[xk] sintered bronze spiggot bearings

Has anyone had useful experience of replacing the sintered
bronze spiggot bush in the back end of a crankshaft.

I ordered some from the local bearing shop but looking at
them I strongly doubt they are actually sintered bronze.

I see XKs Unlimited have them advetised, but don’t mention
what material. I suppose I cold enquire and ask them to tell
me the material rather than ask ‘’ is it Sintered Bronze?’’
BUt I still won’t know how they were made.

I want to get it right and not have it squeaking a bit down
the track, or have it wear… and have to pull out a gear
box.

Previous Jaguars used a roller bearing as a spiggot , but
this by now has worn the inside of the cranks and
encourages jumping out of gear on the over run.
It was changed to a bush about late MK V . XK 120 days.

Googling ‘‘sintered bronze bush’’ doesn’t produce much help
. Either flanged bushed or unfinshed bar or companies in
China and India who sell wwholesale.

Machining to size apparently is not recommended as it ’
smears ’ over the grain on the material holding the
lubricant. Apparently they should be made to size then
impregnated [sintered].–
Ed Nantes SS
Melbourne, Australia
–Posted using Jag-lovers JagFORUM [forums.jag-lovers.org]–

Hi Ed,
There’s an easy way to check if you have a sintered bronze bush and in fact even if you have one you should do the following. Wipe the bush clean on the outside (just to get rid of any oil). Sit the bush on the pad of your middle finger, fill the bush with clean engine oil and then put your thumb over the end of the bush. Then force your thumb down and oil will bleed through the bush. If it doesn’t it’s not sintered. Also by doing this you’ll know that the bush is impregnated with oil.

LenSent from my iPhone

On 29 Jun 2014, at 15:23, “Ed Nantes” enantes@bigpond.com wrote:

Has anyone had useful experience of replacing the sintered
bronze spiggot bush in the back end of a crankshaft.

I ordered some from the local bearing shop but looking at
them I strongly doubt they are actually sintered bronze.

I see XKs Unlimited have them advetised, but don’t mention
what material. I suppose I cold enquire and ask them to tell
me the material rather than ask ‘’ is it Sintered Bronze?‘’
BUt I still won’t know how they were made.

I want to get it right and not have it squeaking a bit down
the track, or have it wear… and have to pull out a gear
box.

Previous Jaguars used a roller bearing as a spiggot , but
this by now has worn the inside of the cranks and
encourages jumping out of gear on the over run.
It was changed to a bush about late MK V . XK 120 days.

Googling ‘‘sintered bronze bush’’ doesn’t produce much help
. Either flanged bushed or unfinshed bar or companies in
China and India who sell wwholesale.

Machining to size apparently is not recommended as it ’
smears ’ over the grain on the material holding the
lubricant. Apparently they should be made to size then
impregnated [sintered].


Ed Nantes SS
Melbourne, Australia
–Posted using Jag-lovers JagFORUM [forums.jag-lovers.org]–

Ed
Sintered bronze ( Oilite,TM) is routinely machined with good results as
long a you take a few precautions.
Best Machining Practices

There are a few basic machining practices required to optimize retaining
surface micro-porosity and the self lubricating properties of Oilite®
bearing materials.

Cutting tools must be sharp. For this reason, carbide inserts are highly
recommended since they hold a cutting edge much longer. This preserves
the open-pore structure from which oil can flow freely. A dull tool will
smear the pores, greatly reducing the self-lubricating qualities of the
material.

Turning: Cutting Feed Rate: 0.002-0.006 IPM
Speed: Oilite® Bronze 375-500 SFM
Speed: Super-Oilite® 250-500 SFM

Roller Burnishing is an excellent choice to modify an ID slightly. Ball
sizing can also be used on the ID effectively for final sizing.

Honing and grinding are never recommended on Oilite® bearing materials.
Using these methods on any surface which will become the bearing surface
will introduce grinding media and could easily smear the bronze pores
sealing the micro-porosity.

After extensive machining, bearings should be re-impregnated with
appropriate / specified oils. Vacuumed impregnation is recommended. If
bearings were not lubricated prior to machining and if cutting fluids
were used, that medium must be removed prior to any impregnation of the
oil selected for the application.

Best regards

Klaus W Nielsen
815666BW
812394On 6/29/14 1:10 AM, “Ed Nantes” enantes@bigpond.com wrote:

Has anyone had useful experience of replacing the sintered
bronze spiggot bush in the back end of a crankshaft.

I ordered some from the local bearing shop but looking at
them I strongly doubt they are actually sintered bronze.

I see XKs Unlimited have them advetised, but don’t mention
what material. I suppose I cold enquire and ask them to tell
me the material rather than ask ‘’ is it Sintered Bronze?‘’
BUt I still won’t know how they were made.

I want to get it right and not have it squeaking a bit down
the track, or have it wear… and have to pull out a gear
box.

Previous Jaguars used a roller bearing as a spiggot , but
this by now has worn the inside of the cranks and
encourages jumping out of gear on the over run.
It was changed to a bush about late MK V . XK 120 days.

Googling ‘‘sintered bronze bush’’ doesn’t produce much help
. Either flanged bushed or unfinshed bar or companies in
China and India who sell wwholesale.

Machining to size apparently is not recommended as it ’
smears ’ over the grain on the material holding the
lubricant. Apparently they should be made to size then
impregnated [sintered].


Ed Nantes SS
Melbourne, Australia
–Posted using Jag-lovers JagFORUM [forums.jag-lovers.org]–

Ed N;
I seem to recall in my fuzzy memory that “sintered bronze”
had a bit of a “mottled” look, opposed to that of a “straight
brass” bushing… If this is true, then, when I worked for Datsun
('68-'75) the spiggot (first motion shaft) bushing I replaced on
that era vehicles were all “brass”… I do recall that those vehicles
were all rather high mileage, as well (over 250K).
With respect to “A” west coast vendor, when I called them
asking about the details of a particular part, I was told by a
parts cluck, in no uncertain terms, that “They have no mechanics
and do NOT work on cars!” To which I asked: “Then who does
your restoration work?” The cluck hung-up!! YMMV!!!
Charles #677556.
http://xktx.org----- Original Message -----
From: “Ed Nantes”

Has anyone had useful experience of replacing the sintered
bronze spiggot bush in the back end of a crankshaft.

I ordered some from the local bearing shop but looking at
them I strongly doubt they are actually sintered bronze.

I see XKs Unlimited have them advetised, but don’t mention
what material. I suppose I cold enquire and ask them to tell
me the material rather than ask ‘’ is it Sintered Bronze?‘’
BUt I still won’t know how they were made.

I want to get it right and not have it squeaking a bit down
the track, or have it wear… and have to pull out a gear
box.

Previous Jaguars used a roller bearing as a spiggot , but
this by now has worn the inside of the cranks and
encourages jumping out of gear on the over run.
It was changed to a bush about late MK V . XK 120 days.

Googling ‘‘sintered bronze bush’’ doesn’t produce much help
. Either flanged bushed or unfinshed bar or companies in
China and India who sell wwholesale.

Machining to size apparently is not recommended as it ’
smears ’ over the grain on the material holding the
lubricant. Apparently they should be made to size then
impregnated [sintered].

Ed Nantes SS
Melbourne, Australia

In reply to a message from cb@XKTX.Org sent Sun 29 Jun 2014:

Well I’ve done some chasing around.
Checked witht eh supplier of the bushes I got and they
admitted they were only ph Bronze. It’s not easy [ or cheap]
to get Sintered

They did however have soe useful advice.

Historic an Vintage restorations here, who do excellent
work, had bought stocks of sintered bronze and make bushes

The trouble with doing it oneself is there is a minimum buy
of 12’’ and very expensive to have the left over laying
around.
Rang Historic and Vintage and they said come on up and
we’ll make a couple for you.

Klaus excellent advice on machining ties in with what I had
been able to find. It’s mainly the need to buy excess
material that means it’s probably cheaper in the long run to
H & V to supply.

Charles , yes sintered is quite distinctive in appearance.
But if it needs replacing , I’d rather have to pull out a
Datsun Box than an SS100 [ I’ve found that gear boxes have
put on weight in recent times: >)–
The original message included these comments:

I seem to recall in my fuzzy memory that ‘‘sintered bronze’’
had a bit of a ‘‘mottled’’ look, opposed to that of a ‘‘straight
brass’’ bushing… If this is true, then, when I worked for Datsun
('68-'75) the spiggot (first motion shaft) bushing I replaced on
that era vehicles were all ‘‘brass’’… I do recall that those vehicles
were all rather high mileage, as well (over 250K).


Ed Nantes SS
Melbourne, Australia
–Posted using Jag-lovers JagFORUM [forums.jag-lovers.org]–
–Support Jag-lovers - Donate at http://www.jag-lovers.org/donate04.php

Hi Ed,
I’ve had pretty good luck with oilite sintered bronze products…Local automatic transmission parts supplier
had access to the line. Bearing supply places as well. See link to website below. Seem to remember AA-742 might have been close.
http://tinyurl.com/pbxr8zp
Brian Kallweit,
Calgary, Alberta, Canada
XK120DHCOn Jun 29, 2014, at 9:35 PM, Ed Nantes enantes@bigpond.com wrote:

In reply to a message from cb@XKTX.Org sent Sun 29 Jun 2014:

Well I’ve done some chasing around.
Checked witht eh supplier of the bushes I got and they
admitted they were only ph Bronze. It’s not easy [ or cheap]
to get Sintered

They did however have soe useful advice.

Historic an Vintage restorations here, who do excellent
work, had bought stocks of sintered bronze and make bushes

The trouble with doing it oneself is there is a minimum buy
of 12’’ and very expensive to have the left over laying
around.
Rang Historic and Vintage and they said come on up and
we’ll make a couple for you.

Klaus excellent advice on machining ties in with what I had
been able to find. It’s mainly the need to buy excess
material that means it’s probably cheaper in the long run to
H & V to supply.

Charles , yes sintered is quite distinctive in appearance.
But if it needs replacing , I’d rather have to pull out a
Datsun Box than an SS100 [ I’ve found that gear boxes have
put on weight in recent times: >)


The original message included these comments:

I seem to recall in my fuzzy memory that ‘‘sintered bronze’’
had a bit of a ‘‘mottled’’ look, opposed to that of a ‘‘straight
brass’’ bushing… If this is true, then, when I worked for Datsun
('68-'75) the spiggot (first motion shaft) bushing I replaced on
that era vehicles were all ‘‘brass’’… I do recall that those vehicles
were all rather high mileage, as well (over 250K).


Ed Nantes SS
Melbourne, Australia
–Posted using Jag-lovers JagFORUM [forums.jag-lovers.org]–
–Support Jag-lovers - Donate at http://www.jag-lovers.org/donate04.php

In reply to a message from Ed Nantes sent Sat 28 Jun 2014:

I don’t remember the size, but I believe you may find one
here: McMaster-Carr
The original message included these comments:

Has anyone had useful experience of replacing the sintered
bronze spiggot bush in the back end of a crankshaft.
Googling ‘‘sintered bronze bush’’ doesn’t produce much help
. Either flanged bushed or unfinshed bar or companies in
China and India who sell wwholesale.
Machining to size apparently is not recommended as it ’
smears ’ over the grain on the material holding the
lubricant. Apparently they should be made to size then


Mike Spoelker
Louisville,Kentucky, United States
–Posted using Jag-lovers JagFORUM [forums.jag-lovers.org]–
–Support Jag-lovers - Donate at http://www.jag-lovers.org/donate04.php

Hello. The bronze bushing between the end of the crankshaft and gearbox nose shaft… should it be force fed into its receptacle at the back of the crankshaft? Some light hammering doesn’t seem to drive it home and I’m wondering if I need to machine the OD of the bushing. How much resistance should there be while driving this bushing home? Thank you.

john

It needs to be a tight fit so that it doesn’t spin, you could lightly emery paper the out side by holding it in a drill press, located on a bolt and nut, but I’d be very careful, also make sure when you are happy with the fit that you preload the bush with oil by holding it between your thumbs, first filling it with oil, and then squeeze your thumbs together.

Thanks Robin, I understand. I’ll try that. I thought also about leaving it in the freezer for a bit before inserting it.

john

1 Like

That could work but the shrinkage on that size would be minimal.