Powdercoating

I have the entire front of my e-type disassembled for repainting and
wanted to ask about powdercoating.

What is the usual position of concours judges re powdercoarting vs:
paint? I am thinking about getting all of the parts that are usually a
semi-gloss black powdercoated. They have a powder which is relatively
close to the original color. I know that powder is much more durable
(and expensive).

The car will never be a “concours trailer queen”, rather a driver. I
would like to preserve it as much as possible, yet keep it as nearly
“correct” at the same time.

If I were to enter it in a concours, would I lose points for a better
than factory finish?

Thanks in advance._________________________
George Cohn
'70 OTS
http://www.xke-lovers.com

George,

I voted for paint last time and maintain that position. In fact, the
subtle addition of a flattner doesn’t hurt.

You mention driving it, which depending upon where you show, could hurt
your position simply because it’s a helluva lot more difficult to keep
the resto looking fresh and clean. Assuming your driver gets placed next
to a trailer queen and the trailer queen is the obvious first place
winner, you shouldn’t get beaten up by the judges as there would be no
point in dwelling deeper into the car’s defficiencies (of course, there
are others who think differently). Should your driver and another very
close car show up, the difference between a noticable powder coated part
vs. a painted part could break the tie to your disfavor.

Your decision to powder coat should be based on how important winning
is.

SK
62 OTS
George Cohn wrote:>

I have the entire front of my e-type disassembled for repainting and
wanted to ask about powdercoating.

What is the usual position of concours judges re powdercoarting vs:
paint? I am thinking about getting all of the parts that are usually a
semi-gloss black powdercoated. They have a powder which is relatively
close to the original color. I know that powder is much more durable
(and expensive).

The car will never be a “concours trailer queen”, rather a driver. I
would like to preserve it as much as possible, yet keep it as nearly
“correct” at the same time.

If I were to enter it in a concours, would I lose points for a better
than factory finish?

Thanks in advance.


George Cohn
'70 OTS
http://www.xke-lovers.com

Dear George,

Powder coating is “paint”. It is paint applied without solvent. I can
show you two parts, one finished with powder coating, one sprayed with a
solvent based finish and you could not tell by eye which was which.

A tried and true way of telling is the “acetone wipe test”. Take a piece
of cotton cloth wet with acetone, and quickly wipe the painted surface.
The solvent based finish transfers the greatest amount of color to the
cloth. A good quality powder coat finish will yield almost no color. Do
the judges at your concours do test paint by wiping them with solvent
soaked rags?

Powder coating is generally more durable because for one thing you can get
a denser coating (you do not have the microscopic voids created by
evaporating solvents).

But on a poorly prepared surface, and with a poorly applied powder coating
is no more durable than a solvent based finish.

If you get a powder coat finish on the any exterior parts be sure you have
a zinc rich primer applied first.

Because of air quality standards in my part of southern California it
cost me the same whether I specify powder coating (solventless painting)
or solvent based paint to finish a part.

Powder coating is not a miracle paint (Bill Hirsch sells that). Who
applies it is just as important as what is applied. I won’t trust anyone
who says you don’t need a primer on chassis parts and who can’t get you
the look of a solvent based paint.

Lastly, are the judges at your concours deducting points for the use of
polyurethane acrylic exterior finishes? Because if your are loosing points
for using this modern, not original paint to finish the exterior of the
car then might just deduct points for the use of powder coat finishes.

Take care,

Robert Paulson
1966 3.8 ‘S’ type
1965 3.8 MK2

George Cohn wrote:> I have the entire front of my e-type disassembled for repainting and

wanted to ask about powdercoating.

What is the usual position of concours judges re powdercoarting vs:
paint? I am thinking about getting all of the parts that are usually a
semi-gloss black powdercoated. They have a powder which is relatively
close to the original color. I know that powder is much more durable
(and expensive).

http://www.xke-lovers.com

Where I’ve seen the difference in powder coating is exactly as you
describe, a total lack of small voids or any orange peel. That’s usually
what gives it away. If you could somehow ensure a little peel, that
would probably do the trick and hide the fact.

I don’t think it will be plausible to deduct points for acrylic vs.
lacquar (never could spell that word), as most states EPA have outlawed
the high VOC of lacquar. However, there is a big difference between
parts shot with a single stage urethane vs. a base coat/clear coat and
this should be cause for deduction.

SK
62 OTS

Robert Paulson wrote:>

Dear George,

Powder coating is “paint”. It is paint applied without solvent. I can
show you two parts, one finished with powder coating, one sprayed with a
solvent based finish and you could not tell by eye which was which.

A tried and true way of telling is the “acetone wipe test”. Take a piece
of cotton cloth wet with acetone, and quickly wipe the painted surface.
The solvent based finish transfers the greatest amount of color to the
cloth. A good quality powder coat finish will yield almost no color. Do
the judges at your concours do test paint by wiping them with solvent
soaked rags?

Powder coating is generally more durable because for one thing you can get
a denser coating (you do not have the microscopic voids created by
evaporating solvents).

But on a poorly prepared surface, and with a poorly applied powder coating
is no more durable than a solvent based finish.

If you get a powder coat finish on the any exterior parts be sure you have
a zinc rich primer applied first.

Because of air quality standards in my part of southern California it
cost me the same whether I specify powder coating (solventless painting)
or solvent based paint to finish a part.

Powder coating is not a miracle paint (Bill Hirsch sells that). Who
applies it is just as important as what is applied. I won’t trust anyone
who says you don’t need a primer on chassis parts and who can’t get you
the look of a solvent based paint.

Lastly, are the judges at your concours deducting points for the use of
polyurethane acrylic exterior finishes? Because if your are loosing points
for using this modern, not original paint to finish the exterior of the
car then might just deduct points for the use of powder coat finishes.

Take care,

Robert Paulson
1966 3.8 ‘S’ type
1965 3.8 MK2

George Cohn wrote:

I have the entire front of my e-type disassembled for repainting and
wanted to ask about powdercoating.

What is the usual position of concours judges re powdercoarting vs:
paint? I am thinking about getting all of the parts that are usually a
semi-gloss black powdercoated. They have a powder which is relatively
close to the original color. I know that powder is much more durable
(and expensive).

http://www.xke-lovers.com

Steve

Could you please explain your following statement.

<
However, there is a big difference between
parts shot with a single stage urethane vs. a base coat/clear coat and
this should be cause for deduction.
<

Cheers

Lauren

Where I’ve seen the difference in powder coating is exactly as you
describe, a total lack of small voids or any orange peel…>

As a comment on that and it’s effect on judging, my wife’s cousin restores
and shows cars (Mopar things, but he is dedicated!). On his last project
car, a '60s Charger that came with the air cleaner poking through the hood,
his paint job was discounted for the lack of any flaws in the paint job, a
sure sign that the perfection of the paint was more than the original car
would have had straight from the factory. Mind you, I don’t know if that is
more of a comment on judging or the quality of Chrysler paint jobs.

Jim Voorhies
XK140

Sorry for the delay, but I’ve been playing PC technician for four nites.
Having now done that, I’d rather return to playing Jaguar technician.

Look at the depth of the clear coat on a base coat/clear coat job. It is
noticably deeper than the finish on a single stage (acrylic enamal,
lacquar or single stage urethane). The obvious difference is that the
clear scratches well above the surface of the color. Unless the clear
coat is micro thin (like maybe 1 miron) it will exhibit way too much
depth. A sure giveaway would be the scratches, so just don’t ever clean
all those black parts.

While I don’t believe that anyone will deduct for a base/clear coat
finish on the body panels unless it is in the preservation class, this
process (like powder) clearly deviates from the factory finish in a way
that is not superior, just plain different. Conversely, the base/clear
coat on the body panels is nearly essential, as there aren’t any paint
shops likely to want to do anything else (plus the materials recommended
by the EPA virtually drive it in this direction).

SK
62 OTS

Lauren Pratt wrote:>

Steve

Could you please explain your following statement.

<
However, there is a big difference between
parts shot with a single stage urethane vs. a base coat/clear coat and
this should be cause for deduction.
<

Cheers

Lauren