[xk] Re: headlights that turn with the front wheels

I’ve got to step in at this point. The car in question, is a Citroen. But it is not a 2CV (there would not have been enough profit margin to pay for this feature) but the SM.

The SM was the 2.6 litre straight-six Maserati-engined Citroen, which not only had lights which moved with the steering, but had self-levelling lights and suspension. Everything on the car was powered by hydraulics.

It’s just a shame if you run out of fluid.

Regards,

David Lonsdale
Cirencester, UK
120FHC #681396

David,

Yes.
Only one correction: the SM had a V-6, not a straight six, that came out of
the Maserati Merak. Maserati was owned by Citroen at the time.

Cheers!

Jack Verschuur> I’ve got to step in at this point. The car in question, is a

Citroen. But it is not a 2CV (there would not have been enough
profit margin to pay for this feature) but the SM.

The SM was the 2.6 litre straight-six Maserati-engined Citroen,
which not only had lights which moved with the steering, but had
self-levelling lights and suspension. Everything on the car was
powered by hydraulics.

It’s just a shame if you run out of fluid.

Regards,

David Lonsdale
Cirencester, UK
120FHC #681396

Jack,

You are absolutely correct, and I knew that when I typed my posting. Must be my age!

Regards,

David Lonsdale
Cirencester, UK
120FHC #681396

My father had several 4CVs, including a requisite parts car. One of the
cars he bought new, and paid about $1200. It was a 4 door car, with one
external hinge on each side that was shared by both doors, so the front door
hinged at the rear. There were no interior door panels: you touched the
inside of the door skin. I still have a distributor cap, which measures 2"
in diameter.

Mike Eck
New Jersey, USA
Smiths clock electronic upgrade
'51 XK120 OTS, '62 3.8 MK2 MOD, '72 SIII E-Type 2+2

2CV meant two(taxable) horsepower “Deaux Chaveau” in French, I think.
Renault made a nifty little bug about the same era called the 4CV “Quatre
Cheveaux”. I had one for a few years, and it would not start off the
battery
in cold weather, but came with a hand crank and a priming lever on the
carburetor, and it would fire right up with a couple of turns of the crank
on cold days. It had a top speed of 62 m.p.h. downhill, on the highway,
and
I developed the bad habit of driving it “flat out” all the time, which
eventually took its toll on the head gasket.The bolts connecting the
engine
to the transaxle had a tendency to work loose, and needed to be
retightened
peiodically to keep the drivetrain from falling out. It actually had a
nice> ride, though, better than a VW.
It was a fun car to drive, just not made for highway travel.
And you thought Jaguars were quirky?
Greg Bernier