[xk] Fw: XK high colonic

As an added bit of trivia, I understand that this procedure is necessary in
starting the Bugatti type 35 (and others, I sure). Oil/water/engine must be
brought up to operating temp prior to starting. Probably why they were not
used much to go to market.
BB----- Original Message -----
From: “Bruce Baysinger” <@bbay>
To: xk@jag-lovers.org
Sent: Tuesday, February 24, 2004 8:27 AM
Subject: XK high colonic

All:
For those fearing the worse, I haven’t done the classic tear down of
the

Bruce,
People were made of tougher stuff back when that Bugatti was new. When I
bought my 1912 Model T touring there were three well used cans mounted on
the running board. I later learned from an old timer that in addition to
carrying extra gasoline (the red can), the black can was to drain the oil,
and the green can was used for the water. He said he worked in a railroad
yard in Spokane, and in the winter, the pot belly stove in the office would
be surrounded by the cans of oil and water. Its not a lot of fun hand
cranking a cold Model T. After returning the warmed water and oil to the T,
one would jack up the rear to prevent kick back, and pull the crank through
to start. Sounds like fun in freezing weather. Still easier than the horse,
though.
Jerry Oliver
Olympia, WA----- Original Message -----
From: “Bruce Baysinger” bbaysinger@socal.rr.com
To: xk@jag-lovers.org
Sent: Tuesday, February 24, 2004 8:41 AM
Subject: [xk] Fw: XK high colonic

As an added bit of trivia, I understand that this procedure is necessary
in
starting the Bugatti type 35 (and others, I sure). Oil/water/engine must
be
brought up to operating temp prior to starting. Probably why they were not
used much to go to market.
BB
----- Original Message -----
From: “Bruce Baysinger” bbaysinger@socal.rr.com
To: xk@jag-lovers.org
Sent: Tuesday, February 24, 2004 8:27 AM
Subject: XK high colonic

All:
For those fearing the worse, I haven’t done the classic tear down of
the

After returning the warmed water and oil to the T,

one would jack up the rear to prevent kick back, and pull the crank
through
to start. Sounds like fun in freezing weather. Still easier than the
horse,
though.

    Jerry O;
    The rear wheel on the Model T wasn't jacked up to prevent "kick

back"… the Spark Retard on the steering column did that…
The rear wheel was raised off the ground to prevent the Model T from
running over the starter once the engine fired off…
The Model T , as you well know, used a Planetary Gear transmission…
basically an “automatic” without the Torque Converter and hydraulic operated
valve body… One shifted into low by depressing the far left pedal, neutral
was half way up and high was all the way out, all on the same pedal…
Reverse was actuated by depressing the center pedal and the rear (only)
brakes were the right hand pedal… The “Reverse” pedal was often used as a
“brake” pedal, as it slowed the T down quicker… The “bands” that engaged
the “gears” were owner replacable, without having to remove the transmission
from the car.
Often, the person starting the T would not engage the hand brake,
which automatically put the transmission into neutral… without this act,
the transmission was in high gear… There was no “clutch”…
Charles #677556----- Original Message -----
From: “JerrysJaguar”

Charles,
True, keeping the rear wheel off the ground did prevent being accidentally
run over. I had a 1913 Overland, which had a cone clutch and a neutral. I
had the original owners manual which suggested when cranking to stand
directly between the frame horns, with your back to the barn wall (I’m
paraphrasing accurately) so as if the car drove forward, it would prevent
injury both to you and the car. But back to the T. With the rear wheels up,
they acted like a large flywheel, keeping the engine rotation in one
direction in case of a mis-timed ignition. In the years I had the T, I only
had one time that she got me when the wheel was off the ground.
Now for Jaguar content; Did you know with headers checking the oil can when
warm can make your hand very well done? Learned by personal experience.
Jerry Oliver
Olympia, WA----- Original Message -----
From: “BISHOP-13” bishop-13@ispwest.com
To: xk@jag-lovers.org
Sent: Tuesday, February 24, 2004 9:28 PM
Subject: Re: [xk] Fw: XK high colonic

----- Original Message -----
From: “JerrysJaguar”
After returning the warmed water and oil to the T,

one would jack up the rear to prevent kick back, and pull the crank
through
to start. Sounds like fun in freezing weather. Still easier than the
horse,
though.

    Jerry O;
    The rear wheel on the Model T wasn't jacked up to prevent "kick

back"… the Spark Retard on the steering column did that…
The rear wheel was raised off the ground to prevent the Model T
from
running over the starter once the engine fired off…
The Model T , as you well know, used a Planetary Gear
transmission…
basically an “automatic” without the Torque Converter and hydraulic
operated
valve body… One shifted into low by depressing the far left pedal,
neutral
was half way up and high was all the way out, all on the same pedal…
Reverse was actuated by depressing the center pedal and the rear (only)
brakes were the right hand pedal… The “Reverse” pedal was often used as
a
“brake” pedal, as it slowed the T down quicker… The “bands” that engaged
the “gears” were owner replacable, without having to remove the
transmission
from the car.
Often, the person starting the T would not engage the hand brake,
which automatically put the transmission into neutral… without this act,
the transmission was in high gear… There was no “clutch”…
Charles #677556

Now for Jaguar content; Did you know with headers checking the oil can
when
warm can make your hand very well done? Learned by personal experience.

       Jerry O;
    Even with the stock exhaust manifolds.. reaching for that short oil

dipstick on the 120 resulted in a few burn scars on the back of my right
hand…
Charles #677556.
PS, You are right, I forgot about the “flywheel effect” on the “T”…
ceb----- Original Message -----
From: “JerrysJaguar”

Charles,
And the “bands” had linings which were held on with “bifurcated” brass
rivets.
Roar

[Original Message]
From: BISHOP-13 bishop-13@ispwest.com
To: xk@jag-lovers.org
Date: 2/25/04 2:47:49 AM
Subject: Re: [xk] Fw: XK high colonic

----- Original Message -----
From: “JerrysJaguar”
After returning the warmed water and oil to the T,

one would jack up the rear to prevent kick back, and pull the crank
through
to start. Sounds like fun in freezing weather. Still easier than the
horse,
though.

    Jerry O;
    The rear wheel on the Model T wasn't jacked up to prevent "kick

back"… the Spark Retard on the steering column did that…
The rear wheel was raised off the ground to prevent the Model T
from
running over the starter once the engine fired off…
The Model T , as you well know, used a Planetary Gear
transmission…
basically an “automatic” without the Torque Converter and hydraulic
operated
valve body… One shifted into low by depressing the far left pedal,
neutral
was half way up and high was all the way out, all on the same pedal…
Reverse was actuated by depressing the center pedal and the rear (only)
brakes were the right hand pedal… The “Reverse” pedal was often used as
a
“brake” pedal, as it slowed the T down quicker… The “bands” that engaged
the “gears” were owner replacable, without having to remove the
transmission> from the car.
Often, the person starting the T would not engage the hand brake,
which automatically put the transmission into neutral… without this act,
the transmission was in high gear… There was no “clutch”…
Charles #677556

Yup! Unfortunately they aren’t the correct size to use on the L469 cover
;-}
Charles #677556.----- Original Message -----
From: “Roar Sand”

Charles,
And the “bands” had linings which were held on with “bifurcated” brass
rivets.
Roar