[Saloon-lovers] Wiper motor rewinding

Can anyone recommend a small motor rebuilder that can rewind and
re-commutator my wiper motor armature? It’s the Mk1-Mk2 variety. Lucas
specialization is not necessarily required, but would be nice, as would a
western US company. But, I’ll accept any inputs of course - can’t drive in
Oregon without a screenwiper.

Meanwhile, the engine waits patiently for bearings and seals parts from a
couple of parts houses.
Soon, very soon !

Gary
Portland OR
63 Mk2
59 Mk1

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Hi Gary: I would imagine that buying a used motor would be much cheaper and
save you a lot of time. I have some I have taken out of parts cars, but
can’t promise they
will work longer than one wiper stroke. Cannot imagine you need them more
than
that, as certainly you do not drive your car in the rain!!!. I drive my
420 as a daily
driver, and drive a MK2 and a Daimler V8 on occasion. Do get caught in the
rain
every once in a while, but my motor works long enough to get me home and
hopefully out of the rain quickly. Regards, Bob McAnelly

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Alastair Lauener
alastair@jag-lover.sorgFrom: “Frank Newman” dust201@hotmail.com
To: saloons@jag-lovers.org
Subject: Re: [Saloon-lovers] Wiper motor rewinding
Date: Tue, 10 Apr 2001 22:16:10 -0000

I used Asom Electric, 1204 McClellan Drive, Los Angeles, Ca 90025,
310-820-3720.  The wiper motor works.

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Hello List,

I wouldn't want to be accused of blatant advertising but I know that

one of the nicest 3.8 S-Type Saloons is looking for a new home. This
car has won first place Nationally in the JCNA Driven division and
placed 4rth in the Concours class this year. It is meticulously
restored both cosmetically and mechanically.
If you would like one of the best, you can see it at.

                  http://www.brucemaccormack.com/jaguars

(It’s located in NW Washington, USA) I wish I could fit it in my garage.

Rob Westcott

'59 MK 1
'63 MK 2

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Don’t you just love the prior owner who takes the battery out of the car,
which is in otherwise amazing condition, and tells you that he’s turned the
engine over every month…only to find when you actually do hook up a
battery that the engine is completely and solidly stuck?

Yup, I fell for that one with a 1966 Mark 10 4.2…

I’ve tried the big breaker bar on the pulley. I tried marvel mystery oil
down the spark plug holes, soak for a few days, then the big breaker bar on
the pulley. My latest attempts have resorted to putting diesel down the
spark plug holes every day and using the big breaker bar on the pulley. It
moves not one millimeter, so I’m guessing that the pistons are stuck to the
engine wall. I’ve pulled the cam covers and saw absolutely nothing
amiss-the lobes which are up have valves which are up, the lobes which are
down have valves which are down.

So far I’ve put 1 gallon of diesel in over the course of a week. Of course,
each day I have to add a bit more, since it’s leaking down. I realize at
some point the entire engine will be full of diesel/engine oil. How much
more will the engine take? Is this my ultimate goal so that it can really
soak in?

Am I deluding myself that this engine is ever going to be capable of
running without a rebuild?

Should I pull the camshafts now and verify that all the valves pop up?

Should I pull the head now and verify that the pistons are really the
culprit? If I pull the head, won’t I have to later put it back to pull the
engine out if I choose the “out the top” method?

Should I just bite the bullet, pull the entire engine, and send it off to
the shop for rebuild?

I’m looking for sage advise, keeping in mind that the car this is going
into is a Mark 10, not an E type…

Craig

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Am I deluding myself that this engine is ever going to be capable of
running without a rebuild?

I would pull the engine and take it apart. Even if you do somehow manage to
break it free, I wouldn’t want to try and run an engine which had been so
solidly stuck.

John H

'67 420G

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There is a fellow on this list, I believe, who told us all about how he
un-stuck an engine. It was remarkable. Perhaps that individual is still on
board (can’t recall who it was) or perhaps someone saved the technique.

Tom Carson
1962 Mark 2, 3.8 MOD
1954 XK 120SE OTS, S674946
Juneau, Alaska–

From: Craig Tiano ctiano@voicenet.com
Reply-To: saloons@jag-lovers.org
Date: Mon, 23 Apr 2001 21:28:14
To: saloons@jag-lovers.org
Subject: [Saloon-lovers] unsticking the stuck engine…

Am I deluding myself that this engine is ever going to be capable of
running without a rebuild?

I’m looking for sage advise, keeping in mind that the car this is going
into is a Mark 10, not an E type…

Craig

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Tom, that’s the trouble with having too many Jaguars, you can never keep the
lists straight!

I believe you are referring to Rick Holland’s missive concerning his first
car, and XK120 DHC which he is currently working towards driving. He
said…

I started the process by first looking under the cam covers to get an
appreciation of the severity of the seizure…The cam lobes and chains to
my surprise were not even surface rusted…This car had not moved in over
30 years…I sprayed them any way and continued to do so during the
soaking period…did the same for the pistons…started by filling them
up with as much as they would hold…sometimes 2X a day…or whenever I
took a break from some other task…everything else was disconnected on
the front…(belt off, radiator out…etc)

I did this for about 3 weeks and still could not get a smidgen of
movement at the pulley bolt…I then started to introduce solvents
through the lube system via an oil galley plug on the mains feed off the
right side of the block…I jury rigged a pressurized container normally
used to feed paint to a commercial paint roller…I put a 0 to 60 lb
pressure gauge on it and a schrader valve for adapting to my tire
inflator hose…The cannister takes about 3 gal of liquid topped off,
but you need air space to have some flow time…I simply filled it with a
solvent xmission oil combo and continually recirculated through the oil
system…I had of course, to catch the stuff as it came out of the
pan, open the pressure container and re fill it but It was probably more
satisfying to watch the dash gage show almost the same pressure as the
can gauge …the bleed down time was rather slower than i thought
too…Combining these techniques and patience probably helped a
lot…This car was virtually outside for a good part of this
storage…(wood garage) with a lean to…The DHC was in the lean to…

I used WD-40 mixed with CRC mixed with whale oil trans fluid (I had the
can of stuff for about 40 years) and some rust solvent given to me by a
friend of a friend…you know the story…from a private airport
shop…about 2 quarts of an unnamed loose substance that is probably EPA
banned…Kind of smelled like lestoil…any way I threw it into the soak
down mix not the pump through and only after I let some set on a bright
piece of aluminum and an old main bearing overnight…I felt that if it
did not tarnish either the babbitt of aluminum it was ok…Kept the
routine up till one fine day the crank seemed to move…Now mind you I’m
using an antique adjustable wrench on this bolt, not a breaker bar…in
fact the wrench is no more than a foot long…I moved it just a bit one
way…soaked it down (through the plug holes) over night…moved it a bit
the other…soaked it again over nite until 3 days later it rotated with a
resistance of an engine that actually may run a while before it needs a
rebuild…No, I can’t tell fore sure if any rings are stuck, but that’s
the least of my problems overall…

There is another or an additional method to speed up the process but it
generally means the end to soaking down…A spark plug is altered to
take a high press grease gun hose and grease is pumped into the chamber
(obviously valves are closed) to move the piston off stuck…this can be
done to any chamber that has a piston somewhere between BDC and TDC
providing the valves are closed (cams unlinked)

It is generally true that some minute movement will be felt on the crank
with those pistons stuck at top most or bottom…

Let us know how you solve your situation

Regards.

Rick
677342-DHC
673190-Roadster

Mike Eck
New Jersey, USA
'51 XK120 OTS
'62 3.8 MK2 MOD
www.jag-lovers.org/events/event_view.php3?id=140----- Original Message -----
From: “Carson” carson@alaska.net
To: saloons@jag-lovers.org
Sent: Monday, April 23, 2001 10:01 PM
Subject: Re: [Saloon-lovers] unsticking the stuck engine…

There is a fellow on this list, I believe, who told us all about how he
un-stuck an engine. It was remarkable. Perhaps that individual is still
on
board (can’t recall who it was) or perhaps someone saved the technique.

Tom Carson
1962 Mark 2, 3.8 MOD
1954 XK 120SE OTS, S674946
Juneau, Alaska

From: Craig Tiano ctiano@voicenet.com
Reply-To: saloons@jag-lovers.org
Date: Mon, 23 Apr 2001 21:28:14
To: saloons@jag-lovers.org
Subject: [Saloon-lovers] unsticking the stuck engine…

Am I deluding myself that this engine is ever going to be capable of
running without a rebuild?

I’m looking for sage advise, keeping in mind that the car this is going
into is a Mark 10, not an E type…

Craig

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That’s the one! I love this list (or is the other list!)!

Tom Carson
1962 Mark 2, 3.8 MOD
1954 XK 120SE OTS, S674946
Juneau, Alaska–

From: “Michael Eck” MichaelEck@att.net
Reply-To: saloons@jag-lovers.org
Date: Mon, 23 Apr 2001 23:32:53 -0400
To: saloons@jag-lovers.org
Subject: Re: [Saloon-lovers] unsticking the stuck engine…

Tom, that’s the trouble with having too many Jaguars, you can never keep the
lists straight!

I believe you are referring to Rick Holland’s missive concerning his first
car, and XK120 DHC which he is currently working towards driving. He
said…

I started the process by first …

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Craig Tiano wrote:

Am I deluding myself that this engine is ever going to be capable of
running without a rebuild?

Should I pull the camshafts now and verify that all the valves pop up?

Should I pull the head now and verify that the pistons are really the
culprit? If I pull the head, won’t I have to later put it back to pull the
engine out if I choose the “out the top” method?

Hello Craig,

Sounds like you are doing all the right things, patience is required for 

these situations. You may try heating the oil before pouring it down the
bores, but I would empty the sump first. No one can tell you what will
happen if you get it free and start it. You may be lucky or… There
is no problem removing the engine without a head, you can bolt the chains to
the stud holes using washers to protect the surface or bolt them to some of
the mount holes on the block. I would take the thing apart immediately
because I am suffering from “impatient air tool syndrome” and would want to
see just what was stuck, but you may choose to use your head and wait it out.
I like the grease gun through the spark plug hole idea, but it would take an
awful lot of grease and you would have to pick a piston on the way down.
This method works well for unsticking lots of things, but the cylinder volume
is pretty big. Lots of pumping unless you have an air powered grease gun.
How are you trying to move the crank bolt and do you think you have enough
leverage?

Paul Saltwick
3.8S Type

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Try spraying several cans of PB Blaster into the cylinders. That stuff is
pretty impressive in my book. I see it at NAPA and also at True Value
Hardware and Western Auto now. If you should happen to get the engine free,
though, just remember that sitting for long periods of time is tough on an
engine.

I got my XK 120 out of about 25 years of storage. The head was off and
rebuilt. The engine was free. I went through this big soul searching event
about what to do. Under heavy pressure from the XK List I finally pulled
the pan and remove the pistons. The bottom end was completely spotless.
The rings were all gooked up in their grooves, though. Some of them stuck
solid…they would have never freed up on their own. Anyway, I cleaned them
all, freed them up and put them back on the pistons. There were rust lines
in the cylinders, though, that I couldn’t hone out.

The result is an engine that runs fine (really strong in fact), but uses
oil.

Many on the XK list had recommended a total rebuild. I think I made
reasonable choices except I should have never used the old rings. The word
was, and I agree now, that after sitting in those bores for 25 years years
the old rings no longer had the “spring” left in them to hold against the
cylinder walls.

Of course, on an XK 120 the pan comes off with no interference from the
front suspension.

Good luck,

Tom Carson
1962 Mark 2, 3.8 MOD
1954 XK 120SE OTS, S674946
Juneau, Alaska–

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You may also find that the contaminants in the oil have eaten into the
bearing shells - without doing the crank any harm, but shortening the bearing
& potentially the crank life.

We found this when putting a long stored engine into my MK VII when time &
funds were too short to allow a complete rebuild, but as Tom points out, the
VII-IX series has the advantage you can easily pull the sump pan on the older
shape of beast, or even lower the engine minus carbs & manifolds if you
haven’t enough hoist lift or headroom…

Good luck.

(Still trying to find a deserted road or airfield long enough to run my XJ6
up and down to free the clutch after long storage.)

Alan

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Craig Tiano wrote:

Am I deluding myself that this engine is ever going to be capable of
running without a rebuild?

No way Craig,
If it will run at all it will most certainly not good run for long as the
contamination will groove your cilinder bore
Why risk it, Having overhauled my MK VII engine I know it is a lot of work
to pull it out (wish a had kown the list than, would have saved my a lot of
work!) but once it is out you can check the main bearings and big end
bearings as well as the piston rings wich I would certainly change once the
engine is open anyway.
If the crankshaft bearings are within tolerance you can use them again but
cost to replace them aren’t that high.
But again : do not fire up the engine if it is as stuck as you say it is
even if you get it unstuck !!

Craig:

Should I pull the camshafts now and verify that all the valves pop up?

Nothing wrong with that

Craig:

Should I pull the head now and verify that the pistons are really the
culprit? If I pull the head, won’t I have to later put it back to pull
the
engine out if I choose the “out the top” method?

No problem, it weighs less and there are plenty other uppertuneties to hook
on your hoist
By the way:
following up on the discusion some time ago to pull it out from the top or
drop it.
I pulled it out from the top together with the auto trans.
Because of the transmission it was not possible to pull it staight up so we
had to gradually rotate the engine as it came out of the car.
Problem is that a normal engine hoist does not go high enough to get it
over the grille.
Since I have a two columm car bridge (is that the right word ?) we used the
two arms connected with a tube.
Maybe not perfect put it worked pretty good.
perhaps an idea for those of you who do not have an engine hoist but who do
have acces to a bridge.
For those of you interested, I can show it off list with pictures upon
request.

Cock

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Had an old stock '33 Willys pickup years ago, that hadn’t run for about 25
years. We were planning to run the car as a Chevy powered “B” gasser and were
not too concerned about the stock four bangger. We removed the plugs and
filled the bore with Liquid Wrench, let her sit for a week and then turned it
over by hand, Hooked up a battery poured some gas down the card throat and
lit it off.
The little engine ran so well that we used it as a gofer vehicle for a year
before adding a chevy small block and heading for the drag strip.

Brian
57 MKII 2.4L auto

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Craig,
I have unstuck several engines by pulling the starter and using a large
screwdriver as a lever between the ring gear teeth and the starter hole. A
lot of mechanical advantage is gained and you can go either direction.

John Hendrix

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