[pre-xk] Rear Window Blind

(OddBrit) #1

I’m about to install a new headliner in my car and I am needing
information on the rear window blind cabling. WHen I got my car
the only part of the system I had was the l brackets on the back
of the rear seat. When I removed the old head liner there was
nothing above it either.

SO I need information on what the blind was made of? How it was
raised and lowered? Where the activation mechanism was located.
How the shade rerolled. etc.

Thanks in advance, Jim Bolinger (Canton, OH)–
Jim Bolinger 48 Jaguar Mk IV
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(Ed Nantes) #2

In reply to a message from OddBrit sent Sun 7 Feb 2016:

The blind itself was mounted on the back of the seat . Two
cords cameupwards and went through small eyelets [ round hooks
that screwed through the headlining into the metal arch. If you
examine the arches you should be able to see the small holes.

The cords then went across to the driver’s sie and along
above the doors where a small ring was at the end
When this was pulled the blind raised. There was a small
bakelite/ plastic knob that the ring could be hooked on to hold
it up.
One would have guessed that Lyons would have never seen a
drive-in theatre, bu here we see he has included the perfect
accessory for attending them.

The roller blind was pretty much the normal type whc was
spring loaded [ from memory.

All this being said , I never bothered to re-fit mine.
I had thought that if I did, rather than a plian blind, one
with an artistic rendering of two passengers would add
interest.

If oyu are about to install the head lining , I think there
were previous posts which offered useful hints.
There are certainly ays to make it easier.–
The original message included these comments:

I’m about to install a new headliner in my car and I am needing
information on the rear window blind cabling. WHen I got my car
the only part of the system I had was the l brackets on the back
of the rear seat. When I removed the old head liner there was
nothing above it either.
SO I need information on what the blind was made of? How it was
raised and lowered? Where the activation mechanism was located.
How the shade rerolled. etc.


Ed Nantes SS
Melbourne, Australia
–Posted using Jag-lovers JagFORUM [forums.jag-lovers.org]–
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(Graham Jordan) #3

In reply to a message from Ed Nantes sent Mon 8 Feb 2016:

I have lots of photos of mine. Where it mounted to the rear
seat. The eyelets in the headlining etc.
Given time I can send them to you.
If you are going to install it it needs to be done in
conjunction with installing the headlining.
Send me an email direct.
Regards, Jordy.–
Jordymk5
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(Peter Lloyd) #4

I just found this topic and have a related question. I will add comments that will no doubt be a bit late for your task, Jim, but it may help others. Several years ago I had to replace the headcloth because moths had set up camp behind it.

Firstly, my question - what was the style of fabric for the blind? Was it in matching headlining cloth or something else to contrast with the upholstery or carpet, or something neutral? It is not important in the scheme of things as one can be creative with this. A few years ago I entered my car in a concours (to find out how much work I still needed to do) and the judges commented on the incorrect blind material, but I did not get a chance to ask what it should be.

Back to what I found during my replacement task, which might help someone else, and to add to Ed’s and Graham’s comments. The route that the cord takes is this. The two headlining steel hoops ( easily made from 1/2" x 1/8" flat if rusted and the eyelet studs broken) have tapped holes to take the eyelets. There are 6 in total, 5 in the rear hoop and one in the forward hoop. These are to keep the cord following closely to the contour of the headlining. There is one above each end of the blind suspension rod (just clear of the rear window sides), and one in the centre between these. There are two more to take the cord around the downward curve of the hoop. There is a single one in the forward hoop aligning with the outer one in the rear hoop. From there the cord becomes obscure behind the headlining. There is a small hole through the wooden transom which fixes to the back of the sunroof box and the cord passes through this and above the cant rail to a small metal guide bracket above the driver’s head. A section of the weave is opened here to allow the cord through. There is a smart little art deco peg a little further along for the cord pull ring to hook onto.

You will need to install a pull wire through this overhead area of course, during the headlining replacement. There is nothing fancy about the provision of the holes for the cord - just open up the weave and pass the cord through. The little peg at the front is important as it maintains a fixed point for the pull ring to rest on without straining the headcloth and is the reference point for the blind upper stop position.

The roller is a conventional roller blind but with no ratchet, as you cannot operate it with a ratchet, the blind being upside down to conventional use. I had trouble finding a replacement roller blind, as they were too big in diameter to fit behind the seat. I eventually did and have kept it as a spare, as I managed to unseize my original. The diameter is important, as is the thickness of cloth to avoid binding in the gap. (If you use a suitable modern roller, you must permanently lock out the ratchet.)

Twin cords run from the pull ring through the cant rail cavity then through the first four eyelets. One then drops to the first side of the blind and the other feeds through the remaining two rings and drops to the other side of the blind. It is advisable to wind the roller to the lowest strength for rewinding as there is more force than you expect for drawing the blind up due to the resistance from the roller spring and friction through the eyelets. With one leg of the cord a bit longer than the other, you may find in time that the natural stretch makes the blind lean slightly to the longer side. To overcome this, I use a single cord doubled and attached with a clove hitch through the ring. This allows an easy adjustment later.

The eyelets are somewhat special - heavy section, small eye, integral washer, and 6BA stud. I don’t know of any available so if you are missing these, you may have to make something as an alternative. Personally, I would go for a 1/8" Whitworth. The washer is important as it covers the hole in the headlining where the eye passes through.

I used venetian blind cord and soaked it in strong tea to give it a colour closer to the head cloth.

That’s about it, but what should the blind fabric be?

(Rob Reilly) #5

Ahh, so that’s what those loops are for.
First one about 2" forward of the right hand B post.


Second one above right rear door.

Three more around right rear corner.

One above left hand shade end.