[DaimLan] RE pre=selectot box


(Duddlesasling@aol.com) #1

Dear yLISTERS< AS an old old man reading yr enthusisam ref the Daimer fluid
flywheel trans by comparative youngsters some comments from a man who was
around when the trans wasfirst on the market. You would think that this
winderful invention to make driving easier ( and safer) there should hav
ebeen onoverwhelming demand for it ?? Not a bit, because you must reckon
with the old english tradition t\at the time, WHAT’S GOOD ENOUGH FOR MY DAD
IS GOOD ENOUGH FOR ME !!. tHE DIEHARD MALE MOTORIST EVEN RESENTED THE NEW
SYNCHRO BOX COS IT MEANT NEW DRIVERS ( EVEN WOMEN!!) COMING ON TO THE
ROADS. My impression of the general public was then that theyviewed it
with a lot o distrust. Many Daimler owners used the gear change pedal as
a cljutch even when when they had had a Daimler for years !! Such is the
fate of apioneer !!! Dudley
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(Porter House Productions) #2

Duddlesasling@aol.com wrote:

“Many Daimler owners used the gear change pedal as a clutch even when when
they
had had a Daimler for years!”

Which raises a question…
Many Daimler authorities have warned against the practice of depressing the
gear-change pedal prior to selecting the gear, then releasing it afterwards,
a la
a conventional clutch. I have faithfully followed this advice, but having
studied
the innards of quite a few preselector boxes over the years, I’m not
altogether
sure what damage might result from such an heretical practice. Provided the
selector rods are in the appropriate positions before the busbar rises
again,
what difference does it make at what point the busbar is lowered (ie: by the
depression of the gearchange pedal)? I can’t see how damage may result. Can
somebody please explain?
Tony Porter.

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(Porter House Productions) #3

Duddlesasling@aol.com wrote:

“Many Daimler owners used the gear change pedal as a clutch even when when
they
had had a Daimler for years!”

Which raises a question…
Many Daimler authorities have warned against the practice of depressing the
gear-change pedal prior to selecting the gear, then releasing it afterwards,
a la
a conventional clutch. I have faithfully followed this advice, but having
studied
the innards of quite a few preselector boxes over the years, I’m not
altogether
sure what damage might result from such an heretical practice. Provided the
selector rods are in the appropriate positions before the busbar rises
again,
what difference does it make at what point the busbar is lowered (ie: by the
depression of the gearchange pedal)? I can’t see how damage may result. Can
somebody please explain?
Tony Porter.

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(LANCHALE@aol.com) #4

Tony & other interested ‘Listers’,

Although like Tony I have always tried to select a gear prior to depressing
the gearchange pedal I do recall having done it incorrectly once or twice.

I am unable to recall exactly what the result was however it may have
resulted in the busbar not picking up on one of the gear engaging levers.
This results in the spring, one with coils usually as thick as ones little
finger, not having much work to do. The result is the spring causes the
linkage to the pedal and thus the pedal from moving much further than normal.
The first indication of this unfortunate incident is that your left foot not
expecting this to occur slips off the pedal, the second is a sudden sharp
pain to ones shin, omnibus drivers used to refer to it as ‘Daimler Knee’,
caused by the impact of the pedal to the shin. Dependent upon ones demeanour
the air may or may not turn blue momentarily, the presence of passengers does
have a bearing on this!!. You are then left with the sometimes difficult
task of pushing the blasted pedal back down again, having ensured that you
have this time selected correctly a gear for the busbar to engage. This can
take both feet sometimes, an interesting task whilst continuing to maintain
an even course down the road without wishing to give concern to other road
users.

All in all it is more simple to follow the recommended method of changing
gear as described by Tony.

Regards

Adrian Lanchester-Hale

DJ256

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(John Hurst) #5

Tony, and other interested parties,

It is my view that the fault is not when the pedal is pressed or release,
but the manner of doing so that is important. With a conventional clutch,
you rapidly let the clutch out until it starts to bite, then ease it out the
rest of the way until fully engaged, whilst pressing the accelerator -
particularly if starting from rest. Do that to a preselector and you are
causing the bands to slip under load - increasing wear. There is no need to
do it, as the fluid flywheel is there to emulate the smooth engagement
achieved by slipping a conventional clutch. Let the pedal out smoothly and
fully, then when fully out, press the accelerator.

Similarly, there is the urban myth that you should not hold the change pedal
down for any length of time. I am sure that you have noticed that when
neutral is selected the pedal is held down by the gearbox - keeping all
bands disengaged. No much difference between the box doing this and
achieving the same result with your foot.

John.-----Original Message-----
From: Porter House Productions [mailto:porterhouse@virtual.net.au]
Sent: Saturday, September 09, 2000 10:27 PM
To: daimlan@jag-lovers.org
Subject: Re: [DaimLan] RE pre=selectot box

Duddlesasling@aol.com wrote:

“Many Daimler owners used the gear change pedal as a clutch even when when
they
had had a Daimler for years!”

Which raises a question…
Many Daimler authorities have warned against the practice of depressing the
gear-change pedal prior to selecting the gear, then releasing it afterwards,
a la
a conventional clutch. I have faithfully followed this advice, but having
studied
the innards of quite a few preselector boxes over the years, I’m not
altogether
sure what damage might result from such an heretical practice. Provided the
selector rods are in the appropriate positions before the busbar rises
again,
what difference does it make at what point the busbar is lowered (ie: by the
depression of the gearchange pedal)? I can’t see how damage may result. Can
somebody please explain?
Tony Porter.

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(John Hurst) #6

Adrian and other pre-selectors,

The false neutral condition described below is indeed embarrassing. I
looked after a DE36 (King George VI’s number 2 state car - now in the
heritage trust museum) that did this more than once. Substantial left leg
strength required to get it back where it belonged.

This problem tends to occur when the lever and pedal are both moved at the
same time. Tony Porter’s original comment is right - it doesn’t matter much
if the pedal is in or out when the lever is moved, however do both together
and you run the risk of the selectors not picking up any band, which results
in the over enthusiastic pedal syndrome you so well describe.

John.-----Original Message-----
From: LANCHALE@aol.com [mailto:LANCHALE@aol.com]
Sent: Wednesday, September 13, 2000 6:14 AM
To: daimlan@jag-lovers.org
Subject: Re: [DaimLan] RE pre=selectot box

Tony & other interested ‘Listers’,

Although like Tony I have always tried to select a gear prior to depressing
the gearchange pedal I do recall having done it incorrectly once or twice.

I am unable to recall exactly what the result was however it may have
resulted in the busbar not picking up on one of the gear engaging levers.
This results in the spring, one with coils usually as thick as ones little
finger, not having much work to do. The result is the spring causes the
linkage to the pedal and thus the pedal from moving much further than
normal.
The first indication of this unfortunate incident is that your left foot
not
expecting this to occur slips off the pedal, the second is a sudden sharp
pain to ones shin, omnibus drivers used to refer to it as ‘Daimler Knee’,
caused by the impact of the pedal to the shin. Dependent upon ones
demeanour
the air may or may not turn blue momentarily, the presence of passengers
does
have a bearing on this!!. You are then left with the sometimes difficult
task of pushing the blasted pedal back down again, having ensured that you
have this time selected correctly a gear for the busbar to engage. This can
take both feet sometimes, an interesting task whilst continuing to maintain
an even course down the road without wishing to give concern to other road
users.

All in all it is more simple to follow the recommended method of changing
gear as described by Tony.

Regards

Adrian Lanchester-Hale

DJ256
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(keith pearson) #7

Doing this will wear out the linings on the band brakes. Just press the pedal to the floor and let go! I know the huge prejudice over here against auto boxes anyway. “they cost too much when they go wrong” , so silly when you think that clutches used to last 30,000 miles in the “good old days” and autos went on for ever. I have a Lanchester LJ200 1953 and the old box still woks very well. Much better than crunching about with an ancient gear box .