 1986 XJ6 Series III - Fuel pressure regulator.
Re: jag-lovers-digest V2 #346
Re: Rear Brakes on 89 XJS
Re: Oil Weight
88-89 XJ40 Low Brake Pressure
64 3.8 S-type automatic transmission shifting hard
Mk2 steering column rebuild
Cats in Their Environments
Re: Mk2 steering column rebuild
SI XJ12 idle
Re: jag-lovers-digest V2 #346


From: Jan Wikstroem Jan_Wikstroem@acp.com.au
Date: 11 Sep 96 14:27:25
Subject: Fire extinguisher/XJ

I’ve found a great location for the fire extinguisher in S1 and S2 XJs (don’t
know if it applies to S3, S4 and XJ-S).
Under the passenger seat cushion, which can be lifted off in a fraction of a
second (pull bottom front edge up and forward) there’s a chassis cross member.
I’ve attached the quick-release clip for my 1kg powder extinguisher to the rear
side of that. I can get the extinguisher out of there faster than out of its
previous place in the foot well, and it’s not in the way of the rear seat
passenger’s feet.

If I carry a passenger, I’ll of course have to get that person to vacate the
seat smartly, but most of the time, that seat is empty. It might be better to
put the extinguisher under the driver’s seat, since you have to get out of it
to use the extinguisher anyway, but the steering wheel makes it more awkward to
remove the cushion.

The only real drawback I can see is that it’s easier to forget to give the
extinguisher a shake at every service to prevent the powder packing down…

  • -Jan

77 XJ5.3C
78 XJ5.3L


From: Randy Wilson randy@taylor.infi.net
Date: Tue, 10 Sep 1996 23:43:57 -0400 (EDT)
Subject: Re: 1986 XJ6 Series III - Fuel pressure regulator.

The Bosch FI book by Charles Probst (1991 Ed) states on page 9 that a “neat”
method of relieving fuel pressure is to “connect a hand vacuum pump at the
pressure regulator, when you pump vacuum the regulator will dump pressure to
the fuel tank”. Mine pulls 62 Hg with no effect.

Therefore, is the Bosch FI oracle wrong, the Jag L-jetronic system different
(its a Bosch regulator), or some function of my regulator, to use a quaint
British (engineering) expression, just buggered? Assuming the latter, I

My first reaction is the guy is out to lunch, but the more I think about it…
The regualtor is a linear device. It’s job is to keep the fuel pressure
approx 36 psi above the absolute pressure. Note that I did not say atmosphere
pressure. this is because that does not matter. It’s the pressure at the
injector tips that matters. For this reason, it is better to view the hose
on the regulator not as a vacuum line, but rather a vent line routed to
the same enviroment as the injector tips. thus, when there is atmospheric
pressure in the manifold, such as WOT, a fuel pressure gauge, which is vented
and relative to the atmosphere, will read 36 psi. When there is a partial
vacuum in the manifold, such as idle, the same gauge will read about 26 psi.
But there is still a 36 psi pressure drop across the injector.

So much for the thinking. The guy is out to lunch. Assuming no mechanical
limits in the regulator, an absolute vacuum should drop the fuel pressure
to around 20 psi relative to the atmosphere.

And, yes. With the minor exception of the handling of the throttle switch,
the 4.2 injection is stock Bosch L-jet. I use the same breakout box I have
for Jags on my Lancia, and a friends BMW.

took regulator and vacuum pump to a local Bosch parts purveyor. After much
sucking, blowing and pumping they declined to relieve me of the eighty or so
dollars to order a new one saying that it was “probably OK”. Unfortunately,
they did not have an equivalent in stock to make a comparison, so I am still
not sure, but for now I will look elsewhere for the cause of my pressure leaks.

The regulators are a fairly common failure. The standard failure mode is
to stick totally closed, not allowing any fuel to dump. This puts the
system on the pumps full pressure; approx 100 psi. Note that they will
often work fine when first started, then jam within two or three minutes.
A quick no gauge test for this condition is to remove the return line and
install a 6 foot length of 5/16 fuel line on to the regulator outlet. Put
the other end of the hose in a five gallon gas can, and activate the
fuel pump. You should have a healthy stream of fuel from the hose. If it
stops, suspect the regulator.

Tony Gardner

Randy K. Wilson
randy@taylor.infi.net


From: sky182@ix.netcom.com (Gerald M Foster)
Date: Tue, 10 Sep 1996 21:12:33 -0700
Subject: Re: jag-lovers-digest V2 #346

Jim,

I live in North Carolina and the temperatures are mild but tending 

to be pretty hot in the summer. In my 10 years of Jag driving I found
the 10W-40W Castrol to be too thin in the summer. I have always used
Castrol 20W-50W year round, and it does not leak much in my cars. Two
quarts between 3,000 mi. changes would be OK for a 6 cyl. Jag of
moderate milage. I would give the 20W-50W a try. On cold AM’s (+10 to
+15F) my old XJ12 would turn a little slower but fire right up and
build pressure quickly.

By the way, I always check the compression and look at the plugs 

when oil consumption is high on any vehicle. A quart in a hundred
takes puddles to get that kind of consumption from just a leak.

                            Regards,


                            Gerald
  • ----------------------------Snip----------------------------------------

From: JimJag@aol.com
Date: Tue, 10 Sep 1996 14:55:15 -0400
Subject: Re: Oil Weight

until recently, i have been using Castrol 10W-40 oil in my 1985 Vanden
Plas with 136,000 miles on the engine. yesterday, i took the car to an
authorized jaguar dealer in frederick, maryland for some gasket repairs
to fix a major oil leak. the mechanics there impressed me as being
extremely knowledgeable about jaguar cars (or extreme bullshit artists;
its too early to tell). those mechanics recommended using Castrol
20W-50 in order to burn less oil. they think that the “proper” weight
oil, coupled with the gasket repair, should curb my cat’s appetite (100
+/- miles/quart!!!) for the viscuous petrol stuff. even though they
make a convincing argument, i have NEVER heard of using that weight of
oil in an automobile. my question to the auto handymen of the jaguar
persuasion is: does this sound reasonable? is 20w-50 the correct
weight oil? if so, how does temperature and seasonality affect this
oil in my 4.2 liter? all insights and opinions are appreciated.

thanx - jim


From: Randy Wilson randy@taylor.infi.net
Date: Tue, 10 Sep 1996 23:47:40 -0400 (EDT)
Subject: Re: Rear Brakes on 89 XJS

Y’know, you may find that this is an aluminum tag with the part
number of the hose assembly on it!
– Kirbert

Nope,
I’ve looked closely. It actually cross clamps the line!!!

Any Ideas? Any reason why it would hurt the ABS system if I removed it?

Patrick Bowers

I would hazzard a guess that the car has had some differential repair,
or some such that required disconnected the rear brake line(s). The
mechanic put a clamp on the flex hose to keep from losing all of the
brake fluid, and neglected to remove it when done.

Randy K. Wilson
randy@taylor.infi.net


From: Randy Wilson randy@taylor.infi.net
Date: Wed, 11 Sep 1996 00:02:47 -0400 (EDT)
Subject: Re: Oil Weight

my question to the auto handymen of the jaguar persuasion is: does this
sound reasonable? is 20w-50 the correct weight oil? if so, how does
temperature and seasonality affect this oil in my 4.2 liter? all insights
and opinions are appreciated.

thanx - jim

Yes, Jaguars (really most British cars) want the heaviest oil the ambient
temps will allow. For this climate (Va. Beach) it’s 20w/50 year round.
For your area it might be prudent to switch to a lighter oil during the
winter months. Say 15w/40. The is a temp vs. viscosity graph in the
owners manual. But I’d say trust your Jag dealer. They know your climate
better than I do. If they say 20w/50 all year, then do it.

Randy K. Wilson
randy@taylor.infi.net


From: “Rennick, Kim (AS01)” KRennick@p03.as01.honeywell.com.au
Date: Wed, 11 Sep 96 13:51:00 EST
Subject: 88-89 XJ40 Low Brake Pressure

Michael Powers wrote:

My VCM Low Brake Pressure light ALWAYS comes on for a minute
or so after I start my XJ6. It also seems to appear once in a while when I
put
the
car in park What’s up with this thing? The brakes seem like they are in
perfect working
order.

Michael,

It’s almost certainly the brake accumulator at fault. The diaphragm in the
accumulator deteriorates with age, so that the system doesn’t maintain the
pressure properly. (The hydraulic pump actually generates the pressure, the
accumulator acts as a ‘store’.) The symptom you describe shows that the
pump is taking too long to restore the pressure throughout the system.

The accumulator is a small pressure vessel, mounted at the low, right hand,
front of the engine bay - effectively in the engine bay behind the RH turn
indicator. Replacing it is easy - I did mine about six months ago (with the
help of jag lovers’ advice!). The job took me about one hour go-to-whoa,
and would be less with practice! The cost of the replacement part in
Australia is A$295 (c. US$200).

Kim Rennick


|
| XJ40 3.6L Sovereign -
| Citroen BX 19 GTI -
| …(English and French rapprochement in my garage!)
|__________________________________________________


From: “Alastair Lauener” a.lauener@napier.ac.uk
Date: Wed, 11 Sep 96 09:47:45 gmt
Subject: 64 3.8 S-type automatic transmission shifting hard

Albert

Does this adjustment change with operating temperature? To me (who has NO
experience in this) this would mean that the lever would have to be set
on the basis of:

1 Set to shift when cold. Mark the setting.
2 Set to shift when hot. Mark the setting.
3 Set to half-way between the two marks so that both cold operation
and hot operation work.

You usually find that automatics work best (properly) when warm. The old 30 -
40 year old DG’s can be sluggish to change into top when cold, but can also
change from 1-2 very early. When warm, they can drop into top gear very harshly
by modern standards. My experience is of thrr of these gearboxes.

The lever also actuates the kickdown.
So is there some symptom in the kickdown we could expect? Such as:

1 Kickdown works when cold, but not hot - therefore do X
2 Kickdown works when hot, but not cold - therefore do Y
3 Kickdown operation isn’t materially affected by this setting.

Kickdown is very much affected by this setting. I can’t answer about my
experience with engine cold, as I tend not to give it too much throttle before
it is warm, and therefore don’t use the kickdown when cold. I don’t know also
how long it takes auto fluid to warm up.

The best way to set the lever is described in the transmission books, but is
basically done without engine running. If you have the engine off, and open the
bonnet (so you can hear). With drivers door open (so you can hear), press
acelerator full to the floor. You should hear/feel a clunk of the gearbox lever
‘going over’ to kickdown mode, at just past full normal throttle… This car by
the sound of it may ‘go over’ too soon., before it is getting to full throttle.

If the noise is heard early, the car will probably hang on to lower gears for
too long, as the gearbox thinks that you have the throttle pressed to the floor,
even though you may only have a moderate throttle on, and may not actually be
accelerating.

More common, is that the adjustment is the other way, the gearbox may move off
in second gear, and may change into top at below 20 mph, at very low engine
revs. It is possible in this condition to give it full throttle, the car will
accelerate in top gear very slowly until about 30 mph, when you get normal
acceleration… This is very bad for the gearbox, it is being overloaded, and
can overheat very quickly. This is almost like the lever not even being there.
I think your friends condition is the other mode, ie is holding gears too long.
The owner may hear the lever going ‘over’ at even 1/2 throttle.

The adjustment is way below the heater box, (behind the exhaust system as well)
not to sure about Left hand drive cars. It is a very simple rod in adjustable
holes, and there is a lever from the throttle that can be rotated on a rod.
Again, i have never seen a LHD car, but the principal is the same.

What I am trying to say is that the gearbox has to know what your throttle is
doing. This lever affects kickdown very much, but also gearbox performance.It
already knows engine speed from the speed of the torque converter.

Apparently the amount of ATF doesn’t affect the operation in this case.
This is a surprise to me: I’d expect the symptom you mention. Still, I’ll
get the owner to look into the amounts he’s seen listed to see if they
differentiate between fill from dry and fill from change.

From normal fill, these gearboxes can lose about 6 pints before you may notice
any fault, although the fluid may be getting too warm. First fault of low fluid
is slippage from moving off. If owner is prepared to remove part of the inside
of the car, there is an internal dipstick which is much more accurate. Not sure
if that can be reached from under the car.

Hope the rambling helps, if you want more specifics, please ask.



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Subject: re:64 3.8 S-type automatic transmission shifting hard


From: “Alastair Lauener” a.lauener@napier.ac.uk
Date: Wed, 11 Sep 96 10:07:12 gmt
Subject: Mk2 steering column rebuild

Patrick O’Neill asks

I am in the middle of rebuilding the steering column on my 1963 LHD Mk2
3.8L MOD, actually I am just putting in new nylon bushings.

Has anyone done this before? My car had a nylon bushing in the top of the
column but it has a felt bussing in the bottom. I purchased the top and
bottom nylon bushings and I will us the nylon in the bottom unless some one
has a good reason not to.

I also bought new nylon bushes from a well known spares dealer. When I rebuilt
my column, I realised the bushes are not a matched pair, as sold. Also, the old
fitted better than the one new one that was correct, and I put both original
back in. Yes, replace the felt with the nylon, don’t lubricate the nylon (I
believe).

Are there any other jobs I should do as I have the column out?
Check the shim bits at the bottom don’t allow the column to move in and out.

On a side note a few months back there was a discussion about Mk2’s RHD vs.
LHD with regard to a U-joint or a rubber “flex” joint into the steering
box. I believe the general thinking was that RHD cars had the U-joint and
LHD cars had the flex-joint, well my LHD car has a U-joint and it is a
original Power steering car.
It is age dependant, don’t know the dates though. I know of some RHD cars with
the old flex joint. The petrol from the carbs overflowing generally destroyed
them, and they broke!!. Problem on the LHD cars was the heat from the exhaust.
I think the change date was sometime in 1962.




From: Kyle Chatman kchatman@mail.coin.missouri.edu
Date: Tue, 10 Sep 1996 22:10:49 -0500
Subject: Cats in Their Environments

Took the family to NYC last week and had a wonderful time. Saw several =
Jaguars, mostly sedans, prowling the busy streets, shooting through =
intersections but staying above the fray of yellow Caprices and Crown =
Victorias. Returned to central Missouri Sunday night and late Monday =
night found me driving 100 miles from one small city to another. Two =
curving lanes and just enough traffic to offer something to pass. And I =
did. XJ6 running great, stereo sounding good, and new tires holding =
their own. Every ten miles found a small town of 200 -1000 that slowed =
me down so that I could relax any muscles that were still tensed from =
those last curves and begin the next stretch. As I arrived home I =
thought about those cats in the city and hoped that they got the chance =
to run now and again. I felt a bit sorry for them living in the concrete =
maze, but then again, my country cat doesn’t get many chances to dart =
and strut and cats love to dart and strut.


From: ejt@wg.icl.co.uk (Ted Trim)
Date: Wed, 11 Sep 96 11:10:17 BST
Subject: Re: Mk2 steering column rebuild

Patrick,

I’ve just rebuilt the column on my Mk2, but it’s a 1966 rhd non-assisted 3.4l
MOD car:
looking in the parts book there are quite a few changes from earlier cars.

[for UK “bushes” read US “bushings” as preferred ]

My column always made a grating noise when turning the wheel, so I thought
I’d replace the bushes which are nylon top and bottom on my car. With the
column stripped down I found that the grating sound was from the earth
contact near the base of the upper column. I replaced this contact (it was
worn badly) and the horn slip ring contact (also worn badly). On late
columns there is a thrust bearing; mine was worn so I replaced that too.
The new bushes were a looser fit than the old ones so I didn’t change them
in the end. I used some ordinary grease when reassembling these bushes but
I don’t know if this is recommended. A coat of paint and clean-up of all
contacts completed the job.

The lower column on my car has two ujs, the upper one does not have a gaiter
as shown in some diagrams. I think it’s original.

Cheers,
Ted

1966 3.4 Mk2 “getting closer to running”

ejt@wg.icl.co.uk


From: Dave Oxenreider daveox@av-imagineering.com
Date: Wed, 11 Sep 1996 09:31:09 -0400
Subject: SI XJ12 idle

Hello Dave,

She has a heavy, idle that shakes the car.
At 1000rpm, she is smooth as glass.

Yes, your V12 should idle like glass as well as run smooth as glass. It
sounds as if you have a BAD vacuum leak at one of the ports nearest one
of the butterflies. If one of these goes to atmosphere your mixture
leans out. This causes you to tune down that carb and compensate by
slowing the idle down by choking it off (closing the butters). This
causes the Strombergs to struggle to deliver a consistent mixture ratio,
causing a major imbalance in combustion. This all goes away when you
open the butters because the critical low pressure area is not
concentrated on the vacuum port, but rather at the venturi - and so it’s
smooth.

Mfg defect… the passage from the throat to the float
assembly was not drilled deep enough. A dead end if
you will. I fixed that and now it works as advertised…

I am curious as to where you did your drilling. On the Strombergs
fitted
on my '73 XJ12 the left-hand front and right-hand rear carbs do not have
choke assemblies (the others of each pair handle richening). Therefore,
the machined area is present on the side of the carb body, but the holes
are not drilled through to the plenum. Is this where your drilling took
place? If so, that is the cause of your vacuum leak. If not, please
tell me where you had to drill so I can check mine.

If none of the above is the case, is your vacuum retard unit working on
the distributor? If not, and you have compensated by bumping up the
timing at idle, then this could cause you to have to really turn down
the
idle speed by closing the butterflies, thereby causing an inconsistent
mixture. Let us know what you find.

BTW, The Roadster Factory and Moss Motors I believe both carry
Colortune,
probably Welsh Jaguar also.

Dave Ox.
73 XJ12
75 TR6


From: pjsmith pjsmith@gil.com.au
Date: Wed, 11 Sep 1996 23:32:03 +1100
Subject: Re: jag-lovers-digest V2 #346

@owner-jag-lovers-di1 wrote:

jag-lovers-digest Wednesday, 11 September 1996 Volume 02 : Number 346

Brake Sleeves FWIW
XJ40 hard starts
Re: '86 XJ6 Battery
Re: Water Pump Removal
XJ-40 Hard Stsrts
Local Jag-lovers
Re: Oil Weight
A/C Systems
Re: XJ6 S3 Fan Clutch $
Mk2 steering column rebuild
Re: Knockoff tool - Marston Motors
Re: When the student surpasses the teacher…
Re: Hurricane Fran - XJS lowrider (R.I.P.)
88-89 XJ40 Low Brake Pressure??
Re: XJS — Oops!!! (a.k.a. Chassis failure)
Re: XJS Micro switch on throttle
Re: Hej Matthias,
Re: Radiator removal XJS
RE: XJS Micro switch on throttle
Re: XJS brake fluid reservoir cap
re: air dam on XJ-S


From: “KENNETH M GILSON” kgilson@ccmail.unl.edu
Date: Tue, 10 Sep 96 12:30:58 CST
Subject: Brake Sleeves FWIW

 The company you suggested "Imperial Machine Co. in Lincoln, Ne USA" to
 resleeve the master cylinder and/or the brake cylinders is owned and
 ran by an acquaintance of mine. He is a top notch machinist and does
 excellent work. I would recommend him to do anyone's work.

From: Michael Powers/TEIR/Thomson Michael_Powers@teir.com
Date: 10 Sep 96 13:34:54
Subject: XJ40 hard starts

I have a 89 XJ6 that takes about 4-6 seconds to start after it has sit for
about an hour.
It starts fine when the engine is cold and it starts fine immediately after it
has been turned off.
Also, I never use the gas pedal when cranking the engine (per the manual).

Any areas I can starting looking? Any component failures that this might
point to?

As always, thanks for any input,

  • -Mike
    /-----------------------------------------------------------------
    | mpowers@teir.com
    | (703) 736-1832
    |
    | Would somebody please explain to me those signs that
    | say, “No animals allowed except for Seeing Eye Dogs?”
    | Who is that sign for? Is it for the dog, or the blind person?
    | -Jerry Seinfeld
    *-------------------------------------------------------------------*/

From: BSherw@aol.com
Date: Tue, 10 Sep 1996 13:39:34 -0400
Subject: Re: '86 XJ6 Battery

"William F. Stickney >picker1@ix.netcom.com< wrote:

I have a need to check my battery. It appears to be not holding a charge.<

William- before buying a new battery, I suggest you check alternator output,
should be about 13.5 to 14 volts, measured across battery terminals with
engine at
idle. Also good to check battery with engine off: turn on lights and see if
battery
residual voltage (12 V) drops quickly under load (not good).
Good luck-
Brian Sherwood
'85 XJ6
'84 XJ-S


From: Thomas Alberts talberts@aero.odu.edu
Date: Tue, 10 Sep 1996 14:26:14 -0400 (EDT)
Subject: Re: Water Pump Removal

I finaly got the damned thing off. That was worse than the radiator removal!

One of the reasons I recommended taking the hood off even though it
is not strictly necessary. Removing and replacing the hood is not
difficult. Working on the water pump/radiator ect is a lot
easier with the hood out of the way. One recommendation: be careful
when you reinstall the pump. I understand that a lot of people
break the pump housing by over-tightening that one countersunk
head allen bolt.

Anyone have any suggestions on how to get the short (3") hose on the top of
the temp sender housing into place when I go back on? I had to cut it off
to get the pump off and dont see how I am going to get it back on with that
hose in there unless I remove the crossover pipe.

Why don’t you want to remove the crossover pipe? That is the way to do it.
Do remove the crossover pipe and replace the little hoses on each end too.

Thomas E. Alberts


From: PLacey@swri.edu
Date: Tue, 10 Sep 96 13:15:30 CDT
Subject: XJ-40 Hard Stsrts

I had this same exact problem with my 88 XJ-40 and several others on the list
have reported the same. Hard starting with a hot engine that has sat for a
while. It was due to failure of the non-return valve at the fuel pump. This
allowed the fuel vapor pressure to push the fuel back to the tank and the
system to vapor-lock. The non-return valve is cheap and easy to replace.

Paul Lacey, Texas


From: “Gregory W. Price” gprice@mack.rt66.com
Date: Tue, 10 Sep 1996 12:22:57 +0700
Subject: Local Jag-lovers

Are there any other Jag-lovers in the Northern New Mexico area?

Greg Price


From: JimJag@aol.com
Date: Tue, 10 Sep 1996 14:55:15 -0400
Subject: Re: Oil Weight

until recently, i have been using Castrol 10W-40 oil in my 1985 Vanden Plas
with 136,000 miles on the engine. yesterday, i took the car to an authorized
jaguar dealer in frederick, maryland for some gasket repairs to fix a major
oil leak. the mechanics there impressed me as being extremely knowledgeable
about jaguar cars (or extreme bullshit artists; its too early to tell).
those mechanics recommended using Castrol 20W-50 in order to burn less oil.
they think that the “proper” weight oil, coupled with the gasket repair,
should curb my cat’s appetite (100 +/- miles/quart!!!) for the viscuous
petrol stuff. even though they make a convincing argument, i have NEVER
heard of using that weight of oil in an automobile.

my question to the auto handymen of the jaguar persuasion is: does this
sound reasonable? is 20w-50 the correct weight oil? if so, how does
temperature and seasonality affect this oil in my 4.2 liter? all insights
and opinions are appreciated.

thanx - jim
Jim in my V12 I was using GTX2 many years ago and heaps of it! I
changed to a non friction modified oil Penrite HPR30 in Australia, and
the use and leaks halved. I’ve forgotten the viscosity rating of HPR30
but Pennzoil also make a suitable oil. A multigrade with 50 at the top
end is OK, perhaps North American winters need lighter oil but it’s
worth talking to your Pennzoil distributor.
Regards Peter Smith


From: Carlos Madero/Intl/Corp/Tyson Carlos_Madero/Intl/Corp/Tyson.TYSON@mislnx.tyson.com
Date: Tue, 10 Sep 1996 13:50:24 -0500
Subject: A/C Systems

I have read with interest the discussion in regard to Jag A/C systems and all
the hassles and problems associated with them. The reports I have read on the
A/C on early 70’s XJ cars don’t have much good to say about it either. Has
anyone exchanged / upgraded components (evaporator, expansion valve, etc) to
make the system perform better? I know it must be a pain to gain access to
these components under the dash, but with current technology and parts
available, there must be a way to upgrade the system so that it cools better.
Since I still intend the remove the dash to refinish it, I also will look into
upgrading the A/C while everything is apart.

Carlos Madero
'73 XJ6 (since '86)
'53 Chev PU
'86 Caprice (with COLD air and a strong V8 which is scheduled to go in the Jag
soon)


From: hdrsons@iamerica.net (Hal Rogers)
Date: Tue, 10 Sep 1996 15:42:55 -0600
Subject: Re: XJ6 S3 Fan Clutch $

Don’t recall the originator but someone asked about an XJ6 Fan Clutch. The
Original part number for the Series 3 is EAC4751. The XJ40 is different
incidentally. If anyone wants an aftermarket alternative, I sell them for
$69.95 each.

Best Regards,
Hal

Hal Rogers
H.D. Rogers & Sons
Import Auto Specialists
3418 Barksdale Blvd.
Bossier City LA 71112
(318) 742-3651 voice
(318) 742-5044 fax

Serving Auto Enthusiasts since 1959


From: “Patrick O’Neill” patrick.oneill@premierusa.com
Date: Tue, 10 Sep 1996 14:00:18 -0700
Subject: Mk2 steering column rebuild

I am in the middle of rebuilding the steering column on my 1963 LHD Mk2
3.8L MOD, actually I am just putting in new nylon bushings.

Has anyone done this before? My car had a nylon bushing in the top of the
column but it has a felt bussing in the bottom. I purchased the top and
bottom nylon bushings and I will us the nylon in the bottom unless some one
has a good reason not to.

Are you supposed to use any kind of lubricant on these nylon bushings?

Are there any other jobs I should do as I have the column out?

On a side note a few months back there was a discussion about Mk2’s RHD vs.
LHD with regard to a U-joint or a rubber “flex” joint into the steering
box. I believe the general thinking was that RHD cars had the U-joint and
LHD cars had the flex-joint, well my LHD car has a U-joint and it is a
original Power steering car.

Kind Regards,

Patrick D. O’Neill
1963 MK2 3.8L MOD
Rolling Hills Estates, California
www.beachnet.com/~patricko

PS I have just added some cool Jaguar Animated GIF files to my Web site


From: nick@sn.no (Nick Johannessen)
Date: Tue, 10 Sep 1996 23:05:19 +0200
Subject: Re: Knockoff tool - Marston Motors

[ Patrick Krejcik pkr@SLAC.Stanford.EDU ]
|
| An E-Type owner (Chuck Rockhold) told me he got it from Marston Motors
| at Bradford in the UK at a cost of about $US25 including shipping to the
| US.
| Apparently they advertise in Jaguar World, so can somebody look up their
| telephone and/or fax number and tell me.

This would be The Hutson Motor Company. They have incidentally
just opened a web-page at http://www.jagweb.com/hutson/

Nick


<<< Nick Johannessen | nick@sn.no | nickj on IRC >>>
<<< Jaguar XJ6 4.2 '70 MOD & '82 Auto >>>

The JagWeb http://www.sn.no/~nick/jaguar.html <<<
The Jaguar Specialists Web http://www.jagweb.com <<


From: John Napoli jgn@li.net
Date: Tue, 10 Sep 1996 17:22:41 -0400 (EDT)
Subject: Re: When the student surpasses the teacher…

And second prize is two Esprits…

John

On Fri, 6 Sep 1996, Lee Walden wrote:

My brother told me that some guy offered Lotus a deal to put
all of the service manuals for the Esprit on a CD-ROM. They
“rewarded” him with a brand new Esprit Turbo. Talk about
not fair…
Lee


From: John Napoli jgn@li.net
Date: Tue, 10 Sep 1996 17:37:37 -0400 (EDT)
Subject: Re: Hurricane Fran - XJS lowrider (R.I.P.)

My condolences to you and your family on the damage to your house and
property and XJ-S. This is a terrible thing to go thru and I only hope
that you are treated fairly by the insurance adjusters.

Consider using an agent to negotiate on your behalf. They charge a fee
but in the experiences of several friends that went thru similar losses
during local storms, they end up getting you far more than you would have
on your own. Since many of the Jag parts were in the house and possibly
damaged, perhaps that can be counted as ‘personal property’ rather than as
part of the car.

It seems that you are all ok physically, and of course that is the most
important, but nevertheless thius is a terrible thing to go thru.
Especially the waste ofthe car.

Consider keeping the hulk if it is not repairable and parting it out.
Perhaps you will find enough buyers on the list to help with the loss.

Regards,

John

On Fri, 6 Sep 1996 Juliansean@aol.com wrote:

Hurricane Fran
To the Jag-lovers mailing list. =20
I=92ve never experienced a hurricane before so the feeling of powerlessne=
ss is
strangely interesting. It=92s 4:00 AM and the wind is still building. N=
othing
Any feedback on advice, to keep for parts or not, market values (I=92ll h=
ave to
deal with insurance people) would be much appreciated. =20
By the way, wasn=92t someone selling a convertible XJS on this list not t=
oo
long ago?? I forgot who it was but please contact me.
Thanks for listening.
=20
Julian Mullaney
1987 XJS Convertible (now with VERY low ride height)
=20
=20


From: Michael Powers/TEIR/Thomson Michael_Powers@teir.com
Date: 10 Sep 96 17:46:41
Subject: 88-89 XJ40 Low Brake Pressure??

My VCM Low Brake Pressure light ALWAYS comes on for a minute
or so after I start my XJ6. It also seems to appear once in a while when I put
the
car in park What’s up with this thing? The brakes seem like they are in
perfect working
order.

Any ideas and/or experience with this?

  • -Mike
    /-----------------------------------------------------------------
    | mpowers@teir.com
    | (703) 736-1832
    |
    | Would somebody please explain to me those signs that
    | say, “No animals allowed except for Seeing Eye Dogs?”
    | Who is that sign for? Is it for the dog, or the blind person?
    | -Jerry Seinfeld
    *-------------------------------------------------------------------*/

From: John Napoli jgn@li.net
Date: Tue, 10 Sep 1996 17:48:24 -0400 (EDT)
Subject: Re: XJS — Oops!!! (a.k.a. Chassis failure)

On Fri, 6 Sep 1996, Kirbert wrote:

John Napoli:

  1. Is there a source for stiffer cage mounts? Or is it a case of using
    the stock setup or going solid?

I have not seen any alternative mounts offered. A shame, too, I bet
there’d be a market. But the more common fix is to ADD a support,
usually some kind of link from the bottom center area of the cage
forward, parallel to the drive shaft, to some bracket attached to
the floorpan. Rubber doughnuts on both ends, like an anti-sway bar
link. The result is that the cage is held much more securely without
stiffening the existing mounts themselves, and there’s probably a
lot less stress on some other components as well.

I have not heard of this solution previously but it makes a lot of sense.
It would keep the cage from rocking back and forth.

I would like to take this opportunity to point out that if one was to
go to totally solid mounts, it would be a good idea to toss the
trailing arms at the same time.

Yes, this is an absolute. The trailing arms might not even have enough
flex if the cage was solid.

  1. The XJ-S in question seems to be one of the more powerful ones out
    there. Is the stock setup just unable to absorb the extra power over an
    extended time?

It’s my understanding that any effort toward giving the XJ-S a
serious hole-shot capability endangers the rear cage mounts. My own
car hauls a__, but I don’t push it very often at all, probably have
just avoided problems for myself. Again, the standard fix is that
link holding the bottom of the cage; I’ll probably rig one for my car
one of these days.

I am interested in this mod myself. But one of my plans was to route the
exhaust pipes under the center of the cage to be able to go to a larger
diameter and remove some of the heat from the rear disks. I wonder if you
can do both?

  1. If the failure was hastened by rust in the tub, do we all face this
    problem? Where does the water get in from? How do you check (drill holes
    in some strategic location)? I have seen E-Type tubs cut open; they get
    looking pretty bad inside rust-wise. Do our XJ-S’s have the same
    proclivity?

There are guys here more adept at anti-rust practices than I, and one
of the discussions has been going on recently. I can only say that,
clearly, this particular spot is one where attention is warranted.

They seemed to discuss rust in areas easily accessible. We are talking
about, I think, hidden sections. I wonder if there is a stabilization
technique that can be effectively used on hidden box sections. Maybe
spritz in a rust neutralizer followed by a resilient coating followed by a
closed-cell foam that expands just the right amount and that does not
absorb water.

John


From: John Napoli jgn@li.net
Date: Tue, 10 Sep 1996 17:56:25 -0400 (EDT)
Subject: Re: XJS Micro switch on throttle

On Fri, 6 Sep 1996, Kirbert wrote:

Question: will a pushbutton wired in parallel with this switch and
controlled somehow by the driver provide part-throttle kickdown? Or does
the electric kickdown only work if the transmission is also seeing zero
vacuum at the modulator (from WOT)?

Of course, this begs the question: Why would you want to do such a
thing? You can always just pull the shifter into 2nd.

Faster than struggling with the detents.

John


From: John Napoli jgn@li.net
Date: Tue, 10 Sep 1996 17:55:00 -0400 (EDT)
Subject: Re: Hej Matthias,

What year range did the donor impeller come from? I presume that it was
from a Chevy small-block V8.

My water pump is very accessible (mechanical fan drive long gone) and I
have a lot of instrumentation (TWO mechanical water temp gauges installed
in different locations in addition to the stock gauge) so my car might
make a great experiment. I’m willing to do it, but don’t want to kill my
perfectly fine water pump to try it. Anyone got a dead water pump to lend
me? I don’t think I’d have trouble in getting one of the impellers Kirby
describes.

My car could be the guinea pig, and I will be able to report quantified
results.

John

On Fri, 6 Sep 1996, Kirbert wrote:

I have never mentioned this impeller substitute in my booklet,
primarily because it was NOT a perfect fit. But seeing as how I
seem to be the only one around here who lives in a hot climate and
has no overheating problems, maybe there’s a clue here somewhere.
The next time somebody has a pump off (or a spare laying around),
take it down to the local parts store and compare the impeller with
those on the various pumps on the shelf. Tell us if there appear to
be any that would be an excellent fit, and if any have vanes that
look like those on the Jag impeller.

Jag impellers have steeply backward-sloping vanes, and nobody else
does. Jaguars have a reputation for overheating, and nobody else
does. Connection?


From: John Napoli jgn@li.net
Date: Tue, 10 Sep 1996 18:22:51 -0400 (EDT)
Subject: Re: Radiator removal XJS

On Sun, 8 Sep 1996, Jim Isbell wrote:

I am in the process of removing the radiator from my XJS and have
found several errors in the Haynes manua. So whats new? The big
error is that they say you have to discharge the AC. It aint so!
The second is that they say you need to remove the bonnet. It aint
so. Just remove the grill and one end of the lift struts and the
bonnet will lean back very happily on the bumper, well out of your
way.

On my car, with the replacement struts we talked about on the list a long
time ago, I don’t even have to do that. Just remove the top panel and
hoses.

Anyone know how important the sponge rubber inserts around the
ratiator are. Mine are rotted away.

Very important. As Kirby points out in his book, the radiator absorbs
vibrations from the rest of the car and it can’t do this unless properly
mounted.

It looks like the front license plate does alot of damage to the air
flow into the lower grill, and with that dam gone, that might be a
big part of my overheating problem. Any comments on removing the
licnseplate?

My XJ-S has never had an air dam (PO must have killed it) and it has not
made any difference (car never overheats). It will run a few degrees
hotter at high speeds (I can track this on the tertiary mechanical water
temp gauges I have recently installed) and presumably if I had a front air
dam this would not be the case.

John


From: John Napoli jgn@li.net
Date: Tue, 10 Sep 1996 18:29:13 -0400 (EDT)
Subject: RE: XJS Micro switch on throttle

Thanks. Another thing to try.

John

On 9 Sep 1996, Jan Wikstroem wrote:

John Napoli :
Question: will a pushbutton wired in parallel with this switch and
controlled somehow by the driver provide part-throttle kickdown? Or does
the electric kickdown only work if the transmission is also seeing zero
vacuum at the modulator (from WOT)?


From my own experience when the arm on the microswitch decided to bend past the
critical point, I can report that it’s the switch alone that operates the
kickdown subject to governor settings, regardless of vacuum.
-Jan


From: John Napoli jgn@li.net
Date: Tue, 10 Sep 1996 18:37:07 -0400 (EDT)
Subject: Re: XJS brake fluid reservoir cap

Yes, I like that idea. Makes it less likely to miss something.

John

For those who have my booklet: I have been thinking of eliminating
the separation between “Maintenance” and “Modifications”. Some of my
suggestions for maintenance are to replace a stock part with a
non-stock part, which technically is a modification. And some
modifications I suggest be considered even by those who don’t modify
the car, such as the installation of aftermarket steering rack
bushes. As a result, I have quite a few references back and forth
between the sections. Do you guys think it would be a better idea
for that to be one large section, where you can look up the thing
you’re concerned about and find the maintenance suggestions and the
suggested modifications at the same place?


From: John Napoli jgn@li.net
Date: Tue, 10 Sep 1996 18:54:46 -0400 (EDT)
Subject: re: air dam on XJ-S

On Tue, 10 Sep 1996, Ryan Border wrote:

Air which flows through the radiator, into the engine bay, has to exit
somewhere. Assuming your bonnet is in place, the exit point for most of
this air is out the bottom. The lower the pressure under the car, the easier
it is for the air to “get out”. Decreasing the pressure under the car
with an air-dam can increase the airflow through the engine bay and
the radiator, thus improving the cooling.

Just a guess- but I don’t think cars go nearly fast enough for an airdam
under the bumper to significantly increase the pressure in front of the
radiator grille.

Your response raised an interesting question. My XJ-S has no air dam.
Some time ago, as an experiment, I disconnected my hood struts, popped the
hood latch, and went out for a drive. By 30 mph or so the hood was firmly
pulled up against the hood safety latch. Conclusion: much higher
pressure underneath, even at that low speed. I wonder what the results
would be on a car with an air dam?

John


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jag-lovers-digest Thursday, 12 September 1996 Volume 02 : Number 349

Oil weight
Air dam on XJS
XK’s Unlimited Open House… 20% off parts… Barbeque…
Re: XJ rear suspension behaviour
JCNA Concors d’Elegance - Sacramento - September 28th.
Santa Cruz - Autumn Classic British Sports Car Concors
Re: air dam on XJ-S
Re: fuel for the “air dams on the XJ-S” controversy
Power steering rack bellows
RE: Mk2 steering column rebuild
XKE engine oil capacity
Re: XKE engine oil capacity
Re: Power steering rack bellows
XJ-S Water Pump Replace
California Clubs
Re: Power steering rack bellows
Re: XJ-S Water Pump Replace
Re: Oil weight
re: air dam on XJ-S
Re: air dam on XJ-S
1964 E-type FHC production


From: Dave Oxenreider daveox@av-imagineering.com
Date: Wed, 11 Sep 1996 09:47:27 -0400
Subject: Oil weight

those mechanics recommended using Castrol 20W-50 in order
to burn less oil. They think that the “proper” weight oil,
coupled with the gasket repair, should curb my cat’s appetite
(100 +/- miles/quart!!!) for the viscuous petrol stuff. Even
though they make a convincing argument, i have NEVER
heard of using that weight of oil in an automobile.

Jim, I use 20W-50 in both my Jag and my TR6. I live in Florida and the
hot climate is the main reason I use such heavy oil in the XJ12. It
gives good pressure at operating temp.

I began running it in my TR6 because of bad cylinder wear (124,000+
miles) and a poor reaming job on the valve guides (damn machine shop!)
cause it to use about a quart every 250 miles (driving hard). I would
only recommend this weight if the average temperature does not fall
below about 50 degrees F. Below this the viscosity creates VERY high
pressures and very low flow, in addition to putting undue stress on the
oil pump and lines.

Unfortunately, nothing can really solve an engine’s oil consumption
except for a proper repair of the cause. There is no additive that I
know of that can effectively ‘fill the gaps’ that allow the oil into the
cylinders. If you live in a hot climate, I would say that a heavier oil
will reduce your consumption by about 10-20 percent per weight increase
(i.e., 10W-40 to 20W-50). Not much, I know.

Good luck!

Dave Ox.
73 XJ12
75 TR6


From: “Martin R. Fooks – InternetDesign” Martin.Fooks@internetdesign.com
Date: Wed, 11 Sep 1996 15:49:50 +0200
Subject: Air dam on XJS

I saw a picture of a Lister once with twin NACA ducts on the bonnet and
decided to do the same to my XJS whils performing all the other
modifications.

Take a look at the pictures to see what it looks like –
HTTP://www.internetdesign.com/mrfooks

Look in the section “Martins’ XJS”.

These are placed in front of each air box, but not up tight as I don’t
want rain water running into the engine when parked.

Martin


From: bill_clark@ccmail.rsco.com
Date: Wed, 11 Sep 96 07:12:58 PST
Subject: XK’s Unlimited Open House… 20% off parts… Barbeque…

 Open house weekend   October 5th and 6th.
 
 Saturday: Peoples Choice Car Show, free bbg 'n drinks. 20% off parts.
 
 Sunday: 0900 meet in park lot for start of 2-3 hour rallye ending in
            a luncheon/picnic with live blue Grass Country Concert.
 
 
 I've ever only made the Saturday part, and it's always enjoyable.
 
 
 The local JAG club (San Francisco) is convoying down Saturday... all 
 welcome to join... ocntact me on the side for details.

From: “Kirbert” palmk@gcn.scri.fsu.edu
Date: Wed, 11 Sep 1996 09:58:55 -0005
Subject: Re: XJ rear suspension behaviour

Jan Wikstroem:

So I did some linkage moving with
the torque arms fitted but no shock/spring units (hey, I’m not that strong!)
and a dial gauge set up longitudinally against the rear middle of the rear
subframe.

Cool! This is a GREAT group!

Are you still there? How about disconnecting the trailing arms and
taking the same measurements that way? In theory, of course, the
subframe should not move at all, but it makes an easy baseline test.

Sure, applying increased torque to the final drive unit would tend to twist the
rear sub-frame base forward and top back against the rubber mounts and torque
arm rubbers, equally on both sides. The only effect on cornering I can see in
that is that the pushing of the hub carriers against the torque arms flexes the
lower suspension arms, hubs and pivot bearings slightly backward from the
centre, counteracting the toe-in. Since this would have the greatest effect on
the much more heavily loaded outside tyre, there would be a slight outward
steering. However, those suspension parts are enormously strong, and I can’t
imagine any deflection that matters.

I might argue here. Applying increased torque to the final drive
unit tends to twist the rear subframe as described, and the lower
suspension arms are in fact so massive that flex is probably
negligible. However, the forces involved tend to flex the rubber
joints on either end of the trailing arms (effectively making the
trailing arms shorter) and rocking the bottom of the subframe forward

  • – probably a fairly significant amount, and perhaps the cause of
    failed subframe mounts in cars with significantly more get-up-and-go
    than stock.

In fact, given the nature of the geometry here, I wouldn’t be too
surprised to learn that there was a significant amount of flexing in
the entire subframe under heavy torque. The subframe mounts are out
at the outer end; the trailing arms, effectively serving as torque
links, are also at the outer end – but are connected at the diff, at
the center. And the torque is applied at the diff. And the subframe
is a large, fairly flimsy-looking sheet metal structure.

What we REALLY need is a high-frame-rate camera mounted under there
on a car with about 600 HP!

– Kirbert | If anything is to be accomplished,
| some rules must be broken.
| - Palm’s Postulate


From: bill_clark@ccmail.rsco.com
Date: Wed, 11 Sep 96 07:18:22 PST
Subject: JCNA Concors d’Elegance - Sacramento - September 28th.

 Sponsored by Sacramento Jaguar Club during the All British Car Day 
 which they;re running in conjunction with the Sacramento Valley MG Car 
 Club.  
 
 Held at Cosumnes River College Fountain Quad area - grass trees 
 fountains etc.
 
 Entry7 fees: $25 driven, $30 concors classes
 
 (proceeds to Children's Hospital)
 
 contact Chuck Imperatori (510) 825-7731 for more details.

From: bill_clark@ccmail.rsco.com
Date: Wed, 11 Sep 96 07:53:00 PST
Subject: Santa Cruz - Autumn Classic British Sports Car Concors

 October 20th 0900 .... (rain day October 27th)        
                
        Inn at Pasatiempo
 
 This Autumn Classic brings back the nostalgic fun of the relaxed, 
 friendly sports car club events of the 1950's and 1960's (for those 
 who go back that far).  This event is for all regularly driven British 
 classic two-seater (or their jumpseat or 2+2 derivatives) cars. 
                  NO TRAILER QUEENS or towed cars.
 
 Excellent brunch... all in cost $15.50.  All reservations must be in 
 advance... no same day meal payments.
 
 Great door prizes etc, mountain driving tour.
 
 Directions: Exit off Route 17 at Pasatiempo Drive (just North of Santa 
 Cruz)
 
 Registration Forms: Dave Ferguson (408) 363-1423 evenings
 
 Two Thumbs Up: based on past experience... a very relaxing and 
 enjoyable day.

From: “Lee Walden” lwalden@ebmud.com
Date: Wed, 11 Sep 1996 07:55:16 -0700
Subject: Re: air dam on XJ-S

John wrote:

Your response raised an interesting question. My XJ-S has no
air dam.
Some time ago, as an experiment, I disconnected my hood
struts, popped the
hood latch, and went out for a drive. By 30 mph or so the
hood was firmly
pulled up against the hood safety latch. Conclusion: much
higher
pressure underneath, even at that low speed.

Are you sure about the higher air pressure underneath? It
sounds more like a lower air pressure above the hood. Bernoulii
effect at work. faster airflow across the hood lowers the air
pressure on the hood, and causes it to rise until it hits the
stops. Lee


From: “Lee Walden” lwalden@ebmud.com
Date: Wed, 11 Sep 1996 08:14:03 -0700
Subject: Re: fuel for the “air dams on the XJ-S” controversy


From: Weiss-Malik ee84287@goodnet.com
To: jag-lovers@sn.no
Subject: fuel for the “air dams on the XJ-S” controversy
Date: Sunday, September 08, 1996 7:40 PM

Here’s my two cents worth on the air dam controversy:

-The front spoiler helps to create a low pressure zone under
the car at
higher speeds.
-At low speeds, the “spoiler undertray” prevents flow of the
“air being
blown into the engine bay by the radiator fan” under the car,
through the
opening that exists between the front of the engine and the
back of the
radiator.
-The impact of this opening is really obvious on a car like
mine which
currently lacks the “undertray” as well as the dam (I’m
looking for a
reasonably priced used set if anyone knows of one). If the
undertray is not
there, then the path of least resistance for the flow of air
(once it hits
the mammoth front of the engine) is to go down through the
opening created
by the absent undertray, rather than around the engine bay
(big obstacle).
-If the undertray is there then the air is forced to flow
through the engine
bay (actually around the engine) and to exit at the back end
of the engine bay.
-At high speed, and if both the dam and undertray are there,
they help each
other. The dam creates a low pressure zone under the front of
the car that
helps to suck-out the air flowing to/out-of the back of the
bay.
-I also suspect, that if both the dam and undertray are
present, they
probably reduce the amount of heat that accumulates (and
radiates from) the
transmission tunnel.

Any other thoughts?

Rob W-M
85 XJ-S

I always thought the purpose of the air dam was to reduce the
amount of air reaching the “dirty” underside of the car. Other
benefits include better gas mileage due to reduced drag, and
better traction due to increased downforce. Look at most race
cars. No air dam, but the underside of the car is very flat and
“clean”. Air dams on trucks are there to improve fuel mileage
by reducing the air flow under the truck and trailer. Lee


From: JISBELLJR@mail.utexas.edu (James A. Isbell)
Date: Wed, 11 Sep 1996 08:59:06 -0500
Subject: Power steering rack bellows

Yo, Jim! Do I have to tell you that the bellows are not the problem?

No Kirby, you dont. I know the leak is not stopped by the bellows. But the
bellows are also shot so it ends up on my driveway a drip at a time and I
want to keep dirt out of the stuff that is coating the ends of the rack.

The leak is not bad, maybe a few drops a day, not enough to notice on the
filler cap maybe an oz a month. So rather then do a real horrible job, for
now I am only goint to replace the bellows.


                                                        Jim

“Better an outlaw than not free.”
Nance O’Neil


From: “White, Dick” white@msgate.ColumbiaSC.NCR.COM
Date: Wed, 11 Sep 1996 11:30:00 -0400
Subject: RE: Mk2 steering column rebuild

Patrick,

I have replaced the bushings on my '64 3.8 S-Type. The S-Types have
only the nylon type. According to my parts books, Mark II’s used both
felt and nylon bushings ( 3.4 up to chassis #162488 and 3.8 up to
chassis #230140 used felt). As long as the nylon one will go in the
bottom I don’t see a problem using it.

I occasionally spray mine with WD-40 or silicone but I don’t think it’s
really necessary.

My parts books also imply that Mk II’s used flex couplings up to chassis
#17893 (3.4_LHD) and #222240 (3.8_LHD). All S-types used nylon roller
u-joints and the 420’s went back to the flex coupling. All Mk X’s and
420G’s used u-joints.

While out check the condition of the split cone near the top of the
column and the rubber gaiter around the nylon roller u-joint. Both are
available from Brit/Auto or XK’s.

Regards,
Dick White
'64 3.8 S-type
'58 XK 150 FHC

From: “Patrick O’Neill” patrick.oneill@premierusa.com
Date: Tue, 10 Sep 1996 14:00:18 -0700
Subject: Mk2 steering column rebuild

I am in the middle of rebuilding the steering column on my 1963 LHD Mk2
3.8L MOD, actually I am just putting in new nylon bushings.

Has anyone done this before? My car had a nylon bushing in the top of the
column but it has a felt bussing in the bottom. I purchased the top and
bottom nylon bushings and I will us the nylon in the bottom unless some one
has a good reason not to.

Are you supposed to use any kind of lubricant on these nylon bushings?

Are there any other jobs I should do as I have the column out?

On a side note a few months back there was a discussion about Mk2’s RHD vs.
LHD with regard to a U-joint or a rubber “flex” joint into the steering
box. I believe the general thinking was that RHD cars had the U-joint and
LHD cars had the flex-joint, well my LHD car has a U-joint and it is a
original Power steering car.

Kind Regards,

Patrick D. O’Neill
1963 MK2 3.8L MOD
Rolling Hills Estates, California
www.beachnet.com/~patricko

PS I have just added some cool Jaguar Animated GIF files to my Web site


From: DHarr13177@aol.com
Date: Wed, 11 Sep 1996 11:40:18 -0400
Subject: XKE engine oil capacity

What is the proper oil level on an E-type ?

The manual states 8.5 liters ( 9 quarts) for refill. This shows a level about
1/4 inch over the lower mark on the dipstick. It takes 2 more quarts to reach
the upper mark.


From: “Larry Miller” psllarry@gate.net
Date: Wed, 11 Sep 1996 12:35:36 -0400
Subject: Re: XKE engine oil capacity

This is a multi-part message in MIME format.

  • ------=_NextPart_000_01BB9FDD.BB9DF260
    Content-Type: text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1
    Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

hmmm…my 67 E does the same.
Let me know what you find out?
Larry
psllarry@gate.net


From: DHarr13177@aol.com
To: jag-lovers@sn.no
Subject: XKE engine oil capacity

The manual states 8.5 liters ( 9 quarts) for refill. This shows a level
about
1/4 inch over the lower mark on the dipstick. It takes 2 more quarts to
reach
the upper mark.

  • ------=_NextPart_000_01BB9FDD.BB9DF260
    Content-Type: text/html; charset=ISO-8859-1
    Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable

hmmm...my 67 E does the same. =  
Let me know what you find = out?
Larry
psllarry@gate.net
------
> From: DHarr13177@aol.com
> To: jag-lovers@sn.no
> Subject: XKE engine oil capacity
> =
> The manual states 8.5 liters ( 9 quarts) for refill. This shows = a level about
> 1/4 inch over the lower mark on the dipstick. It = takes 2 more quarts to reach
> the upper mark.

- ------=_NextPart_000_01BB9FDD.BB9DF260--

From: Thomas Alberts talberts@aero.odu.edu
Date: Wed, 11 Sep 1996 12:50:17 -0400 (EDT)
Subject: Re: Power steering rack bellows

  • ----- Begin Included Message -----

The leak is not bad, maybe a few drops a day, not enough to notice on the
filler cap maybe an oz a month. So rather then do a real horrible job, for
now I am only goint to replace the bellows.

If you are going to replace the steering rack gaitors (I hear they are
not cheap) make sure that the stainless steel exhaust heat shields
are in place so the gaitors will last a while.

Thomas E. Alberts


From: JISBELLJR@mail.utexas.edu (James A. Isbell)
Date: Wed, 11 Sep 1996 08:59:02 -0500
Subject: XJ-S Water Pump Replace

when you reinstall the pump. I understand that a lot of people
break the pump housing by over-tightening that one countersunk
head allen bolt.

Interesting. My orriginal pump with the exact same casting number does not
have a counter sunk PHILLIPS head bolt (phillips, not allen). But the
replacement does. Whats it for and why does the orriginal have a normal
bolt (casting is NOT countersunk)?


                                                        Jim

“Better an outlaw than not free.”
Nance O’Neil


From: “John Hed” john_hed@wssagw.chinalake.navy.mil
Date: 11 Sep 1996 10:42:14 -0700
Subject: California Clubs

                   Subject:                               Time:10:43 AM

OFFICE MEMO California Clubs Date:9/11/96

I am in the early stages of planning a British car event in S. Calif. for next
year and would like to contact any and all Jaguar clubs in California to
participate. I have only one contact for the “Jaguar Owners Club” in L.A.
There must be more clubs out there in California. If you know of any, please
Email the POC to me. Thanks in advance.

John Hed John_Hed@WSSAGW.chinalake.navy.mil
Ridgecrest British Car Club
Ridgecrest California


From: “Kirbert” palmk@gcn.scri.fsu.edu
Date: Wed, 11 Sep 1996 14:47:41 -0005
Subject: Re: Power steering rack bellows

The leak is not bad, maybe a few drops a day, not enough to notice on the
filler cap maybe an oz a month. So rather then do a real horrible job, for
now I am only goint to replace the bellows.

Gee, how can I clarify this? The bellows are SUPPOSED to be a
dust-only item; some of them even have little drain holes. They
certainly cannot hold the pressure of the pump, and usually fail even
to hold a significant amount of liquid. If your seals are leaking,
the ONLY solution is an overhaul – replacing the bellows is
worthless.

– Kirbert | If anything is to be accomplished,
| some rules must be broken.
| - Palm’s Postulate


From: Thomas Alberts talberts@aero.odu.edu
Date: Wed, 11 Sep 1996 15:10:16 -0400 (EDT)
Subject: Re: XJ-S Water Pump Replace

when you reinstall the pump. I understand that a lot of people
break the pump housing by over-tightening that one countersunk
head allen bolt.

Interesting. My orriginal pump with the exact same casting number does not
have a counter sunk PHILLIPS head bolt (phillips, not allen). But the
replacement does. Whats it for and why does the orriginal have a normal
bolt (casting is NOT countersunk)?

Right, Phillips. I forgot. Anyway I have no idea why they decided
to make one bolt countersunk. It doesn’t appear that the bolt head would
be in the way if it had one. Possibly a remnant from other models?
I’ve always been curious about this. Anyway, when I bought my rebuilt
pump the guy at the counter showed me one someone had overtightened and
broken and warned me that lots of people break them this way.

Thomas


From: M.Cogswell@ccmail.mi04.zds.com (Mike Cogswell)
Date: Wed, 11 Sep 1996 15:29:50 -0400
Subject: Re: Oil weight

 FWIW I've used 10W-40 in winter and 20W-50 in summer in all my 
 vehicles for many years.
 
 MikeC
 m.cogswell@zds.com

______________________________ Reply Separator _________________________________

Even
though they make a convincing argument, i have NEVER
heard of using that weight of oil in an automobile.


From: John Napoli jgn@li.net
Date: Wed, 11 Sep 1996 17:43:23 -0400 (EDT)
Subject: re: air dam on XJ-S

OK, so then don’t I want hood louvers to exhaust hot air under the hood
and also to slightly reduce front end lift?

And does my car have more front end lift without an air dam?

John

On Tue, 10 Sep 1996, Ryan Border wrote:

Hi John,

Adding an airdam may indeed decrease the pressure under the car, increasing
the speed of the air through the engine bay; BUT, I don’t think you
could ever get the hood to be sucked down, short of some very special
air channelling under the hood, combined with a big upright windshield
to stagnate the flow over the top of the hood :-). You might be able
to increase the speed where the pressure differential across the hood
overcomes the weight of the hood slightly though.


From: John Napoli jgn@li.net
Date: Wed, 11 Sep 1996 17:53:43 -0400 (EDT)
Subject: Re: air dam on XJ-S

Ummm, isn’t lower pressure on top the same as higher pressure underneath?

Everything is relative, after all. It just depends on your frame of
reference.

BTW, I too have an MG that popped its bonnet. Fortunately, the damage was
slight and easily repaired (stepped on it while it was upside down on my
lawn!).

John

On Tue, 10 Sep 1996 Juliansean@aol.com wrote:

John, this was surely due to the Bernoulli effect. Faster airflow over the
outside of the hood = lower pressure on outside of hood than underneath. Not
necessarily higher pressure underneath. This caused the bonnet of my MG to
lift up once and crease itself over the windshield. It was worse than an XJS
though…
Julian Mullaney


From: rrichardson@eurekanet.com (Bob Richardson)
Date: Wed, 11 Sep 1996 18:03:43 -0500
Subject: 1964 E-type FHC production

I have a LHD 1964 E type Series 1 FHC with the armrests and padded dash. My
serial number is 890630; the 1961 FHC model started with serial number
875001 and a total number of Series 1 FHC built were 7,663, which would
indicate that the last serial number for the four years that Series 1 E
type FHC’s would be 882664. I found these figures in a 1991 issue of
“Jaguar Quarterly.” Since the production figure includes the small number
of RHD models sold in Great Britain (and this figure was not given in the
article) there is no way I can figure just when in 1964 my particular
E-type was built and delivered. The interior is identical to the 1965 4.2,
but I have the Moss crash box, the XK type clutch and the XK 150 braking
system. I was wondering if any of you can tell me the serial number of the
last '64 FHC (LHD) produced before the introduction of the 4.2 in 1965. If
I knew how many LHD E types were exported during the four years of
production, that would help me estimate whether my Jag was an early '64 or
built near the end of the production run. Will, for example, a 4.2’s vacuum
assist brake setup bolt onto a 3.4 without any major modifications? Can the
4.2’s clutch system (housing, pressure plate, clutch, master cylinders,
etc.) be fitted to a 3.8 E type, again as a bolt-on system? I’d put a
4.2’s gearbox in my '64 E type in a minute, but the price is just too steep
for me to pay now that I’m an aging retiree. Would appreciate getting some
numbers from someone steeped in Jag lore.


End of jag-lovers-digest V2 #349


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jag-lovers-digest Thursday, 12 September 1996 Volume 02 : Number 350

Re: fuel for the “air dams on the XJ-S” controversy
Re: 1964 E-type FHC production
Vehicle Dynamics (Was XJ Rear Suspension Behavior) [Very Long]
Re: Oil Weight
XJ40: Round to Square Headlamps
Re: 88-89 XJ40 Low Brake Pressure??
Re: 88-89 XJ40 Low Brake Pressure??
Re: Cats in Their Environments
RE: XKE engine oil capacity
Re: 1964 E-type FHC production
Re: Vehicle Dynamics (Was XJ Rear Suspension Behavior) [Very Long]
Re: XJ40: Round to Square Headlamps
Re: Oil Weight
Re: Cats in Their Environments
Re: When the student surpasses the teacher…
Re: 88-89 XJ40 Low Brake Pressure
Re: Oil weight
1964 E-type FHC production


From: John Napoli jgn@li.net
Date: Wed, 11 Sep 1996 18:03:11 -0400 (EDT)
Subject: Re: fuel for the “air dams on the XJ-S” controversy

My XJ-S, the one without the air dam or undertray, gets real hot in the
transmission tunnel. This is not wafting heat from the climate
control system, because I have checked this with no water flow through the
heater core (hoses bypassing the heater core entirely). Furthermore, I
have checked this with the ski slope (center console) removed, so I can
actually touch the floor in this area.

So you may be right on this.

John

On Sun, 8 Sep 1996, Weiss-Malik wrote:

Here’s my two cents worth on the air dam controversy:

probably reduce the amount of heat that accumulates (and radiates from) the
transmission tunnel.

Any other thoughts?

Rob W-M
85 XJ-S


From: charles daly cdaly@passport.ca
Date: Wed, 11 Sep 1996 20:05:16 +0100
Subject: Re: 1964 E-type FHC production

I perhaps should have mailed this directly to
Bob Richardson, but I went to the list in case anyone
else can benefit.
Bob,
Haddock’s Originality Guide says, in part;
LHD FHC #890487 (rubber added to bumper) May 1964
LHD FHC #890714 (rear springs…changes) October 1964
FYI, #890871 was the last 3.8 FHC

He further states;
Total production, Series 1, 3.8
RHD Roadsters; 942
RHD Coupes; 1,798
LHD Roadsters; 6,885
LHD Coupes; 5,871

This seems to put your car between May and
October, perhaps mid-summer. If you can’t find the
book I’ll do more research for you, if it will help.

BTW, he further states that white is the best colour,
but that’s not important to this post (just to me!)

Now, I knew all those numbers/dates without need
of the book…but why waste my memory!
Hopes this bit helps.

Regards,
Charles Daly, Toronto, Canada
'62 E-Type, ots (June '62!)


From: Kroppe kroppe@mich.com
Date: Wed, 11 Sep 1996 21:24:00 -0400
Subject: Vehicle Dynamics (Was XJ Rear Suspension Behavior) [Very Long]

Jan Wikstroem Jan_Wikstroem@acp.com.au wrote:

The conclusion is that under mere brisk cornering, the rear sub-frame tilts
very slightly base-forward, with the outside leading. Under all-out race
cornering, the tilt on the inside may become larger than on the outside. What
does this mean at the wheels, except of course that movement at the centre
corresponds to twice as much movement at the wheel? Well, we have deflected the
outside wheel to where its axis is mere millimetres below the subframe mounting
rubbers; with the subframe probably tilting about a virtual axis close above
those rubbers, the leverage effect would reduce the forward movement to
effectively zero. On the inside, the wheel axis is close to the base of the
subframe, so the wheel gets the full effect of the forward movement. This would
move the inside wheel slightly forward of the outside one. Net effect: very
slight steering effect except right close to the limit of adhesion - and let’s
not forget the rear wheel toe-in (nearly 3 mm on my car), which would tend to
counteract that.

the XJ is a fine exponent of
classical rear wheel drive behaviour, meaning that giving extra gas in a corner
tends to tighten the line slightly and increase perceived grip. “Tightening the
line” means of course that the rear wheels steer out slightly, going from
neutral steering to slight oversteer. I don’t think that effect comes from
anything to do with suspension geometry; it’s adequately accounted for by the
fact that applying driving force to the wheel/road interface reduces the
proportion of total adhesion left to resist cornering force.

Jan -

I am impressed with your initiative to observe your rear suspension.
Are you in the mechanical engineering field?

What you are talking about is roll steer. This one third of the
phenomenon known as “understeer” or “oversteer”. The other two thirds
of under/oversteer are compliance steer and tire grip (adhesion).

When you say that the “rear wheels steer out slightly”, that is not
quite correct. Public passenger cars are emphatically not designed for
oversteer, because that is an unstable and unsafe condition. Start
from the principle of lateral acceleration, acting on the vehicle’s
center of gravity. Given a fixed lateral acceleration (a fixed
radius corner at constant speed), a car which exhibits oversteer will
steer into the corner, therefore decreasing the radius. If the radius
is decreased and speed is held constant, lateral force is increased,
thus making the car roll more and higher cornering forces are
imparted to the rubber suspension components, both creating more
oversteer in our hypothetical car. The car again steers into the
corner, decreasing the radius and increasing the lateral force, and
you can see where we are going – into the oncoming lane of traffic
or the ditch!

To fully understand the rear suspension behavior you must also
observe toe-in through suspension travel. You say your rear toe-in
at design load (fully laden stationary vehicle) is nearly 3mm. OK.
Now measure toe-in when both wheels are in full rebound (maximum
lower limit of travel, with car on stands and rear wheels unsupported).
Toe-in should decrease at full rebound, maybe even toe-out. Now
move both wheels into full jounce (maximum upper limit of travel).
Measure toe-in and you should find it to be more than 3mm.

The effect of the change of toe through travel is that in cornering,
the outside wheel will go into jounce, and toe-in. The inside wheel
will go into rebound, and toe-out. The net effect is that the rear
wheels will steer into the corner making the vehicle yaw out of the
corner and increase the cornering radius, thus defining the term
“roll understeer”.

Compliance understeer is the resultant change in geometry that occurs
when you apply cornering forces to the tire/road contact patch (which
we can’t do in our driveways!). Consider a force at the tire contact
patch and think about the four rubber subframe bushes and rubber radius
arm bushes. These rubber springs must react the lateral force applied
at the tire. The static equilibrium of this system will cause the rear
wheels to steer into the corner and yaw the vehicle out of the corner
in public passenger vehicles.

Tire grip/adhesion is controlled by weight on the tire, which is
controlled
by weight distribution, center of gravity height, tires, and anti-roll
bars.
Since weight distribution and c.g. height is fixed in public passenger
vehicles, you must look at tires and anti-roll bars to obtain greater
grip.
I am not a tire expert, so I will only say that you can buy tires with
greater or lesser grip. To increase the grip of a given tire, you can
increase the force on the tire using anti-roll bars. This causes the
weight transfer from the inside tire to the outside
tire to be reduced, thereby utilizing more of the grip of your inside
tire.

If the front/rear balance of grip is biased towards the front, you will
have an oversteer condition whereby the front tires are controlling the
behavior of the vehicle vs. the rear tires. The car will yaw into the
turn
and oversteer.

B.J. Kroppe - '82 XJ6


From: “Scott W. Phillips” phillips@mn.uswest.net
Date: Wed, 11 Sep 1996 20:23:38 -0500
Subject: Re: Oil Weight

Hail fellow jag lovers. A new job has kept me away, but I must add a
Minnesota perspective to this issue.

In the winter here it is common to use 5W-10 so the stuff can retain some
fluidity to it!

Don’t you wish you all lived here???

Scott Phillips – now re-employed as a professional fund raiser (so I can
get my A/C fixed now)
'88 XJ40
Minnetonka,mn,usa


From: cobac@ix.netcom.com (Eric J Faber )
Date: Wed, 11 Sep 1996 18:26:12 -0700
Subject: XJ40: Round to Square Headlamps

Hello Jag-lovers!,
Has anyone out there changed the headlamps in their XJ40 from the
four round headlamps to the two square headlamps? I was looking to do
this to my car because I think the two headlamps are nicer and more
European looking than the four.
What is involved in this process? I’m not sure if I’ll have to
change those bulb failure units (with the wiring) or be able to plug
the other headlamps in with an adapter. Any idea on cost? Or
aftermarket suppliers or places to get used headlights?
As always, thanks for any ideas or input!
-cobac@ix.netcom.com
-89 XJ40-VDP


From: “Robert Johnson, D.Sc.” bjomejag@sover.net
Date: Wed, 11 Sep 1996 22:04:06 -0500
Subject: Re: 88-89 XJ40 Low Brake Pressure??

Michael Powers/TEIR/Thomson wrote:

My VCM Low Brake Pressure light ALWAYS comes on for a minute
or so after I start my XJ6. It also seems to appear once in a while when I put
the
car in park What’s up with this thing? The brakes seem like they are in
perfect working
order.

Any ideas and/or experience with this?

-Mike
/-----------------------------------------------------------------
| mpowers@teir.com
| (703) 736-1832
|
| Would somebody please explain to me those signs that
| say, “No animals allowed except for Seeing Eye Dogs?”
| Who is that sign for? Is it for the dog, or the blind person?
| -Jerry Seinfeld
*-------------------------------------------------------------------*/
I would guess the cause is the nitrogen pressure bladder. This
pressurized cylinder is intended to keep a reserve of high pressure
hydraulic assist. If the bladder looses charge the hydraulic pump is
activated on start up to repressurize the system, and the VCM signals
that the pressure is low. I don’t know why the signal would come on on
engaging ‘Park’.

Bob Johnson
Brattleboro, Vt.
XJ40, XJ50


From: RMac@aol.com
Date: Wed, 11 Sep 1996 22:38:49 -0400
Subject: Re: 88-89 XJ40 Low Brake Pressure??

Michael Powers/TEIR/Thomson Michael_Powers@teir.com wrote:

My VCM Low Brake Pressure light ALWAYS comes on for a minute
or so after I start my XJ6. It also seems to appear once in a while when I
put
the car in park What’s up with this thing? The brakes seem like they are
in
perfect working order.

Any ideas and/or experience with this?

Don’t panic. The owners manual says this is normal and to be expected. I
have the same symptoms in my 1990.

Robert MacLeay
1990 XJ40 VDP Majestic


From: RMac@aol.com
Date: Wed, 11 Sep 1996 22:38:53 -0400
Subject: Re: Cats in Their Environments

There is no doubt that having a two lane country road to oneself is fun
indeed. NYC driving, which as a resident of suburban New Jersey I do
occassionally, can be equally rewarding providing traffic can move at all.

I have found city driving the only practical use for the J-shift
transmission. I put the transmission in “2”, activate Sport shift points,
and slice and dice with the best of them. Rough pavement, agressive local
drivers, and double-parked shmucks make for the ultimate real-life chicane –
just the environment where sure-footedness, power, and nerve can triumph.

(Incidentally, there are only three violations for which police will give you
a citation in the city – gridlock, illegal parking, and vehicular homicide.)

Robert MacLeay
1990 XJ40 VDP Majestic


From: Ed Scripps 73200.2362@CompuServe.COM
Date: 11 Sep 96 22:32:17 EDT
Subject: RE: XKE engine oil capacity

What is the proper oil level on an E-type ?

I was taught long ago to fill to the top mark…drive around for a week or so
and then check the level. That’s that particular engine’s level. All engines
have their own level, somewhere between the high and low marks. Continually
filling above this “natural” level is hard on the engine since the excess must
be expelled. On most engines if you’re between the high and low marks your
fine. You’re not “low” until the level drops to or below the mark. The natural
level in my '66 E-Type Jag is just below half.

All this of course depends on how badly your Jag leaks. :slight_smile:

  • -Ed-

From: rrichardson@eurekanet.com (Bob Richardson)
Date: Wed, 11 Sep 1996 23:13:20 -0500
Subject: Re: 1964 E-type FHC production

I perhaps should have mailed this directly to
Bob Richardson, but I went to the list in case anyone
else can benefit.
Bob,
Haddock’s Originality Guide says, in part;
LHD FHC #890487 (rubber added to bumper) May 1964
LHD FHC #890714 (rear springs…changes) October 1964
FYI, #890871 was the last 3.8 FHC

He further states;
Total production, Series 1, 3.8
RHD Roadsters; 942
RHD Coupes; 1,798
LHD Roadsters; 6,885
LHD Coupes; 5,871

This seems to put your car between May and
October, perhaps mid-summer. If you can’t find the
book I’ll do more research for you, if it will help.

BTW, he further states that white is the best colour,
but that’s not important to this post (just to me!)

Now, I knew all those numbers/dates without need
of the book…but why waste my memory!
Hopes this bit helps.

Regards,
Charles Daly, Toronto, Canada
'62 E-Type, ots (June '62!)
Thanks Charles. I’m really amazed about the thoroughness of Haddock’s guide.
I’m going to make every effort to obtain the guide. Our university book
store is networked in such a way that I’m sure the store can locate a
Haddock’s. The Brits, you reveal, only got to buy approximately 2,800
E-types out of a production of about 15,500 Series 1 that were produced. I
had done some rough calculations from another source and had figured my car
was built mid-way between the 1964 model run. Again, thanks for your very
informative replay, which I am now going to Save as…on my Mac for future
reference.


From: Randy Wilson randy@taylor.infi.net
Date: Wed, 11 Sep 1996 23:12:41 -0400 (EDT)
Subject: Re: Vehicle Dynamics (Was XJ Rear Suspension Behavior) [Very Long]

(Very long part deleted)

What B.J. has described is pretty much the standard thinking of most
sedan makers. The effects (bump/roll steer and compliance steer) do
apply to a degree with the XK/XJ rear suspension, but I don’t think it
was by design. This suspension system, started with the E-type, dates
back to the very early sixties. It’s design in both layout and function
is very close to the racing machinery of the period. upper and lower
tranverse arms (with the axle often being the upper arm) attached to
the differential housing, and trailing arm(s) attached to the monicoque.
The results are a system with minimal toe change with travel, a low IRC
(minimum side scrub), while giving an acceptable camber change curve.
Note that the transverse links run on bearings, not rubber. The only
rubber in the system is the diff to frame mounts (via the cage), and the
trailing arm links. I feel that the rubber was added only for noise and
vibration control (comfort), and the resulting compliance is a “necessary
evil” side effect.

Another side effect of this particular suspension layout is the hub
and arms are not positioned to effectively deal with brake reaction torque.
Thus, as with sixties Formula 1 cars, the brakes had to be moved inboard,
inducing much owner shock at the cost of service. :>

This, the race bred suspension (that’s not just a slogan!), with simuliar
details in the front, is the Magic of the Jaguar, especially the XJ
sedans. The ride is fantastic. The handling, for a 2ton+ sedan, is outstanding.
Having both in the same car, at the same time, was unheard of. It took
25 years and lots of computer time for the rest of the world to catch up.

Now, the XJ40 is a totally different beast. The whole rear suspension was
designed around compliance steer. while the suspension arms are still
firmly attached to the diff housing, the diff in these cars is hung by
a very complicated rubber suspended trapeze arrangement. It is set up to
induce a fairly large amount of compliance understeer. Blasting down a
back country lane, the magic just is not there with these cars.

I am not a tire expert, so I will only say that you can buy tires with
greater or lesser grip. To increase the grip of a given tire, you can
increase the force on the tire using anti-roll bars. This causes the
weight transfer from the inside tire to the outside
tire to be reduced, thereby utilizing more of the grip of your inside
tire.

Ummm, huh? The total weight transfer for a given condition is determined
by the CoG position and the mean track of the vehicle. Where this
weight is tranfered from and to is a function of the springs and anti-roll
bars. Adding more anti-roll bar force at one end of the car will increase
the weight transfered from inside to outside at that end of the car, which
in turn means less will be transfered at the other end. In general, the
more weight transfer taken on on end of the vehicle, the less relative
grip that end will have, though there are notable exceptions to this. these
exceptions are often cars with an extremely offset (fore/aft) CoG position.

B.J. Kroppe - '82 XJ6

Randy K. Wilson
randy@taylor.infi.net


From: Randy Wilson randy@taylor.infi.net
Date: Wed, 11 Sep 1996 23:17:12 -0400 (EDT)
Subject: Re: XJ40: Round to Square Headlamps

Hello Jag-lovers!,
Has anyone out there changed the headlamps in their XJ40 from the
four round headlamps to the two square headlamps? I was looking to do
this to my car because I think the two headlamps are nicer and more
European looking than the four.
What is involved in this process? I’m not sure if I’ll have to
change those bulb failure units (with the wiring) or be able to plug
the other headlamps in with an adapter. Any idea on cost? Or
aftermarket suppliers or places to get used headlights?

I’ve done it for a customer. It’s all bolt in stuff. The bulb controllers
have to be changed. The wiring (to the lamps) is different, the bulb wattage
is different, and the logic is different. The time I did it was with
customer supplied used parts, so I can not give an accurate guess at the
cost.

                      -cobac@ix.netcom.com
                               -89 XJ40-VDP

Randy K. Wilson
randy@taylor.infi.net


From: rrichardson@eurekanet.com (Bob Richardson)
Date: Wed, 11 Sep 1996 23:27:20 -0500
Subject: Re: Oil Weight

Hail fellow jag lovers. A new job has kept me away, but I must add a
Minnesota perspective to this issue.

In the winter here it is common to use 5W-10 so the stuff can retain some
fluidity to it!

Don’t you wish you all lived here???

Scott Phillips – now re-employed as a professional fund raiser (so I can
get my A/C fixed now)
'88 XJ40
Minnetonka,mn,usa
Scott’s information led to my reminiscing about owning my first Jag (used)
in 1956. We had a very strong sports car club and we never missed being
part of a parade or racing during intermission on a local half-mile dirt
track while the Detroit iron made hasty repairs or modified what had
already been modified. Anyhow, there were several XK-120 and XK-140 owners
in our club and we all religiously used nothing but Castrol motor oil in
the appropriate weight for each of the four seasons. And we changed oil
more often than we probably needed to, we all wore leather open-backed
driving gloves, Brit style caps (wool in winter, of course) and probably
looked pretty hilarous to those “others” in Warren, Ohio. We had to be
careful to what we exposed all that natural rubber in the brake system and
elsewhere. But this strict maintenance paid off. I took my Jag to Aruba
where I worked for Esso and there was no one on the island one could go to
for any kind of mechanical work. When the Jag, an XK-120M Drophead Coupe
hit about 50,000 miles, a good friend of mine with all the right tools
helped me rebuild the lower end, replace the rings and we even ground all
the valves with a homemade device (a rubber dart on the end of a dowel with
grinding compound did the trick). Now I let BP lube my E-type and fill the
crank with 10-30w with whatever oil they recommended. Oh, yes. Back in the
XK-120 days, all of us in the club swore by 100-octane white gasoline
(nearly an aircraft grade), but I long ago forgot the brand name.


From: DisneyPors@aol.com
Date: Wed, 11 Sep 1996 23:26:34 -0400
Subject: Re: Cats in Their Environments

In a message dated 96-09-11 22:42:02 EDT, RMac@aol.com writes:

<< (Incidentally, there are only three violations for which police will give
you
a citation in the city – gridlock, illegal parking, and vehicular
homicide.) >>

not totally true. if you drive agressive enough (and the road is not full)
you can a ticket for other things. in my 84 XJ-6 I used to drive like a nut
in NY (actually I used to drive it like it was a little sports car.) anyway,
in that car, no wait, it was the 90vdp…well, it was one…anyway, I was on
the west side highway, and decided I wanted to be on the service road to turn
to go to 7th ave (I was headed uptown). At about 60 I changed over in one of
the places that are not turn lanes and cut the shit out of someone without
slowing down, well, a cop saw it and ticketed me. I will admit I was driving
that car like a porsche not a jag. thats why I bought a porsche, and now
drive a jag the proper way. fast but not that way. anyway, NY cops will
ticket you when it is blatent enough


From: viadata@interramp.com (David Hurlston)
Date: Wed, 11 Sep 1996 22:44:36 -0700
Subject: Re: When the student surpasses the teacher…

From: John Napoli jgn@li.net
Date: Tue, 10 Sep 1996 17:22:41 -0400 (EDT)
Subject: Re: When the student surpasses the teacher…

And second prize is two Esprits…

Whoa, just a cotton pickin minute now…

My Turbo Esprit SE looks amazing
It doesn’t drip oil
It’s very reliable (so far)
AND
it will leave all those wussy Jags in its dust.

So there!

Dave


From: Randy Wilson randy@taylor.infi.net
Date: Wed, 11 Sep 1996 23:22:57 -0400 (EDT)
Subject: Re: 88-89 XJ40 Low Brake Pressure

Michael Powers wrote:

My VCM Low Brake Pressure light ALWAYS comes on for a minute
or so after I start my XJ6. It also seems to appear once in a while when I
put
the
car in park What’s up with this thing? The brakes seem like they are in
perfect working
order.

Michael,

It’s almost certainly the brake accumulator at fault. The diaphragm in the
accumulator deteriorates with age, so that the system doesn’t maintain the

From the description, I would say that the charge solenoid is faulty; not
seating properly. This allows pump output to partially bypass back to the
reservoir, hence the long charge time. This may be combined with a weak
or dead pressure accumulator.

Randy K. Wilson
randy@taylor.infi.net


From: Randy Wilson randy@taylor.infi.net
Date: Wed, 11 Sep 1996 23:32:40 -0400 (EDT)
Subject: Re: Oil weight

Jim, I use 20W-50 in both my Jag and my TR6. I live in Florida and the
hot climate is the main reason I use such heavy oil in the XJ12. It
gives good pressure at operating temp.

I began running it in my TR6 because of bad cylinder wear (124,000+
miles) and a poor reaming job on the valve guides (damn machine shop!)
cause it to use about a quart every 250 miles (driving hard). I would
only recommend this weight if the average temperature does not fall
below about 50 degrees F. Below this the viscosity creates VERY high
pressures and very low flow, in addition to putting undue stress on the
oil pump and lines.

I did something today that I had not done in many years. I dug up and
looked at the Jaguar oil viscosity vs. ambient temp chart while talking
to a customer that was running 10w/30 in his V12. Jaguar recommends
20w/50 in all temps above -10c (18F). Their high temp cut off point
for 10w/30 and 10w/40 is 15c (60F). I didn’t even look at the 5w/30
numbers, but the bar was way down the chart.

We run 20w/50 here all year, and winter ambient temps do go below
freezing… though not by much.

Randy K. Wilson
randy@taylor.infi.net


From: “George W. Cohn” gwcohn@azstarnet.com
Date: Wed, 11 Sep 1996 21:14:31 -0700
Subject: 1964 E-type FHC production

Bob, according to the Jaguar E-Type Six-Cylinder Restoration and
Originality Guide by Dr. Thomas Haddock, the LHD Coupes started with
chassis number 885001 and the total production was 5,871 for a total of
89,0872 LHD FHC built. I believe this would make your car one of the
last 242 3.8 liter coupes built. The 87,5001 number you quote is for the
LHD roadsters with a total of 6,885 built. According to the book, the
last years production incorporated several of the features of the soon to
be 4.2. These included upholstered dash, console with storage
compartment and padded cover, armrests on the doors, sculpted windshield
L-post trim, and even synchromesh on the very last cars.

I would say that you probably just barely missed the all-synchro tranny.
I used to own a 64 E-type roadster and it too had all of the above
mentioned items except the synchro-tranny. From what I read in the parts
catalogs, I believe the sychro 4-speed is a bolt up proposition but I’ll
defer to someone whose actually done it.

My current project car is a 70 E-type roadster. It is a series 2 and I
know a lot of people don’t think they are a pure sports car like the
series 1. I have read many test reports that seem to indicate that they
are the equal of the series 1, just a little more civilized. I fully
believe that they could be built today to comply with most safety and
emmisions standards and still look like a sports car. I have mixed
feelings on the styling of the new XK-8. Hope this info helps! GWC


End of jag-lovers-digest V2 #350


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jag-lovers-digest Thursday, 12 September 1996 Volume 02 : Number 351

RE: XKE engine oil capacity
RE: Oil Weight
re: air dam on XJ-S
Re: XJ-S Water Pump Replace
re: air dam on XJ-S
Re: Cats in Their Environments
XJ6 II vacuum connections
Re: Power steering rack bellows
Le Jog 1996
SV: Oil Weight
re: air dam on XJ-S
XJ40: How does your A/C work
Re: Re: When the student surpasses the teacher…
XJ12 carbs, timing
E-Type all syncro trans conversion
Re: Cats in Their Environments
83 XJ-S TRACTION PROBLEM
Re:V12 Radiator stuff
To: Larry Lee
Re: Cats in Their Environments
Re[2]: fuel for the “air dams on the XJ-S” controversy
Missed messages and FTP address
Last Report on “Old #25”. It is finished.


From: charles daly cdaly@passport.ca
Date: Thu, 12 Sep 1996 00:52:56 +0100
Subject: RE: XKE engine oil capacity

At 10:32 PM 11/09/96 EDT, Ed wrote, in part:

All this of course depends on how badly your Jag leaks. :slight_smile:

I’m sure you meant “how well your Jag leaks!”
It is a jag-u-war, after all!
Mine leaks very well, thank you very much.
:slight_smile:

Charles Daly, Toronto, Canada
'62 E-Type, ots


From: Lou Sabovic lsabovic@execpc.com
Date: Wed, 11 Sep 96 23:16:41 -0500
Subject: RE: Oil Weight

Scott,
As a new Jag owner I have been looking for additional information on oil used for the winter. Here in Wisconsin I have always changed from a 20W50 to a 10W30 for winter. But 5W10 ? Do you do freeway driving with that weight oil ?


From: “Scott W. Phillips” phillips@mn.uswest.net

In the winter here it is common to use 5W-10 so the stuff can retain some
fluidity to it!


From: “Kirbert” palmk@gcn.scri.fsu.edu
Date: Thu, 12 Sep 1996 00:54:36 -0005
Subject: re: air dam on XJ-S

John Napoli:

OK, so then don’t I want hood louvers to exhaust hot air under the hood
and also to slightly reduce front end lift?

I’m not sure how much louvers will do toward reducing front end lift,
but they will definitely help engine compartment cooling. Question
is, is this necessary? And worth the problems of intaking hot air
into the A/C intake?

And does my car have more front end lift without an air dam?

Oh, yes. By a whole bunch.

– Kirbert | If anything is to be accomplished,
| some rules must be broken.
| - Palm’s Postulate


From: “Kirbert” palmk@gcn.scri.fsu.edu
Date: Thu, 12 Sep 1996 00:54:36 -0005
Subject: Re: XJ-S Water Pump Replace

Thomas Alberts talberts@aero.odu.edu:

…I have no idea why they decided
to make one bolt countersunk.

Just a guess: The pre-79 V-12 supposedly had a double-groove pulley.
Maybe the wider pulley – or the belts – got too close to the bolt
head.

Anyway, when I bought my rebuilt
pump the guy at the counter showed me one someone had overtightened and
broken and warned me that lots of people break them this way.

This is the first I’ve heard of this. Hard to imagine anybody
breaking a Phillips countersunk bolt. Is this really something that
needs mentioning in the XJ-S booklet?

– Kirbert | If anything is to be accomplished,
| some rules must be broken.
| - Palm’s Postulate


From: “Kirbert” palmk@gcn.scri.fsu.edu
Date: Thu, 12 Sep 1996 00:54:36 -0005
Subject: re: air dam on XJ-S

John Napoli:

…but my question is
whether this happens at a lower speed than on a car with the air dam. If
thirty mph (neglecting wind) was the number on my car, then will it be 33?
36? on your car? Even a five percent difference would seem to be
significant.

Gee, are we all supposed to go out and perform this test? Seems to
me it would go a long way toward testing the condition of people’s
hood struts, but I dunno what else we will learn. Probably need
somebody to try a spoiler on/spoiler off test with the same car.

Won’t be me, it’s too much work – and I’m already convinced the
spoiler is valuable.

Perhaps a better idea would be to forget about unlatching the hood,
and instead rig some sort of manometer within the passenger
compartment with a hose run into the engine compartment. Then take
the car up to highway speed and see how much pressure there is in
there with the hood shut. A couple readings like this – from people
with and without spoilers – should give us a good indication.

I’m pretty sure a suitable manometer can be faked with a piece of
clear nylon hose and a yardstick. And a few ounces of water.

– Kirbert | If anything is to be accomplished,
| some rules must be broken.
| - Palm’s Postulate


From: charles daly cdaly@passport.ca
Date: Thu, 12 Sep 1996 00:57:25 +0100
Subject: Re: Cats in Their Environments

At 11:26 PM 11/09/96 -0400, you wrote:

In a message dated 96-09-11 22:42:02 EDT, RMac@aol.com writes:

<< (Incidentally, there are only three violations for which police will give
you
a citation in the city – gridlock, illegal parking, and vehicular
homicide.) >>

I understand that they are also ticketing chevy engines in…
oh, never mind!
Charles Daly, Toronto, Canada
'62 E-Type, ots


From: “Arnold, Dave Dr.” davearno@sandton.senchem.co.za
Date: Thu, 12 Sep 96 07:41:00 PDT
Subject: XJ6 II vacuum connections

Dear experts…could anyone please tell me how many vacuum
connections there are to the inlet system on my 1980 XJ6 ser II? And
where they are? I am missing a vacuum pipe from the air temperature
valve on the air inlet tube (the one that mixes hot air from the exhaust
cowling and colder air from the ram tube) and I can’t see any reference
to it in my manual, so even if I get one I don’t know where it plugs into
the inlet manifold, if indeed it does! I also have symptoms of a vacuum
leak such as no brake assist immediately I switch the engine off. I will
be most eternally genuflectingly grovellingly topknotpullingly grateful
if you can share your all-knowing worldly wisdom.
Dave.
80 XJ6 II my daily transport
47 Mk IV my daily transport of delight
84 VW Passat son’s daily resource drain
84 Renault TSE daughter’s ditto
90 Corolla wife’s daily
49 Wife husband’s weakly


From: Robert Bradley Robert.Bradley@bh.eyi.com
Date: Thu, 12 Sep 1996 01:22:25 -0500
Subject: Re: Power steering rack bellows

Jim said

The leak is not bad, maybe a few drops a day, not enough to notice on the
filler cap maybe an oz a month. So rather then do a real horrible job, for
now I am only goint to replace the bellows.

Kirbert said

Gee, how can I clarify this? The bellows are SUPPOSED to be a
dust-only item; some of them even have little drain holes. They
certainly cannot hold the pressure of the pump, and usually fail even
to hold a significant amount of liquid. If your seals are leaking,
the ONLY solution is an overhaul – replacing the bellows is
worthless.

Technically Kirbert is correct, however, resealing the rack doesn’t always fix
a leak anyway. If the leak doesn’t annoy you then I agree with Jim; keep the
dust out and top it up once a month. Fix something more serious instead.


From: Gerry Leumann glueman@collano.ch
Date: Thu, 12 Sep 1996 06:58:06 GMT
Subject: Le Jog 1996

Any of you jag-lovers planning to participate?
(Dec 7-10 in England)
Glue Man
glueman@collano.ch


From: Are Lorentsen are@vinn.no
Date: Thu, 12 Sep 96 10:17:00 PDT
Subject: SV: Oil Weight

Scott,
As a new Jag owner I have been looking for additional information on oil
used for the winter. Here in Wisconsin I have always changed from a 20W50
to a 10W30 for winter. But 5W10 ?

I have used Mobil 1 5W50 for a year now, and I like to think upon this as
a grade for all conditions. This grade is produced in Sweden, and is
maybe only ment for the Scandinavian marked(?). Any comments…

Are Lorentsen
Narvik, Norway
82 XJ6


From: Robert Bradley Robert.Bradley@bh.eyi.com
Date: Thu, 12 Sep 1996 04:50:45 -0500
Subject: re: air dam on XJ-S

Your response raised an interesting question. My XJ-S has no air dam.
Some time ago, as an experiment, I disconnected my hood struts, popped the
hood latch, and went out for a drive. By 30 mph or so the hood was firmly
pulled up against the hood safety latch. Conclusion: much higher
pressure underneath, even at that low speed. I wonder what the results
would be on a car with an air dam?

John

About 45-50 mph which supports all the other responses you got explaining the
function of the air dam and Whatshisname’s theory.

Robert Bradley, 87 XJS c/w air dam etc.


From: etles@etlxdmx.ericsson.se ( espen skare xm/pp )
Date: Thu, 12 Sep 96 11:01:53 BST
Subject: XJ40: How does your A/C work

I agree in Roger Pengs opinions on stupid controls design. An
attempt to make it non-tech and user friendly has made it confusing
instead.

I also think a major missing of the A/C and vent control of the XJ40 is
the lacking ability to get some fresh air through the vents without using
the fans. Just pure ventilation from the speed of the car. Most other makes
have this. It should not be impossible or too expencive even combined with
all the A/C stuff.

           /Espen

From: cuno@macworld.ch (Cuno Schneeberger)
Date: 12 Sep 1996 14:03:55 GMT
Subject: Re: Re: When the student surpasses the teacher…

Dave wrote:

My Turbo Esprit SE looks amazing
It doesn’t drip oil
It’s very reliable (so far)
AND
it will leave all those wussy Jags in its dust.

At least it’s a british car. You can stay :slight_smile:

Cuno


From: Dave Oxenreider daveox@av-imagineering.com
Date: Thu, 12 Sep 1996 08:28:24 -0400
Subject: XJ12 carbs, timing

Dave,

How can I check for vacuum leaks?

Best way I’ve found is to use a length of hose with one end to your ear
and the other used to poke around everything that has to do with vacuum

    • from all around the carbs to the heater and A/C controls. I go to the
      extent of putting small hose clamps on all the vacuum hoses just to be
      sure of a tight fit. Also, make sure your brake diaphragm is not
      leaking (although I haven’t heard of that failing in that way).

The drilling I did was on the UniSyn… not the carbs…

Oh. Whew!

When I set the timing (6 ATDC?), should the vacuum pot have the vacuum
hose connected or not? I just replaced the pot with a new one.

I have a factory shop manual (unfortunately for a '72 XJ12 - anyone know
if there is a difference timing-wise???) and it says:

1.  Disconnect vacuum pipe from vacuum retard unit (plug).
2.  Slacken locknut of micro adjustment control and set 
	vernier at zero.
3.  Set engine idling speed at 500 to 600 rev/min.
4.  Check timing with a stroboscope and adjust vernier
	until timing is 12 degrees BTDC.
5.  Tighten locknut, refit vacuum pipe.
6.  Reset engine idling speed at 650 to 750 rev/min.

BTW, where did you find a retard module? I got a price of $85 USD from
Welsh with a 2-3 week wait (I’m using an old one from the TR6).

Let me know how it runs…

Dave Ox.
73 XJ12
75 TR6


From: Jack Fulford fulford@gte.com
Date: Thu, 12 Sep 1996 08:25:09 -0500
Subject: E-Type all syncro trans conversion

Greetings,

In a recent post someone mentioned that converting an E-type Moss =

gearbox (aka Crash Box, I don’t need no stink’n synchro in first) might =
be a straight bolt on. I have a 67 E-Type that a PO converted from and =
all synchro box to a Moss Tranny. I called two or three shops including =
Grand Tourismo and Straight Six about converting back to the correct =
tranny. According to the people that I talked to, it would require a =
replacement bell housing, speedo gear, fly wheel, starter and =
transmission. This started running into big (for me) $$$$$. I still =
have the old Moss box… The things are darn near indestructible.

Jack Fulford
67 E-type
Dallas, TX


From: “Patrick O’Neill” patrick.oneill@premierusa.com
Date: Thu, 12 Sep 1996 08:13:21 -0700
Subject: Re: Cats in Their Environments

in my 84 XJ-6 I used to drive like a nut
in NY (actually I used to drive it like it was a little sports car.)
anyway,

You must have thought that you thought you were driving a Mk2!?

in that car, no wait, it was the 90vdp…well, it was one…anyway, I was
on
the west side highway, and decided I wanted to be on the service road to
turn
to go to 7th ave (I was headed uptown). At about 60 I changed over in one
of
the places that are not turn lanes and cut the shit out of someone
without
slowing down, well, a cop saw it and ticketed me. I will admit I was
driving
that car like a porsche not a jag. thats why I bought a porsche, and now
drive a jag the proper way. fast but not that way. anyway, NY cops will
ticket you when it is blatent enough

Give up the porsche buy a Mk2 if you want a sample of how you can scare the
Lexus’ or is Lexii, and do it in a Classic manner, come out to LA and we
will go hunting.

Patrick D. O’Neill
1963 Mk2 3.8L MOD
Rolling Hills Estates, California


From: “S.R. BROADY” acmevfsl@Direct.CA
Date: Thu, 12 Sep 1996 09:04:50 -0700
Subject: 83 XJ-S TRACTION PROBLEM

xjs 5.3 automatic which is used on slalom circiut is equipped with race
tires ,shocks,and sway bars. However have traction problem exiting corners,
the car wants to go sideways (rear end) upon applying throttle need advise
on traction control.
considering manual transmission any advise as to helping this problem would
be appreciated. Also availability of used or new manual transmission.

S.R. BROADY
acmevfsl@direct.ca


From: “mark (m.d.) roberts” markdr@nortel.ca
Date: Wed, 11 Sep 1996 17:06:00 -0400
Subject: Re:V12 Radiator stuff

Jim:

I’ve just been where you are going now with your radiator,
both in a friend’s XJ-S, and in our SIII V12.

To get that short hose from the cross-over pipe to the
water pump housing back in, you will have to remove
the cross-over pipe. To get it back in, you have to
put the short end of the cross-over pipe “just” in its
hose, at the same time as you “just” put the large
cross-over pipe in that short hose. This is done with
the longer end of the cross-over pipe in front of, and
just above the A/C compressor pulley. the trick then is
to twist and push down the cross-overpipe so that it
goes below the A/C pulley and the longer end of the pipe
goes into it’s hose, WITHOUT the shorter pipe end coming
out of it’s hose. Life is a bit easier if you remove
the crankcase breather elbow, and the A/C compressor,
but I did not have to. It took me about an hour to
figure that out, and about 30 seconds to actually put it
in.

I don’t know about the wires you’re talking about, but I
will look for them tonight.

Something that I’m a bit interested in…what is “rodding out”
in reference to radiators. The only option I know of around these
parts is a core replacement, or a new radiator. We did a core
replacement on the SIII, temp now at between 90-100 C, and just
a clean on the XJ-S, temp now at the “N”. I think I may still
have a thermostat problem on the SIII, as the temp fluctuates,
for no apparent reason.

Regards, Mark Roberts Phone: (613) 763-2924
Ottawa, Ontario, CANADA Fax: (613) 763-3970
1988 VDP - SIII V12 email: markdr@nortel.ca
1963 3.8L E-Type Coupe - 15 years into a 3 year project


From: “Kirbert” palmk@gcn.scri.fsu.edu
Date: Thu, 12 Sep 1996 12:23:07 -0005
Subject: To: Larry Lee

Hey, I don’t happen to have Larry Lee’s e-mail address. Everyone
else can delete this message.

Lee: On your schematic for connecting a Dana aftermarket cruise
control to the Jaguar set switch and ON/OFF/RESUME switch, there is a
standard relay. Did you mean to imply that the installer must buy
such a relay? Or does the Dana kit come with one?

Thanks.

– Kirbert | If anything is to be accomplished,
| some rules must be broken.
| - Palm’s Postulate


From: DisneyPors@aol.com
Date: Thu, 12 Sep 1996 12:46:53 -0400
Subject: Re: Cats in Their Environments

be careful what you offer. I may just take you up on it. - Doug

and the correct reply is not give up the porsche and get…it is drive the
porsche a little less and get…

I am a lover of all fine cars. and the each have their place and purpose. I
hope to never sell another car (except for daily beaters “take your dog to
the vet cars” like my integra). But I do hope to get an MK2 someday (along
with several other jags) - Doug


From: M.Cogswell@zds.com (Mike Cogswell)
Date: Thu, 12 Sep 1996 12:38:58 -0400
Subject: Re[2]: fuel for the “air dams on the XJ-S” controversy

  • –IMA.Boundary.611645248
    Content-Type: text/plain; charset=US-ASCII
    Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit
    Content-Description: cc:Mail note part

FWIW: My '88 XJ-S, which has both the air dam and undertray present and in
good condition, also gets extremely hot in the transmission tunnel area.
My theory is that the very hot (and therefore expanded) air flowing through
the engine compartment is partially forced to exit via the tunnel. This is
caused by the reduction in area when it gets to the firewall and is forced
under the car. The air dam and undertray should help cooling by forcing
more air through the radiator and reduce front lift by lowering the
pressure under the extreme front of the car. However, I’m not sure that
forcing more air through the radiator will reduce the tunnel temperature.

MikeC m.cogswell@zds.com
'74 E-Type OTS
'88 XJ-S (H&E Convertible)
'88 Honda Accord (330,000 miles and climbing)
'91 Chevy Suburban (when you really need the room)
'96 Honda Accord (hope it lasts as long as the '88)

______________________________ Reply Separator _________________________________
Subject: Re: fuel for the “air dams on the XJ-S” controversy
Author: John Napoli jgn@li.net at INTERNET
Date: 09/11/96 06:03 PM

My XJ-S, the one without the air dam or undertray, gets real hot in the
transmission tunnel.

John

  • –IMA.Boundary.611645248–

From: M.Cogswell@zds.com (Mike Cogswell)
Date: Thu, 12 Sep 1996 13:05:08 -0400
Subject: Missed messages and FTP address

  • –IMA.Boundary.974745248
    Content-Type: text/plain; charset=US-ASCII
    Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit
    Content-Description: cc:Mail note part

My internet mail connection was lost from 9/3 through 9/11. If anyone sent
me mail and had it “bounced”, please resend.

Also, can anyone supply the ftp address for the digest archives? I’d like
to get up to speed on what I missed the past week and also while I was on
vacation. The www site doesn’t have any recent digests on it. While it
suggests getting them from the ftp site, the address is not provided.

Thanks

  • –IMA.Boundary.974745248–

From: JISBELLJR@mail.utexas.edu (James A. Isbell)
Date: Thu, 12 Sep 1996 10:23:21 -0500
Subject: Last Report on “Old #25”. It is finished.

She is at home now and resting well. I have put 250 miles on it the last
two days.

The cost was reasonable, though a bit above my orriginal expectations.

We essentialy removed the body from my '82 and placed the body from a '85
onto the old running gear. The only thing that is from the new car in the
running gear is the front suspension and steering rack. The rest including
the exhaust system, and drivetrain (engine and trans) is from the old car.
The interior is from my old car.

Things that got fixed because of a new body:
    
    1) old car needed a new paint job.  New body has a 1 year old $3000 job.
    2) Antena now works properly
    3) rear radius arm bushings needed replacement.
    4) Old windshield gasket was leaking
    5) there were rust spots on the old body and left rear door was shot.
    6) There was a "cow bell" behind the rear seat

The cost was just $500 more than the insurance to buy the '85 and another
$2175 to the shop to do the work. (they gave me $500 for the old car as
salvage) or the price would have been $2675.

So my bottom line was $2675 to get a car that was worth $2200 more (1985 vs
1982). Thats $475 in the hole, but my deductable was $500 so I actualy came
out $25 ahead.

But…But… look at all the things I got fixed for free (list above).

So, as we can see, totaling the old car was not so bad after all. And now I
have a computer!


                                                        Jim

“Better an outlaw than not free.”
Nance O’Neil


End of jag-lovers-digest V2 #351


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jag-lovers-digest Friday, 13 September 1996 Volume 02 : Number 352

Wheres Nick?
Re: Panic in the forest
Re: SV: Oil Weight
Re: Wheres Nick?
Re: 64 3.8 S-type automatic transmission shfiting hard
Re: Cats in Their Environments
S.U. CARB PARTS
front shocks 86 XJ6 SIII FW: S.U. CARB PARTS Advice: Cold start/idle:'78 Ser2 XJ-12 Off topic help request Re: V12 Radiator stuff XJS air dam and XJ6 engine cooling, mixed a bit. Re: XJ-40 Hard Stsrts Re: When the student surpasses the teacher.... Re: Off topic help request Inroduction + MK2 steering re: air dam on XJ-S re: air dam on XJ-S Re: XJS air dam and XJ6 engine cooling, mixed a bit. Re: XJS air dam and XJ6 engine cooling, mixed a bit. XJ6 III Stake-down Re: front shocks86 XJ6 SIII


From: JISBELLJR@mail.utexas.edu (James A. Isbell)
Date: Thu, 12 Sep 1996 10:23:18 -0500
Subject: Wheres Nick?

I have lost the address that I need to send to to get to Nick. “The Jaguar
XJ6 from Bumper to Bumper” is ready for publication on Saturday as promised.
I need to knopw where to send the document to get it on the WEB page.


                                                        Jim

“Better an outlaw than not free.”
Nance O’Neil


From: rpeng@cadev6.intel.com
Date: Thu, 12 Sep 96 10:34:50 PDT
Subject: Re: Panic in the forest

It would appear that the rest of my wood trim is deteriorating rapidly. It
looks great from arm’s length, but getting real close reveals many tiny
light-colored “fractures” appearing in the finish. Have I just noticed them,
I wonder, or is something horrible happening? What can I do to prevent this
deterioration? Is refinishing or replacement the only option?

This may not be possible, but the best thing for you to do is to not
let your car sit out in the sun all day. Use a window shade whenever
it is under the sun.

My `91 XJ40 has received this treatment since very new, and the wood still
looks great.

By the way, I think your “Majestic” has a terrific interior, similar
to a Rolls Royce.



Roger Peng (408)765-7863
Intel Corporation
Design Technology, Physical CAD



From: “Kirbert” palmk@gcn.scri.fsu.edu
Date: Thu, 12 Sep 1996 13:38:56 -0005
Subject: Re: SV: Oil Weight

Are Lorentsen:

I have used Mobil 1 5W50 for a year now, and I like to think upon this as
a grade for all conditions. This grade is produced in Sweden, and is
maybe only ment for the Scandinavian marked(?). Any comments…

Around here, Mobil 1 comes in 15W-50. However, Pennzoil Performax
100 synthetic oil comes in a 5W-50, and I think some others do too.

I’m not sure the weight is as important as the fact it is synthetic.
I live in Florida, but a few friends and relatives that live in the
cold North tell me that a synthetic oil – ANY synthetic oil – is
simply wonderful for cold weather starting.

– Kirbert | If anything is to be accomplished,
| some rules must be broken.
| - Palm’s Postulate


From: nick@sn.no (Nick Johannessen)
Date: Thu, 12 Sep 1996 20:07:37 +0200
Subject: Re: Wheres Nick?

[ JISBELLJR@mail.utexas.edu (James A. Isbell) ]
| I have lost the address that I need to send to to get to Nick. “The Jaguar
| XJ6 from Bumper to Bumper” is ready for publication on Saturday as promised.
| I need to knopw where to send the document to get it on the WEB page.

You can remember “jag-lovers@sn.no” but not “nick@sn.no”? :slight_smile:

Nick


<<< Nick Johannessen | nick@sn.no | nickj on IRC >>>
<<< Jaguar XJ6 4.2 '70 MOD & '82 Auto >>>

The JagWeb http://www.sn.no/~nick/jaguar.html <<<


From: Melanie Brackett brackett@uwimona.edu.jm
Date: Thu, 12 Sep 1996 13:29:28 -0500 (GMT-0500)
Subject: Re: 64 3.8 S-type automatic transmission shfiting hard

Dear Albert,
If that particular transmission has a govenor, I would replace
that part first. The governor in a BW Tranny is what forces the 1-2 and
the 2-3 valves in your tranny to move, causing repective shifts. If the
Governor is worn, it will cause erratic shifting. Do not play with the
throttle cable, as if you do adjust it to get it to shift properly, You
could lower the hydraulic pressure to the clutch packs in the transmission
and cause them to slip, and eventually burn up the transmission. If it
has a govenor, all of the above will apply.

Yours Truly,
Mario James


From: “Patrick O’Neill” patrick.oneill@premierusa.com
Date: Thu, 12 Sep 1996 11:50:14 -0700
Subject: Re: Cats in Their Environments


From: DisneyPors@aol.com
To: patrick.oneill@premierusa.com; jag-lovers@sn.no
Subject: Re: Cats in Their Environments
Date: Thursday, September 12, 1996 9:46 AM

be careful what you offer. I may just take you up on it. - Doug

The offer is open.

and the correct reply is not give up the porsche and get…it is drive
the
porsche a little less and get…

Just a minute I thought this was the Jag Lovers List, with that in mind I
am sure my reply was the correct one!

I am a lover of all fine cars. and the each have their place and purpose.
I
hope to never sell another car (except for daily beaters “take your dog
to
the vet cars” like my integra). But I do hope to get an MK2 someday
(along
with several other jags) - Doug

Words to live by.

Cheers,

Patrick O’Neill
1963 Mk2 3.8L MOD
Rolling Hills Estates, California (near LA)


From: little_mike@CCMAIL.ncsc.navy.mil
Date: Thu, 12 Sep 96 14:14:41 CDT
Subject: S.U. CARB PARTS

 I have a 66 3.8L MKII LHD with all synchro tranny and type "A" compact 
 OD. I just finished a big DIY brake job - new pipes, new servo, 
 resleeved cylinders (XKs did these)  etc. Now I'm on the carbs. Does 
 anyone know of a good source for S.U. HD6 parts (other than the big 
 catalog folks - seem to only have some of the AUC #s)? I don't need 
 anything yet but I am curious about a source for new/used 
 pistons/chambers.  

From: “Gary H. Zajic” zajic@umich.edu
Date: Thu, 12 Sep 1996 16:33:10 -0400 (EDT)
Subject: front shocks `86 XJ6 SIII

Hello, Recently bought my first Jag, an `86XJ6 and am busy working
on various things. Immediate major concerns are back brakes, front
shocks and probably most serious of all is the rust. Anyway, I want
to get shocks on the front right away. The place I called wants to know
if I want replacement hydraulic shocks or the “upgrade” gas shocks
(about $20 more each). Mostly cross-town driving but there are
plenty of potholes here in Ann Arbor. Recommendations on which type
to get would be appreciated. Thanks in advance, Gary
ps: I enjoy the jag-lovers postings; helpful because I have never
worked on a car like this before.


From: Jack Fulford fulford@gte.com
Date: Thu, 12 Sep 1996 16:01:08 -0500
Subject: FW: S.U. CARB PARTS

You wrote "Does=20
anyone know of a good source for S.U. HD6 parts "

I used Joe Curto as the supplier when I rebuilt the triple SUs on my 67 =
E-type. He is OUTSTANDING!! He walked me through some tight spots in =
the rebuild and helped save me a little money.

His particulars are Joe Curto, 230-22 58th Ave. Bayside, NY 11364 =
1-718-465-4829

Jack Fulford
67 E-type
Dallas, TX


From: pgrant@balink.com (PHILIP B. GRANT)
Date: Thu, 12 Sep 1996 17:18:22 -0400
Subject: Advice: Cold start/idle:'78 Ser2 XJ-12

 Does any one have suggestions re: diagnosis on hard-start and stall 
 from cold on  '78 XJ12.
 
 I suspect, and have removed for testing, the auxillary air valve, but 
 I'm not sure that the "boiling water test" has told me anything--seems 
 to be no change in the valve, but maybe I'm looking at the wrong 
 port/area.
 
 Has anyone had success in relacing/renewing these to fix idle speed 
 and/or start problems?? Also can the valves be purchased; I did some 
 checking w/ one supplier and was told they are no longer manufactured.
 
 Other suggestions?
 
 All comments appreciated.
 
 
 Phil Grant
 Purcellville, VA

From: ron 102225.2356@CompuServe.COM
Date: 12 Sep 96 17:44:59 EDT
Subject: Off topic help request

I think I saw someone on this list that sold notebook computers, does anyone
remember who it was? I’m in the market for a new computer and am wondering
about the pro’s and con’s of a notebook replacing my desktop computer.

Thanks one and all fellow Jag lovers and drivers,

Ron Powers


From: “mark (m.d.) roberts” markdr@nortel.ca
Date: Wed, 11 Sep 1996 17:12:00 -0400
Subject: Re: V12 Radiator stuff

Jim:

Now that I’ve actually thought about it for more than
30 seconds, if you have the water pump off, and the cross-over
pipe out, relacing them as a unit would be MUCH easier than
replacing either of them individually. The instructions
I gave earlier were for replacing the cross-over pipe
with the waterpump still on the engine. :-0

Sorry for the wasted bandwidth.

Regards, Mark Roberts Phone: (613) 763-2924
Ottawa, Ontario, CANADA Fax: (613) 763-3970
1988 VDP - SIII V12 email: markdr@nortel.ca
1963 3.8L E-Type Coupe - 15 years into a 3 year project


From: JISBELLJR@mail.utexas.edu (James A. Isbell)
Date: Thu, 12 Sep 1996 13:20:49 -0500
Subject: XJS air dam and XJ6 engine cooling, mixed a bit.

Since my XJ-S has no air dam I will gladly preform any experiment (within
reason and below 100MPH) that anyone thinks will be beneficial to the
conversation.

Now as to louvers. It is my considered opinion that two, just two, louvers
in say three rows across the hood, just infront of the firewall might be
beneficial on an XJ6 so maybe also on an XJ-S.

The reason for this opinion is that day before yesterday I got the XJ6 back
after the rebuild. When I go out on the highway the bonnet will stay down
for about 50 miles at highway speed then it will pop up on the right side.
(yes, I am going to fix it, just dont have time right now!) I don’t stop to
put it back down because it isnt dangerous.

But…I have noticed that the engine temp drops by 3 drgrees centigrade
from 82 to 79 after a few minutes with the bonnet poped up.

Emperical data, lap it up!


                                                        Jim

“Better an outlaw than not free.”
Nance O’Neil


From: Michael Powers/TEIR/Thomson Michael_Powers@teir.com
Date: 12 Sep 96 17:54:37
Subject: Re: XJ-40 Hard Stsrts

Many thanks to the people that replied on this one!! The new valve on fuel pump
fixed the troubles. Now she starts up on the first crank!!

Rgds,
Mike
89 XJ6

PLacey @ swri.edu 

09/10/96 01:15 PM
To: Jag-LOVERS @ sn.no @ Internet
cc:
Subject: XJ-40 Hard Stsrts

I had this same exact problem with my 88 XJ-40 and several others on the list
have reported the same. Hard starting with a hot engine that has sat for a
while. It was due to failure of the non-return valve at the fuel pump. This
allowed the fuel vapor pressure to push the fuel back to the tank and the
system to vapor-lock. The non-return valve is cheap and easy to replace.

Paul Lacey, Texas


From: John Napoli jgn@li.net
Date: Thu, 12 Sep 1996 19:01:16 -0400 (EDT)
Subject: Re: When the student surpasses the teacher…

So you don’t pass any Jags, because none of them are wussy.
Gotcha back!
John

Whoa, just a cotton pickin minute now…

My Turbo Esprit SE looks amazing
It doesn’t drip oil
It’s very reliable (so far)
AND
it will leave all those wussy Jags in its dust.

So there!

Dave


From: “Donald R. Farr” d.farr@phx.cox.com
Date: Thu, 12 Sep 1996 16:10:21 -0700
Subject: Re: Off topic help request

Ron,

I don’t know if if was me, but my company sells the Jetta Notebook
computers, and they are priced well also. My personal choice is to
use a notebook with a large color monitor and 101 keyboard while at
my desk, and to travel where-ever I go with my computer. It keeps me
always up to date, and I seldom have to double enter things and NEVER
wish I had access to a file or program when I’m away from my office.

Our homepage is below…please look the Pentium 133 MHz configured
there,
and give me a call if you would like a different configuration.
Delivery is running about a five to seven days.

If you have any other questions, please give me a call. Hope we can
help.


Donald R. Farr
President
National Consulting Services
6719 North 58th Place
Paradise Valley, AZ 85253
(602) 998-3919 - voice
(602) 948-7499 - fax
91 Sovereign
d.farr@phx.cox.com - e-mail
http://people.phx.cox.com/dfarr/dfarr.htm - Don’s Homepage
http://people.phx.cox.com/dfarr/jetta1.htm - Jetta Notebook Computers
http://people.phx.cox.com/dfarr/march10.htm - Wireless products
http://people.phx.cox.com/dfarr/ncs1.htm - National Consulting Services


From: Frank Holden Frank_Holden@qmgates.affymax.com
Date: Thu, 12 Sep 1996 16:14:58 +0000
Subject: Inroduction + MK2 steering

Hello all, I just subscribed.
Here is a breif introduction-
My name is Frank Holden, I live in California near San Francisco, but I’m
really from Northern Michigan.
I have a 1961 Mk2 Jag, a couple of other British cars, a Volvo and a GMC truck.

I also have three motorcycles, an AJS, a BSA and a Norton
I work for a biotech type company and do pharmaceutical research.

I’m having some trouble with the power steering box on my Mk2. It leaks. I
have replaced all the seals except the one on the bottom where the shaft comes
out. It still leaks.

I am considering installing a rack and pinion power unit from an XJ6 or XJS.
I see XKs Unlimited sells a kit for about $2000 but I think that is a little
steep. I can get a rebuilt power steering rack from an XJ6 for less than $400.
I will have to fabricate mounting hardware and modify the steering column
shaft. I talked to the guy that rebuilds the racks and he says there are two
types. Does anyone know which type I need for my Mk2? What kind XKs
unlimited uses? Any help would be greatly appreciated.

Thanks,

  • -Frank

From: John Napoli jgn@li.net
Date: Thu, 12 Sep 1996 19:14:59 -0400 (EDT)
Subject: re: air dam on XJ-S

Oh, come on. Anyone with the spoilers and disconnected hood struts can do
the test.

I like the manometer idea. Take readings on both sides of the hood at
different speeds. How much head is needed to use water? Is glycerin or
mercury or something needed to have a small enough gauge?

John

Won’t be me, it’s too much work – and I’m already convinced the
spoiler is valuable.

I’m pretty sure a suitable manometer can be faked with a piece of
clear nylon hose and a yardstick. And a few ounces of water.

– Kirbert | If anything is to be accomplished,
| some rules must be broken.
| - Palm’s Postulate


From: John Napoli jgn@li.net
Date: Thu, 12 Sep 1996 19:24:21 -0400 (EDT)
Subject: re: air dam on XJ-S

A number! Thanks. Now I can rest.

Now I guess I’ll need the air dam stuff. I still like the idea of hood
louvers. Any of you E-Type guys have problems sucking hot air into the
cowl inlets? My guess is that the flow is turbulent enough and so small
compared to the mass of ambient air and what about the hot heater matrix
in there anyway and besides we waste some of the cool chilling gasoline
and it still works so it should not be a problem.

John

About 45-50 mph which supports all the other responses you got explaining the
function of the air dam and Whatshisname’s theory.

Robert Bradley, 87 XJS c/w air dam etc.


From: John Napoli jgn@li.net
Date: Thu, 12 Sep 1996 19:48:57 -0400 (EDT)
Subject: Re: XJS air dam and XJ6 engine cooling, mixed a bit.

So far I think we’re the only ones without the air dams.

John

On Thu, 12 Sep 1996, James A. Isbell wrote:

Since my XJ-S has no air dam I will gladly preform any experiment (within
reason and below 100MPH) that anyone thinks will be beneficial to the
conversation.


From: Ryan Border border@best.com
Date: Thu, 12 Sep 1996 16:50:27 -0700 (PDT)
Subject: Re: XJS air dam and XJ6 engine cooling, mixed a bit.

My father had the same experience with his series 2 XJ12. In the
summer he regularly drove with the bonnett loose, allowing air to
escape; it was the only way to keep the engine from overheating.

The air conditioner also couldn’t be ran… unless it was cold
outside without causing overheating. Not very useful. That
car, a '79, used as a daily driver, was one of those that gave
Jaguar it’s poor reputation. It was total’d when we here hit
by a big old Cadillac; but the machanics who had done most of the work
on the car bought it from the insurance and rebuilt it; we’d see
it driving around Denver every now and then (recognizeable by
the custom steering wheel and a few other oddities).

My dad was just getting ready to put louvres in the bonnet when
the car got smacked…

Ryan.


From: Kyle Chatman kchatman@mail.coin.missouri.edu
Date: Thu, 12 Sep 1996 19:48:11 -0500
Subject: XJ6 III Stake-down

Jag-lovers,

I’m almost ready to tackle the last major maintenance item that I have =
planned for my XJ6 with 77K miles (purchase 6 months ago). I think that =
it’s time for the stake-down kit. I have read archive references from =
quite a while back that seem to be in agreement that it must be done. =
Also, I do seem to occasionally have excessive clacking on the exhaust =
side when cold started and until oil pressure comes up to normal. I =
believe that is a symptom. Perhaps someone could better describe the =
symptoms and the models that are most likely to need this alteration.

I am asking someone to walk me through the process in much detail. If =
possible, I would appreciate a description done with the head in place. =
It sounds easier. I have valve cover gaskets, the XJ Unlimited =
stake-down kit, and almost enough courage to drill holes in the head. I =
understand that many recommend pulling the head and that some are using =
simple metal screws to hold down the valve guides, and I am not above =
changing my mind if these solutions are better. However, as an example =
of the level of instruction I need for this job, I have not tapped =
threads before. TIA


From: Jan Wikstroem Jan_Wikstroem@acp.com.au
Date: 13 Sep 96 12:54:33
Subject: Re: front shocks `86 XJ6 SIII

I’d go for the gas shocks, Gary; not only are they much better as shock
absorbers, they also help the road springs a wee bit, and those springs need
all the help they can get…

    • Jan

End of jag-lovers-digest V2 #352


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jag-lovers-digest Friday, 13 September 1996 Volume 02 : Number 353

Re: XJS air dam and XJ6 engine cooling, mixed a bit.
Wisconsin Jag clubs
XJ6 Book is finished???
Re: Advice: Cold start/idle:'78 Ser2 XJ-12
Re: 83 XJ-S TRACTION PROBLEM
re: air dam on XJ-S
jaguar info.
One-man E-type brake bleed
Re:V12 Radiator stuff
Re: Vehicle Dynamics (Was XJ Rear Suspension Behavior) [Very Long]
Re: One-man E-type brake bleed
Re: jag-lovers-digest V2 #352
Burlen Fuel Systems
Jag: Mk2 electrics - heated rear window
Bonnet openning (NOT XJS air Damn!)
Oil Weight
Limited edition XK8 in Neiman’s
Re: Bonnet openning (NOT XJS air Damn!)


From: Jan Wikstroem Jan_Wikstroem@acp.com.au
Date: 13 Sep 96 12:57:30
Subject: Re: XJS air dam and XJ6 engine cooling, mixed a bit.

Jim Isbell :
But…I have noticed that the engine temp drops by 3 drgrees centigrade
from 82 to 79 after a few minutes with the bonnet poped up.


Yeah, that’s why I used to pop the bonnet on my XJC when getting into town -
until I had the radiator rebuilt.

    • Jan

From: dbusch@inxpress.net (donald buschner)
Date: Thu, 12 Sep 1996 21:01:30 -0500 (CDT)
Subject: Wisconsin Jag clubs

I have been a subscriber to the jag list for a number of months now.
I own a 1988 XJ-6, and have enjoyed reading all the imformation that
comes to me on a daily basis. I live outside Madison, Wisconsin in a
town called Mcfarland, and I would like to know if there is a Jaguar
club near me. Thanks

Donald Buschner dbusch@inxpress.net
Mcfarland, Wisconsin U.S.A.
1988 XJ-6


From: “Jim Isbell” JISBELLJR@mail.utexas.edu
Date: Thu, 12 Sep 1996 20:21:24 +0000
Subject: XJ6 Book is finished???

As Kirby Palm pointed out, “It will never be finished.”

But I am now up to 80 plus (probably be near 100 by Saturday) pages
and I see that there is at least another 100 pages more information that
I will be adding forever if I dont stop and say “Now is the time”.

The other 100 pages and the information that is sure to flow in as
the orriginal gets distributed around the world will be added to it
in the months following.

“The XJ6 Jaguar from Bumper to Bumper” will be an ongoing project,
constantly evolving and hopefully getting better.

I will deliver the first edition to Nick on Saturday then as he feels
moved it will apear on the web page. It will be rather long so
downloading could become laborious. If you want a copy on paper or
on disk I will be able to send you one as below.

This book covers the XJ6 Jaguar from 1968 to 1986. Even though the
later Jaguar sedans are marked on the back with an XJ6 badge they are
more commonly known as the XJ40. This book does not cover the XJ40.

This book is not meant to replace a proper repair manual. This book
is a supplement to a good manual. If something in this book does not
make sense to you then use your own good judgement, thats what it’s there
for.

Some of the contents of this book were contributed by members of the
Jag-Lovers list on the internet. Where known, their names are noted.
Major sections include maintenance tips, modifications, and sources
for parts. The information is not intended to replace a repair manual,
but rather to supplement it.

If your name appears in this list, you have been quoted in the book
and your name was mentioned. I DID NOT mention your E Mail address
and only will do so if you send me a note saying you want me to.

Names in no particulat order:

Lawrence Buja (Starter diagnostics from your web page)
Bela Orban (Front end repairs and notes)
Gregory Andrachuk (all sorts of stuff)
Larry Lee (Series 1 and 2 cruise control installation)
Nick Johannessen
Greg Moboe
John Proctor
Tom Grahm
Julio Loza
Andrew Kalman
B.J. Kroppe

The book is organized as your car is organized, from the front bumper
to the back bumper. If you want to know something about the dash
board it will likely be near the midle of the book. The headlights
will be in the front of the book and the gas tanks will be just
before the appendices which include, Starter Diagnoses, Front end
bits of rubber, Wood care, a list of suppliers, production numbers of
the XJ6 and hopefully a parts replacement list of other makes that
match the Jag.

To receive a printed copy of this book send $15(US) to the author
(below). To receive a Word for Windows file so you can print your
own copy, send $9(US). Add $1(US) for Canada, $2(US) for other countries
outside the USA. Be sure to give your name and address, and state
what you want: printout vs. diskette, type of diskette (IBM
Compatable only, 3.5" or 5.25").

This book will be corrected and updated constantly. If you have learned
something about your Jag that the rest of us should know, please
write, call or send a message to:

Jim Isbell
2404 Pebble Beach Drive
Austin, Texas 78747
(512) 280-4457
InterNet: JISBELLJR@mail.utexas.edu

This book IS copyrighted. You are NOT allowed to make copies for
sale. The information in this book is for the benefit of Jag-Lovers and is
not to be used for commercial gain.


From: Jan Wikstroem Jan_Wikstroem@acp.com.au
Date: 13 Sep 96 13:24:19
Subject: Re: Advice: Cold start/idle:'78 Ser2 XJ-12

Yes, Phil, your aux. air valve is deceased. It’s a particularly dumb design,
unfortunately, being a slide valve - one tiny speck of grit or a modest
accumulation of soot and it jams, and if your engine boils, the wax bulb that
operates it can expire. You can overhaul these valves, though. When you look
down the neck from the top, you’ll see a part with about six holes (there are
variations) in it; that’s the actual valve. If you make up a tool with six
flat-ended pegs to pass through these holes (about 2in long, from memory) you
can press out the brass bulb unit in the bottom - carefully; the pegs need to
be as large as you can fit through.
You can now clean out the bore and the valve slider and press the bulb back in
(or buy a new one if it’s dead; they must be available, as a chap here in
Sydney rebuilds these valves.

I got sick of fixing and replacing aux. air valves when the one on my XJC stuck
open the third time. Don’t tell anyone, but all I did was prepare a long,
narrow (1/2in) rag with some old-fashioned gasket stickum, take off the left
air filter and allow the end of the rag to be sucked in by the tube to the aux.
air valve. That blocks the cold-start passage without interfering with the idle
bypass.

The result is that my engine (which idles a bit rich) starts just fine, idles
at 650 rpm at first, coming up to 900 rpm when the cold start enrichening goes
off and settling to 700 rpm as the engine warms up. Perfect, for my money - I
was contemplating the alternative of fitting a solenoid valve, controlled by
the temperature gauge sender. If your idling problem is that it’s too fast, try
the rag cure - you’ll hear a “thup!” and the idle quiets down immediately. The
reason I made up a long, thin rag was so I could pull it out again if it didn’t
work out. Bush engineering lives!

If your engine is still hard to start, check the cold start jets; they should
open for the first couple of seconds under control of the thermotime switch. I
made the experiment of unplugging them, and they really are needed.

    • Jan

From: “Kirbert” palmk@gcn.scri.fsu.edu
Date: Thu, 12 Sep 1996 22:56:07 -0005
Subject: Re: 83 XJ-S TRACTION PROBLEM

S.R. BROADY:

xjs 5.3 automatic which is used on slalom circiut is equipped with race
tires ,shocks,and sway bars. However have traction problem exiting corners,
the car wants to go sideways (rear end) upon applying throttle need advise
on traction control.

If you have a traction problem on one end of a car, install a stiffer
anti-sway bar at the other end – or a less stiff one on the end with
the problem.

Y’know, I’d almost be willing to bet your rear bar is an Addco.

– Kirbert | If anything is to be accomplished,
| some rules must be broken.
| - Palm’s Postulate


From: Jan Wikstroem Jan_Wikstroem@acp.com.au
Date: 13 Sep 96 14:46:20
Subject: re: air dam on XJ-S

John Napoli : And does my car have more front end lift without an air dam?

Yes, by varying amounts depending on ground clearance etc. I fitted a very
serious air dam to my 240Z, which is a car that feels very insecure and wanders
all over the place as its front end goes light at speed. Not only did the air
dam cure that absolutely and utterly, it generated so much downforce that the
steering became too heavy.

    • Jan

From: ldtech@island.net (l.duckmanton)
Date: Thu, 12 Sep 1996 22:06:31 -0700
Subject: jaguar info.

hello, i reside on the west coast of vancouver island, british columbia, canada.
home of beutiful long beach and clayoquot sound.

i am quite interested in finding a used series 3 sedan on vancouver island or?

i am a long time admirer of jags and a fairly skilled back yard mechanic,
would appreciate any leads that could be sent my way.

thank-you, leverne duckmanton


From: rrichardson@eurekanet.com (Bob Richardson)
Date: Fri, 13 Sep 1996 01:20:32 -0500
Subject: One-man E-type brake bleed

There only three mechanics in my area that I would trust in solving my
master cylinder dilemma on my 64 Series 1 E-type. I guess they want jobs
that are quick turnovers. So I’ve decided to send both master cylinders to
Imperial in Nebraska to get stainless steel slieves. I can remove them and
refit the rebuilt cylinders, but I’ve never personally bled a brake system.
I know I’ll need to purchase two and possibly four jack stands plus a
hydraulic jack capable of taking the Jag high enough for placing the jack
stands. Does anyone know the approximate cost of a reliable jack stand and
the cost and brand name of a suitable hydraulic jack? These items would be
a good investment for me as I also have decided to service it properly and
at scheduled intervals. My final question is this: Can one person, without
any assistance, bleed brakes. I know the brake pedal should be pumped until
no air is evident in the brake fluid for that particular disc unit. I don’t
see how one person could both pump the brakes and observe the draining
brake fluid for air bubbles. Most of my acquaintenances
are profs like me and scoff at the idea of helping someone work on a “toy.”
Any suggestions as to any or all of the above would be appreciated.


From: Jan Wikstroem Jan_Wikstroem@acp.com.au
Date: 13 Sep 96 17:06:49
Subject: Re:V12 Radiator stuff

Mark Roberts : .what is “rodding out”
in reference to radiators.

It’s jargon for cleaning out a blocked core; you unsolder the ends and push a
special flat rod through the tubes. I have achieved much the same effect (after
unsoldering the ends, of course) with a penknife, a garden hose and patience,
as most of the blockage seemed to be close to the tube ends.

  • -Jan

From: Jan Wikstroem Jan_Wikstroem@acp.com.au
Date: 13 Sep 96 18:32:22
Subject: Re: Vehicle Dynamics (Was XJ Rear Suspension Behavior) [Very Long]

Yeah, B.J., I’m in the mechanical engineering field - Ph.D in engineering from
the University of Severe Impact, Dept. of Implied Sciences. And I have a patent
on a high-speed railway pantograph that never sold…

Seriously, let’s not confuse theory - especially public passenger vehicle
theory - with actual measurement. By actual measurement, the XJ turns the axis
through its rear wheels very_slightly outward in the corner as cornering
force increases to near-racing levels, thereby adding a wee bit oversteer. This
is why she says to a sensitive driver “hey, boss, we’re getting close to the
limit here - let’s make music” where a lump of safely-understeering Detroit
iron would just mulishly mush outward in the corner at much lower speeds,
forcing the driver to either back off or deliberately break the rear-end loose.

I have an appalling memory from road-testing the Ford Edsel back when I was a
motor journalist (yes, that long ago). Flicking the steering wheel rapidly from
side to side through fully half a turn produced loud screams from the front
tyres but no change in direction whatever, and the stupid thing rolled so much
from side to side that the suspension bottomed out. I wouldn’t recommend
copying that action with an XJ…

Where Ralph Nader (a non-driver) and his soul-mates went wrong is in looking at
the car as a pure machine, which needs to be self-stabilising and as much as
possible physically limited to a “safe” condition. It’s no such thing, of
course - the driver is very much part of the system, and must be given the best
possible means to control the vehicle throughout its performance envelope,
including strong feedback from the suspension. If he/she/it is not capable of
safely controlling a sensitive and well-balanced car, what is needed is not
castrating the car, its improving driver training.

Randy is absolutely right; this two-ton luxury car is indeed race-bred, which
explains why it’s so nimble and such indecent fun to drive fast on a twisting
country road. At my age, booze doesn’t seem as much fun as it used to be and
broads are just too much trouble - so the exhilaration my sure-footed,
sensitive, smooth and powerful Jaguar gives me is all the more precious.

As for the toe-in, it doesn’t change measurably through the suspension travel.
The torque arms have no effect on it at all, being connected through rubber.

Regarding tyre grip, I have always found wheel alignment, or rather wheel
positioning, critically important - that’s why I wanted to investigate the rear
suspension in the first place. As cornering side loads deform a tyre, pushing
the tread to one side, the wheel needs to be tilted so as to maintain the tread
flat to the road. This is why you see racing saloons with several degrees of
negative camber in order to milk their mandatory standard suspensions for the
final bit of adhesion. I’m not saying that’s the way to go with the Jag, but I
am looking to fine-tune my XJC for the best balance in handling and cornering.
I have the rears set at -1 deg camber, which is a hair over the limit specified
by the manual, and when I get back on the road in a couple of days, I’ll try
the same camber up front (currently working very well with -1/4 deg). I expect
to spend some time finding the best combination of angles with wide, modern
tyres - the factory angles were devised for the technology of a generation ago.
At least it’s worth investigating.

Some tyres do indeed have more grip than others. Radials can vary a lot in slip
angle (how much you need to turn them for a given cornering load), which
strongly affects the handling. I’ve used Dunlop Le Mans and Bridgestone Eagers
on my Jaguars, and I find both very grippy and nimble with a very low slip
angle. I’d give the Dunlops the nod, but unfortunately they don’t come in
235-60.

  • -Jan

From: Jan Wikstroem Jan_Wikstroem@acp.com.au
Date: 13 Sep 96 18:58:42
Subject: Re: One-man E-type brake bleed

Bob Richardson :

I know I’ll need to purchase…
No.
Can one person, without any assistance, bleed brakes
Yes.
Most of my acquaintenances … scoff at the idea of helping someone work on a
“toy.”
Sheesh…


You can do the job perfectly well with just the jack in the car, as you only
need to lift one wheel at a time enough to get access to the bleeding nipple on
the caliper (always starting with the farthest from the master cylinder). Get a
longish transparent hose (long enough to see from the driver’s position at any
wheel) and a check valve - sometimes available as a “brake bleeding kit”. Hook
the hose up, fill your master cylinder, stick the end of the hose into a jar,
loosen the nipple and pump away until the fluid is bubble-free. Don’t loosen
the nipple too much, so air is drawn in around the shank; “just enough” is the
ticket. Keep topping up the master cylinder so it doesn’t get too low. Tighten
the nipple and go to the next wheel.

If you have help, you don’t need the check valve but you have to close and
re-open the nipple for each pump stroke (or put your fingertip lightly over the
hose end to work as a check valve). Note that your helper must hold the brake
pedal down while you close the nipple, so absolutely no air gets drawn back in.

Throw out the old fluid that accumulates in the jar. When the clear, fresh
fluid comes through, re-use it.

  • -Jan

From: ejt@wg.icl.co.uk (Ted Trim)
Date: Fri, 13 Sep 96 09:46:05 BST
Subject: Re: jag-lovers-digest V2 #352

little_mike wrote…

Now I’m on the carbs. Does anyone know of a good source for S.U. HD6 parts

Burlen Fuel Systems in the UK make/stock just about all SU bits. I haven’t
got the address to hand, they advertise in most of the UK classic mags. I’ve
got their catalogue if you need anything looked up, or you can’t find the
address.

Cheers,
Ted

1966 3.4 Mk2

ejt@wg.icl.co.uk


From: Nick Johannessen nick@sn.no
Date: Fri, 13 Sep 1996 11:20:21 +0200
Subject: Burlen Fuel Systems

[Ted Trim]

Now I’m on the carbs. Does anyone know of a good source for S.U. HD6 parts

Burlen Fuel Systems in the UK make/stock just about all SU bits. I haven’t
got the address to hand, they advertise in most of the UK classic mags. I’ve
got their catalogue if you need anything looked up, or you can’t find the
address.

From sometime next week I hope to have Burlen on the web. Their address
will then be http://www.jagweb.com/burlen/

Nick


Nick Johannessen // nick@sn.no // http://www.sn.no/~nick/
Adminstrator of the JagWeb and the Jag-lovers mailing-list
JagWeb - Jag-lovers web-site http://home.sn.no/home/nick/jaguar.html
JagWeb.com - Jaguar specialist web-site http://www.jagweb.com/
Check out the North Cape Challenge 1996 http://www.sn.no/~moydalus/


From: ejt@wg.icl.co.uk (Ted Trim)
Date: Fri, 13 Sep 96 10:31:05 BST
Subject: Jag: Mk2 electrics - heated rear window

Fellow Jag-lovers,

I need to share my astonishment with some sympathetic folk…

Setting the scene: I have recently been refitting the instrument panels and
bulkhead wiring on my 1966 Mk2. This car, 170906, is a late Mk2 and incorp-
orates a number of 340 type features, but the wiring doesn’t match either
Mk2 or 340 diagrams - and the heated rear window doesn’t feature on either.
The window heater is operated by a push/pull switch at the right hand end of
the dashboard (rhd car); there is a small warning light by the switch. When
stripping the dash assembly I found a 6RA relay mounted at the lefthand end
of the bulkhead panel. (There is only one other relay on the car, which is
the horn relay in the engine bay fusebox assembly - neither relay is fitted
in early Mk2s). I assumed this second “mystery” relay controlled the hrw.

Now, I’ve got used to return wires being smaller gauge than feed wires on this
car (probably fits with the Lucas “smoke” theory!), but the sole purpose
of this relay appears to be to…control the hrw warning light, enabling it
only when the lights are on. Honestly. A heavy duty relay and several lengths
of wire for what seems an unnecessary purpose.

So is this how it’s meant to work? I always thought the bulb was just too
dim to see in daylight! Can anyone see any sense in this? Any owners of
similar era Jags got any insight (or better wiring diagrams)?

Cheers,
Ted

ejt@wg.icl.co.uk


From: Cosmo simond@informix.com
Date: Fri, 13 Sep 1996 12:40:13 +0100
Subject: Bonnet openning (NOT XJS air Damn!)

The bonnet on my XJ6 SIII as started to open when on the move. This
is a tad annoying and has now become serious as both sides now do it
occasionaly. The Fine Manual only mentions adjusting the release
cable and I can’t see any adjustment in the catch mechanism. Is
there any trick to this?

I’d hate to do what my father did - he put chrome, go faster, bonnet
pins on his series I. ACK!

Cosmo


83 XJ6 4.2
65 Mustang 289


From: Dave Oxenreider daveox@av-imagineering.com
Date: Fri, 13 Sep 1996 09:23:24 -0400
Subject: Oil Weight

Caution to all…

My TR6 blows a lot of oil. I decided to try Castrol Syntec 5w-50
(synthetic). It promtly blew almost ALL the oil out the pipes within 50
miles!

If your car uses oil through the exhaust I strongly recommend that you
don’t use synthetic multi-vis 5w-50.

Dave Ox.
73 XJ12
75 TR6


From: Lance Hartmann lance@IO.COM
Date: Fri, 13 Sep 1996 08:11:18 -0500 (CDT)
Subject: Limited edition XK8 in Neiman’s

Anyone else read about the limited edition XK8 that is going to
be included within the famous Neiman Marcus Christmas catalog?
For our non-US readers, Neiman Marcus is one of the US’s premier
(read: usually very expensive, anything-goes) retail stores.

If memory serves me correctly, they plan to install birds-eye maple
as the wood treatment. I don’t recall any other significant changes.

Now, if Santa would just leave THAT in my garage…


Lance Hartmann (lance@io.com)


From: David Wood David.Wood@durham.ac.uk
Date: Fri, 13 Sep 1996 14:42:45 PDT
Subject: Re: Bonnet openning (NOT XJS air Damn!)

On Fri, 13 Sep 1996 12:40:13 +0100 Cosmo wrote:

The bonnet on my XJ6 SIII as started to open when on the move.
This
is a tad annoying and has now become serious as both sides now
do it
occasionaly. The Fine Manual only mentions adjusting the release
cable and I can’t see any adjustment in the catch mechanism. Is
there any trick to this?

My SIII bonnet hinges were going rusty, such that it was
becoming difficult to open the bonnet without a lot of heaving on
the structure - a common failing apparently, but never mentioned
in ANY of the reports I have seen on an XJ6 (why? Do all the
hacks just rehash each other’s work? I digress.)

After a local garage had fixed the hinges, the bonnet shut and opened
with no trouble, but occassionally the rhs would pop open out of its
catch. Rather than taking it back, I noticed that the bonnet was not
catching properly when it was should, although it appeared to do so.
A final press in the offending area made sure the bonnet catched, and
stayed shut.

Cheers,

Dave Wood.


End of jag-lovers-digest V2 #353


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jag-lovers-digest Saturday, 14 September 1996 Volume 02 : Number 354

re: air dam on XJ-S and E-Type air intake
XJ6 bonnet opening fix.
RE: XJ6 III Stake-down
E-type master cylinder reservoirs
RE:Bonnet opening(NOT XJS air Damn!)
Re: V12 Water Pump
Re: E-type tranny swaps
Re: One-man E-type brake bleed
XJ6 SIII Brake master cylinder seals
Re: Limited edition XK8 in Neiman’s
Re: XJ6 III Stake-down
Re: One-man E-type brake bleed
GM400 book for sale
[none]
70 E Tune Wire Wheels
Camshafts
Re: Limited edition XK8 in Neiman’s
TM8 - An additive from a major oil company


From: “Lauren E. Pratt” pratt@its.bldrdoc.gov
Date: Fri, 13 Sep 96 09:23:07 PDT
Subject: re: air dam on XJ-S and E-Type air intake

John

The E-Types do not have cowl air intakes.

Cheers Lauren


Name: Lauren Pratt
E-mail: lpratt@its.bldrdoc.gov
Date: 9/13/96
Time: 9:23:08 AM

This message was sent by Chameleon



From: southern@sol.cgd.ucar.EDU (Lawrence Buja)
Date: Fri, 13 Sep 1996 09:33:48 -0600 (MDT)
Subject: XJ6 bonnet opening fix.

Cosmo pleads…
{The bonnet on my XJ6 SIII as started to open when on the move. This
{is a tad annoying and has now become serious as both sides now do it
{occasionaly. The Fine Manual only mentions adjusting the release
{cable and I can’t see any adjustment in the catch mechanism. Is
{there any trick to this?

This was happening on the Daimler for a long time before I got around to
fixing it.

I loosened the pinch nut on the bonnet pin and turned the bonnet pin a
few turns to make it longer, then retightened the pinch nut. It was
really very simple. I did this to both sides of the bonnet and now it’s
stopped popping up. Previously, I had increased the spring tension on
the catch mechanism and it didn’t help at all.

Since I happened to have the ASCII graphic lying around from a previous
post, here’s what the bonnet pin looks like:

  1. The assembled product: 2. The individual parts:

                                bonnet top 
    

\ .-. / \ \ / \
\ ####### / \ ####### / <- Sheetmetal U
*#######/ *#######/ channel
===== ^ ^ ^
===== weld Nut weld
/—\
/// .-.
/// |~| <-bonnet pin (threaded)
/// |~|
—/ ===== <-pinch nut
V =====
/—\ <-washer
///
/// <-spring over the pin
///
—/ <-washer
V <-end of pin which engages
the striker plate

If somehow you mess up and can’t get the bonnet released (say the bonnet
release cable breaks), there are little access holes in each wheel well
thru which you can insert a slim screwdriver and manually release each
bonnet catch. Just to be on the safe side, I practiced opening the
bonnet this way a few times before I started messing around with the
catch mechanism.

Below are some further posts on the subject

/\ Lawrence Buja http://www.cgd.ucar.edu/cms/southern/
_][ southern@ncar.ucar.edu National Center for Atmospheric Research
________________Boulder,Colorado___80307-3000

On Wed, 29 Nov 1995, Aygen E. Dogar wrote:

Now my problem and it’s been a frustrating one as several people including
myself worked on it with no solution: … MY HOOD WILL POP OUT
UNEXPECTEDLY… ^^^^^^^^^^^^

Aygen,
Believe it or not, our car had the same problem. Boy, we messed
with adjustment, hood pin springs (even removing them at one point),
cable adjustment. etc… It would sure strike fear into occupants’ heads
when the hood jumps up 2 inches at 70 mph! On one trip of several
hundred miles duration, I got out and adjusted the inner headlights to
compensate for the always-up hood, so that we could see the road
adequately.
Ok I’ll quit with the stories and tell you what we did which
stopped the problem. I removed the striker plate assemblies and replaced
the plate retraction springs with ones of higher stiffness. I noted that
the coils of the old springs had begun to separate, indicating that the
original preload wound into the spring had been lost. All tension
springs have a wound-in preload during cold-forming which gives the
spring a non-zero initial takeup force.

	Greg
                        Greg Meboe     meboe@lestat.scs.wsu.edu

From: ** SHANE MANTOSZKO ** IBMA INVENTORY ANALYST **
*** Resending note of 11/29/95 21:14
*** SYDVM1(SHANEM) PH. (02) 354-4918 CUMBERLAND FOREST FC42
*** INTERNET ADDRESS - SHANEM@VNET.IBM.COM *****************
Subject: Hood(Bonnet) catch problems

myself worked on it with no solution: … MY HOOD WILL POP OUT
UNEXPECTEDLY… This will happen usually if I hit a slight bump on the
road. First one side will come loose, then about 5-10 minutes of driving

Boy what a familiar problem. I went through exactly what you went
through here in Sydney. I took the car to the mighty rip-off artist
called Gary Walker Jaguar (only because he’s a few blocks from my house.
All you other Sydney Jag Lovers should avoid him like the plague…if
he was operating in America, he would have so many law suits that he’d
have to leave the country…any other Sydney-siders had experiences
with him they would like to share? I know this list tries to avoid
such things, but I think it’s important that people know who to avoid
when it comes to spending money on their jag…after all we’re not
all engineers/mechanics who can do all their own work).
Anyway, basically he had the car 3 times, and each time he said he
had it fixed, and lo and behold, you couldn’t drive 2 blocks without it
popping again. All the parts had been replaced, so what the hell was
going on !!!
I was so angry I could have killed these guys…anyway, I calmed down,
got the car home and had a good look at the latch. What I noticed, was
that the bolt sticking down from the bonnet on the problem side, was
not sticking out at the same angle as the bolt on the other side. Even
though both sides slid into the hole easily, it was just a fraction of an
inch out.
All I did was tap it a few times with a rubber mallet, to get it
parallel to the other pin. It closes just as easily now, but has not
popped in the 2 years since. Also, no damage to the pin or bonnet.
I had to tap it towards the back of the car. The more it
was tilted towards the front, the more the bonnet(hood) would pop.
Sure this may not be the problem with yours, but it sure was with
mine…amazing what a couple eighth’s of an inch can do in a jag…


From: “Lauren E. Pratt” pratt@its.bldrdoc.gov
Date: Fri, 13 Sep 96 09:30:28 PDT
Subject: RE: XJ6 III Stake-down

Kyle

Installing the stake down kit is fairly straight forward
but there is something that should be mentioned. The metal
in the head is about 1/4 inch thick where you will be
drilling and taping the holes. If you drill through this
1/4 inch you will dump a LOT of metal drillings in to the
oil return below. It’s very hard to remove these metal drillings,
so they will end up in the oil pan.

If you can stop drilling JUST BEFORE going through (requires
good luck and lots of skill for 6 holes) you may be able
to catch most of the drillings. This will also require using a
bottoming tap and cutting the bolts to length or shimming under
the bolt heads.

My recommendation; do it when the head is removed so it can
be properly cleaned.

Cheers and good luck Lauren


Name: Lauren Pratt
E-mail: lpratt@its.bldrdoc.gov
Date: 9/13/96
Time: 9:30:28 AM

This message was sent by Chameleon



From: rrichardson@eurekanet.com (Bob Richardson)
Date: Fri, 13 Sep 1996 12:44:25 -0500
Subject: E-type master cylinder reservoirs

I’ve now beem twice bitten because of the service manual for my 64 Series 1
E-type. I had traced the brake fluid leakage to the bottom master cylinder
after having the center brake fluid reservoir go bone dry although the car
hadn’t been driven for three weeks. Page L.7 of the manual states that on
LHD cars, “the forward reservoir supplies the rear brakes, the rear
reservoir supplies the front brakes.” This lead me to believe lead that
“rear reservoir” meant the reservoir nearest the bulkhead (far right
reservoir when facing the three units). Indeed, the center reservoir’s
steel pipe can be traced to the bottom master cylinder. Today, I was
examining the schematic on Page L.24 and was surprised to see that the top
master cylinder serves the rear brakes and the bottom master cylinder
serves the front brakes. And since the bottom ms is leaking fluid from the
operating rod (I had to remove the rubber dust excluder to spot this) then
my stopping problem has been the front brakes and not the rears. And this
is reason that in my past missives I was fraught about having to drop the
rear suspension in order to overhaul the rear brake system. In a nutshell
am I correct now in my finding that: 1}the center brake fluid reservoir is
connected to the bottom (front brake) master cylinder and to remove this ms
I must first disconnect and remove the top (rear brake) master cylinder?


From: Barrie Dawson DAWSONB@btcec3.agw.bt.co.uk
Date: Fri, 13 Sep 96 18:02:19 -0700
Subject: RE:Bonnet opening(NOT XJS air Damn!)

Dave Wood, wrote about the rhs of the bonnet occasionally popping open. I to
have had this problem especially when I first got my XJ6. My friendly Jaguar
speciallist helped me out by showing me the recognised method of closing the
bonnet. You stand to the front centre of the open bonnet and place the hand
on finger tips centrally on the bonnet, then push firmly so that the bonnet
shuts with a “clunk”. This ensures sufficient force within the flexing bonnet
to snap shut in the locks. If the bonnet pops up on one side NEVER push that
side back down as the bonnet can bend, always open and start closure afresh.

Try it out, I’ve had no trouble since adopting this technique.

Barrie Dawson
Chatham, Kent England
1985 series III Jaguar Sovereign


From: “mark (m.d.) roberts” markdr@nortel.ca
Date: Fri, 13 Sep 1996 12:06:00 -0400
Subject: Re: V12 Water Pump

Took a look at the water pump in the '88 and it too has the
countersunk phillips screw in one location. I had seen
a '89 V12 VDP that did not have this screw, just a standard
stud. I also took a look at the NEW waterpump that I just
got from a wrecker in Hamilton, Ont. (for $100 CDN :slight_smile: ),
and does not have that hole countersunk…you got me on
the rhyme or reason for it, but I think it provides
marginally more room for the crankshaft pulley and the
alternator belt.

Also of note, the new waterpump has the double groove
pulley up front. Looking at the maintenance manual,
it seems that this pulley is required for cars
with an airpump, but no A/C compressor, thus Kirby’s
speculation that the double pulley was for pre '79 engines
may not be completely correct.

Regards, Mark Roberts Phone: (613) 763-2924
Ottawa, Ontario, CANADA Fax: (613) 763-3970
1988 VDP - SIII V12 email: markdr@nortel.ca
1963 3.8L E-Type Coupe - 15 years into a 3 year project


From: “mark (m.d.) roberts” markdr@nortel.ca
Date: Fri, 13 Sep 1996 12:06:00 -0400
Subject: Re: E-type tranny swaps

Just a data point for the thread on the Moss box-to-synchro
box conversions. When I got my E-type, 1963 3.8l E-type,
it had a 1968 E-type 4.2l engine in it. It also had the
original generator, starter, flywheel, transmission (Moss
Box), and I think, clutch.

The 4.2l engine has a different flywheel, 132 teeth rather
than the 102 teeth (I think…I’ve forgotten the actual
number) for the 3.8l E-type motor. Thus, me thinks that
if you want to go the reverse route, you only need the
synchro box. The bolt pattern on the two bellhousings
are identical, except the 4.2l one has an extra bolt
right up at the top…I think. In the worst case, you
will need the 4.2l starter, flywheel, clutch and tranny.

Regards, Mark Roberts Phone: (613) 763-2924
Ottawa, Ontario, CANADA Fax: (613) 763-3970
1988 VDP - SIII V12 email: markdr@nortel.ca
1963 3.8L E-Type Coupe - 15 years into a 3 year project


From: Patrick Krejcik pkr@SLAC.Stanford.EDU
Date: Fri, 13 Sep 1996 11:50:56 -0700
Subject: Re: One-man E-type brake bleed

Jan wrote in reply to Bob:

You can do the job perfectly well with just the jack in the car, as you only
need to lift one wheel at a time enough to get access to the bleeding nipple on
the caliper (always starting with the farthest from the master cylinder).

This is not a good idea! E-Type rear brakes are inboard and you
definitely don’t want to crawl under the car with the car supported only
on a jack.
Definitely buy stands, just buy the sturdiest ones you can find in a
parts store. A floor jack is also a great investment, as you can roll it
around and lift the car to a considerable height. I got a very sturdy
one from Price Club for about $70 which is way better than the flimsy
ones sold in most parts stores.
I found the best way to raise the rear of the E-Type on a jack was with
a wooden block placed between the tail pipes onto the differential cage,
and the front with a wooden piece under the frame crossmember (not the
radiator crossmember!).

Cheers, Patrick.
1965 E-Type 4.2 Series I FHC.

PS
This morning I got off with a smile and a warning for doing twice the
speed limit, after he asked a question or two about my Jaguar. Yes, I am
going to drive more carefully from now on.


From: “Peter Hamel (h)” pete-hamel@dial.pipex.com
Date: Sat, 14 Sep 1996 03:14:22 +0000
Subject: XJ6 SIII Brake master cylinder seals

Hello all,

I’m going to replace the seals in my brake master cylinder tomorrow. I
have bought a kit which contains the various seals and other parts.

I was wondering if anyone has done this recently and if they have any
tips which might come in useful to save me making any stupid mistakes, or
ways of doing it that might be easier than suggested in the instructions.

Its just that I have memories of doing things like this before and
getting 90 per cent of the way through the job and then finding I have
done something wrong at the beginning and have to start all over again
(I’m sure you all know what I mean!).

Thanks in advance.

Pete Hamel
London UK


From: TezFair@aol.com
Date: Fri, 13 Sep 1996 16:09:55 -0400
Subject: Re: Limited edition XK8 in Neiman’s

Anyone else read about the limited edition XK8 that is going to
be included within the famous Neiman Marcus Christmas catalog?
For our non-US readers, Neiman Marcus is one of the US’s premier
(read: usually very expensive, anything-goes) retail stores.

If memory serves me correctly, they plan to install birds-eye maple
as the wood treatment. I don’t recall any other significant changes.

Now, if Santa would just leave THAT in my garage…

News to me that we’re doing limited editions for posh shops and I build the
thing :slight_smile: We’re working flat out just to get stock cars out to dealers for the
October launch.

I have had the chance to drive the 8 around the plant and I can tell you its
like no other Jag we have built. It goes faster than the Supercharged X300,
the road holding is liken to a snail and the growl from the lump gets the old
blood pumping. Open your cheque books NOW

Terry Fairbrother
http://members.aol.com/tezfair/ford.html


From: “Lauren E. Pratt” pratt@its.bldrdoc.gov
Date: Fri, 13 Sep 96 14:10:22 PDT
Subject: Re: XJ6 III Stake-down

LEAMYS wrote:

<couldn 't you magnitize the drill bit and drill at low speed removing
<the
<drill constanly and cleaning the bit or in aluminum use somthing sticky
<i.e.
<90 weight to catch the fillings

Good idea.

This might be a solution, but I would suggest using bees wax
or taping wax (they are sticker), and plug and tape all other
openings. The head is aluminum, so a magnet will not work.

Cheers Lauren


Name: Lauren Pratt
E-mail: lpratt@its.bldrdoc.gov
Date: 9/13/96
Time: 2:10:22 PM

This message was sent by Chameleon



From: Patrick Krejcik pkr%SLAC.Stanford.EDU@vm1.cc.nps.navy.mil
Date: Fri, 13 Sep 1996 11:50:56 -0700
Subject: Re: One-man E-type brake bleed

about lifting E-types, Patrick tells us;

<and the front with a wooden piece under the frame crossmember (not the
<radiator crossmember!).

Yes, some have gone as far as to fasten a piece of wood, about 14 inches by
3/4 inch by 1 inch to the underside of the crossmember. It will fit snugly
with the 3/4 inch side front to rear, then tie it in place.

LLoyd - perhaps use burlwood walnut for concorse applications…- :wink:


From: Stefan Schulz jaguar@suaviter.demon.co.uk
Date: Thu, 12 Sep 1996 17:53:04 GMT
Subject: GM400 book for sale

As a result of a mix-up at a mail order book shop I have wound up with
two copies of Ron Session’s “How to work with and modify the Turbo-
Hydramatic 400 Transmission”, ISBN 0-87938-267-8.

One is for sale, condition as new (obviously).

First offer over GBP10 + shipping secures.


Stefan Schulz
jaguar@suaviter.demon.co.uk


From: The_Tiger bryan@eagpde.co.uk
Date: Fri, 13 Sep 96 10:27:35 +0100
Subject: [none]

HELP !

I have an 88 3.6 XJ-S, and it is not a happy bunny at the moment.

The symptoms are 4 blown hoses in the last 2 weeks, the last
resulting in a near boil-up.

Whilst pressure testing (after hose replaced again), the header
tank started springing leaks. This is the present situation, with a
header tank on order. The system was eventually succesfully pressure
tested (twice), and resulted OK.
There is, however, a sediment in the water which has been present for
the last 5 or 6 weeks, that looks not dissimilar to McDonalds
Chocolate milk shake.
This made me suspect the head gasket, but no other symptoms of
this are present :- NEVER misses, no steam/water from exhausts, no
water in oil.

All the hoses are pretty old (about 75000 miles), and so I am now
in the process of replacing EVERY hose, and the header, to cut out
any weak spots.

Hopefully, ( ;} ), this will cure things, and I can put the sediment
down to perhaps some oil being shot across the head gasket very
briefly, before resealing.

A friend suggested that perhaps some auto transmission oil may be
gettin ginto the radiator and causing the sediment - thereby blocking
the radiator, and causing the pressurisation - I have back-flushed
the radiator just in case.

Sorry to drone on, but I wanted to add as much info as possible.

Does anyone have any experience of this situation, as I am at
present a man possessed (obsessed) (depressed ??) :frowning:

cheers in advance,

The_Tiger < bb@eagpde.co.uk >


From: Steve Patchel spatchel@radford.com
Date: Fri, 13 Sep 1996 14:29:17 -0700
Subject: 70 E Tune Wire Wheels

I’ve not owned a car with wire wheels prior to the Jag (my 71 MG had steel
wheels) and am seeking advice regarding wires.

How often do they need to be “tuned” and are there any tell tale signs that
they are due?

Roads here in Northern California are in fairly good shape with regard to
pot holes, etc.

Thanks in advance

Stephen Patchel
Consulting Practice Leader
Radford Associates
voice: 408-321-2540
fax: 408-321-2650


From: “Michael P. Neal” mneal@wco.com
Date: Fri, 13 Sep 1996 14:55:56 -0700
Subject: Camshafts

Does anyone have any camshafts for the following motors. Later XJS, XJ6
Series 3 or XJ40. I’m planning on making some special tools, damaged
lobes are ok.

Thanks


========================================================
Michael P. Neal ASE Master Technician, Jaguar Certified
'93 Ducati 900SS '83 Porsche 944 '85 Jaguar XJS
Home (707) 829-8464 Work (707) 577-0101
http://www.wco.com/~mneal (always under construction:-)


From: “Lee Walden” lwalden@ebmud.com
Date: Fri, 13 Sep 1996 15:17:35 -0700
Subject: Re: Limited edition XK8 in Neiman’s

Lance wrote…


Anyone else read about the limited edition XK8 that is going >
to be included within the famous Neiman Marcus Christmas >
catalog?

Don’t you mean Needless Markup???


From: Kyle Chatman kchatman@mail.coin.missouri.edu
Date: Fri, 13 Sep 1996 17:38:21 -0500
Subject: TM8 - An additive from a major oil company

If you haven’t noticed, there is another additive. This one is from =
Valvoline and you can read the “information” made available at their =
site www.valvoline.com. I wrote for more information and was =
disappointed. I asked for documentation regarding the research report =
referenced, “scientific evidence in laboratory experiments and in a =
variety of engines.” What I got was a phone number (1-800-TEAM-VAL) and =
instructions to discuss Valvoline products with one of the technicians. =
Anyone care to do so? Sounds like the usual pitch to me.


End of jag-lovers-digest V2 #354


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jag-lovers-digest Sunday, 15 September 1996 Volume 02 : Number 355

re: air dam on XJ-S and E-Type air intake
Re: your mail
Re: One-man E-type brake bleed
New York/New Jersey/Pennsylvania/New Englad (USA) Jag Events
Re: Jag: Mk2 electrics - heated rear window
Jag V12 Firing Orders
Re: Limited edition XK8 in Neiman’s
Re:
Sediment in cooling system
Re: Limited edition XK8 in Neiman’s
Re: Jag V12 Firing Orders
[JagWeb] Update 14th September
Re: [JagWeb] Update 14th September
Re: [JagWeb] Update 14th September
E-type ramps and bleed kit
Re .Bonnet/Hood catch -all syncro g/box
'85 SIII Radio/Tape Player For sale
XJ-S Book Update


From: John Napoli jgn@li.net
Date: Fri, 13 Sep 1996 19:42:58 -0400 (EDT)
Subject: re: air dam on XJ-S and E-Type air intake

Oops. A Jag faux pas.

Don’t you add cowl vents when the Chevy motors go in???

:slight_smile:

John

On Fri, 13 Sep 1996, Lauren E. Pratt wrote:

John

The E-Types do not have cowl air intakes.

Cheers Lauren


From: John Napoli jgn@li.net
Date: Fri, 13 Sep 1996 20:01:23 -0400 (EDT)
Subject: Re: your mail

I have had this problem once or twice on non-Jags, but cars with alloy
engines. If you find the gunk in the water but the engine oil is OK, then
you have someplace in the engine where engine oil under pressure finds its
way into the coolant.

This persisted on one car for ten years and over 175,000 miles. No amount
of flushing solved the problem (would come right back) and there was never
any reverse infiltration into the oil (engine was never apart, so I never
found the cause. Never knocked, blew a head gasket or burnt oil. Never
overheated or lost coolant, either.).

So, unless others know of specific dangers inherent in the Jag, I’d ignore
it and feel good about all that extra water pump lubrication!

John
On Fri, 13 Sep 1996, The_Tiger wrote:

HELP !

I have an 88 3.6 XJ-S, and it is not a happy bunny at the moment.

There is, however, a sediment in the water which has been present for
the last 5 or 6 weeks, that looks not dissimilar to McDonalds
Chocolate milk shake.
This made me suspect the head gasket, but no other symptoms of
this are present :- NEVER misses, no steam/water from exhausts, no
water in oil.


From: Michael Frank mfrank@westnet.com
Date: Fri, 13 Sep 1996 20:05:54 -0400
Subject: Re: One-man E-type brake bleed

But there is really no need to raise the front in order to bleed the brakes!!!

Mike Frank

At 11:50 AM 9/13/96 -0700, you wrote:

about lifting E-types, Patrick tells us;

<and the front with a wooden piece under the frame crossmember (not the
<radiator crossmember!).

Yes, some have gone as far as to fasten a piece of wood, about 14 inches by
3/4 inch by 1 inch to the underside of the crossmember. It will fit snugly
with the 3/4 inch side front to rear, then tie it in place.


From: Michael Frank mfrank@westnet.com
Date: Fri, 13 Sep 1996 20:48:12 -0400
Subject: New York/New Jersey/Pennsylvania/New Englad (USA) Jag Events

New Jersey Jaguar Touring Club (my affiliation) event highlights (Membership
Chairman is Jacqueline Maetsky, 201-935-3431):

September 28-29. Excursion to Steamtown, USA in Reading, Penn. This is a
huge museum devoted to steam locomotives. It is the home of a Union-Pacific
Big Boy, the world’s largest locomotive. Sunday the tour continues with a
stop at the Lackawanna Coal Mine and Anthracite Museum. Club event Saturday
evening. Contact Chris Acker 717 278-4159

October 20. Fall foliage tour. Includes tour of the Charles Lindbergh
cottage. (Site of the famous kidnapping) Contact is John and Jane Jennings
201-894-0091.

Unaffiliated events:

September 20-22 British Invasion Stowe, Vermont 860-029-6176

September 22 British Car and Bike show sponsored by Mid-Penn British
Marques. Allenby Playhouse, Boiling Springs, PA 717 469-1034
email:britishmom@aol.com

September 22 British MADDness Car Show. Bethlehem, CT 203-776-8148

September 28. Car show at Special Interest Car Parts. 1340 Hartford Ave
(route 6a) Johnston, Rhode Island 800 556-7496 x 3002 15% discount on all
SIPC parts purchased at the show.

September 29 Jaguar Assn of New England Hill-Stead Museum tour & lunch
Farmington, CT 860-928-9786

October 6 Jaguar Club of CT annual show. Litchfield Inn 203-776-8148

Oct 18-20 Bridgehampton, NY Historical Society sports car rallye.
516-352-7311 x115

October 20 Goshen, NY. Red Ribbon car show & family day. Pre registration
required 914-651-6100

October 27 British Cars of New England Hartford, CT

Mike Frank
1969 E-Type 2+2


From: Shane Gibson shane_gibson@qsp.co.nz
Date: Sat, 14 Sep 1996 12:40:59 -0700
Subject: Re: Jag: Mk2 electrics - heated rear window

Ted Trim wrote:

Setting the scene: I have recently been refitting the instrument panels and
bulkhead wiring on my 1966 Mk2. This car, 170906, is a late Mk2 and incorp-
orates a number of 340 type features, but the wiring doesn’t match either
Mk2 or 340 diagrams - and the heated rear window doesn’t feature on either.
The window heater is operated by a push/pull switch at the right hand end of
the dashboard (rhd car); there is a small warning light by the switch.

Ted

I tried to e-mail direct but got a delivery error so I am posting to the
whole group.

The Daimler V8 250 utilised the same body shell as the MKII but
incorporated a heated rear windscreen.

I can fax you the wiring diagram from my manual to see if it matches, if
you are interested.


Shane Gibson
1968 Daimler V8 250 (55% complete, 167% over budget)


From: John Napoli jgn@li.net
Date: Fri, 13 Sep 1996 21:18:34 -0400 (EDT)
Subject: Jag V12 Firing Orders

Last July, when in Denver on a business trip, I had the pleasure to have
dinner with the Bujas and John Himes, et at – local Jag people all.

One of our dinner conversations dealt with the issue of the firing order
of the Jag V12, and if it was the same as some Ferrari V12s, and if not
was this a reason why they don’t seem to sound the same.

John Himes dug out his service manual and with help from the Bujas we
determined that the firing order of the Jag V12 works out as follows:

Right Bank: 1 5 3 6 2 4
\ / \ / \ / \ / \ /
Left Bank: 6 2 4 1 5 3

in other words, the right bank is firing a standard inline 6 firing order,
and the left bank interpserses with the same firing order, but with the
rear three cylinders swapped with the front three.

(Zigzag down and up the above illustration as you scan left to right.
The front of the engine would be on the left.)

I finally found some reference material on one of the best-sounding
Ferrari V12s, the 330 series from the late sixties. I think this is a
Colombo engine.

The Ferrari firing order is:

Right bank: 1 5 3 6 2 4
\ / \ / \ / \ / \ /
Left Bank: 7 11 9 12 8 10

but Ferrari numbers their cylinders down one bank and up the
other, beginning at the right front. In other words, the #1 cylinder is
right front and the #12 cylinder is left front.

So the firing orders are the same. Differences in the exhaust sound
must arise from the mufflers and pipes used.

Now before some of you flame me for wanting a Jag that sounds like a
Ferrari, let me just say that to me there is nothing sweeter than the
sound of a twelve. And I want to hear every 12 sing.

John


From: Lance Hartmann lance@io.com
Date: Fri, 13 Sep 1996 21:13:11 -0500 (CDT)
Subject: Re: Limited edition XK8 in Neiman’s

@owner-jag-lovers-di1 writes:

From: TezFair@aol.com
Date: Fri, 13 Sep 1996 16:09:55 -0400
Subject: Re: Limited edition XK8 in Neiman’s

Anyone else read about the limited edition XK8 that is going to
be included within the famous Neiman Marcus Christmas catalog?
[STUFF DELETED]

News to me that we’re doing limited editions for posh shops and I build the
thing :slight_smile: We’re working flat out just to get stock cars out to dealers for the
October launch.

I found the article dated Sep. 9, 1996 regarding the special XK8
on Jaguar’s “offical” website:

http://www.jaguarvehicles.com/news/neiman.html


Lance Hartmann (lance@io.com)


From: “Michael P. Neal” mneal@wco.com
Date: Fri, 13 Sep 1996 20:55:49 -0700
Subject: Re:

STOP!!! Don’t drive your car!!! This sounds like the power steering
cooler in the right side of the radiator or the trans cooler in the left
side is blown. You are getting extreme pressure in your cooling system
that could blow the head gasket, heater core etc… and cause serious
problems. I had a restriction in the return line to the power steering
reservoir that blew the cooler and pressurized the system to over 100
PSI. Needless to say the potential destruction was rather fascinating.

BTW, the customer got cheap and just had me disconnect the power
steering cooler. I would not do this on the trans cooler, it would
shorten the life of the trans. An aftermarket cooler would probably do
and just plug the radiator.

The_Tiger wrote:

HELP !

I have an 88 3.6 XJ-S, and it is not a happy bunny at the moment.

The symptoms are 4 blown hoses in the last 2 weeks, the last
resulting in a near boil-up.

Whilst pressure testing (after hose replaced again), the header
tank started springing leaks. This is the present situation, with a
header tank on order. The system was eventually succesfully pressure
tested (twice), and resulted OK.
There is, however, a sediment in the water which has been present for
the last 5 or 6 weeks, that looks not dissimilar to McDonalds
Chocolate milk shake.
This made me suspect the head gasket, but no other symptoms of
this are present :- NEVER misses, no steam/water from exhausts, no
water in oil.

All the hoses are pretty old (about 75000 miles), and so I am now
in the process of replacing EVERY hose, and the header, to cut out
any weak spots.

Hopefully, ( ;} ), this will cure things, and I can put the sediment
down to perhaps some oil being shot across the head gasket very
briefly, before resealing.

A friend suggested that perhaps some auto transmission oil may be
gettin ginto the radiator and causing the sediment - thereby blocking
the radiator, and causing the pressurisation - I have back-flushed
the radiator just in case.

Sorry to drone on, but I wanted to add as much info as possible.

Does anyone have any experience of this situation, as I am at
present a man possessed (obsessed) (depressed ??) :frowning:

cheers in advance,

The_Tiger < bb@eagpde.co.uk >


========================================================
Michael P. Neal ASE Master Technician, Jaguar Certified
'93 Ducati 900SS '83 Porsche 944 '85 Jaguar XJS
Home (707) 829-8464 Work (707) 577-0101
http://www.wco.com/~mneal (always under construction:-)


From: Stefan Schulz jaguar@suaviter.demon.co.uk
Date: Fri, 13 Sep 1996 23:30:58 GMT
Subject: Sediment in cooling system

In message 9609130927.AA03525@eeyore.eagpde.co.uk The_Tiger writes:

88 3.6 XJ-S
[snip]
4 blown hoses in the last 2 weeks
[snip]
There is, however, a sediment in the water which has been present for
the last 5 or 6 weeks, that looks not dissimilar to McDonalds
Chocolate milk shake.

If it’s really water in the cooling system, then that’s half your problem,
and the other half is the brown stuff. RUST.

Get some Barr’s FLUSH, fill up the cooling system with the
prescribed water/antifreeze mixture, add the flusher, and run the car nor-
mally for a week. (Ignore what the label says about 48 hours tops.) Then
flush the system again and fill with water/antifreeze again. Oh yes,
avoid Barr’s Leaks when you refill the system - never mind what Jaguar say.

Worked for me 2 years ago with a freshly-bought badly maintained V12 and
just did it again with wifey’s new 13-year-old Volvo.

If flushing doesn’t do the trick, do component elimination testing throughout
the cooling system ;-(

Regards,


Stefan Schulz
jaguar@suaviter.demon.co.uk


From: TezFair@aol.com
Date: Sat, 14 Sep 1996 09:43:10 -0400
Subject: Re: Limited edition XK8 in Neiman’s

I found the article dated Sep. 9, 1996 regarding the special XK8
on Jaguar’s “offical” website:

http://www.jaguarvehicles.com/news/neiman.html

Hi again,

Just been to the above site to see what this limited edition is based on.
Working on the line we see specs for different markets. The Neiman LE is
similar in spec to the Japanese market.

Still a damn nice car to drive :slight_smile:

Tez


From: “Kirbert” palmk@gcn.scri.fsu.edu
Date: Sat, 14 Sep 1996 13:59:25 -0005
Subject: Re: Jag V12 Firing Orders

Napoli:

One of our dinner conversations dealt with the issue of the firing order
of the Jag V12, and if it was the same as some Ferrari V12s, and if not
was this a reason why they don’t seem to sound the same.

I have heard a consistent rumor that the late 50’s/early 60’s Ferrari
V-12’s (which have a truly excellent sound) have a 65-degree V. This
makes absolutely no sense, and I would pass it off as a misprint
except that I have heard it from several sources. The logical layout
of a V-12 is a 60-degree V, as in the Jaguar.

If the Ferrari in fact has a 65-degree layout, there would follow
another question. Does the crankshaft have a 5-degree step between
adjacent big ends on the same crank throw? Because if it doesn’t,
then the engine would have a slightly uneven fire – fire, 55 deg,
fire, 65 deg, fire, 55 deg, and so on. Might have an interesting
effect on its sound. Would not affect balance, since each half of a
V-12 – as two separate inline sixes – is balanced, you can put 'em
together any way you want they will still be balanced even though the
firing is uneven.

– Kirbert | If anything is to be accomplished,
| some rules must be broken.
| - Palm’s Postulate


From: nick@sn.no (Nick Johannessen)
Date: Sat, 14 Sep 1996 19:49:11 +0200
Subject: [JagWeb] Update 14th September

Well, I finally got my act together and have now
officially released the new-look JagWeb. The search
engine Excite commented in their review of the site
that the only thing missing was the burled walnut on
the front-page. This has now been taken care of.

Not only a new look, some nice new material as well:

    • Jim Isbells “XJ6 - Bumper to bumper”
      A book written by Jim based on his experience and
      messages from Jag-lovers. A downloadable Word 2
      document for you to print out at work^h^h^h^hhome.
    • The Monster.guide to Jaguar - The E-type chapter!
      Lawrence Buja has massaged together another chapter
      in the definitive guide to Jaguars. This time it’s
      E-types (XKE), with lots of valuable knowledge and
      anecdotes from owners.
    • How to buy a Jaguar
      Another look at buying a Jaguar, this time by Gunnar
      Helliesen. A good read.
    • The tappet guy
      Gunnar Helliesens holiday saga. Experience the thrill
      of the tapping tappets in full glorious webOrama.
    • The archives are now as up to date as they can be. I
      upload in batches of 30. Need another 5 before the
      next batch goes up. Please note: there archives are no
      longer available by FTP. Web only.

Thats all for now. Thanks. And remember, if you have
something you’d like to share with the rest of the
Jag-lovers, let me know. If you have submitted something
and wonder where the hell it’s got to, send me a nasty
mail. Please do, I don’t like to disappoint people.

Nick


<<< Nick Johannessen | nick@sn.no | nickj on IRC >>>
<<< Jaguar XJ6 4.2 '70 MOD & '82 Auto >>>

The JagWeb http://www.sn.no/~nick/jaguar.html <<<


From: Steve Patchel spatchel@radford.com
Date: Sat, 14 Sep 1996 12:33:04 -0700
Subject: Re: [JagWeb] Update 14th September

Nick:

Just checked out the article on E-Types. Nice work!!!

I appreciate the time and effort you devoted to the JagWeb, its been
especially helpful to me in locating resources for my 70 E-Type.

Regards

Stephen Patchel
Consulting Practice Leader
Radford Associates
voice: 408-321-2540
fax: 408-321-2650


From: nick@sn.no (Nick Johannessen)
Date: Sat, 14 Sep 1996 21:46:57 +0200
Subject: Re: [JagWeb] Update 14th September

[ Steve Patchel spatchel@radford.com ]
|
| Just checked out the article on E-Types. Nice work!!!

Thank Lawrence Buja for the brain-work, I just did the
donkey-work of putting it into HTML :slight_smile:

| I appreciate the time and effort you devoted to the JagWeb, its been
| especially helpful to me in locating resources for my 70 E-Type.

We aim to please.

Nick


Nick Johannessen // nick@sn.no // http://www.sn.no/home/nick/


From: rrichardson@eurekanet.com (Bob Richardson)
Date: Sat, 14 Sep 1996 18:21:22 -0500
Subject: E-type ramps and bleed kit

One thing I have always admired the British for is they know how to even up
a score. The outcome of the U.S. revolution would have to smart a bit. So
how did they eventually even up the score (and remember, they gave it back
to Adoph in spades)? First, they introduced the XK120 to we wild-eyed Yanks
and made the do-it-yourself crowd add Whitworth spanners and such to their
toolkits. And they made us more profane as we scraped knuckles in such tiny
hiding places for clevis pins and such. But they didn’t quit there.
Along came the irresistible E-types and more tiny places that hold
operating rods and locknuts and, yes, those dratted clevis pins. I’ve just
spent six times as many hours as would a professional mechanic in
disconnecting just one of two master cylinders. A 8/16 open end was a hair
too large and a 7/16 wouldn’t cut it at all. The service manual devotes
three short paragraphs to this “mundane” task and I still have one master
cylinder, lock nuts that haven’t been freed since 1978 and a tiny clevis
pin that I can see, sort of, but will surrender only to the nimble fingers
of a Rhesus monkey.
The point of all this is, that I don’t have to have my E-type sitting
outside some mechanic’s shack for weeks on end waiting for a master
cylinder to be resleeved (in stainless steel, naturally). In this small
town with 18,000 college students staggering down streets and alleys at all
hours, a lone E-type could be the object of the revenge of a “have not.”
I priced jack stands for the bleed job that will follow (I also want to do
all of the necessary under-body maintenance chores) and a professinal
hydraulic floor jack one can roll in and out. Well, the jack alone costs
$260. And most car jacks can’t lift the car high enough for one to place
the jack stands.
The young man at my parts store came up with a brilliant money-saving idea!
He sold me a set of Ultra-Ramps and a Napa “One-Man” brake bleeding kit.
The ramps cost $21 and are rated at 6,500 pounds Gross Vehicle Weight. The
ramps are 7.5 inches in height and this, (plus the distance of half a tire
height) allows one safe access the rear brake bleed nipples, differential
housing, lube points,tranny and such. I can’t vouch for the one-man
bleeding kit, but it has a device that prevents air bubbles from being
drawn back into the wheel cylinder. The kit is $10. The Ultra-Ramps
wouldn’t be practical for doing major underbody work, but should prove
useful for oil changes and lube jobs, etc.


From: Don Tracey dont@echuca.net.au
Date: Sat, 14 Sep 1996 07:56:19 -0600
Subject: Re .Bonnet/Hood catch -all syncro g/box

From: “mark (m.d.) roberts” markdr@nortel.ca
Date: Fri, 13 Sep 1996 12:06:00 -0400
Subject: Re: E-type tranny swaps

Just a data point for the thread on the Moss box-to-synchro
box conversions. When I got my E-type, 1963 3.8l E-type,
it had a 1968 E-type 4.2l engine in it. It also had the
original generator, starter, flywheel, transmission (Moss
Box), and I think, clutch.

The 4.2l engine has a different flywheel, 132 teeth rather
than the 102 teeth (I think…I’ve forgotten the actual
number) for the 3.8l E-type motor. Thus, me thinks that
if you want to go the reverse route, you only need the
synchro box. The bolt pattern on the two bellhousings
are identical, except the 4.2l one has an extra bolt
right up at the top…I think. In the worst case, you
will need the 4.2l starter, flywheel, clutch and tranny.

Regards, Mark Roberts Phone: (613) 763-2924
Ottawa, Ontario, CANADA Fax: (613) 763-3970
1988 VDP - SIII V12 email: markdr@nortel.ca
1963 3.8L E-Type Coupe - 15 years into a 3 year project

I did this conversion on a Mk 2 and if I remember rightly the all
syncro box has a bigger front bearing,requiring machining the recess in
the original bell housing.
Also don’t own an XJ but have fiddled with the bonnet catch,the best
people to adjust them (my experience anyway) is your local friendly
panel beater, as they do it all the time,as its a standard type bonnet
lock .If you think its a problem with them coming loose ,if they stick
down it’s real fun getting them to release.Someone told me that there is
a hole in the inner guard to get at the release ,but haven’t checked.
Don Tracey
AUSTRALIA
50 Mk5,58 XK150,59 Mk2


From: blackmx5@usa.pipeline.com (Lawrence Karpman)
Date: Sun, 15 Sep 1996 02:49:56 GMT
Subject: '85 SIII Radio/Tape Player For sale

I have an '85 SIII radio/tape player for sale. It is in excellent
condition, but two LED segments are not working, so sometimes it is
difficult to tell the exact station. Otherwise perect. Includes radio/tape
player, face plate and detachable face control panel.

All wiring is in place, but you’ll need new connectors to fit radio wire
harness to car harness. Simple single connectors will do though.

I will have to check wholesale prices from Welsh, Terry’s, etc. to
determine fair asking price. I will do so Monday.

If interested, please e-mail.

Larry Karpman
Bedford, TX


From: “Kirbert” palmk@gcn.scri.fsu.edu
Date: Sat, 14 Sep 1996 23:39:21 -0005
Subject: XJ-S Book Update

I have just posted a new version of the XJ-S help book. I’ve been
adding stuff like crazy over the past few days, mainly putting in a
lot of input from jag-lovers e-mail that I’d just been saving until I
got around to it.

Flyer follows:


	EXPERIENCE IN A BOOK:
   Help for the Jaguar XJ-S owner
	   by Kirby Palm

This book contains things that a Jaguar XJ-S owner should know, but
doesn’t know who to ask. Owners of other late model Jaguars may also
benefit, as much of the cars are similar. This book is over 100
pages, and includes a few illustrations.

Sections of the book address:

	Maintenance and repair
	Performance modifications
	Sources for parts, accessories, etc.

Generally, the book offers practical knowhow not found in the
official repair manuals, and should be considered a supplement
rather than a substitute.

There are several ways to obtain this book. To receive the very
latest version printed out, send US$15 to the author (below). To
receive a diskette of the latest MicroSoft Word file so you can
print your own copies, send US$7. Add US$1 for Canada, US$2 for
other countries outside the US. Be sure to give your name and
address.

For InterNet users, the archived file is also available (free of
charge) via the World Wide Web page:

http://gcn.scri.fsu.edu/~palmk/jaguar.html

This book is corrected and updated constantly. If you have learned
something about your Jag that the rest of us should know, please
write, call or send a message to:

Kirby Palm
Route 1, Box 3498
Havana, FL  32333-9762
(904) 539-7775
InterNet:  palmk@gcn.scri.fsu.edu

– Kirbert | If anything is to be accomplished,
| some rules must be broken.
| - Palm’s Postulate


End of jag-lovers-digest V2 #355


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jag-lovers-digest Sunday, 15 September 1996 Volume 02 : Number 356

XKE Valve adjustment
XJ40: Headlamps $$$ ?
Re: Jag V12 Firing Orders
re: One-man E-type brake bleed
Mark 2 Paint Colors
re: cowl inlets on E-types; and louvers on XJs
Re: E-type ramps and bleed kit
Series 3, XJ6, Starter motor.
S3 and XJ40 queries
Re: seeking advice on my old flame
XJ6 S2 4.2 rebuil, leaks oil + headgasket question
Re: Koni - standard shockabsorbers
Re: Series 3, XJ6, Starting problem
Re: Series 3, XJ6, Starter motor.
Re: Vehicle Dynamics
xj40 shop manual


From: DHarr13177@aol.com
Date: Sat, 14 Sep 1996 23:41:40 -0400
Subject: XKE Valve adjustment

I am trying to get an accurate valve lash measurement with the engine
assembled. Can one cam be rotated 360 degrees if the other is removed ? [
Will the valves hit the pistons ? ]


From: cobac@ix.netcom.com (Eric J Faber )
Date: Sat, 14 Sep 1996 20:38:56 -0700
Subject: XJ40: Headlamps $$$ ?

for a XJ40 (The two flat-square type) and the bulb controllers that go
with them.
I was looking to switch the headlamps from my '89 VDP to the newer
square headlamps. But, for approx. $1500 new, I would have to be crazy
to spend this to replace my round lights (which are in execellent
condition).
I was hopeing someone would know of a good junk-yard, or place to
obtain these lights at a “reasonable” cost. Most places won’t sell
ONLY the headlamps, just the complete front end of the car. Maybe
there is someone or somewhere that trades these lights, I would only
need one pair of headlamps.
Thanks for any input or help!
-cobac@ix.netcom.com
1989 XJ40 Vanden Plas


From: John Napoli jgn@li.net
Date: Sat, 14 Sep 1996 23:51:37 -0400 (EDT)
Subject: Re: Jag V12 Firing Orders

Interesting idea. Too my knowledge, though, the Ferrari V12s were all 60
degrees. So I went to the bookshelf.

All of the COlumbo and Lampredi V12s were 60 degrees (of course, that
might not eliminate the possibility of some one-off specials, which
Ferrari was always likely to do).

However, between 1958 and 1964 there was a Type 206S V6 car that ranged
from 1 and a half to two liters. It had a 65 degree block. In two liter
form it produced 220 HP at 8500 rpm. Now THAT must have sounded wild!

John

On Sat, 14 Sep 1996, Kirbert wrote:

Napoli:

One of our dinner conversations dealt with the issue of the firing order
of the Jag V12, and if it was the same as some Ferrari V12s, and if not
was this a reason why they don’t seem to sound the same.

I have heard a consistent rumor that the late 50’s/early 60’s Ferrari
V-12’s (which have a truly excellent sound) have a 65-degree V. This
makes absolutely no sense, and I would pass it off as a misprint
except that I have heard it from several sources. The logical layout
of a V-12 is a 60-degree V, as in the Jaguar.

If the Ferrari in fact has a 65-degree layout, there would follow
another question. Does the crankshaft have a 5-degree step between
adjacent big ends on the same crank throw? Because if it doesn’t,
then the engine would have a slightly uneven fire – fire, 55 deg,
fire, 65 deg, fire, 55 deg, and so on. Might have an interesting
effect on its sound. Would not affect balance, since each half of a
V-12 – as two separate inline sixes – is balanced, you can put 'em
together any way you want they will still be balanced even though the
firing is uneven.

– Kirbert | If anything is to be accomplished,
| some rules must be broken.
| - Palm’s Postulate


From: David J Shield David_J_Shield@ccm.fm.intel.com
Date: Sat, 14 Sep 96 21:33:00 PDT
Subject: re: One-man E-type brake bleed

 Bob,
 
 One more thing to add on top of Jan's (and any oine else's) advice: 
 Get a jar that won't tip over.  Usually the long transparent hose is 
 heavy enough, esp. when filled with brake fluid, that it knocks the 
 damn jar over.  Or else pulls out of the jar since it's too heavy and 
 slick.  What a mess.  Glue the jar down to a big piece of wood if you 
 need to.
 
 While I'm at it, I've never used a Mitey Vac for brake bleeding, 
 though I do own one (~$35 USD).  Can anyone vouch for this method?  
 Also, in some old issue of Jaguar World, a writer mentioned installed 
 bleeder extenders on the rear calipers.  Has anyone else done this, 
 and where can I buy a set?
 
 One answer and two questions.  Guess this helps?
 
 David
 '70XKE 2+2 and a
 '84 XJ6 VDP currently on the trickle charger due to not enough use

From: “Frederick L. Phelps” flphelps@erols.com
Date: Sun, 15 Sep 1996 01:16:40 -0400
Subject: Mark 2 Paint Colors

I am having a 62 MK2 painted and am having trouble matching colors with
code numbers. If anyone can provide me with a list of colors and some
form of paint code I would greatly appreciate it. The colors I am most
interested in are: Cotswold Blue, Opalescent Blue, Opalescent Gunmetal,
and Opalescent Silver Blue.

Thank You
Fred Phelps


From: David J Shield David_J_Shield@ccm.fm.intel.com
Date: Sat, 14 Sep 96 23:51:00 PDT
Subject: re: cowl inlets on E-types; and louvers on XJs

 John,
 
 There aren't any cowl inlets on an E.  Fresh air comes from the front 
 and is channeled to the heater box.  Thus the louvers are not a 
 problem, and they look nice.
 
 I often thought of hood louvers on my XJ6 until someone on the list 
 mentioned that the heat would flow right back into the cowl inlets.  
 Jim Isbell reports that his engine runs a few degrees cooler with the 
 bonnet popped open and resting on the safety catch, wonder what that 
 does in terms of heat flowing back into the cowl?  This can be 
 measured - put a thermoprobe in various cowl inlet positions and 
 measure it with and without the bonnet popped.  I'd do this if I had a 
 thermoprobe.
 
 Is there any other way to vent the engine compartment to get that heat 
 out of there, esp with the catalyst under the hood (bonnet)?  Side 
 louvers?  (Maybe too ugly.)  Wheel well louvers?  (Maybe would weaken 
 the shock tower.)
 
 Regards,
 
 David
 
 snip from John Napoli:
 >I still like the idea of hood louvers.  Any of you E-Type guys have 
 >problems sucking hot air into the cowl inlets?  My guess is that the 
 >flow is turbulent enough and so small compared to the mass of ambient 
 >air and what about the hot heater matrix in there anyway and besides 
 >we waste some of the cool chilling gasoline and it still works so it 
 >should not be a problem.
 >John

From: Robert Bradley Robert.Bradley@bh.eyi.com
Date: Sun, 15 Sep 1996 02:52:12 -0500
Subject: Re: E-type ramps and bleed kit

"....and I still have one master cylinder, lock nuts that haven't been freed since 1978 and a tiny clevis pin that I can see, sort of, but will surrender only to the nimble fingers of a Rhesus monkey."

Sorry, no Rhesus monkeys available, all are still receiving psycho therapy
after 10-20 years of assembling Minis in the 60s and 70s.!


From: “John Littler” auibmdak@ibmmail.com
Date: Sun, 15 Sep 1996 04:16:14 EDT
Subject: Series 3, XJ6, Starter motor.

Hi all
A few different things to report: First the tale of woe (but it has a
happy ending :slight_smile: )
On Friday night the better half and I went out to dinner, afterwards we
got into the Sovereignto head home,when thekey was turned all I got was
a click. Hmm…hit the lights yep, plenty of power, tried a few times,
still nothing but a click. Popped the bonnet,nothing loose as far as I
could see. Maybe it’s the little switch that stops you starting it when
the transmission is in drive- put it in and out of gear pushed it up and
down etc - no luck. Ah well, call the NRMA (Aussie version of AA or RAC),
an hour later the roadside assistance van turns up. I tell him what
happened and what I’ve tried and I go to show him by turning the key…
and the damned thing fires !!! Aaarrgh. Face very red !!! I drive
home uneventfully. It’s friday the 13th …just one of those things huh?
Sat. morning starts OK we go into town for Yum Cha, we get back it does
it again - I fiddle around for 10 minutes, just about ready to give up
when it fires - still haven’t figured out the cause - we have to go to
one of my wife’s friends place (no choice - at this point I’d have gone
and started serious trouble shooting otherwise). We get there do the
business and try to leave - same thing- aaarrgh !!! Nrma turn up quickly

    • he grabs a screwdiver and a small hammer and givesthe starter motor
      a tap while I hit the key - goes first hit !!! Sticky solenoid he says,
      sounds logical to me on the facts. Looks like my first real Jaguar
      maintenance job is going to be a starter motor replacement. Go up the
      road to buy the Jag service manual I’ve been meaning to buy for the last
      month ($110 AUD - approx $85 USD- is that a reasonable price ? ).
      Ring up Jan W on the grounds that he knows what he’s talking about and
      I don’t …and he’s been patient with all my other stupid questions !!
      Solenoid sounds right …
      I then do a search of jag lovers digest and come up with an interesting
      post :

On my S2 XJ12, I had exactly the problem you describe and found that
it was due to the heavy white+red wire having a slack female spade
connector on
it that made bad contact with the spade on the relay. I tightened this
connector up with a pair of pliers and haven’t had any trouble since

This was a reply to a slightly different problem but what the hell, I’m
lazy, I’ll try the easy fix first.

So I sprayed INOX on the spades and connectors, tightened the females,
plugged them back onto the starter relay and what do you know, the damn
thing worked!!! INOX is basically WD40 with an anti corrosion agent.

I’ve started it 10 times today and it’s worked every time so hopefully
that’s fixed it.

Hey Jan, that’s your post I just quoted - you could have suggested that
one first :slight_smile:

BARRS Leaks:
There’s been an on again off again thread about Barrs Leaks, I think I’ve
already commented that the Series 3 XJ6 Sovereign manual DEFINITELY

doesn’t mention it at all. On the other hand having just bought the
shop manual (thats the official one not the Haynes) I noticed in passing
that it DOES mention the stuff: Page 09-2 (09 is the recommended lubrican
ts etc.) states
additiveBarrs Leak Inhibitor 1 sachet per car - 6 cylinder model
2 sachets per car - 12cylinder model.

I personally still wouldn’t use the stuff unless someone can give me a
convincing argument why I should, but there you go, Jaguar does endorse
its use.

John

Level 1, 29-57 Christie St.
St Leonards NSW 2065
Ph: +61-2-9937-8063 Fax: +61-2-9937-8100
Mobile +61-419-617-619


From: “John Littler” auibmdak@ibmmail.com
Date: Sun, 15 Sep 1996 04:55:03 EDT
Subject: S3 and XJ40 queries

*** Resending note of 15/09/96 18:51
Hi all
Following fiddling with the starter relay (see prev post), I’ve noticed
there are 3 pins without spade connectors (out of about 8) does anyone
know if this is correct ? Everything seems to work OK but it worries me…
The manual doesn’t even have a picture let alone a description of the
pin outs. Which follows to the next questiondoes anyone know a good
supplementary manual ?

Last question, someone posted something about converting a round
headlighted XJ40 to square (a week or 2 ago) Ithought XJ40’s only came in
square headlighted models ? Can somebody fill me in on this please ?

John

Level 1, 29-57 Christie St.
St Leonards NSW 2065
Ph: +61-2-9937-8063 Fax: +61-2-9937-8100
Mobile +61-419-617-619


From: Jeffrey Gram 101454.2570@CompuServe.COM
Date: 15 Sep 96 06:56:28 EDT
Subject: Re: seeking advice on my old flame

Hi, JH Ferell,

What a shame to hit a pole . 1.5 feet !!! into to engine compartment…
It is always easy to be better knowing afterwards , but I presume the car was
not all risk insured ?.
There is always a risk when not fully insured, and I guess we decide to
take the pounding and grief if it happens anyhow.

If you are short of cash to actually let her repair, now that you have decided
for a sister of hers,
then you have already made the decision or not?

Never mind what “freinds” say. If they only say you’re crazy seen from a
financial point of view then they
have not understood the point of real (jaguar) love. In that case they cannot
help you - they have no reference point to judge from. If it is real love to the
car, it doesn’t matter whether the 9000 bucks are a
financially bad investment. The issue is not about investment but about the
feelings you have for that car.

If you can’t repair her yourself for whatever reason, then there is only few
solution’s. Either store her - but she will slowly die then, or sell her to
someone who will repair her in his/hers free time - this way you know she will
be going to a good home. Selling her to the schredders is downright heresy !.
Other solution is to let her slowly raise from her badly injured state to the
grace she once had by a person who restores her over say a year or two in
his/her free time. May cost 9000$ anyway but so what ? allways better to have it
done by a person with skill and natural love than the local run of the mill
crash-repair shop.

Do you feel alright going Golfing in Scotland while your torn beaty cries for
help ?

Hope you find the right solution for you.

Regards Jeffrey Gram

Regards Jeffrey Gram


From: Jeffrey Gram 101454.2570@CompuServe.COM
Date: 15 Sep 96 06:56:17 EDT
Subject: XJ6 S2 4.2 rebuil, leaks oil + headgasket question

Hi list,

The 4.2 litre I had rebuilt iun 1995, now with 3600 Km on the clock has a
“minor” oil leak. When I think
about the only reason for taking the engine out in the first place during body
rebuild, was to put a stop
to oil leaks…

Rebuild background :
The engine has new sump seal,new oil pump , and new pick up pipe seals, new rear
crankshaft seal, new
front crank seal, new timing chain cober seal, new camshaft cover seals. The
rebuild was honing (only 70.000 km) , new piston rings, new bigends and main
bearings and toughrided crank. The valve seats were reground, all new valves (S3
head), valve stem seals, and 308 degree cams with 10.75 mm lift. gap adjusted to
0.20 mm +/- 0.05

The things not done were : bore and new pistons, new valve stem guides, tappet
bucket guides and tappet buckets. These were not necessary according to the
engine restorer. However after just few hundred kilometers a tappet guide
started “clicking” . Installed a tappet guide stake down kit to solve that
problem. However there remains strange single metallic clicks in idle still. I
guess the valve stems are loose now ? or a seat maybe ? - I wish I had gone for
the complete tour… How expensive it is to save
money…

The Oil leak. First I used Hylomar and no gasket to seal the cam covers. Big
mistake - Credit to Michael Neal. Hylomar cannot be used to seal metal to metal
parts. I used another silicone based procud to seal
toe cam covers and the oil breather connection on font of the head.

The oil leak seems to come from between the head and the cylinder block at the
front where the cylinderblock meets the chain housing. If the restorer milled my
block (dont think so) without mounting the chain cover there would be a small
but significant edge being higher on the chain cover onto which the cylinder
head woul lean and possibly cause an oil leak ?. However then the first cylinder
would not be tied down properly possibly causing a blown head gasket, weak
compression, water in the oil , and I have none of these problems.

So what could it be ?

I am reluctant to strip the head again (another 70 Uk pounds for the head
gasket…) unless I have to.
This oils leak must be stopped - I’m deeply ashamed to leave stains and the
environmental law are tough here - I can get fined and charged to the clean up
of the street here in Germany.

Head gasket. I bough a Proper S3 4,2 headgasket (original Jaguar), however the
water holes puzzled me.

In the head there is along the sides the elongated water holes. the holes in the
gasket to fit these holes were however of smaller “size” thus in principle
restricting water flow and causing “edges” where “sludge” could build up ?. I
was very much under time pressure to finish the car and was reluctant to open up
these holes in case it was supposed to be so ?, and left it as it was.

But I wonder what you think / know about this ?.

In any case this little “adventure” has tought me that it would have been

  1. cheaper to get a complete rebuild long block (1000 pounds), instead on
    endless telephone calls, importing two engines from UK and and and…
  2. It would have been better to get a rebuild long block since I would have
    guarantee…
  3. It would have been a lot quicker ( 2 weeks) instead of 1 year with two times
    2 weeks of extremely
    stressful 16 hour work days, not having time to enjoy the company of my own
    family…
  4. It would even have been cheaper to get a Jaguar factory replacement (1950
    pounds)…

But I WANTED to know why the engine had burned a rear main bearing, I WANTED to
prove that it couldn’t be true that the engine was a gonner. Today I still dont
know why, the engine runs but not quite as it should.

Tsk Tsk Jaguars… BUT THEY DRIVE BLOODY MAGNIFICENTLY when they drive.

Regards Jeffrey Gram


From: Jeffrey Gram 101454.2570@CompuServe.COM
Date: 15 Sep 96 06:56:33 EDT
Subject: Re: Koni - standard shockabsorbers

Hi Martin,

I can’t remember If I already answered you last note from 6/9 on this subject ?,
anyhow here is a (nother)
answer

Harvey Bailey delivers a complete system, of schocks all around (specially
re-valved BILSTEIN shocks)
and a stiffer torsion bar front and a torsion bar for the rear (not standard on
any jag).

HB also delivers at set of springs uprated 25% in spring rate at about 220 UK
pounds. You could in theory
mount these springs with standard schocks to ensure you dont sit to low or sag
too much with 4 passengers.

I have asked around in UK before for extra haevy duty springs, but none came up
with a really convinging offer. The HB springs are more expensive than standard,
but he’s got a name to defend so I expect the quality is really OK

Harvey Bailey Engineering Ltd. is at : Ladycroft Farm, Kniveton, Ashbourne,
Derbyshire DE6 1JH
Telephone +44 (0)1335 346419, fax +44 (0)1335 366440

And he does for most Jags… XK120 / 140 /150, MK II, S type, E type 6 & 12 's,
XJ6, XJS, XJ40.

Regards Jeffrey Gram


From: “John Littler” auibmdak@ibmmail.com
Date: Sun, 15 Sep 1996 10:01:48 EDT
Subject: Re: Series 3, XJ6, Starting problem

Hi all,
As per the last line of Robert’s post (attached) I’m posting this up to
the group because it follows on from mine - seems I’m not the only one
with this problem…
John

Level 1, 29-57 Christie St.
St Leonards NSW 2065
Ph: +61-2-9937-8063 Fax: +61-2-9937-8100
Mobile +61-419-617-619
*** Forwarding note from I2131131–IBMMAIL 15/09/96 09:09 ***
Date:Sun, 15 Sep 1996 08:09:56 -0500
From: Robert Bradley Robert.Bradley@bh.eyi.com
To: “auibmdak%ibmmail.comauibmdak@ibmmail.com (Return requested)
Subject: Re: Series 3, XJ6, Starting problem

  1. $A110 sounds about right. The 87 XJS was $A99 from Tech Book store in Melb
    and the One I just ordered from UK is UKP35.

  2. The starting problem you described in your previous mail is EXACTLY the same
    scenario I suffered two weeks ago, including your suspicions about the safety
    micro switch in the selector housing (uncanny) but minus the Yum Cha & RACV (OK
    NRMA for you) no such road service in Bahrain. I have traced it to the starter
    relay on the fire wall (the one closest to the middle of the car, the other
    three are to do with the fuel pump/system) which sticks/fails intermittently.
    If your car does it again, which I think is highly likely, lift the bonnet
    gently and give the relay a tap with a screwdriver handle and try again. Its a
    Lucas part with a superseding number, I can tell you what it is if you’re
    interested (I don’t have it with me). P.S. It has spare terminals some of
    which are just extra posts on the same electrical point.

You can post this back to jag lovers if this sounds like it is your problem.

Robert Bradley
Bahrain (ex-Melbourne, Go Bombers)
82 XJ4.2,
82 XJ4.2 Daimler,
87 XJS.

  • ---- End of mail text

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From: “Donald R. Farr” d.farr@phx.cox.com
Date: Sun, 15 Sep 1996 07:52:29 -0700
Subject: Re: Series 3, XJ6, Starter motor.

On Friday night the better half and I went out to dinner, afterwards we got into the Sovereign to head home,when the key was turned all I got was a click. Sorry, I don’t have an answer for you, but it reminded me of a situation I encountered with my 91 Sovereign one Sunday after church. I turned the key and got nothing, absolutely quiet. Tried and tried with no success, had a friend jump-start it, still got a big NOTHING. Then I called the Jaguar 800 number; they were totally worthless, not being in any way familiar with the car. Finally, I called AAA to have them come start it and they could not so I had them tow the car to Scottsdale Jaguar. By that time I had wasted pretty near the whole day. Next morning Scottsdale Jag called and said that someone must have “bumped” me in the parking lot and triggered the “cutoff” device which I could have reset by pushing the switch (had I known about it). Turns out there is a little switch down near your left foot (LHD), on top of a small plastic housing about the size of say three tennis balls. Hope this saves someone else who may be “bumped” in the future in a parking lot from a lot of wasted time. BTW I was parked in a large parking lot with no way for someone to “bump” the car. don Donald R. Farr Paradise Valley, AZ 85253 (602) 948-7499 - fax 91 Sovereign d.farr@phx.cox.com - e-mail http://people.phx.cox.com/dfarr/dfarr.htm - Don’s Homepage http://people.phx.cox.com/dfarr/jetta1.htm - Jetta Notebook Computers http://people.phx.cox.com/dfarr/march10.htm - Wireless products http://people.phx.cox.com/dfarr/ncs1.htm - National Consulting Services From: Kroppe kroppe@mich.com Date: Sun, 15 Sep 1996 13:46:04 -0400 Subject: Re: Vehicle Dynamics Jan Wikstroem Jan_Wikstroem@acp.com.au wrote:

Seriously, let’s not confuse theory - especially public passenger vehicle
theory - with actual measurement.

Yes, Jan, you’re right. After careful thought and staring at my XJ6
rear suspension
and speaking with vehicle dynamics gurus where I work, we have concluded
that there
is significant compliance oversteer in the XJ6 rear suspension. This is
because
lateral cornering forces steer the rear wheels out of the corner,
because the
subframe bushes allow lateral movement of the subframe, but the assembly
pivots about the two trailing link forward attachments, causing the
oversteer.

I wonder if you and others agree, though, that because the majority of
vehicle
drivers in the world are not enthusiast types (too bad!) that an
understeer
philosophy is the prudent way for vehicle manufacturers to go.
Understeer for
most people is a behavior which “feels predictable” whereas oversteer is
not
intuitively predictable. The Chevy Corvair and I think BMW have had
negative
experiences with oversteer. Granted, the oversteer may have come from
causes
other than compliance oversteer, but here I am arguing that oversteer in
general is not a responsible design philosophy for manufacturers other
than
all-out racing machines (McLaren, Ferrari, etc.).

I agree that a sporting vehicle (saloon or coupe) should be as neutral
as
possible, but should not be manufactured with designed-in oversteer.
Oversteer
can be be left to enthusiasts who choose to fit their own aftermarket
rubber
bits to their vehicles.

I have requested from my contacts the camber, caster and toe curves for
the
1982 XJ6 front and rear suspensions, as well as the coordinates for the
suspension pivot and mounting points. If I receive this data, I will
simulate the motion of the suspensions on my UNIX workstation, thereby
re-creating the suspension curves. Comparing the Jaguar-derived
(manually using pencil drawings!) suspension curves with my computer
generated curves will be interesting. It will also allow us to
compare calculations with observed behavior in our vehicles.

As for the toe-in, it doesn’t change measurably through the suspension travel.
The torque arms have no effect on it at all, being connected through rubber.

We’ll see from the suspension curves whether this is true or not. I
have
read on this list that some Jaguar racers move the trailing link forward
attachment inboard towards the propshaft tunnel. I believe this is to
reduce the toe change through travel. If this is true, then the
trailing
link does have an effect on toe. Without the trailing link altogether,
the rear suspension would have no toe change (discounting any
compliances,
for now). Doing the racing-mod as above would have the geometric effect
of
“eliminating” the trailing link.

I hope I get the suspension data - if so, I will post my calculations
to either the Jag-web or my own web page. I’ll keep the list posted.
(no pun intended).

B.J. Kroppe - '82 XJ6


From: SirSmed@aol.com
Date: Sun, 15 Sep 1996 16:37:19 -0400
Subject: xj40 shop manual

Would anyone know where the best place is to buy a shop manual for an XJ40?
Here in northern Maine we are 350 miles from the nearest dealer so repairs by
local mechanics are somewhat of a necessity. One of the local garages tells
me that a
factory manual costs $271.00 u.s… I know that there are aftermarket
manuals, but I’m told that they aren’t comprehensive enough. Any help would
be greatly appreciated.
Rick Castonguay 1990 sovereign.


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jag-lovers-digest Monday, 16 September 1996 Volume 02 : Number 357

Feul Addictives
SII luggage compartment springs
re: cowl inlets on E-types; and louvers on XJs
Re: Series 3, XJ6, Starting problem
Re: Series 3, XJ6, Starter motor.
Hung up on E brake job
Re: E-type ramps and bleed kit
reverse lump?
Re: S3 and XJ40 queries
Re: XJ’s :Louvres and headlamp air scoops
Re: XKE Valve adjustment
Re: Series 3, XJ6, Starter motor.
Re: SII luggage compartment springs
Re: XJ40 headlamp preferences
Re: S3 and XJ40 queries
Re: S3 and XJ40 queries
Jaguar World - free copy
Re: XJ 6 Bonnet issues.
Re: S3 and XJ40 queries
SV: XJ40 headlamp preferences


From: “Quang Ngo” quang@psnw.com
Date: Sun, 15 Sep 1996 14:57:22 -0800
Subject: Feul Addictives

Hello everyone,

Is it okay to use feul addictives on a jag? My XJ40 loses power every so
often. When this happens I added a bottle of GUM OUT and it feels more
accelerated. Does this stuff really work or is it just my psychological
mind? If it does work which brand should I use and how often?

Thanks…

    _,'|             _.-''``-...___..--';)  Quang Ngo
    /_ \'.      __..-' ,      ,--...--'''   Principal Software Engineer
   <\    .`--'''       `     /'             quang@valleynet.com
    `-';'               ;   ; ;             89-XJ40 89-300E

__…–’’ …–…’ .;.’ Unix NT Win95 C C++
(,
…----’’’ (,…–’’


From: pbrown@sbnsw.com.au
Date: Mon, 16 Sep 96 18:26:00 ���
Subject: SII luggage compartment springs

Ouch! Ever had the bootlid come down on your head?
Do I have to replace the springs or can they be retempered, or for that
matter, adjusted?
The Haynes manual states that removal is straightforward, using a screwdriver
to lever the springs off and, you guessed
it, replacement is the reversal of the removal method. This usually means a
two-day job.
Thanks in advance to anyone who’s done this and can offer advice, aspirin and
a bandage for my poor loaf.
Regards
Peter Brown
Lobotomised 1979 double 6


From: John Napoli jgn@li.net
Date: Sun, 15 Sep 1996 18:59:08 -0400 (EDT)
Subject: re: cowl inlets on E-types; and louvers on XJs

On Sat, 14 Sep 1996, David J Shield wrote:

 I often thought of hood louvers on my XJ6 until someone on the list 
 mentioned that the heat would flow right back into the cowl inlets.  
 Jim Isbell reports that his engine runs a few degrees cooler with the 
 bonnet popped open and resting on the safety catch, wonder what that 
 does in terms of heat flowing back into the cowl?  This can be 
 measured - put a thermoprobe in various cowl inlet positions and 
 measure it with and without the bonnet popped.  I'd do this if I had a 
 thermoprobe.

I have a thermoprobe and will check it out.

John


From: John Napoli jgn@li.net
Date: Sun, 15 Sep 1996 19:14:01 -0400 (EDT)
Subject: Re: Series 3, XJ6, Starting problem

One of those little relays on the fender near the firewall is called an
inhibit relay (on my XJ-S and I think its the same on an XJ6). When these
bettys go, they do a good job of inhibiting the car from starting!!

Mine went, too – same symptoms, and over a l o n g period of time – so
you think the fiddling fixes it, and then weeeks or months later it fails
again. I eventually tossed mine and replaced it with a small jumper with
spade connectors. For most, this should be the get-me-home repair, tho,
because then the engine will start in any gear.

John

On Sun, 15 Sep 1996, John Littler wrote:

Hi all,

  1. The starting problem you described in your previous mail is EXACTLY the same
    scenario I suffered two weeks ago, including your suspicions about the safety
    micro switch in the selector housing (uncanny) but minus the Yum Cha & RACV (OK
    NRMA for you) no such road service in Bahrain. I have traced it to the starter
    relay on the fire wall (the one closest to the middle of the car, the other
    three are to do with the fuel pump/system) which sticks/fails intermittently.

From: “Robert Johnson, D.Sc.” bjomejag@sover.net
Date: Sun, 15 Sep 1996 19:21:54 -0500
Subject: Re: Series 3, XJ6, Starter motor.

John Littler wrote:

Hi all
A few different things to report: First the tale of woe (but it has a
happy ending :slight_smile: )
On Friday night the better half and I went out to dinner, afterwards we got into the Sovereignto head home,when thekey was turned all I got was a click. Hmm…hit the lights yep, plenty of power, tried a few times, still nothing but a click. Popped the bonnet,nothing loose as far as I could see. I have seen many V12 Jags and some 6 cylinder cars exhibit a similar symptom. The explanation is contamination in the starter solenoid. After running for some time, and than being turned off for about 30 min. The engine heat is soaked by the starter, which, with no cooling gets hotter than the clearances allow within the solenoid. The behavior is to hear only a slight click, and no starter engagement. Invaribly, within another 30 min the starter will work fine. The only fix is a little patience, especially on a hot day, or a replacement solenoid/starter. Bob Johnson XJ12, XJS, From: rrichardson@eurekanet.com (Bob Richardson) Date: Sun, 15 Sep 1996 19:26:56 -0500 Subject: Hung up on E brake job I hope I’m not a pest, but so far I have removed to top master cylinder (rear brake system) and am hung up on removing the bottom master cylinder. I was able to remove one of the bolts (secured by a locknout), but the other bolt and nut seem to be frozen solid. I tried liquid wrench. There is no room to get a spanner or socket in there to keep the locknut from turning. I tried inserting shims, but the nut appears to have rounded corners from some past effort to secure it. Would it help if I applied the heat from a propane torch to this balky locknut? Is there a closed-end spanner that has an ultra-thin surround? Apparently when this entire unit is produced, it’s easy enough, with the proper tools, to assemble it on a clean workbench. Someone didn’t figure in that guys like me, with big clumsy fingers, would have to undo the blasted thing! From: Patrick Krejcik pkr@SLAC.Stanford.EDU Date: Sun, 15 Sep 1996 19:13:14 -0700 Subject: Re: E-type ramps and bleed kit Bob, I hate to be a pessimist, but E-Types are extremely difficult to drive up onto ramps because the long nose is too low and scrapes up against the ramp. For the ramp to work it has to have a very shallow angle and be quite long. The only time I used a ramp was when I jacked the car up slid the ramps underneath. Look around some more for a professional rolling jack. $260 sounds awfully expensive and I am sure discount places will have one for under $100. Cheers, Patrick. 1965 E-Type 4.2 Series I FHC From: “Peter Rebbechi (03) 9275 3374” <"REBBECHI PETER"@A1.MEOC02.SNO.mts.dec.com> Date: Mon, 16 Sep 1996 02:42:00 +0000 (GMT) Subject: reverse lump? Dropped in to the local JAG parts place over the weekend, and participated in a group discussion re kit cars. Two of the guys are planning Cobra replicas powered by 6L V12’s. You should have seen the looks of horror on the faces of the purists! Considering the iscussions on this list, I was quite amused. Remember: Smoke tyres not tobacco. Smells better, and feels great! From: cobac@ix.netcom.com (Eric J Faber ) Date: Sun, 15 Sep 1996 21:33:03 -0700 Subject: Re: S3 and XJ40 queries You wrote:

Last question, someone posted something about converting a round
headlighted XJ40 to square (a week or 2 ago) Ithought XJ40’s only came
in square headlighted models ? Can somebody fill me in on this please?

John,
That was I who was asking about the headlamp conversion. It seems
as if the group isn’t very talkative about the headlamps, so I’ll tell
you how the headlamps in the XJ40 are setup in the U.S…
1988-89 All models have 4 round headlamps
1990-92 Vanden Plas, Sovereign, Majestic: 2 Square headlamps
1990-92 XJ6: Only model for '90’s to have 4 round headlamps
(Also included some black door trim instead of the
usual chrome framed doors.)
1993-94 All models (XJ6, VDP): 2 Square headlamps (also BUILT-IN
FRONT fog lamps)

The round headlamps are sort of shaped like a square. A painted flat
piece covers the front of the 2 lamps (per side) and gives it the look
of a painted rectangle with two circles in it.

I’m still confused on which lights I prefer. From a short distance, I
sometimes percieve the car to be a 1995 X300 or S3, because of the
round lights. The round lights are a bit more traditional for Jaguar.
The car can look like an old, very old or new model. The square ones
can be looked at as unusual for a jaguar, however they still look more
modern, and don’t resemble any other Jaguar.

Hope this answers your question. I’d love to know which headlamps
other Jaguar lovers prefer!


From: Jeffrey Gram 101454.2570@CompuServe.COM
Date: 16 Sep 96 02:17:31 EDT
Subject: Re: XJ’s :Louvres and headlamp air scoops

Hi,

I’m interested in the Louvres in the XJ12 S3. As mentioned by Kirby the hot air
stream from the engine compartmen could enter the fresh air inlet and impair
air-condition performance , especially at standstill I presume. Did anyone try
yet or do I have to be one spending 750 pounds on destroying my V12 bonnet :slight_smile:

I thought the louvers could be made towards the outer side of the bonnet leaving
the centre free to allow most hot air to escape and “miss” the centre fresh air
intake ? any ideas ?.

My Series 2 XJ6C has headlamp air scoops ending up in each footwell. These could
serve as air inlet to the fresh air for the airco - with some not so easy
modifications ? any opinions on that ?

My S3 XJ12 does not have these footwell air scoops - why did Jaguar discontinue
these ?

Just vistited the Jaguar Germany Dealer in Kronberg in Tausun Near Frankfurt.
The new x300’s are for sale used now at about 90.000 German marks (60.000 US$).
Some very nice XJS’s as well V12’s dreaming…, Really I would like a V12
Convertible, but ther aint no room for junior. I guess I’d be better off
converting the Coupe to a Cabrio ? Heresy ?. Vicarage will do it for me…

Regards Jeffrey Gram


From: Jeffrey Gram 101454.2570@CompuServe.COM
Date: 16 Sep 96 02:17:26 EDT
Subject: Re: XKE Valve adjustment

You can rotate a XK engine camshaft 360 degrees without hitting other valves if
the other camshaft is completely loosened or removed.

What I am not 100 % certain about is whether the inlet valves could hit a
piston at Top dead centre. It is better to set the the crankshaft to 30 degrees
before of after TDC to make sure the piston are out of the way.

However it is not necessary to be able to rotate one camshaft freely to make
100% accurate measurements of the valve clearance. With cam covers off and spark
plugs out you can turn the engine on the starter or with a key on the crankshaft
pulley nut and get quite accurate measurements. It is not necessary for the cam
lobe to point absolutely straight up from the valve in order to measurethe
clearance accurately. An error of +/- 30 degrees wont make a difference.

Regards Jeffrey Gram


From: Robert Bradley Robert.Bradley@bh.eyi.com
Date: Mon, 16 Sep 1996 01:22:51 -0500
Subject: Re: Series 3, XJ6, Starter motor.

d.farr%phx.cox.com @ Internet
15/09/96 08:31 PM
To: auibmdak%ibmmail.com @ Internet
cc: jag-lovers%sn.no @ Internet
Subject: Re: Series 3, XJ6, Starter motor.

On Friday night the better half and I went out to dinner, afterwards we
got into the Sovereign to head home,when the key was turned all I got was
a click.

Sorry, I don’t have an answer for you, but it reminded me of a situation
I encountered with my 91 Sovereign one Sunday after church. I turned
the key and got nothing, absolutely quiet. Tried and tried with no
success, had a friend jump-start it, still got a big NOTHING. Then I
called the Jaguar 800 number; they were totally worthless, not being in
any way familiar with the car. Finally, I called AAA to have them come
start it and they could not so I had them tow the car to Scottsdale
Jaguar. By that time I had wasted pretty near the whole day.

Next morning Scottsdale Jag called and said that someone must have
“bumped” me in the parking lot and triggered the “cutoff” device which I
could have reset by pushing the switch (had I known about it). Turns
out there is a little switch down near your left foot (LHD), on top of a
small plastic housing about the size of say three tennis balls.

Hope this saves someone else who may be “bumped” in the future in a
parking lot from a lot of wasted time. BTW I was parked in a large
parking lot with no way for someone to “bump” the car.

don


Since I had this one last week (the relay was two weeks ago) I’ll post script
this one too. For those who read my comment on the starter relay, it was the
other XJ6 (Scarlett) this time! Two days after I get the car back from the
dealer who finally fixes (I think) an 18 month old miss fire, my wife goes to
start the car at school, nothing. She gets out, thinks quickly (it’s still
35-40c here and takes about 60 - 90 seconds to start sweating if your outside)
and lifts bonnet, taps starter relay (previous week, othercar, good thinking I
thought). Still nothing. Thinks even quicker and goes inside to the Air
Conditioned office and calls our friendly Jag service manager. He comes out
personally and tries all tricks including the fuel inertia switch mentioned
above by Don. Nothing. Tows Scarlett back to workshop and lends Felicity a
Peugot 306 (better than walking) cause Rhett was in for a service as well. (its
post summer, holiday over, catch up on put off maintenance time) Turns out it
was the fuel inertia switch which he said had burnt out or something. He said
he had not seen this before. He replaced it FOC with a second hand one. No
“bump” involved here either.

P.S. For those who are wondering about Kermit (87 XJS) and who think these
things come in threes, stay tuned - he is in the shop for his service at the
moment. I’m holding my breath.

P.P.S I should also say that apart from two blown hoses, This is only the third
time these cars have let me down in 2 1/2 years. Given their age, the heat
here and the likely attention of POs to maintenance, I’m philosophical about it.

Robert Bradley
Bahrain
82 XJ4.2 (Scarlett)
82 XJ4.2 Daimler (Rhett)
87 XJS (Kermit) (he’s green)


From: Robert Bradley Robert.Bradley@bh.eyi.com
Date: Mon, 16 Sep 1996 01:30:23 -0500
Subject: Re: SII luggage compartment springs

pbrown%sbnsw.com.au @ Internet
16/09/96 05:04 AM
To: jag-lovers%sn.no @ Internet
cc:
Subject: SII luggage compartment springs

Ouch! Ever had the bootlid come down on your head?
Do I have to replace the springs or can they be retempered, or for that
matter, adjusted?
The Haynes manual states that removal is straightforward, using a screwdriver
to lever the springs off and, you guessed
it, replacement is the reversal of the removal method. This usually means a
two-day job.
Thanks in advance to anyone who’s done this and can offer advice, aspirin and
a bandage for my poor loaf.
Regards
Peter Brown
Lobotomised 1979 double 6

On my old Series I it wasn’t the springs that caused this, it was the thrashed out hinge pivot points. Robert Bradley Bahrain 82 XJ4.2 (Scarlett) 82 XJ4.2 Daimler (Rhett) 87 XJS (Kermit) (he’s green) From: Jeffrey Gram 101454.2570@CompuServe.COM Date: 16 Sep 96 02:29:27 EDT Subject: Re: XJ40 headlamp preferences Hi, I have never owned an XJ40, I Wonder whether I will ever . I find the S3 XJ more “Jaguar” like, and the XJ40 seems cramped to me at the driver seat with all the computer panels around the steering wheel. The squary shape of the Jag is not my taste either, here the XJ40 is a serious deviation from the beatitufully curved lines that has marked Jaguar, to be introduced again with the X300. But Hedlamps it was… In Europe all XJ40 were sold with square lamps (me thinks), and this design sort of underlines the square look (no pun intented) of thge XJ40. So One of the mods that significantly increased the sex appeal of the XJ40 is the round Lamp conversion. I would prefer the rounds anytime. I don’t like XJS’s oval lamps either…(and the butresses…) Regards Jeffrey Gram From: hastings@frodo.eucom.mil (Craig R. Hastings) Date: Mon, 16 Sep 1996 06:49:36 GMT Subject: Re: S3 and XJ40 queries As far as my opinion goes. I prefer the round headlights. More traditional I think and where would Jaguar be without tradition. Craig 88 VDP 73 E-type (maybe, I’m waiting to see if my offer is excepted) From: Jan Wikstroem Jan_Wikstroem@acp.com.au Date: 16 Sep 96 18:19:54 Subject: Re: S3 and XJ40 queries The Australian situation appears to be exclusively the “two square” variety. I can’t recall seeing a series 4 with anything else. Personally, I think the rectangular lamps stink, mainly because they are hideously expensive to replace in the $A1,000 region - and people tell me you average one a year on pebble-strewn Australian roads. In contrast, the standard round ones on S1-2-3 cost around $A80-100 for good halogens. BTW, to remove a small but common confusion, only the outer lamps on S1-2-3 are headlamps; the inners are long-range driving lamps. Some people swear by aircraft landing lights in this position; I’ve found excellent Hella 100W halogen spotlight inserts that make the original Lucas sealed beams look like anemic glow-worms. The number of “stylists” and “engineers” who feel unable to create a good-looking car with standard headlamps has now grown so much that practically only old cars use standard lamps, which I guess means that the standard is on its way out… Jan From: David Wood David.Wood@durham.ac.uk Date: Mon, 16 Sep 1996 09:13:30 PDT Subject: Jaguar World - free copy I’ve just received my subscription copy of Jaguar World - two copies in fact. For UK list members, the first person interested who sends me his/her postal address (by email) can have the spare copy free. Cheers, Dave Wood. From: Baard Th Hesvik baard@telesoft.no Date: Mon, 16 Sep 1996 09:59:15 -0700 Subject: Re: XJ 6 Bonnet issues. Barry Dawson wrote:

… You stand to the front centre of the open bonnet and place the hand
on finger tips centrally on the bonnet, then push firmly so that the bonnet
shuts with a “clunk”. This ensures sufficient force within the flexing bonnet
to snap shut in the locks. If the bonnet pops up on one side NEVER push that
side back down as the bonnet can bend, always open and start closure afresh.

Although all this is correct and, as I’ve posted previousely, the described
manner is indeed the only way allowed to close the XJ bonnet, I’m not sure that
the method of closing necessarily will remove the problem with popping bonnets.

A (Jaggee) friend of mine showed me this method of closing the bonnet, a method
he had used for some 15 years at the time. Yet, he has always had his bonnet
popping up on the right hand side. Until I showed him where to make the
adjustment;

The whole latch mechanism is adjustable! You note where the pins strike on the
plate surrounding the hole, loosen the bolts and make the adjustment. Checking
the bonnet mounted spring/pin for angle first is a very good idea (it is more
likely that this has come out of alignment than the solidly bolted striker
mechanism), whereas adjusting the spring/pin length should only be for the
purpose of aligning the bonnet heigth as opposed to the front wings.

Also, a small correction to Barry’s description; The greater force applied to
close the bonnet should not be on the finger tips placed centrally on the
bonnet, but the other hand, firmly gripping the upper part of the grille, making
an upwards movement as the first hand ensures the direction, lightly supporting
the closure. PS! place a piece of cloth between fingers and bonnet paintwork!

Good luck!

Bard


______ _ ! Baard Th Hesvik, Telesoft AS
/ _ / _ _ _ / / ! Longhammarvn 7, N-5500 Haugesund
/ // / // /_ / / -/- -/- ! T: +47 52735000 F: +47 52717040
/ /_ / /_ / // / /_ ! E-mail: baard@telesoft.no


From: Are Lorentsen are@vinn.no
Date: Mon, 16 Sep 96 10:03:00 PDT
Subject: Re: S3 and XJ40 queries

<Hope this answers your question. I’d love to know which headlamps
<other Jaguar lovers prefer!

<-cobac@ix.netcom.com
1989 XJ40 Vanden Plas

My opinion is that square headlights (or tail lights) doesn’t fit the
beautiful curves on a jaguar. Therefore I was very happy to see that X300
was one step nearer the SIII design.

Are Lorentsen
82XJ6


From: Are Lorentsen are@vinn.no
Date: Mon, 16 Sep 96 10:11:00 PDT
Subject: SV: XJ40 headlamp preferences

Jeffrey Gram:
<But Hedlamps it was… In Europe all XJ40 were sold with square lamps
<(me thinks),

XJ40 was sold in Norway also with round headlights. The sovereign had
squares, if I remember correctly.

Are Lorentsen
82XJ6


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jag-lovers-digest Monday, 16 September 1996 Volume 02 : Number 358

Re: XJ40 headlamp preferences
Re: One-man E-type brake bleed
Re: Luggage comp. springs.
Re: One-man E-type brake bleed
[SIII XJ6] Experiences with shocks and such
Re: long-range driving lamps (Was: S3 and XJ40 queries)
E type Electrical Problems
Hydraulic Floor Jack & Jack stands
XJ12 cutoff cutoff
Series III ('85) XJ6 cylinder head off!
Re: [SIII XJ6] Experiences with shocks and such
Re: E-type ramps and bleed kit
Re: xj40 shop manual
Re: XJ40: Headlamps $$$ ?
XJ front susp. upper bushes.
XK engine stake down
Re: Series 3, XJ6, Starti
GM 400 throttle switch


From: Mark Stiles ittmjs@staffs.ac.uk
Date: Mon, 16 Sep 1996 09:21:42 +0100
Subject: Re: XJ40 headlamp preferences

On 16 Sep 96 02:29:27 EDT Jeffrey Gram 101454.2570@CompuServe.COM wrote:

But Hedlamps it was… In Europe all XJ40 were sold with square lamps (me
thinks), and this design sort of underlines the square look (no pun intented) of
thge XJ40.

In the UK all XJ40s were sold with ROUND headlights, except the
Sovereign and Daimler models.(no VDPs in UK - we had Daimlers instead -
what was the spec of the VDP and Majestic models?) The proportion of
Sovs was very high, judging from what I see on the roads.

Mark Stiles
90 Daimler 4.0


From: Dan Welchman Dan.Welchman@Smallworld.co.uk
Date: Mon, 16 Sep 96 11:38:30 BST
Subject: Re: One-man E-type brake bleed

…on the subject of one-man brake bleeding…

…surely I can’t be the only jag-lover who has an “Eazi-bleed” kit?
(I think they’re made by Gunsons but I’m not sure).

This device uses your spare type as a compressed air reservoir which
pressurises a large plastic brake fluid reservoir via a hose and
footpump-style valve connector. A tube dips into the bottom of this
reservoir and feeds fluid up to an air-tight cap that screws onto
your brake fluid reservoir on the car (the kit comes with a wide range
of different caps and rubber gaskets to fit most cars).

Once you’ve fitted this and got it air-tight you can bleed the brakes
by just opening each of the nipples and letting the fluid flow out until
it’s bubble free (or longer if you’re changing the fluid).
No pumping, No assistant needed, and no worrying about having to top
up the reservoir for fear of running out of fluid and pumping air through
the system.

They’re extremely cheap and work pretty well. Maybe they’re not
available in the states?

Dan.


From: Baard Th Hesvik baard@telesoft.no
Date: Mon, 16 Sep 1996 13:14:13 -0700
Subject: Re: Luggage comp. springs.

To Peter Brown (Lobo)

We were driving along on our way home from our mountain cabin when we suddenly
heard a big BANG! I also think I felt a sudden push from behind. I was convinced
it was something very serious because of the expencive sound of the bang,
climbed out of the car and examined its lower parts, but couldn’t find anything
wrong, so I drove the car carefully home.

When unpacking the boot (boot lid held up by back of head :-, I found a large
spring and wandered where the hell that came from…?! After a short analysis
of the situation, I found out where the spring belonged :slight_smile: It had literally
eaten its way through the metal, and finally contracted with a bang, forcing me
to replace the whole hinge/spring unit.

As to your problem, which is similar to a friend of mine’s whose boot lid and
bonnet both has very weak springs, I suggest a replacement of the springs as the
best/easiest solution.

Cheers!
Bard


______ _ ! Baard Th Hesvik, Telesoft AS
/ _ / _ _ _ / / ! Longhammarvn 7, N-5500 Haugesund
/ // / // /_ / / -/- -/- ! T: +47 52735000 F: +47 52717040
/ /_ / /_ / // / /_ ! E-mail: baard@telesoft.no


From: Robert Bradley Robert.Bradley@bh.eyi.com
Date: Mon, 16 Sep 1996 07:56:54 -0500
Subject: Re: One-man E-type brake bleed

Available from whom? Approx cost please.
I’ve heard of these things and always wanted one. An added benefit would come
from reducing the risk of damage to the master cylinder seals when they travel
where no seals have gone before when you pump full strokes.


From: Gunnar Helliesen gunnar@bitcon.no
Date: Mon, 16 Sep 1996 15:53:08 +0200 (MET DST)
Subject: [SIII XJ6] Experiences with shocks and such

Folks,

I just replaced all six shocks on my '86 Series III XJ6 Sovereign with
Monroe gas shocks (gas-o-matic(?)).

They give the car a whole new feel, much firmer. They also lifted the car
just that little bit that was needed. Perfect! All the little noises from
the suspension vanished too, but that could also be related to the next
item replaced:

I also replaced the steering rack bushes with the original Jaguar Sports
bushes. I couldn’t believe the difference! Anyone out there thinking
about doing this - stop thinking and get to it right away!

Now for a question: Up front (way up front) there are two major bushes
(one each side, of course) holding the whole front suspension to the
car (or so it seems). Mine are shot. How much work is it to replace them?
Does the weight of the engine also lie on these bushes? Recommended
procedure and Real Life™ experiences?

Hints and help appreciated!

Gunnar


Gunnar Helliesen | Bergen IT Consult AS | NetBSD/VAX on a uVAX II
Systems Consultant | Bergen, Norway | '86 Jaguar XJ6 4.2 Sovereign
gunnar@bitcon.no | http://www.bitcon.no/ | Vicki who? What .sig virus?


From: Gunnar Helliesen gunnar@bitcon.no
Date: Mon, 16 Sep 1996 16:03:55 +0200 (MET DST)
Subject: Re: long-range driving lamps (Was: S3 and XJ40 queries)

Jan Wikstroem Jan_Wikstroem@acp.com.au wrote:

I’ve found exce