[Saloon-lovers] MK-2 Coil Spring Rate Question

Hi All,
I’ve got a couple of questions concerning the MK-2’s coil springs:
(1)
Mine are apparently not up to snuff (barely 50 mm ground clearance
under the front cross-member, radical rake, and lower ‘‘A’’ arms at a
10 degree slope up towards the wheels. The problem is, they look
almost new… yellow paint marks and all. I’ve read that the
2.4/240 used coils with a smaller diameter rod, but I won’t be able
to verify that until I take them out. In the mean time, I was
wondering if different initial spring rates were offered for some
reason, before I order a new set. Can anybody help me out?
(2)
Space considerations aside (since I’m taking the front end off
anyway) can I use ‘‘Epsilon’’ (lateral type) spring compressors to
get the coils in and out, or do I have to use the central type (as
shown in the Haynes Manual) because of the overall (deployed)
length of the springs?
As always, I thank you for your continued support :slight_smile:
Jacques Burgalat–
Jacques B
Saint Augustine, Florida, United States
–Posted using Jag-lovers JagFORUM [forums.jag-lovers.org]–

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The 2.4 used smaller wire for its springs, but not much smaller - 0.630" vs.
0.635". The color stripes indicate the load rating of the springs. Yellow
indicates an intermediate load rating for a 3.4 or 3.8 MK2, so you have the
correct springs. They are probably just sagging - I had to replace the
sagging front springs on my MK1 in 1969 when it was just 10 years old. I
replaced them with a set of purple striped springs, which were purported to
have the heaviest load rating, while red stripes had the lowest. I don’t
know if different load rated springs are available from aftermarket sources.

I’m not familiar with the “lateral” spring compressors, but I have removed
many MK2 springs by simply replacing the shock absorber with a greased
length of threaded rod with nuts, large washers and suitably shaped wooden
blocks at the top and bottom. The unladen length of the spring is 14.5", so
make sure you have at least 8" of threaded rod extending out of the top of
the spring tower. Also, unscrew the top nut to release the spring, since
the unattached bottom spring pan can shift violently as you untension the
spring.

Mike Eck
New Jersey, USA
'51 XK120 OTS with working clock
'62 3.8 MK2 MOD with working clock
'72 SIII E-Type 2+2 with working clock

Hi All,
I’ve got a couple of questions concerning the MK-2’s coil springs:
(1)
Mine are apparently not up to snuff (barely 50 mm ground clearance
under the front cross-member, radical rake, and lower ‘‘A’’ arms at a
10 degree slope up towards the wheels. The problem is, they look
almost new… yellow paint marks and all. I’ve read that the
2.4/240 used coils with a smaller diameter rod, but I won’t be able
to verify that until I take them out. In the mean time, I was
wondering if different initial spring rates were offered for some
reason, before I order a new set. Can anybody help me out?
(2)
Space considerations aside (since I’m taking the front end off
anyway) can I use ‘‘Epsilon’’ (lateral type) spring compressors to
get the coils in and out, or do I have to use the central type (as
shown in the Haynes Manual) because of the overall (deployed)
length of the springs?
As always, I thank you for your continued support :slight_smile:
Jacques Burgalat

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In a message dated 3/13/03 2:03:51 PM Eastern Standard Time,
burgalaj@bellsouth.net writes:

<< Space considerations aside (since I’m taking the front end off
anyway) can I use ‘‘Epsilon’’ (lateral type) spring compressors to
get the coils in and out, or do I have to use the central type (as
shown in the Haynes Manual) because of the overall (deployed)
length of the springs?
As always, I thank you for your continued support :slight_smile:

Hello Jacques,

The safest way to remove the springs is to use 4, 3/8-24 threaded rods 12
inches long. Remove the shock, put a floor jack under the spring pan, remove
one of the corner spring pan bolts and replace with a threaded rod, 3-4
washers and a nut. The idea is to put a threaded rod at the four corners of
the pan and remove all the bolt and slowly lower the pan by backing off the
nuts evenly. It is a slow procedure, but it helps to use a few washers to
raise the nuts proud of the pan lip and use racheting box wrenches. I will
admit to using 2 or 3 rods when in a hurry, but it is tricky to get the pan
to lower evenly because it is not vertical. The force involved is
considerable and I was not comfortable with the one central rod idea, because
I did not have a suitably hardened threaded rod.

Paul

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