Questions about a jack

I recently purchased a jack for my 1954 XK-120 (the boot area had been pretty well stripped by previous owners). the jack was described as a “restored original,” but it does not resemble any of the jacks described in Philip Porter’s book. The foot has the letters “Stevenson Jacking System World Patents” stamped on it, but it does not resemble the jack shown in Photo 31 on p. 309 of Porter in that the lifting arm is welded to the body. It more resembles that shown in Photo 33, except that the top is domed, rather than having a groove around the top. It could be that it was assembled by someone out of a hodgepodge of old parts. I would appreciate any insight someone could give me. I may send it back if it is not authentic.


Yes, your jack looks to be correct, though the colour appears to be a little redder than originally. The top of the jack does look a little different. This is mine, also from a ‘54.

Alan,

Your Jack is definately a reproduction and not an original anything, let alone a late XK120 original, but if the right price, may well suit a space-filler until you find an original…
Its interesting in that although both the main tube and the welded on Lifting Arm seem to be fabricated from scratch, the foot itself appears to be an original from a 1945 to 1949 Mark IV or Mark V saloon, or indeed one of many other British makes from the same age period. This 1945 to 1949 period has the lettering STEVENSON JACKING SYSTEM and WORLD PATENTS lettering around the foot whereas from 1950 to 1958 the lettering was changed to SMITHS and STEVENSON JACKING SYSTEM reflecting the change in the actual manufacturer of the Jack…
Re the reproduction parts - look at the top of the main tube, yours is curved over the top circumference, whereas if you look at Nick’s original Jack there is a swaged in circumferential groove which actually was a Smiths Patented improvement, and not something easily copied in a reproduction effort. Also look at the area where your arm is welded to the main body - yours is totally sharp and clean with minimal signs of welding; again look at Nicks - these all have this typical large bead of electric welding very evident. Getting picky now, but with yours the square tube arm has quite sharp corners - again look at Nicks, where there is a small but distinct radius… The colour - who knows from a photo, but same problem with a reproduction Jack and a restored original - depends how good the colour match is.
So that’s just from your photos - who knows how good or otherwise it is if I get a tape/caliper out and start measuring the main body, lifting arm, and top drive-nut…

But as before - if it is cheap enough, maybe something you can use (assuming it works properly) as an interim, but interesting that whoever has made this Jack up has used what appears to be an original 1945-1949 cast-steel foot…

Thank you both. Since it was represented as an original, I’ll return it and keep looking.

Hmm. Looking more closely at mine the base and top are as you describe.


I debated repainting the thing because it retained most of its original colour but it was still ratty. The colour match is close, though. Same as what was used on the seat pans.