[xj] cold, damp air

So, what we need to do is tap into the A/C system and add a small evaporator
core in front of the air intake (to cool the incoming air) and then inject
the condensated water into the plenum (steam power!) and we’ll have super
jags.

I knew a weekend racer who used to build an ice bath for his fuel/air
intake. He swore it worked.

In theory, just the opposite should be true (if I remember my Carnot Cycle
correctly). Heat the intake and cool the exhaust=maximum efficency. But in
theory, the “lamp out” warning light works properly, too ;).

Trey McCay
85 VDP

Trey, as you suggest, Mssr. Carnot’s calculations refer to the change in
temperature of the working fluid (liquid/gas) from input to output. The
higher the difference between intake and working (combustion/steam) temps, the
higher the thermal energy available for work. But, that work, when performed
by the fluid, will cool it, so once heated as hot as possible, we do want it
to cool as much as we can get, while in the machine and making it move. This
is why steam turbines in ships and power plants (and some old steam engines
for trains and ships) are often multi-stage, or compound – the output of one
cycle provides input to the next.

One of the most efficient piston steam engines was done for
turn-of-the-century (last time around) British merchant ships, which used a
triple-compound engine, with 3 successively bigger pistons (real big). As the
working fluid cools in the first stage, its pressure drops so you need a
bigger piston area in the next stage to get a good amount of force. We
actually have one of these engines on display in the SF Bay Area, and it runs
– it’s in one of the thousands of Liberty ships we built in WWII, copying the
British design at their request. It sailed to France and back for the 50th
anniversary of D-Day.

Cars, unfortunately, can’t make use of extra power stages, because of their
increasing weight penalty. So, about 2/3 of the $ we put in our gas tanks
goes out the exhaust pipe as wasted heat.

Alex
79xj6

“T. McCay” wrote:>

So, what we need to do is tap into the A/C system and add a small evaporator
core in front of the air intake (to cool the incoming air) and then inject
the condensated water into the plenum (steam power!) and we’ll have super
jags.

I knew a weekend racer who used to build an ice bath for his fuel/air
intake. He swore it worked.

In theory, just the opposite should be true (if I remember my Carnot Cycle
correctly). Heat the intake and cool the exhaust=maximum efficency. But in
theory, the “lamp out” warning light works properly, too ;).

Trey McCay
85 VDP