[Saloon-lovers] Introduction

Hello Listers!

I’m a Newbie, named Neil Bradley. I like old British Cars, dating to my
first, when I was in High School, a used MGTC I picked up for $400. Now,
retired and living in Berkeley, I can spend lots of time on them. It
took me 28 years to do a ground-up concours restoration on a 1946 MGTC
and a few years to do a complete restoration on an Austin Healey, BN 2.
Actually, I had to raise my own restorer. My son did almost all the work
on both cars, after I dismantled them. I’ve got the scars to prove it.

Now, it’s the turn of a Mark II. I love the lines of a Mark II and
wanted to have a car my wife could drive easily. This is a “rolling”
restoration. That part of it I don’t recommend. Some of you might
cringe at the mechanical changes I’m making under the bonnet but I wanted
an everyday reliable driver. I’ve already installed XJ 6 rack and pinion
power steering and a type 35 transmission with a large oil cooler, which
I hope lasts for awhile. I’m retaining the XK engine and hope that lasts
as well. I’m now working on an air-conditioning set-up, using Vicarage
brackets and pulleys. I might just get the air conditioning ready in time
for winter. The restored wood and BAS supplied interior is finished and
spread all over the house, which may have something to do with the fact
that my wife refers to this wonderful car as “Useless”.

I’ve enjoyed reading the information and comments in the Digest and I’d
appreciate any information I can get on plumbing the air conditioner.
Having introduced another Digest reader, now I can go back to lurking.

Neil Bradley
" I love the smell of Hipoid in the morning."

Hi all,

I am the proud owner of a 3.4S. I bought it in june,
but had to put it in storage until recently. Now, for
the first time I can have a good look at it. Why not
have a good drive in it? Well, I bought it without
engine, gearbox and propshaft.

It is an original dutch car which for dutch cars is
amazingly (but not cmpletely) rust free. It was BRG,
before the PO sprayed primer over the topcoat. The
body has some rust around the small front LH light,
behind the front bumper under the mentioned light
and in the RH front door two rust bubbles are present.
The body is straight and shows no signs of accidental
damage. The wood is really nice, the leather is the
worst part of the car, original carpeting, the chrome
is quite good.

The stange thing about this car is that it was restored
in 1990 to a reasonable high degree. Minor welding was
involved and the outside body was resprayed. Wire wheels
were fitted etc. About fl.30.000,- was spent (UKP 9.000,
USD 15.000) In 1992, when bought by the PO, the car was
valued at fl.32.500,=. At the time the restoration was
considered good and large parts were still original,
such as interior and engine.

Two years later the PO decides to sell the engine to a
friend, because he wanted to put a 4.2 in it, he says.
He is a bit more vague about the primer. He claims that
paint job wasn’t very good. The colour didn’t match with
the old paint (in door entrances etc.) and I can see a lot
of chipping. He also said he wanted to paint it dark blue.
So why would someone do this to a car that is apparently
in good and original condition? Well, my luck I guess.

I just started with stripping all things off the body. And
by doing so I discovered why the car has so little rust. It
is the 4mm thick undercoating! Of course all threads of the
bolts from the front lights and gadgets in the engine bay
are coated as well! Is this normal?

The plan is to remove the paint from the underside of the
doors and sills to make sure there isn’t any hidden rust.
Then get some welding done on the small front light area
and the RH front door. Then I will prepare the car for
the repray. I will do the primer and wet sanding myself.
The car should be resprayed by january.

This is enough for the moment. I will post a separate
question about removing the lights.

Regards,
Frank Benschop
The Netherlands

I’ve been reading the list for the past couple weeks, and decided
it was time for me to introduce myself and my problems.
I just recently discovered and purchased a 1967 420. It has been
parked in a farmers field for 10 years and is quite bad shape. The first
time I looked at it I thought “It will take a miracle to resurrect this
car.” My wife took one look at it and said “It’s beautiful, I want it.”
So now I’m trying to be a miracle worker:-) The po had stripped the
paint off half the car in plans to repaint it, then lost interest in it
and just parked it outside. It also has a broken spark plug, 10 year old
gas in the tanks(serious varnish build up), some misc broken pieces in
the interior, and some shoddy looking maintenance/rigging.
My questions for everyone are: Where do you purchase interior
parts, lights, trim, etc.? Is there any chemicals which will loosen up
the varnish from the old gas? What is the best repair manual which shows
cylinder head removal on the 4.2?
I have several other questions, but will save them for the time
when I begin seriously working on the car. Thanks in advance for your
help.

Glenn Haslem
San Antonio Tx

Hi Glenn

My sympathies…succummed to the wife too eh. We have a 420 for the
same reason, only this time it’s a Daimler Sovereign (read thinly
diguised Jaguar 420). It’s the second one Dianne has owned and
mechanically is very similar to a Series I XJ6 saloon…basically same
engine and carbies, same Girling brakes, similar rear suspension,
exhaust system etc, but shares a lot of fittings/body bits etc with Mark
II/S Type.

As far as repair manuals go…the XJ6 factory manual is good, or the
Bently “Complete E Type” (same motor basically) has lots of detail and
good drawings.

You should also establish contact with Richard Gress in Utah who is
rebuilding his rear suspension on his S Type. Another 420 person is Ron
Smith in Alberquerque New mexico (he also has a Mark X he is restoring).
Lots of help available on this list. Lots of posts about restarting
engines laid up etc.
Any way I can help please Email me.

Noel Annett
68 E (2+2) Manual (His…“On the road ag’in”…Willie Nelson)
67 Daimler (420) (Hers)
71 XJ6 Manual (His - being painted)
85 BMW 528i (Ours)
Canberra, Australia>----------

From: ghaslem@juno.com[SMTP:ghaslem@juno.com]
Sent: Friday, October 24, 1997 1:28 PM
To: saloons@jag-lovers.org
Subject: [Saloon-lovers] Introduction

I’ve been reading the list for the past couple weeks, and decided
it was time for me to introduce myself and my problems.
I just recently discovered and purchased a 1967 420. It has been
parked in a farmers field for 10 years and is quite bad shape. The first
time I looked at it I thought “It will take a miracle to resurrect this
car.” My wife took one look at it and said “It’s beautiful, I want it.”
So now I’m trying to be a miracle worker:-) The po had stripped the
paint off half the car in plans to repaint it, then lost interest in it
and just parked it outside. It also has a broken spark plug, 10 year old
gas in the tanks(serious varnish build up), some misc broken pieces in
the interior, and some shoddy looking maintenance/rigging.
My questions for everyone are: Where do you purchase interior
parts, lights, trim, etc.? Is there any chemicals which will loosen up
the varnish from the old gas? What is the best repair manual which shows
cylinder head removal on the 4.2?
I have several other questions, but will save them for the time
when I begin seriously working on the car. Thanks in advance for your
help.

Glenn Haslem
San Antonio Tx

My Mark 1 had a similar problem. It sat for 11 years in storage, thank goodness, but I could barely draw a drop of gas from the tank. I took it to a radiator shop. They dipped the tank in radiator bath, but that didn’t work. They tried reaming out the suction tube, but that didn’t work. They finally cut about a 3in x 4in hole in the top of the tank and scraped out the inside. Then they welded the the piece back in and coated the inside of the tank.

“Mark 1” Mark Stephenson
Phoenix, AZ----------
From: Glenn and Carla Haslem
Sent: Thursday, October 23, 1997 8:28 PM
To: saloons@jag-lovers.org
Subject: [Saloon-lovers] Introduction

I've been reading the list for the past couple weeks, and decided

it was time for me to introduce myself and my problems.
I just recently discovered and purchased a 1967 420. It has been
parked in a farmers field for 10 years and is quite bad shape. The first
time I looked at it I thought “It will take a miracle to resurrect this
car.” My wife took one look at it and said “It’s beautiful, I want it.”
So now I’m trying to be a miracle worker:-) The po had stripped the
paint off half the car in plans to repaint it, then lost interest in it
and just parked it outside. It also has a broken spark plug, 10 year old
gas in the tanks(serious varnish build up), some misc broken pieces in
the interior, and some shoddy looking maintenance/rigging.
My questions for everyone are: Where do you purchase interior
parts, lights, trim, etc.? Is there any chemicals which will loosen up
the varnish from the old gas? What is the best repair manual which shows
cylinder head removal on the 4.2?
I have several other questions, but will save them for the time
when I begin seriously working on the car. Thanks in advance for your
help.

Glenn Haslem
San Antonio Tx

Now that Noel has used my name in vain about sharing advice on the S type
IRS, let me say that the two Alastairs are the real gurus here, but you
have my support nonetheless. I have a great picture of a 420 on the
“Classic and Sportscar” magazine calendar staring at me this moment; IMHO
that it is a very beautiful car indeed, and thanks to people like
yourselves will become more and more popular.

My rear suspension rebuild (really, the brake mainly) has taken a lot of
time, being concurrent with many other projects, but has been a
fascinating introduction to these cars. Ironically, this, our first Jag,
was bought for my wife, as well, showing that maybe it’s we men who are
the more myopic. Best of luck and hope to hear of your progress.

Richard E. Gress Phone (801)581-3888 Ext313
Senior Systems Analyst e-mail @Richard_E_Gress
University of Utah
'64 S Type

Richard,

I have the same picture on my wall in the office as well! I think Ms October will stay up long into November.

Regards,

Adam Singleton
MkI
MkV
S-Type
Ford XA Coupe-----Original Message-----
From: Richard E. Gress [SMTP:richard@ucvg.med.utah.edu]
Sent: Saturday, October 25, 1997 12:44 AM
To: saloons@jag-lovers.org
Subject: Re: [Saloon-lovers] Introduction

Now that Noel has used my name in vain about sharing advice on the S type
IRS, let me say that the two Alastairs are the real gurus here, but you
have my support nonetheless. I have a great picture of a 420 on the
“Classic and Sportscar” magazine calendar staring at me this moment; IMHO
that it is a very beautiful car indeed, and thanks to people like
yourselves will become more and more popular.

My rear suspension rebuild (really, the brake mainly) has taken a lot of
time, being concurrent with many other projects, but has been a
fascinating introduction to these cars. Ironically, this, our first Jag,
was bought for my wife, as well, showing that maybe it’s we men who are
the more myopic. Best of luck and hope to hear of your progress.

Richard E. Gress Phone (801)581-3888 Ext313
Senior Systems Analyst e-mail richard@ucvg.med.utah.edu
University of Utah
'64 S Type

Hi,

I’ve been around Jag-lovers for quite some time and have been active on the
XJ-lovers list. Some of you might know me from there. While I prefer to lurk for
a while when I subscribe to a new list, this time I can’t wait. I purchased a
1965 S Type this morning and I had to tell someone the story.

It began with my hunt for an E-Type. After a year of searching and test
driving three (there aren’t many E Jags around here), I reached the conclusion
that I’m not a E-Type guy. I love the design but driving one hasn’t done a thing
for me.

Immediately after the test drive on Friday, when I came to the realization that
it was probably me and not the cars I had driven, I went to see an S Type that
had been advertised in Hemmings. I had known about it for a few weeks but waited
until a trip home for Thanksgiving to see it. It was located in southwest
Missouri, about 10 miles from the nearest state highway and 15 from the nearest
small town. For those who don’t know the area, there is no reason to invest
brain cells in doing so now.

The car is a very good example European 3.8 with original interior, good
exterior, and solid mechanics. It also shows less than 40K miles on the odometer
and everyone who has seen it believes that it is entirely possible. As a measure
of the condition, I bought it this morning and drove it the 250 miles home this
afternoon.
It ran flawlessly and the European edition fog lamps were very impressive as
I drove through 50 miles of thick fog.

It isn’t perfect I know. It does need a lot of this and that and I look
forward to learning from you as I try to put it in top form. Hope you don’t mind
a new member bragging a bit, but I thought that you might understand.

Kyle Chatman
65 S Type
83 XJ6

Kyle,
Welcome to the Saloons list. I have known your name around for some time, and
good to see you bought one of the best in the world.
As you know, most of the mechanics you will know well, but I’m sure there will
still be gremlins to sort. Bit of courage buying a 30 year old car, and driving
250 miles. You will be well served on this list!
Alastair Lauener
64 S-Type

Hi Kyle
Welcome and congratulations, it sounds like a lovely car, enjoy!!

John
84 XJ6
63 MK2

Chatman wrote:>

Hi,

I’ve been around Jag-lovers for quite some time and have been active on the
XJ-lovers list. Some of you might know me from there. While I prefer to lurk for
a while when I subscribe to a new list, this time I can’t wait. I purchased a
1965 S Type this morning and I had to tell someone the story.

I am a retired academic and now am a volunteer restorer and detailer
for the San Diego Auto Museum. I own one of the earliest XK-150s’
made,but, for this message, you will be more interested in my “MkIV”,
#630027. I have owned this car since 1960 and am almost finished with
the third, and I hope, final restoration. The car is a 100% factory
original car with every factory option except the tow bar. It has
fitted luggage, Lucas undercar antenna and original badge bar. In
addition,I have every scrap of paper that ever came with the car: Grease
chart, sales contract, owners manual, radio warantee, tire pamphlet,
shop manual, parts manual, and even an RAC book which shows how to
change tires. I also have original sales brochures and advertisements.
I have also owned a MkV DHC in the past.
I’ll be happy to help anyone who is restoring a pushrod-engined
Jaguar.

Greetings, everyone. I did not see any specific recommendation on
introducing oneself, in the list guidelines, but I have found it is
generally not a bad idea, on friendly car lists (and I know the Jag lists
are the friendliest I have found).

My name is Steve MacSween, and I am located in Ottawa, Canada. Though not
currently a Jag owner, I have in the past lurked for extended periods on
the original (prior to split-up) list, and later on the XJ and XJS lists.

As I near my 40th birthday, thankfully I seem to be accommodating it not by
rushing out and leasing a Corvette, but instead catching the old car bug. I
have in the past year dumped my Volvo 760 Turbo in favour of a '79 Mercedes
300sd turbodiesel and a '75 Volvo 164e.

The MB is a daily driver, while the Volvo is under light restoration to
bring it up to daily driver spec, at which point I foresee disposing of the
Benz (which came to me needing nothing) in favour of another project,
probably (given my finances) a more ambitious restoration… ah, so many
beautiful cars, so little time…

I seem to be gelling in the direction of a Jaguar Mark X/420G, possibly a
Mark II or S-Type, or maybe even an XJ. Also in the running are the “Big
Farinas”, I am actually tracking down a lead on a Princess R 4-Litre right
now. But that is an aside. I guess I am reverting to my boyhood, spent in
Bromely, Kent – I learned to drive on a Wolseley 6/110, and our next door
neighbour was the service manager for a Jaguar dealership.

One thing I am quite interested in finding out, initially, is how practical
something like a 420G/Mark X would be as a fine-weather daily driver. Is
this a feasible goal, or should I be sticking to something like an XJ
instead, for that? Any input most welcome.

Thanks for the bandwidth,

steve

Mark X - 420G makes agreat daily driver, but watch out on the fuel consumption! If you like to repair things yourself, you will probable enjoy the early car better. But… it is not easy to find a good Mark X, whereas the XJ6’s and 12’s are easy to find (in your area).

Have you contacted the boys at the Ottawa Jaguar Club? They could help!

Daniel Thompson-----Original Message-----
From: Steve MacSween [SMTP:smacs@cyberus.ca]
Sent: Sunday, March 22, 1998 12:55 AM
To: saloons@jag-lovers.org
Subject: [Saloon-lovers] Introduction

Greetings, everyone. I did not see any specific recommendation on
introducing oneself, in the list guidelines, but I have found it is
generally not a bad idea, on friendly car lists (and I know the Jag lists
are the friendliest I have found).

My name is Steve MacSween, and I am located in Ottawa, Canada. Though not
currently a Jag owner, I have in the past lurked for extended periods on
the original (prior to split-up) list, and later on the XJ and XJS lists.

As I near my 40th birthday, thankfully I seem to be accommodating it not by
rushing out and leasing a Corvette, but instead catching the old car bug. I
have in the past year dumped my Volvo 760 Turbo in favour of a '79 Mercedes
300sd turbodiesel and a '75 Volvo 164e.

The MB is a daily driver, while the Volvo is under light restoration to
bring it up to daily driver spec, at which point I foresee disposing of the
Benz (which came to me needing nothing) in favour of another project,
probably (given my finances) a more ambitious restoration… ah, so many
beautiful cars, so little time…

I seem to be gelling in the direction of a Jaguar Mark X/420G, possibly a
Mark II or S-Type, or maybe even an XJ. Also in the running are the “Big
Farinas”, I am actually tracking down a lead on a Princess R 4-Litre right
now. But that is an aside. I guess I am reverting to my boyhood, spent in
Bromely, Kent – I learned to drive on a Wolseley 6/110, and our next door
neighbour was the service manager for a Jaguar dealership.

One thing I am quite interested in finding out, initially, is how practical
something like a 420G/Mark X would be as a fine-weather daily driver. Is
this a feasible goal, or should I be sticking to something like an XJ
instead, for that? Any input most welcome.

Thanks for the bandwidth,

steve

I have a 67 420G that is for sale. I 've used it as an every day driver and
love it. This vehicle is in exceptional condition and has every option
imaginable. I live in Charlotte, NC, but am going to visit relatives in
Buffalo, NY between April 2nd and 5th.

Hi all,
I Have just joined the mailing list and have an immediate problem that =
someone may be able to help with.
Car is a Mk2 3.8 Manual Overdrive 1962
I am having trouble with starting and the carburretors flooding out of =
the air intakes. I have tried thge obvious things like adjusting the =
float levels and jets etc but to no avail.
I have noticed that there seems to be a gap of about 1/4"" between the =
rotor arm and the contacts inside the distributor cap - is this normal??
This is a rebuilt engine that has never run properly but has in the past =
started and managed to idle OK but would not rev up, I put this down to =
a block in the feed pipe from the tank which I cleared out but since =
reassembling I have had the above problem. I have even tried =
disconnecting the petrol pump and fitting up a gravity feed also to no =
avail.
I would appreciate any help anyonme can give me on the above =
particularly in relation toi the rotor arm as I suspect it may be the =
wrong type as it does not look exactly like the one in the parts manual =
pic.

Regards Graham Moseley

Graham,

Welcome to the best source of old Jaguar information in the universe. You
will get lots of feedback on the issues you have asked about. Here are my 2
cents:

You mention a parts manual, which is good to have, but you didn’t mention a
shop manual. If you don’t have one of those, get one straight away. There
are any number of sources for the factory manual, and even though the Haynes
manual is much harder to come by, apparently Listers have recently been
successful ordering a copy directly from Haynes:

http://www.haynes.co.uk/

Fuel flooding out of the carbs:

The good news here is that you are getting fuel. That means, at least to
some degree, the blockage you had is gone and the fuel pump is working.
Think about adding a modern in-line fuel filter between the tank and the
fuel pump. These old cars tend to have gunk in the tanks, and a fuel filter
BEFORE the pump can save a lot of heart ache.

Fuel coming out of the carbs indicates there is no control of the fuel level
in the float chambers. Could be sticking needle and seat, and could be bad
float level. Needle and seat problems aren’t uncommon. I recommend new
Grose needle and seats. Not expensive, and available from all the Jag parts
houses. Float problems could well be caused by floats that have fuel
inside…thereby “sinking” them in the chamber, opening the needle, and
allowing fuel to enter the chamber uncontrolled. New floats fix that.

Rotor and cap:

The clearance twixt the rotor and cap should be very minimal. Definitely
not a quarter inch.

Recommendation:

Ignition: Sounds like tune up time. Buy all new ignition stuff from a
reputable source and carefully install them to spec. Get plugs, points,
rotor, cap, condenser, and even think about wires. This way, when you’re
finished you know exactly what you have…no wondering about the one thing
you didn’t replace. Be very careful removing the plus if they haven’t come
out of the head during your stewardship of the vehicle. Steel plus and
aluminum head can spell stripped head. Once out install the new ones using
that copper anti-seize compound. This issue is serious and deserves special
care the first time through the chute.

Carbs: If you’re into it, get a rebuild kit, buy a set of Grose needle and
seats, pull the carbs, and rebuild them. Pay particular attention to the
floats, and replace or repair them if necessary. I have rebuilt these carbs
in the past and they aren’t too bad, and I have recently had Joe Curto
rebuild them for about $300 a pair including new throttle shafts and
bushings. Worn throttle shafts spoil the way the carbs perform. ANY
“wiggle” movement of the shaft indicates worn bushings. New shafts make a
BIG difference in the way the carb performs. Personally I prefer the Curto
route, but bebuilding them yourself costs a lot less and is completely
do-able (except for the shafts…and there are Listers out there who have
done their own shafts as well).

Good Luck. If the engine is sound, it will start immediately and run
smoothly every time once you get things sorted out in the ignition and carb
department.

Tom Carson
1962 Mark 2, 3.8 MOD
Juneau, Alaska> From: “Kat moseley” katmat@cmoseley.freeserve.co.uk

Reply-To: saloons@jag-lovers.org
Date: Sat, 27 May 2000 21:43:01 +0100
To: “Jag Lovers” saloons@jag-lovers.org
Subject: [Saloon-lovers] Introduction

Hi all,
I Have just joined the mailing list and have an immediate problem that =
someone may be able to help with.
Car is a Mk2 3.8 Manual Overdrive 1962
I am having trouble with starting and the carburretors flooding out of =
the air intakes. I have tried thge obvious things like adjusting the =
float levels and jets etc but to no avail.
I have noticed that there seems to be a gap of about 1/4"" between the =
rotor arm and the contacts inside the distributor cap - is this normal??
This is a rebuilt engine that has never run properly but has in the past =
started and managed to idle OK but would not rev up, I put this down to =
a block in the feed pipe from the tank which I cleared out but since =
reassembling I have had the above problem. I have even tried =
disconnecting the petrol pump and fitting up a gravity feed also to no =
avail.
I would appreciate any help anyonme can give me on the above =
particularly in relation toi the rotor arm as I suspect it may be the =
wrong type as it does not look exactly like the one in the parts manual =
pic.

Regards Graham Moseley

Graham, Welcome!

Flooding is caused by too high a level in the float chambers. I too
suffered flooding despite continuous checks on the float.
It is imperative that the float lever has no free movement, other than up
and down.

http://www.jag-lovers.org/saloons/carbs/index.html

The lever can if it has ‘sideways’ movement jam and the float does not
shut off the fuel.

Don’t know what Gap a rotor/cap should have.

Check the URL above, the pictures help explain. This has been the answer
to so many flooding problems. The other is that the float has a tiny
hole in it.

Alastair Lauener
64 S-Type>

Hi all,
I Have just joined the mailing list and have an immediate problem that =
someone may be able to help with.
Car is a Mk2 3.8 Manual Overdrive 1962
I am having trouble with starting and the carburretors flooding out of =
the air intakes. I have tried thge obvious things like adjusting the =
float levels and jets etc but to no avail.
I have noticed that there seems to be a gap of about 1/4"" between the =
rotor arm and the contacts inside the distributor cap - is this normal??
This is a rebuilt engine that has never run properly but has in the past =
started and managed to idle OK but would not rev up, I put this down to =
a block in the feed pipe from the tank which I cleared out but since =
reassembling I have had the above problem. I have even tried =
disconnecting the petrol pump and fitting up a gravity feed also to no =
avail.
I would appreciate any help anyonme can give me on the above =
particularly in relation toi the rotor arm as I suspect it may be the =
wrong type as it does not look exactly like the one in the parts manual =
pic.

Regards Graham Moseley

Hi Graham,
You’re in good hands here! There are lots of genuine people who will go out
of their way to help you solve your problems with your Jaguar. . . and maybe
also your Volvo . . . and maybe even the problem with your washing machine.
. :slight_smile:
I have just comlpeted a restoration of a 66 S Type and got a whole heap of
help from members of this list. I know you’re going to enjoy being here!
I see you live in the UK which explains the time stamp on your posting to
“Saloons”
The reply you got from Tom Carson is indicative of the help you can expect.
. . although it seems like Tom must be an early riser to have posted a reply
so early in the morning. . . .
Anyway Graham, welcome to the “List”

Dave Symington Fernie BC
66 S Type 3.8 MOD----- Original Message -----
From: Kat moseley katmat@cmoseley.freeserve.co.uk
To: Jag Lovers saloons@jag-lovers.org
Sent: Saturday, May 27, 2000 2:43 PM
Subject: [Saloon-lovers] Introduction

Hi all,
I Have just joined the mailing list and have an immediate problem that =
someone may be able to help with.
Car is a Mk2 3.8 Manual Overdrive 1962
I am having trouble with starting and the carburretors flooding out of =
the air intakes. I have tried thge obvious things like adjusting the =
float levels and jets etc but to no avail.
I have noticed that there seems to be a gap of about 1/4"" between the =
rotor arm and the contacts inside the distributor cap - is this normal??
This is a rebuilt engine that has never run properly but has in the past =
started and managed to idle OK but would not rev up, I put this down to =
a block in the feed pipe from the tank which I cleared out but since =
reassembling I have had the above problem. I have even tried =
disconnecting the petrol pump and fitting up a gravity feed also to no =
avail.
I would appreciate any help anyonme can give me on the above =
particularly in relation toi the rotor arm as I suspect it may be the =
wrong type as it does not look exactly like the one in the parts manual =
pic.

Regards Graham Moseley

Hi Carson ,
Thanks for your detailed reply to my flooding problem. It would seem that I
have more than one fault that may be compounding to make matters worse. My
rotor arm is definitely the wrong one (I think it is a 4 cylinder engine
one).
Perhaps at this point I will give you a bit of background into the engine.
It was originally stripped and rebuilt by someone else who did bot finish it
and I ended up finding the parts needed to coomplete it but by this time
moistuer had got into the cylinders and although everything seemed OK I took
the head off and ended up having it skimmed etc. What I am saying is that
the engine has not actually run properly since rebuilding. Here is the
strange bit - when the pipe in the tank was blocked it would start first
time and idle OK but would not rev even with the wrong rotor arm (with a
1/4" gap). At one point I put a pressure hose on the pipe to the tank and
blew it free and then I started getting the flooding problem. The next day
the flooding had gone and I was back to just idling - the pipe had blocked
up again and so I removed the tank and properly cleaned it out and freed the
blockage. (why did they put 2 right angle bends in the pipe in the tank
!!!).
Here’s my guess as to what may be happening - The incorrect rotor arm is
causing the engine to fire on 3 or 4 cylinders intermittently and with
incorrect timing. The restricted fuel flow somehow compensated for this. Now
that I have full fuel flow it is being sucked in to the manifold area but
not into all the cylinders and causing flooding. The fuel seems to be
leaking back from the manifold. Is this a complete load of rubish ??
Re. the float levels - I have gone over these countless times and have tried
filling the float chambers up and then disconnecting the pump to release any
pressure in the pipe then taking the tops of the carbs to check that the
level is correct, reassembled and it still pours out the air intakes on
trying to start.

I am getting a new rotor arm tommorrow and so will let you know what
happens.

Thanks again for the advice by all listers.

Graham. MK2 3.8 MOD 1962

Graham,

Ahh, yes: the REST of the story. You sure you got those cams timed right?
That little job ain’t no walk in the park, y’know.

With all due respect, though, Graham, your theory about a plugged fuel line
compensating for a short rotor…and some cylinder now refusing to accept
fuel…does sort of sound like, well, rubbish. But, who knows…

We’re all standing by.

Tom Carson
Juneau, Alaska> From: “Kat moseley” katmat@cmoseley.freeserve.co.uk

Reply-To: saloons@jag-lovers.org
Date: Mon, 29 May 2000 23:22:59 +0100
To: saloons@jag-lovers.org
Subject: Re: [Saloon-lovers] Introduction

Hi Carson ,
Thanks for your detailed reply to my flooding problem. It would seem that I
have more than one fault that may be compounding to make matters worse. My
rotor arm is definitely the wrong one (I think it is a 4 cylinder engine
one).
Perhaps at this point I will give you a bit of background into the engine.
It was originally stripped and rebuilt by someone else who did bot finish it
and I ended up finding the parts needed to coomplete it but by this time
moistuer had got into the cylinders and although everything seemed OK I took
the head off and ended up having it skimmed etc. What I am saying is that
the engine has not actually run properly since rebuilding. Here is the
strange bit - when the pipe in the tank was blocked it would start first
time and idle OK but would not rev even with the wrong rotor arm (with a
1/4" gap). At one point I put a pressure hose on the pipe to the tank and
blew it free and then I started getting the flooding problem. The next day
the flooding had gone and I was back to just idling - the pipe had blocked
up again and so I removed the tank and properly cleaned it out and freed the
blockage. (why did they put 2 right angle bends in the pipe in the tank
!!!).
Here’s my guess as to what may be happening - The incorrect rotor arm is
causing the engine to fire on 3 or 4 cylinders intermittently and with
incorrect timing. The restricted fuel flow somehow compensated for this. Now
that I have full fuel flow it is being sucked in to the manifold area but
not into all the cylinders and causing flooding. The fuel seems to be
leaking back from the manifold. Is this a complete load of rubish ??
Re. the float levels - I have gone over these countless times and have tried
filling the float chambers up and then disconnecting the pump to release any
pressure in the pipe then taking the tops of the carbs to check that the
level is correct, reassembled and it still pours out the air intakes on
trying to start.

I am getting a new rotor arm tommorrow and so will let you know what
happens.

Thanks again for the advice by all listers.

Graham. MK2 3.8 MOD 1962