Respraying S-type

Hi,

I am about to respray my S-type. I asked the following questions
on the saloons list before and it was suggested that there is
more detailed knowledge on this list. I am not in pursuit of a
concours condition S-type, but the paint job has to look perfect.
I don’t want to strip to bare metal since the car is rustfree and
undented.

I want to get it resprayed in a modern 2-pack from PPG.
I have the following questions:

What type of paint was originally used on a 1967 jaguar?
A Cellulose or synthetic or thermo plastic acryl laquer?

Can I just respray in 2-pack or would the old paint react?

Can I use an epoxy or filling primer as an insulation layer?

Or is it better to find a cellulose or TPA paint?

Thanks,

Frank Benschop

My personal opionion is that you’ll have too much paint on the car after
the respray and a much less than perfect job compared to a bare metal
job. The reason is that Jaguar used a fair amount of primer as a base to
fill in imperfections followed by several coats of what was probably
acrylic, not nitro cellulous laquer, on top. If the car was a solid
color, it might have been acrylic enamel. Nonetheless, you’ll need at
least a filler/primer/sealer on that (a sealer to prevent reactions with
enough to filler to block sand), plus the color coat followed by the
clear coat. About $700 worth of material plus labor on a 30 year old
base. Bad plan.

SK
62 OTS

Frank Benschop wrote:>

Hi,

I am about to respray my S-type. I asked the following questions
on the saloons list before and it was suggested that there is
more detailed knowledge on this list. I am not in pursuit of a
concours condition S-type, but the paint job has to look perfect.
I don’t want to strip to bare metal since the car is rustfree and
undented.

I want to get it resprayed in a modern 2-pack from PPG.
I have the following questions:

What type of paint was originally used on a 1967 jaguar?
A Cellulose or synthetic or thermo plastic acryl laquer?

Can I just respray in 2-pack or would the old paint react?

Can I use an epoxy or filling primer as an insulation layer?

Or is it better to find a cellulose or TPA paint?

Thanks,

Frank Benschop

Frank Benschop wrote:

Hi,

I am about to respray my S-type. I asked the following questions
on the saloons list before and it was suggested that there is
more detailed knowledge on this list. I am not in pursuit of a
concours condition S-type, but the paint job has to look perfect.
I don’t want to strip to bare metal since the car is rustfree and
undented.

I want to get it resprayed in a modern 2-pack from PPG.
I have the following questions:

What type of paint was originally used on a 1967 jaguar?
A Cellulose or synthetic or thermo plastic acryl laquer?

Can I just respray in 2-pack or would the old paint react?

Can I use an epoxy or filling primer as an insulation layer?

Or is it better to find a cellulose or TPA paint?

The paint subject seems to come up all of the time on the e-type list.
One of these days I’ll have to sift through the messages and create a
FAQ.

I’ll toss my two cents worth in here FWIW. I agree that you would be
foolish to apply hundreds of dollars of new material over a 30 year old
base. The material is really the least of the cost. Think about the
hours of labor you or someone else will spend prepping the surface.
Labor is expensive, even if it’s just your own time.

While you COULD apply a sealer to prevent any reaction betwwen the new
and old paint, you’re still relying on the adhesion of 30 year old paint
to hold it together.

As far as I know, most manufacturers were using synthetic acrylic
enamels in the late '60’s. They are inexpensive, easy to apply and last
5 or 6 years before starting to deteriorate.

Lacquer was the paint of choice for customizers and auto repair shops.
It dried quickly and you could apply many layers of paint, rub it out
between coats, and come up with a shine that looked a mile deep. It’s
sale or use has been banned in many areas due to environmental reasons.
(Guess why it dried so fast).

Modern 2 pack polyurethanes provide a finish that’s extremely durable,
reasonably easy to apply but the material is relatively expensive. The
real down side is that they are catalysed with an isocyranate, a close
relative to cyanide. Their use requires fresh air breathing apparatus
and carefully filtered spray booths. Not something I would recommend to
an amateur.

I would recommend finding a good paint shop, talk to them and determine
what prep work you could do to save costs, then let them handle the
actual spray job. You will probably be a lot happier in the long run.

BTW, I have talked to several members of the local Jaguar club who have
spent 5 to 7 thousand dollars on just the paint job for their e-types.__________________________
George Cohn
'70 OTS