XJ needs to be moved after 20 years... help please

They are exactly the same.

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Rust never sleeps, Max - and ‘new’ coolant contains ‘new’ oxygen. But I don’t know your level of ‘freakish’, of course…:slight_smile:

Frank
xj6 85 Sov Europe (UK/NZ)

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Hey boys and girls :slight_smile:
Its been a while since I posted anything. I have started a big boy job and to no suprise I have a lot less time to play now…

The Jag has been my daily driver and only car for a while now. It has a few things I need/should do to it but nothing that I would consider a show stopper. It has also been very reliable. At least I have not been stranded yet. I still keep a trunk full of tools with me but I figured as soon as I take that out I will need them.

After over 5000km/ 3100 miles I can say I am very pleased with it. My overall average fuel consumption is 15L/100km or 15.68MPG. This is of course mixed city and highway but I do drive much more city than highway unfortunatly. In the city she likes to eat a bit of oil. I hope its nothing but I have checked compressions and they are equal if not better than what I started with.

I have to do an inspection every 2 years in this country… That would be in November but I would like to start making a list of “service” items to do with it. I will probably do it earlier than that to not freeze in the garage.

I was planning on changing:

  • Engine Oil+filter,
  • Coolant,
  • Transmission Fluid…

Little items I have issues with:

  • The 3 way change over valve that is new is leaking. Basically it levels the tanks when I dont drive the car.
  • Exhaust leak at the rear connector of the exhaust to the header.
  • I have little grounding issue with the light located in the bonnet and one fog light. They seem to work sometimes… I know putting down new cables would fix the issue but I want to keep the car as original as possible.

What are things you guys do as preventative maintance and it what intervals?
Since I drive very little each year this is more on a time basis rather than a miles driven.

Thanks guys.

Great to hear a progress report Max. I used to do a lot of around town travel in Auckland in my old ‘66 3.8 ‘S’ interspersed with runs down the country to the capital Wellington where my ex lived with the young son and daughter, inevitably at the end of the journey down the oil level would drop and I would have to top off the oil, on the way back it didn’t use any.

I surmised that a couple of things were happening (right or wrong)

A) during the around town running the bores were getting slightly glazed allowing some petrol blow by when on choke.

B) the run down tended to de-glaze the bores and the continuous hot running for 6+ hours evaporated the non oil residues allowing the rings to seal better and/or it just burned oil.

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The 3 way valve is problematic.
I ordered a new aftermarket one and was cross-leaking from day one so I had to find a better solution.

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Except for the exhaust leak, Max; there is nothing on your list that will interest the testers. They will be concerned about play in bearings, steering and suspension rubbers - and of course brakes. Also external leaks, windscreen and certainly rust - and the question of emission relevant to the EU specs. They are very thorough - and I don’t know their attitude to old car ‘rebates’ on issues…:slight_smile:

Frank
xj6 85 Sov Europe (UK/NZ)

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I know Frank, I was asking what I should be doing for the car “while I am at it” I figure after close to 2 years I’d do a little check up so to speak.

I doubt they will find much on the things they look at since the suspension and most rubbers and actually 100% of the brake system is overhauled.

I have a moisture tester for the brake fluid. That should be enough? They always tell you once you open a bottle of brake fluid you should not use it if it has been sitting for a while. Turns out I had an old container from my seat sitting somewhere and I had marked open date 2019… It still tested the same as the brand new one I put in the jag. YMMV

Max,

call me “old man”, but the only thing I’m fairly formal is the grease gun exercise and the oil/filter service: each year, no matter how many miles.

Brake fluid is due every third year, coolant is tested for antifreeze properties and changed according to need. Gearbox oil is checked and topped up, if necessary (never), the same with diff oil.

Rubber hoses (water, fuel) are checked and replaced as necessary.

Usually, TÜV helps you find what needs to be done - make it a habit to warm up the brakes right before the examination (same circle you drive immediately before, same braking exercise) and directly compare the results from test to test. Chances are you can recognize that something starts going wrong with your left rear caliper even before the car fails on the test bed.

And yes, better use your bike for city driving! i was lucky to have to nice occasions to give the cat some 200 mls of motorway driving in the last two weeks:-)

Good luck

Jochen

75 XJ6L 4.2 auto (UK spec)

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As Frank implied the standard timing is probably retarded slightly to accommodate low octane fuel.
The best way to set the ignition timing is using a vacuum gauge while under load. The higher the vacuum, the more efficient the engine is running.
Either advanced, or retarded will reduce the vacuum.

There is a lot of iron in an engine block, flushing alone won’t remove all the ferric corrosion.
I once added vinegar to a rusty cooling system and forgot and left it in…until the upper radiator hose spigot dissolved: it was mainly rust, not good steel.

To deglaze bores, find a steep hill and floor the accelerator all the way up. The extra heat and piston ring pressure will remove light glaze.

That car has long gone.

Hi,

Well another ”old man”, now 54, have been doing the same for my Jaguars and haven’t experienced any other nasty surprises, except the parts left out or installed wrong in the 1947 engine inside my 1950 MKV DHC.

I also replace and flush brake fluid every two or three years, a very cheap insurance IMHO.

Cooling fluid also every three years and every second time the (medival to some) Bar’s Leaks treatment as specified in the Jaguar ROM. Also I tend to follow the recommendations in the owner’s manual and service manuals.

For winter hibernation I bump up the tire pressure to 3.5-3.6 bars, add a fuel saver and run the fuel line dry on the V12 E and in the XJ6C run one tank empty, drain and clean the sump and add 5-10 liters of small engine petrol (gasoline) and replace the engine oil and filter. YMMV.

BTW I drove more than 800kms last weekend, Friday to the Opera festival and on Saturday back via a small detour. So after having only driven 40-50kms (max) for two years in one go, and lots of city traffic I finally got a proper reference also for mileage, mostly highway driving, 80-130km/h and overdrive and A/C on.

Cheers!

Ps. I just calculated the mileage. On Friday when I filled her up, it was 87.39 liters after 536.8 km which is 16.28 L/100km and on Saturday it was 88.52 liters after 709.5 km which is 12.47 L/100km. That might be the first time I drove over 700kms without refueling! :smiley: Not bad for a 49 year old car with SU carburrettors and a 4.2L engine. :+1:

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Fairly sure that has been stopped, it was blocking radiators.

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I don’t think they actually test the fluid, Max; moisture content will cause brake fade when sustained heavy braking cause very high calliper temps - they don’t usually test the brakes to that extent. But for your own safety; keeping an eye on the fluid is wise - and the reason for the advise to change fluid every 2 years. Alas, seldom followed; few use the brakes to the extent to encounter the problem - normally the brake fluid temps seldom reach the boiling point of water

Frank
xj6 85 Sov Europe (UK/NZ)

Hi,

Ok, I wonder if it was because they did not flush properly? I have been doing that in my E-types for 29 years and in the XJ for 17 years, no cooling problems and no leaking water pumps.

The Bar’s Nural treatment should help if that’s a concern. No affiliations, just what I have done.
Now 68.000kms on the XJ6C, 67.000kms on the ex 4.2 S1 2+2 (1996-2012) and 52.000kms on the V12 E OTS.
Cheers!

Hi,

I have experience this only once, in the Alps driving from Füssen (via Schloß Neuschwanstein) to Innsbruck via Garmisch-Partenkirchen. And later on it seems it was due to one piston (new SS) sticking a bit in the LH rear caliper, the rubber shield had melted. :astonished:

Cheers!

Sounds good.

Not sure I get it… I do think my brakes are prefect. Its all new hardware and everything is overhauled…I teated the fluid and it shows less than 1% moisture.

I knoooow. But I love driving the beast

Thats great! looks like about the same as mine.

Oh but I do. I have a little battery operated tester. You just stick it into the coolant and it tells you the % of moisture… It also has a color scala that basically suggest when to change the fluid. Based on that I really do not have to change the fluid at all. The thing is I would not mind the work but I know the rear bleeder will be a PIA and make a mess when the fluid starts running down …

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Famous last words, Max…:slight_smile:

Just remember that water and brake fluid do not mix - like water in petrol it will precipitate out, and anyway boil wherever temps are high enough…:slight_smile:

Frank
xj6 85 Sov Europe (UK/NZ)

Max,

if you go to the same test station you get pretty much ideal data for comparison. Long before you realize that your braking is deteriorating the data may reveal that the self-adjusting mechanism of your left parking brake is on its way out if over three tests and six years the figures are going down … ask me where I know!

As for water in your brake fluid: water has pretty much the same hydraulic qualities as oil, but one problem: it turns to vapour with heat. Now with a serenely driven car or only occasional short and hard braking action this may not even be a problem. Spirited driving in the countryside or straightforward alpine driving will test the liquid.

While your tester may reveal figures that do not even compromise your braking or safety, any water in the system will make the calipers and brake lines corrode. As a matter of fact I was quite amazed how expensive the dual master brake cylinder on my Spitfire was … I had been compromising on fluid exchange on the basis that the brakes were perfect.

Colour of the brake fluid is a pretty good indicator of age and use. Keep it like honey and you’ll be fine.

Good luck

Jochen

75 XJ6L 4.2 auto (UK spec)

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