[Lumps!] things to look for

donn,
why is an open air cleaner bad?.
<<<<< The engine should be fairly clean. If
<<<<<there’s anything that looks like it was redesigned with a hammer, run
<<<<<away.
<<<<<An ‘open’ air cleaner is a bad sign.

donn,
thanks for the informative answer, i opted for the open air cleaner as a
cheaper alternative for dressing up the engine compartment( chrome ), not
understanding the science behind it. i also thought that the longer the air
had to travel to get to the filter lessened that amount of air. however now
i am in search of an effiecient assembly yet complimentary to my engine
compartment. thanks again and thanks to all the others who responded as
well. happy new year
johnny

Nowadays, it’s better to run a closed air cleaner. There are free
<<<<flowing
<<<<designs that you can fit a K&N style element into for good breathing,

(Camaro or Firebird cleaners spring to mind) plus you can run the inlet
up
in front of the radiator, taking advantage of the cooler, denser air there,
to make more HP. Granted, a ten degree drop in intake air is only good for
about 1 HP, but on a 70 degree day, it could be 150 or more under your hood.
Why throw away those horses? Plus, a closed cleaner body allows you to
plumb a proper crankcase breather into it (which may be required to pass
your states inspection) & a warm air system to draw heated air from near
your exhaust manifold, to warm up the car quicker in cold weather.

At 06:46 PM 01/02/2002 -0500, maybenot69 wrote:

donn,
thanks for the informative answer, i opted for the open air cleaner as a
cheaper alternative for dressing up the engine compartment( chrome ), not
understanding the science behind it. i also thought that the longer the air
had to travel to get to the filter lessened that amount of air. however now
i am in search of an effiecient assembly yet complimentary to my engine
compartment. thanks again and thanks to all the others who responded as
well. happy new year

See

http://www.ramairbox.com/

for some possible ideas.

Wes Channell

Here’s one I haven’t seen addressed before. I actually found some
references and suggestions in the archives but did not see any posts
from persons actually pulling a trailer.

Anyone using their XJ6 [lump] to pull a trailer?

If so, how heavy is the trailer?

Any special issues?

I have a MGB vintage race car. The car weights about 1825 pounds, I’m
not sure what the trailer weights. I’m thinking with a 350 and a 700R4
train and a special load equalizing hitch, pulling the trailer shouldn’t
be a problem. I seem to recall in the owners manual the Jaguar
recommendation is the trailer weight should not exceed 75% of the car
weight. 3000lbs?

I’m presently pulling it with a 3/4 ton Dodge Van with a trailer tow
package. But frankly I have too many cars around here and would like to
do some consolidating.

Larry Hoy

At 09:59 PM 01/24/2002 -0700, you wrote:

Here’s one I haven’t seen addressed before. I actually found some
references and suggestions in the archives but did not see any posts
from persons actually pulling a trailer.

Anyone using their XJ6 [lump] to pull a trailer?

If so, how heavy is the trailer?

Any special issues?

Larry

The '83 XJ6 owner’s manual lists 2,000lbs as the max trailer weight. From
dragging 3-5,000 boats around all over the country with a 350 700R4
Suburban I’d say the Lump has plenty to power. But, I have no clue on the
braking reserve. Heat might also be an issue since you’d be pulling in 3rd
gear. What rear end are you running? A 2.88 with a couple of thousand
pounds++ of trailer might be a little tough. Jaguar lists a hitch but I
have never seen one. I did inquire at a local trailer company and they
could order a receiver for the XJ6 but I can’t remember if it was a class
II or III. Someone on the XJ list used to pull a race car with his XJ6 but
I also can’t remember who or how much the rig weighed.

Other things you might consider. I don’t know the implications of a
equalizing hitch on a car with no frame. When I went past 2,000 lbs with
the Suburban I beefed up the brakes and when I hit 3,000 I went to trailer
brakes and was glad I did in a couple of emergency situations. Consider
brakes. Most car trailers I pulled in my misspent youth were comparatively
high riding. Consider a modern drop axle unit.

Wes

Let me clarify something. At the present time my XJ6 is not lumped.
I’m of the opinion that the BW66 tranny won’t survive long pulling a
trailer. My question is for planning purposes. I’m thinking if the XJ6
is capable of towing a 3000 lb trailer, then when I lump the XJ6 I can
sell my present tow vehicle.

Larry Hoy> -----Original Message-----

From: owner-lumps@jag-lovers.org
[mailto:owner-lumps@jag-lovers.org] On Behalf Of Larry Hoy
Sent: Thursday, January 24, 2002 10:00 PM
To: lumps@jag-lovers.org
Subject: [Lumps!] Pulling a trailer?

Here’s one I haven’t seen addressed before. I actually found
some references and suggestions in the archives but did not
see any posts from persons actually pulling a trailer.

Anyone using their XJ6 [lump] to pull a trailer?

If so, how heavy is the trailer?

Any special issues?

I have a MGB vintage race car. The car weights about 1825
pounds, I’m not sure what the trailer weights. I’m thinking
with a 350 and a 700R4 train and a special load equalizing
hitch, pulling the trailer shouldn’t be a problem. I seem to
recall in the owners manual the Jaguar recommendation is the
trailer weight should not exceed 75% of the car weight. 3000lbs?

I’m presently pulling it with a 3/4 ton Dodge Van with a
trailer tow package. But frankly I have too many cars around
here and would like to do some consolidating.

Larry Hoy

Hmm, I feel like I’m talking to myself here. I’ve responded twice to my
own question!

Wes’s message made me get up and dig out he owners manual. My
recollection was the max trailer weight was 75% of the vehicle weight.
Wes suggested it was 2000 lbs. To far off so I decided to look it up.
(It may be that the recommendation by Jaguar is different for different
years)

My manual for the 1987 XJ6 says, "The generally accepted formula that
the Trailer [sic] should not exceed, seventy-five per cent of the towing
car’s kerbside weight proves an adequate margin for good towing
performance with a reserve of power for overtaking and hill climbing.
Our Engineers [sic]closely follow this formula and recommend a maximum
laden weight of 1500 kg (3100 lb) as a basis for achieving these
essentials. The kerbside weight of the car can be found in the General
Data Section of the Maintenance Handbook) sic].

OK so I went to the General Data Section of the Maintenance Handbook and
found the kerbside weight to be 2155 kg(4075 lb). 4075 X 75% = 3056.

Now having said all that I’m really interested in feedback from those
that actually tow with their XJ6. Some “seat of the pants” comments.

Thanks,

Larry Hoy> Let me clarify something. At the present time my XJ6 is not

lumped. I’m of the opinion that the BW66 tranny won’t survive
long pulling a trailer. My question is for planning
purposes. I’m thinking if the XJ6 is capable of towing a
3000 lb trailer, then when I lump the XJ6 I can sell my
present tow vehicle.

Larry Hoy

My first thought would be “where are you gonna mount the hitch?” I’m sure
the car itself would be a fine towing rig…

Doug Dwyer
Longview, Washington USA----- Original Message -----
From: “Larry Hoy” larryhoy@prodigy.net

Here’s one I haven’t seen addressed before. I actually found some
references and suggestions in the archives but did not see any posts
from persons actually pulling a trailer.

Anyone using their XJ6 [lump] to pull a trailer?

If so, how heavy is the trailer?

Any special issues?

My first thought would be “where are you gonna mount the hitch?” I’m
sure
the car itself would be a fine towing rig…

Doug Dwyer

Not on the bumper. I’m sure it will need to be a rather elaborate (and
for my purposes, nearly invisible) structure that spreads the weight
evenly over the rear of the car.

Larry Hoy

At 11:31 PM 01/24/2002 -0700, Larry Hoy wrote:

Hmm, I feel like I’m talking to myself here. I’ve responded twice to my
own question!

Wes’s message made me get up and dig out he owners manual. My
recollection was the max trailer weight was 75% of the vehicle weight.
Wes suggested it was 2000 lbs. To far off so I decided to look it up.
(It may be that the recommendation by Jaguar is different for different
years)

Larry et al.

Mea Culpa. I blew that one. I am now looking at page 09-3 of the Series
III Service Manual. For the UK and European Models XJ Daimler/Sovereign
the following are given

                             4.2                     5.3

Kerb weight 4044 lbs. 4265 lbs.
Gross Vehicle Weight 4973 lbs. 6294 lbs.
Gross Train Weight 7773 lbs. 7994 lbs.
Max front axle Load 2398 lbs. 2398 lbs.
Max rear axle Load 2607 lbs. 2652 lbs.

“Gross train weight is the gross vehicle weight plus the maximum trailer
weight.”

For Federal Models

                                             XJ6                     XJ12

Gross vehicle Weight Rating 4979 lbs. 5229 lbs.
Gross Axle Weight Rating–Front 2370 lbs. 2580 lbs.
Gross Axle Weight Rating–Rear 2609 lbs. 2649 lbs.

This source is silent on trailer ratings for Federal models.

So apparently this source says the UK version XJ6 has a max trailer of
2,800 lbs. and the UK version XJ12 has a max trailer of 1,700 lbs.

The US Series III Handbook (1982) from my '83 XJ6 uses the term UNladen
weight but specifies the same 3,100 lbs. as Larry’s '87 version. The '83
Handbook goes on to explain the laden weight to be the sum of unladen
weight and contents.

What do we know? The '83 Handbook probably contains a typographical
error. We have three different Jaguar specified trailer ratings for 6
cylinder vehicles…2,800, 3056, and 3,100.

Will your '87 XJ6 handle a 3,000 lb. trailer? It ought to. I’ll be
interested to see what the list experience is.

Wes

My first thought would be “where are you gonna mount the hitch?”
I’m
sure
the car itself would be a fine towing rig…

Doug Dwyer

Not on the bumper. I’m sure it will need to be a rather elaborate (and
for my purposes, nearly invisible) structure that spreads the weight
evenly over the rear of the car.

Larry Hoy

Semi-hands on experience,
Sorry, I think it is not a good idea. Mine had one(a so
called hitch) when I bought it. I could not get it off
fast enough. It was mounted to the trunk floor. In the
tire well. 6 bolts. Framework on the bottom and plates
on the top. It probably worked great but the reason mine
is lumped is because the engine was cooked(too much
load?). The rear end has also been rebuilt (too much
load?). Just food for thought. I never used it on the
car, but someone did. Maybe it worked great!?! 82,000
miles, engine and rear end cooked and most everything
shot underneath the car when I bought it.

Mike in S.E. WA
'73 XJ12 (305/700r4) w/a late model sunroof when painted!

Another thing to consider: the 2.88 axle ratio is not a very good choice if
you’re gonna haul around an additional 3000 pounds !

Doug Dwyer
Longview, Washington USA----- Original Message -----
From: “Larry Hoy” larryhoy@prodigy.net

Hmm, I feel like I’m talking to myself here. I’ve responded twice to my
own question!

Wes’s message made me get up and dig out he owners manual. My
recollection was the max trailer weight was 75% of the vehicle weight.
Wes suggested it was 2000 lbs. To far off so I decided to look it up.
(It may be that the recommendation by Jaguar is different for different
years)

Trailer towing IS tough on a car, no doubt about it. When I used to pull
[boat] trailers I doubled up on all routine servicing: change diff oil and
trans oil every 12K miles, flush cooling system every year, etc.

Overheating and cooking an engine is easy enough to do on any car. Pretty
hard to destroy a Jag diff, though, unless it has been run low on oil (axle
seals leaking, too much work to replace!) or has really been abused.

Cheers,
Doug Dwyer----- Original Message -----
From: “michael mcginnis” mkkmmcgin@mybluelight.com

Mine had one(a so
called hitch) when I bought it. I could not get it off
fast enough. It was mounted to the trunk floor. In the
tire well. 6 bolts. Framework on the bottom and plates
on the top. It probably worked great but the reason mine
is lumped is because the engine was cooked(too much
load?). The rear end has also been rebuilt (too much
load?). Just food for thought. I never used it on the
car, but someone did. Maybe it worked great!?! 82,000
miles, engine and rear end cooked and most everything
shot underneath the car when I bought it.

Mike has hit on a point I think is critical. I’m sure the 350/700r4 can
handle the pull, I think the weight and layout of the Jag will work OK
too. The real issue is the rear suspension. One factor in pulling a
trailer is tongue weight. You must have enough to make the trailer pull
correctly but not so much you destroy the rear suspension. I don’t know
how robust the rear suspension of the Jag is.

Larry Hoy> -----Original Message-----

From: owner-lumps@jag-lovers.org
[mailto:owner-lumps@jag-lovers.org] On Behalf Of michael mcginnis
Sent: Friday, January 25, 2002 1:14 AM
To: lumps@jag-lovers.org
Subject: RE: [Lumps!] Pulling a trailer?

My first thought would be “where are you gonna mount the hitch?”
I’m
sure
the car itself would be a fine towing rig…

Doug Dwyer

Not on the bumper. I’m sure it will need to be a rather
elaborate (and for my purposes, nearly invisible) structure
that spreads the weight evenly over the rear of the car.

Larry Hoy

Semi-hands on experience,
Sorry, I think it is not a good idea. Mine had one(a so
called hitch) when I bought it. I could not get it off
fast enough. It was mounted to the trunk floor. In the
tire well. 6 bolts. Framework on the bottom and plates
on the top. It probably worked great but the reason mine
is lumped is because the engine was cooked(too much
load?). The rear end has also been rebuilt (too much
load?). Just food for thought. I never used it on the
car, but someone did. Maybe it worked great!?! 82,000
miles, engine and rear end cooked and most everything
shot underneath the car when I bought it.

Mike in S.E. WA
'73 XJ12 (305/700r4) w/a late model sunroof when painted!

At 08:13 AM 01/25/2002 -0700, Larry Hoy wrote:

Mike has hit on a point I think is critical. I’m sure the 350/700r4 can
handle the pull, I think the weight and layout of the Jag will work OK
too. The real issue is the rear suspension. One factor in pulling a
trailer is tongue weight. You must have enough to make the trailer pull
correctly but not so much you destroy the rear suspension. I don’t know
how robust the rear suspension of the Jag is.

Larry Hoy

The Jag’s rear suspension is pretty stout. You are correct on tongue
weight and the lateral forces when pulling exacerbate the issue. However,
the rear axle weight rating seems to be high enough to provide the
necessary range for your application with a “dead weight” type hitch
assembly. I don’t know if you can use an “equalizer” type assembly with
this type of chassis. Also, the trailer axle assembly will influence the
actual “on hitch” tongue weight. My boat trailers were always set up with
tandem axles and leaf springs linked to a pivoting cantilever. Thus, if
you raised the tongue high enough the trailer would balance with no tongue
support. Tongue weight would increase as height was reduced until it was
heaviest when resting on the ground. I’m not sure I completely understand
all the physics of the configuration. I can tell you that with about 100
lbs. of ball height tongue weight 5,000 lbs. of trailed weight handled
nicely through any road conditions and any speed including running with the
truckers on Western interstates. For me that usually meant I-70 and I-80
literally trans-continental.

Wes

Keith, welcome to the list. Thanks for the input. That’s exactly what
I’m looking for, first hand experience. I’ll be hauling more weight but
it sounds like your experience was good … Except for the wiring. You
must have had conversion problems, English voltage to US voltage???

Thanks again, and welcome.

Larry Hoy> -----Original Message-----

From: owner-lumps@jag-lovers.org
[mailto:owner-lumps@jag-lovers.org] On Behalf Of TOPICALRBC@aol.com
Sent: Friday, January 25, 2002 2:14 PM
To: lumps@jag-lovers.org
Subject: [Lumps!] Pulling a trailer?

First off, let me introduce myself, I’m Keith from Michigan
and last summer
bought a lumped 1979XJ12L 454/TH400 turbo. I have enjoyed
watching and
learning from the list ever since but was to much of a novice
to add any
thoughtful input-till now.

I had bought a small speed boat in LA and needed to get it
back to Michigan.
Long story shortened, I ended up buying the car and having a
Reese hitch put
on it by a custom shop in Canoga Park,CA. They bolted it
through the floor
of the trunk onto a long 1/2 inch cross bar. I then drove the
car and boat
back to Michigan in just 4 days(stopover in Vegas took longer
than expected).
Granted, the boat only weighs around 1000lbs but I never even
knew it was
back there. The biggest problem was hooking up the wiring
harness-but then I
always have problems with my trailer lights working. There’s
nothing like
driving a vintage car.

Keith
1979XJ12L