Sheetmetal repair for the E-type

Hi all,
I was wondering if there are any books or references dealing with E-type sheetmetal repairs: floor pans, door sills , etc.
I just picked up another “E” and it needs some metal work. I’d would like to do the work myself if I can.
Any help appreciated.
Thanks,
Wes

Great info, pictures and parts on the Monocoque Metalworks site. The archives of Classic Jaguar have great pictures as well. The Jag Lovers community has been a great help to me. Lots of member pages showing how they attacked issues. Best results. Stu

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Wes, You didnt say if it was a coupe or roadster. The scope of which panels you think you need to replace will make a big difference in determining if it needs to be placed on a jig to render repairs. How about some pics?

Hi,
My apologies. It is a 68 FHC , 1.5 series. Both floor pans need replacing and possibly the rocker panels/door sills. Here are some photos.IMG_0496

You best talk to @69Cat: I think your car will need at least what his is getting.

To do it correctly, there are no shortcuts.

Thanks Paul,
Will give him a shout.
Wes

I would plan on doing both drop floors and both sills. Possibly the lower sections of the inner sills as well. Jaguar wasnt much for painting the inner portions of the sills. Hopefully the forward portions of the drop floors will still be solid. Be gentle with the grinder there and you may not have to repair the foward lip. All in all, a rather nasty job to grind away that drop floor upper lip.

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I definitely plan on doing both sides. I plan on going slow and methodical…inspect 2 or 3 times before I cut. Although, I am more of a nuts and bolts guy than a “tin bender/welder”. I do have access to all the appropriate tooling - grinders, plasma cutters, etc. I guess the best way to learn is to jump right in.

In addition to Monocoque Metalworks and Classic Jagaur photo archives, I would suggest Experimental Aircraft Association (EAA) pamphlets and books by Ron Fournier, for general tips on sheet metal work.

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To add to that, TinMan Tech.

Ouch…

Do one side at a time, making sure the car sits and is held flat and solid. I would have an experienced person help with the first half, very easy to completely screw up!!! (I replaced sills and floor pans on mine, but had a shop weld them in, then I finished it off)

LLoyd

Wherever space and time interact, there is information, and wherever information can be ordered into knowledge, and knowledge can be applied, there is intelligence.
Pavel Mirsky, mid 21st Century Russian General

Definitely replace inner and outer sills, and stiffeners… OH… use the 2+2 stiffeners, much more solid.

LLoyd

Wherever space and time interact, there is information, and wherever information can be ordered into knowledge, and knowledge can be applied, there is intelligence.
Pavel Mirsky, mid 21st Century Russian General

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So Wes,
LLoyd suggests

this sure looks and sounds good

Those pictures would make me decide for a jig. As suggested, leave one side intact, to be able to check measurements side for side. When getting the outer sills, check for getting the ones with the correct radius at the door gap. The ones I got from England are way too soft in that regard, the resulting door gap is too large and hard to rectify. My floor looked similar, maybe not as bad, I sourced complete floors from front to back in one piece, with the radius arm points and frame rails already fitted. They come in right half / left half. The floors came from Martin Robey and were a very good fit. The sills I should have sourced from MM, which are supposed be the perfect fit in terms of curvature and door gap radius.

Wes, as some have alluded to, you might want to consider having a local welder do the welding part. I’m a diligent DIY guy and did all my own welding. But if you have never welded before, an Etype may not be the best training ground. If you go this route, identify your welding guy and get him involved in the conversation before you begin. There are certain fitup gap limitations that he will want to recommend to make his job doable. Also, I would recommend a combination of MIG to tack weld and TIG to complete the joint full penetration. All that said, you probably will need a MIG welder just to tack weld pieces together. You can learn to tack weld pretty quickly. The metal thicknesses involved (typically < 1/16" and always < 1/4" will allow you to buy a lower powered MIG machine, if you choose to.

I am by no means an expert but if you go to my website at the following link and go backwards to articles 13 through 16, I do address panel replacement. I tend to provide more “narrative” than some sources.

https://newhillgarage.com/category/current-restoration/

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Mine was about the same. DO check the boot floor and gas tank as well. My car is about finished for body panels (all the bottom bits and outer sills). The inner sills just needed patching. In my case it was a VERY good idea to strip the whole car and get it on a rotisserie. The mechanicals are being done in parallel.

Sure, this was a major undertaking, but when it is done, it will be finished rather than become some endless nightmare.

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Hi Gents,
Wow…thanks for all the advice. I feel more confident with you guys directing me. This looks to be a long term project - something I wanted to avoid but has to be done. I obtained the vehicle “on the cheap”.
Now I know why.
I am already in touch with Chuck at "monocoupe metalworks so I am off to a good start. I guess I am going to completely strip the interior and see what other “hidden treasures” await me.

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Take TONS of well-lit pictures, at each and every step: make discrete files, like, left footwell shots," or the like.

Literally, photos are one of the MOST valuable tools at your disposal.

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And after you think you have taken way to many of a particular feature, stand on your head and take them all over again to get a different angle

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Many was the time I wished I’d bought a package of 3X5 cards and a Sharpie and wrote a caption which I’d have positioned in the picture, so a year or so later I’d know what the picture represented. .

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