[Saloon-lovers] Can't get into gear

Hi all,

For the first time I was able to get my Mk 2 started and running. I was not able to get it into gear.

I imagine the clutch plate is rusted to the flywheel.

I’ve started the car with the gear lever in 1st gear with the rear wheels off the ground and let it run for a while but it did not break free.

I put the gear lever in reverse and started the car with the wheels on the ground but still no clutch.

The clutch slave is moving the fork and it looks like the throw out bearing is moving but no clutch action.

We adjusted the clutch rod at the slave to make it longer with out any change.

Any ideas how to free this up.

Thanks,

Shell–
61 MK 2- 69 E FHC-97 XJR
La Grange Park, IL, United States
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In reply to a message from Shell Yoelin sent Sat 11 Apr 2009:

If the clutch is stuck to the flywheel you wont be able to
start the car, as as soon as you hit the start button the
car will move forward (or try to). If that is what is
happening the the usual method of freeing it is to tow or
push start it, then with the car running (say 20 -30 mph)
push the clutch pedal down and jump on the brakes, it will
eventually break free.
Regards
Phil Dobson–
The original message included these comments:

Hi all,
For the first time I was able to get my Mk 2 started and running. I was not able to get it into gear.
I imagine the clutch plate is rusted to the flywheel.
I’ve started the car with the gear lever in 1st gear with the rear wheels off the ground and let it run for a while but it did not break free.
I put the gear lever in reverse and started the car with the wheels on the ground but still no clutch.
The clutch slave is moving the fork and it looks like the throw out bearing is moving but no clutch action.
We adjusted the clutch rod at the slave to make it longer with out any change.


Phil.D 3.8 etype, TWR V12 XJS, 4.0 XKR8, 2.4 MK2
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In reply to a message from Phil.Dobson sent Sat 11 Apr 2009:

Phil’s method is right but I would suggest that you try to get the
car to a place with space–start it and after it is up to temp turn
it off and start it in gear (just worry about push/tow starting.
After you are going do as Phil says but easy then harder–try to
use the least force you can as it is very possible to snatch the
center of the clutch out!–
The original message included these comments:

car will move forward (or try to). If that is what is
happening the the usual method of freeing it is to tow or
push start it, then with the car running (say 20 -30 mph)
push the clutch pedal down and jump on the brakes, it will
eventually break free.


George Camp
Columbia SC, United States
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In preparation for the return of my repainted (Pearl Grey w/ Old English
White) 1957 MK VIII later this month I started a spreadsheet list of all
the chromed pieces on my car (not counting the individual pieces of the
radiator grille or the chromed screws). I used my original OEM Jaguar
MK VIII Spare Parts Catalogue published in June 1958 as the primary
source of this information. I was surprised to find that there were at
least 136 individually chromed metal pieces on this car. I think my
list is at least 90% complete and accurate now, but it wouldn’t surprise
me that there may be more additions to my list when the car returns home
and I get started.

The good news is that I believe I have all the pieces (and many spares
pieces) in relatively decent shape, the bad news is that all will need
re-choming after 52 years (34 years in non-drivable storage) and the
re-chroming will probably be the second most expensive part of this
restoration after the repaint.

I compiled the list to help me get price quotes on the re-chroming and
to help prioritize which parts get chromed first.

For those with MK VIIIs or MK IXs interested in a copy of my list, just
send me an email off list (see email address below) and I will send you
a copy of the Excel spreadsheet that I have created with the
nomenclature, parts number, parts catalogue page and plate.

Regards,

Paul M. Novak

1990 XJ-S Classic Collection convertible
1987 XJ6 Vanden Plas
1985 XJ6 Vanden Plas (parts)
1984 XJ6 Vanden Plas
1969 E-Type FHC
1957 MK VIII Saloon
Ramona, CA
@Paul_M_Novak1

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In reply to a message from George Camp sent Sun 12 Apr 2009:

Someone discussed this problem here several years ago. He started
the car in first, while it was safely pointed down the quiet
street, not into the garage, and then press and release the gas
pedal a couple times to bunny hop the car and that broke the clutch
loose.

You can actually power shift into your other gears and drive quite
a ways without using the clutch, but you need to time your shifts
to the engine and road speed and you can munch the gears pretty
badly in the process of learning. I drove my first car this way in
San Franciso for a couple months, including parking on hills, with
no further depreciation of that $35 Datsun (1964 SPL310, off topic
here).

I took the jag on a 120 mile loop with the club this weekend, it
ran great, crappy mileage, needs some compression and needs the OD
solenoid to work right.
P.

P.–
Peter J. Smith, 1966 3.8S MOD
Carson City Nevada, United States
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In reply to a message from Shell Yoelin sent Sat 11 Apr 2009:

Hi Shell,
while I have no direct experience with a manual transmission Mk 2,
I can relay my experience with my Rover 2000TC. Sticking of the
clutch plate to the flywhees was a common experience with the
Rovers. If it sat for a few weeks while we were on vacation, the
clutch plate would stick.

The remedy for severe sticking was to gain access to the
flywheel/clutch plate with a screwdriver between the two and pop
the plate free while a helper kept the clutch pedal depressed.

Now the question is: Is there an access hole somewhere on the Mk 2
that will allow you to do this?

Tom–
The original message included these comments:

For the first time I was able to get my Mk 2 started and running. I was not able to get it into gear.
I imagine the clutch plate is rusted to the flywheel.
Any ideas how to free this up.
Shell


1960 Mk 2, 1968 Rover 2000TC, 2001 XJ8, Los Angeles, CA
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In reply to a message from 302Rover sent Mon 13 Apr 2009:

Hello Tom,

No.

The worst case I’ve seen required driving down hill at 30 mph in
first, clutch pedal to the floor, then slamming on the brakes until
lockup. The problem is that the springs in the clutch plate can
absorb a lot of force. A mild case can be broken by the starter in
gear or by raising the rear wheels, reving the engine in gear and
applying the brakes. If that does not work, warm up the engine in
neutral, push to a safe location, start in first gear and apply the
brakes at speed with the clutch held down. It that fails, look for
a hill.–
The original message included these comments:

Now the question is: Is there an access hole somewhere on the Mk 2
that will allow you to do this?
Tom


PS
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In reply to a message from 302Rover sent Mon 13 Apr 2009:

Hi All,

We got the clutch free using a very benign method that had
little risk to life and limb.

We had a neighbors tractor pull the car slowly about 20 feet
with the engine off in 4th gear with the clutch depressed.
Then in 3rd, 2nd and 1st, stopping between each gear change.
The clutch plate came free and I went on my maiden voyage.

I’ll get pictures posted.

Thanks for your generous support.

Shell–
The original message included these comments:

I imagine the clutch plate is rusted to the flywheel.
Any ideas how to free this up.


61 MK 2- 69 E FHC-97 XJR
La Grange Park, IL, United States
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