[xj-s] Heat, Heat, Heat

To the List: Someone on the list mentioned that he had a very similar
problem to what I have and I ditched the e-mail by mistake. Along with the
other problems I have with heat in the passengers compartment this is one of
the worst. When the engine gets really warmed up and the car has been driven
for a while the tranny console and all the things in it start getting
HOT!..I mean really hot to the touch. I even have to put a sock on the
shifter sometimes to make it comfortable. I think someone said that they
found out that something was disconnected in the dash or that it was a
problem with the climate control etc. etc.
If anyone has had this problem and has solved it…please share it with
me and the others who who also suffer from “Fever in the Passenger’s
Compartment.” It sounds like a play by Tennessee Williams doesn’t it? It
should be an interesting thread. I don’t remember anything being done on it
since I have belonged to the list. Also, even if you haven’t solved the
problem…let me know. It must be something gone awry because if it was
there when it was new they wouldn’t have been able to sell even one. It is so
damned uncomfortable. Bradley Smith

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Bradley,

Did you perhaps remove the large foam rubber pad that sits on top of the
transmission and forget to replace it when you did your mods? That pad
not only reduces noise inside the cabin, but it also prevents hot air
from the engine compartment from flowing across the top of the
transmission and along the sides and top of the transmission tunnel. The
previous owner of my Corvette removed the foam padding (Much like the
foam that surrounds the radiator in the XJ-S) from the Bell housing
during a repair, and the car became absolutely unbearable after an hours
drive. Even the window switches became extremely hot to the touch, until
I located and installed the padding.

Mark Emerson________________________________________________________________
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In reply to a message from Lushan@aol.com sent Tue 9 Jul 2002:

Hi Bradley,

Sounds like I’ve got the same issue as you. Judging by the
archives, it seems to be a common problem. From what I can
gather, the issue is caused by the heater control valve failing
to close properly, thus allowing hot water to enter the small
radiator behind the dash which provides cabin heat.

I’m currently looking into a temporary fix that will allow
operation without excessive sweating!!! If I get anywhere, I’ll
report back.

‘‘Fever in the Passenger’s Compartment’’ Lol, my wife suggested we
hire the car as a mobile sauna!!–
The original message included these comments:

other problems I have with heat in the passengers compartment this is one of
the worst. When the engine gets really warmed up and the car has been driven
for a while the tranny console and all the things in it start getting
HOT!..I mean really hot to the touch. I even have to put a sock on the
shifter sometimes to make it comfortable. I think someone said that they
found out that something was disconnected in the dash or that it was a
problem with the climate control etc. etc.


baaaa humbug. Regards, Sheepy.
Leighton Buzzard, Bedfordshire, United Kingdom
–Posted using Jag-lovers JagFORUM [forums.jag-lovers.org]–

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archives, it seems to be a common problem. From what I can
gather, the issue is caused by the heater control valve failing
to close properly, thus allowing hot water to enter the small
radiator behind the dash which provides cabin heat.

Sounds very much like the problem I too have… The ski slope gets very hot
indeed, maybe not as hot as bradley’s but still uncomfortable to touch…
Also I find myself on summer days with full open windows and max. cold
blower (I currently have no A/C) - but the cabin is still getting hotter.

Let me know if you find a fix or even just the source of the problem.

Regards
Anders

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‘‘Fever in the Passenger’s Compartment’’ Lol, my wife suggested we
hire the car as a mobile sauna!!

Does that mean you will be driving around wearing only a towel?? Wonder how
far you will get before someone pulls you over :o) Anyhow, I think there’s
a reason saunas normally don’t come with leather interior!

/Anders

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Sounds like I’ve got the same issue as you. Judging by the
archives, it seems to be a common problem. From what I can
gather, the issue is caused by the heater control valve failing
to close properly, thus allowing hot water to enter the small
radiator behind the dash which provides cabin heat.

I’m not certain about this. My car has no dashboard so I can see
what’s behind it (including no heater core; that “small radiator” you
speak of), but even when my hole in the firewall was sufficiently
taped up there was tons of heat entering the cabin through the tranny
tunnel. Not surprising… the V12 generates a ton of heat, the Turbo
400 probably isn’t that cool either, and Jaguar neglected to put much
(if any) heat insulation there. When I install my 5-speed (finally
got the pedal box yesterday… YAY!!!) I’d like to put in some
heat insulation. In the winter I’ll worry about staying warm, but if
I die of heat exhaustion before then…

I’m currently looking into a temporary fix that will allow
operation without excessive sweating!!! If I get anywhere, I’ll
report back.

I keep both windows open and a lot of ice water/Gatorade in the car.

‘‘Fever in the Passenger’s Compartment’’ Lol, my wife suggested we
hire the car as a mobile sauna!!

Hmm… that’d work!

-Ted

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Bradley wrote:

When the engine gets really warmed up and the car has been
driven for a while the tranny console and all the things in it
start getting HOT!..I mean really hot to the touch.

My ash tray lids used to get too hot to touch and my right leg would get
roasted by the tranny tunnel even with the A/C running full blast. I
have partially corrected the problem.

I added a horizontal baffle plate to block off the front area of the
frame behind the radiator. This is the area where a wrench would fall
to the ground if you dropped it while working on your water pump. In my
XJ-S the wrench lands on the baffle which now blocks that opening.

I figured that the air going through the radiator was all exiting
through that opening. While the air is hot to us humans, it is still
cooler than the exhaust manifolds and the tranny. My baffle forces the
radiator air to travel around the manifolds and exit along the tranny,
removing heat from them.

At hiway speeds the console stays comfortable to the touch and the A/C
now runs at low speed. However, the same heat problem still exists at
low speeds where the air flow is insufficient to cool much.

That area of the frame has a lip which holds my baffle in place. I used
a piece of flat galvanized duct sheet metal from the home heating
section of my local hardware store. I cut it to match the shape of the
opening and slid it onto the lips of the frame. Sheet screws at the
front of the baffle mount it to the body panel behind the front air dam
to hold it in place. The console stayed cool through our trips between
MI and the NJ Jag-Lovers picnic.

Don Neff
1991 XJ-S V12 Conv.

.

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Bradley and all,

My racer would get very hot while driving. Since I removed the AC, having an
open window would draw heat from any opening in the passesnger compartment
to the tranny/engine, and exit it out the open windows. While on the track,
it was so uncomfortable, that I was sweating. I may have been wetting my
pants too, but not sure if that had anything to do with the heat! When the
windows are closed, the heat isn’t as much an issue.

Anyway, I took the console off, and saw openings that needed to be plugged.
The mechanic who installed the 5-speed had left some openings where heat
entered the cabin. There is a metal disk on the drivers side where wires run
through. I sealed with gasket sealer and re-screwed it in. Added some
insulation around the wires while at it. The shifter boot below the boot
that is by the skislope, also had openings. I added some inulsation around
the shifter inside the boot, and screwed the boot down as best as I could.

Results: The car is much cooler now, even with the windows open. I’ve not
yet taken it to the track to see if I’ve solved all my problems, but it is
better than it was. I also intstalled the Hot-Ur-Not mats which help, but
not if you are getting a forced air induction into the cabin. You need to
fix the leaks first. Unfortunetly, the shifter still gets warm. I have a
Hurst knob and that stays pretty good since it is not metallic.

Charles

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Now heres a good idea! And one that I cant see any problems with.
Will give it a try myself as my SO constantly complains about the heat in
the car.
It has improved since I fitted the vents to the hood. But I have to admit,
its not as comfy to drive around in as her Mitsubishi Magna.
Shouldnt ake more than a lunch time in the sheet metal shop at the RAAF base
to fix.

Andrew Holley
77 XJS----- Original Message -----
From: “Donald F Neff” neffd@dteenergy.com
To: xj-s@jag-lovers.org
Sent: Wednesday, July 10, 2002 9:06 PM
Subject: [xj-s] Heat, Heat, Heat…

Bradley wrote:

When the engine gets really warmed up and the car has been
driven for a while the tranny console and all the things in it
start getting HOT!..I mean really hot to the touch.

My ash tray lids used to get too hot to touch and my right leg would get
roasted by the tranny tunnel even with the A/C running full blast. I
have partially corrected the problem.

I added a horizontal baffle plate to block off the front area of the
frame behind the radiator. This is the area where a wrench would fall
to the ground if you dropped it while working on your water pump. In my
XJ-S the wrench lands on the baffle which now blocks that opening.

I figured that the air going through the radiator was all exiting
through that opening. While the air is hot to us humans, it is still
cooler than the exhaust manifolds and the tranny. My baffle forces the
radiator air to travel around the manifolds and exit along the tranny,
removing heat from them.

At hiway speeds the console stays comfortable to the touch and the A/C
now runs at low speed. However, the same heat problem still exists at
low speeds where the air flow is insufficient to cool much.

That area of the frame has a lip which holds my baffle in place. I used
a piece of flat galvanized duct sheet metal from the home heating
section of my local hardware store. I cut it to match the shape of the
opening and slid it onto the lips of the frame. Sheet screws at the
front of the baffle mount it to the body panel behind the front air dam
to hold it in place. The console stayed cool through our trips between
MI and the NJ Jag-Lovers picnic.

Don Neff
1991 XJ-S V12 Conv.

.

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