[E-Type] Radiator is too high!

My bonnet was shutting nicely until I had the car up on
jack stands. I raised it using a jack under the picture
frame, but noticed that the car has obviously been jacked
up using the radiator support in the past, as it is
buckled and bent in the middle. Now, on lowering the car,
the bonnet fouls against the top left of the radiator.

Clearly I need to do something about the support, but I’m
not sure what, or how to tackle it, as it’s an integral
part of the frame etc…

Advice would be most welcome!–
Julian, '69 E-Type 2+2
Pasadena, United States
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Well, I had the same problem, or at least I needed to straighten out
said radiator support. Remove bonnet, then using a combination of C
clamps and very stout pieces of wood and/or angle iron, try to
straighten out the support. On my car that wasn’t enough and I ended
up having the hit it very hard with a suitably heavy hammer.

That part of the frame is malleable enough to stand this process.

We had this on the list a short while ago and this was the suggested
option…worked ok for me.On Fri, Mar 25, 2011 at 10:05 PM, jjbunn julian.bunn@caltech.edu wrote:

My bonnet was shutting nicely until I had the car up on
jack stands. I raised it using a jack under the picture
frame, but noticed that the car has obviously been jacked
up using the radiator support in the past, as it is
buckled and bent in the middle. Now, on lowering the car,
the bonnet fouls against the top left of the radiator.

Clearly I need to do something about the support, but I’m
not sure what, or how to tackle it, as it’s an integral
part of the frame etc…

Advice would be most welcome!

Julian, '69 E-Type 2+2
Pasadena, United States
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Les…'68 S1.5 2+2


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In reply to a message from Les Halls sent Fri 25 Mar 2011:

Thanks, Les, I found that thread and read it.

I’m wondering how you whacked the thing with a hammer in
a downwards direction? Where did you whack it, and how
did you avoid hitting the radiator itself?!–
The original message included these comments:

Well, I had the same problem, or at least I needed to straighten out
said radiator support. Remove bonnet, then using a combination of C
clamps and very stout pieces of wood and/or angle iron, try to
straighten out the support. On my car that wasn’t enough and I ended
up having the hit it very hard with a suitably heavy hammer.


Julian, '69 E-Type 2+2
Pasadena, United States
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In reply to a message from jjbunn sent Fri 25 Mar 2011:

I had to do the same ‘adjustment’ in the past. You will be able to
get the most accurately straight support if you just bite the
bullet and remove the radiator and go from there. You will be able
to lay a straight piece of wood or metal on the top the radiator
mounting cross piece and continue to adjust till you have it right,
without damaging your radiator. It really isn’t that bad to remove
the radiator. You can even use this time to put an
aluminum ‘divider’ in the fan(s) shroud so you will still have some
cooling should one of the fans go out on you. I’m glad I have one.
I never thought of the idea, till I read about it here on the forum.–
Tom Hishon, 69 E-type 2+2, 69 E-type OTS, 85 XJ6, '03 X-type
Wasilla, Alaska, United States
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Remove the radiator. Good time to clean and straighten the fins etc.
Maybe put new hoses on, clean the front of the engine etc etc.
Removing/replacing the rad is a simple task.On Sat, Mar 26, 2011 at 1:03 AM, jjbunn julian.bunn@caltech.edu wrote:

In reply to a message from Les Halls sent Fri 25 Mar 2011:

Thanks, Les, I found that thread and read it.

I’m wondering how you whacked the thing with a hammer in
a downwards direction? Where did you whack it, and how
did you avoid hitting the radiator itself?!

The original message included these comments:

Well, I had the same problem, or at least I needed to straighten out
said radiator support. Remove bonnet, then using a combination of C
clamps and very stout pieces of wood and/or angle iron, try to
straighten out the support. On my car that wasn’t enough and I ended
up having the hit it very hard with a suitably heavy hammer.


Julian, '69 E-Type 2+2
Pasadena, United States
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Les…'68 S1.5 2+2


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In reply to a message from Les Halls sent Sat 26 Mar 2011:

So Julian, after all your Otter switch woes it looks like
the rad might have to come out anyway.

As well as the other ‘‘while I am in there’’ jobs, you could
also flush the engine and rad.–
Ian 1970 OTS
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In reply to a message from jjbunn sent Fri 25 Mar 2011:

the folks at eh body shop where Tweety got painted lifted
the $%^&*ing car by the rad support: fortunately, the bonnet
wasn’t fastened shut, otherwise they’d have been fixing the
bonnet I’d just spent days getting perfect. Equally
fortunate was the fact they picked it up by the edges and
not in the middle of the support.

So, yes I too had to use the ‘‘percussive polishing’’
technique on the support: I just whacked it witha
sledgehammer whilst my wife held a suitably cut-to-lenth 2x4
and it went back to proper height.–
The original message included these comments:

My bonnet was shutting nicely until I had the car up on
jack stands. I raised it using a jack under the picture
frame, but noticed that the car has obviously been jacked
up using the radiator support in the past, as it is


Paul Wigton, steward to a '60 DKW 1000 SP, Tweety, '63 FHC!
Keenesburg, CO, United States
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In reply to a message from jjbunn sent Fri 25 Mar 2011:

And, while the radiator is getting a flush at the shop, have them
move the hot water inlet to the left corner and seal the hole where
it had been. No need to relocate the bleed hose. Making the
radiator a TRUE cross-flow will eliminate any chance of
overheating.–
The original message included these comments:

My bonnet was shutting nicely until I had the car up on
jack stands. I raised it using a jack under the picture
frame, but noticed that the car has obviously been jacked
up using the radiator support in the past, as it is
buckled and bent in the middle. Now, on lowering the car,
the bonnet fouls against the top left of the radiator.
Clearly I need to do something about the support, but I’m
part of the frame etc…
Advice would be most welcome!


Pete Peterson 70E(193K) 88XJ40s(253K & 242K) 94XJ40 (122K)
Severna Park, Maryland, United States
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In reply to a message from Jaguarpete sent Sat 26 Mar 2011:

Wow, you guys are really keen for me to remove my
radiator :slight_smile:

Anyway, problem solved with a few judicious hammer blows
and careful application of a crowbar underneath. I must
say I’m not entirely happy with it, as the clearance
between the top of the radiator and the underside of the
bonnet must be only about 1/8’’. I wonder what will happen
if I go over a bump?!

By the way, the method I used to find what was stopping
the bonnet closing fully was to put small mounds of
talcum powder in the likely spots, close the bonnet as
far as it would go, the open and look where there was
powder on the underside, and how flat the mounds were.
Then I hovered it up. I got that trick from one of the
guys over on the BCF Triumph forum, I think.–
Julian, '69 E-Type 2+2
Pasadena, United States
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Julian,
Just a guess but betting that if you take the car to a body shop they
can put it on a frame machine that will support the bonnet frame and
pull down the radiator support with the radiator in situ. It won’t be
free but would think it would be less than an hour labor. They should
have the expertise to do it right without damaging anything else and
it won’t cost anything to get an estimate. I think you’re correct to
be concerned with 1/8" clearance, that radiator is heavy, especially
full of water. Its on rubber mounts and its going to move as will the
bonnet. Regarding checking distances/clearances I use clay or silly
putty.
pauls 67ots

Wow, you guys are really keen for me to remove my
radiator :slight_smile:

Anyway, problem solved with a few judicious hammer blows
and careful application of a crowbar underneath. I must
say I’m not entirely happy with it, as the clearance
between the top of the radiator and the underside of the
bonnet must be only about 1/8’’. I wonder what will happen
if I go over a bump?!

By the way, the method I used to find what was stopping
the bonnet closing fully was to put small mounds of
talcum powder in the likely spots, close the bonnet as
far as it would go, the open and look where there was
powder on the underside, and how flat the mounds were.
Then I hovered it up. I got that trick from one of the
guys over on the BCF Triumph forum, I think.
<<<<<<<<<<From: “jjbunn” julian.bunn@caltech.edu
Subject: Re: [E-Type] Radiator is too high!


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In reply to a message from paul spurlock sent Sat 26 Mar 2011:

Visitor would add:

  1. Modeling clay is great for measuring blind. Air cleaner to
    bonnett in older domestic V8’s. Piston and valve clearances in the
    combustion chamber.

  2. Straightening a channel section is just a tad tricky, but
    doable. If the displacement is away from the open side, the sides
    are stretched and gettig it back with no wrinkles without a
    shrinking process isn’t really possible. The other way will cause
    the walls to wrinkle, but straightening pulls them flat, somewhat
    easier.

Often,k it’s necessary to clamp or hammer the metsal past the point
you want it as it will spring back to some extent. Especially true,
in the clamp method. Frame folks use jacks and chains and sometimes
heat. I straightened the beam axle on an older Ford pickup with a
length of chain and a bottle jack. I was amazed at how easy it was
to pull it back into place. I did have to pull past the point I
wanted as it moved back a bit on relaxing the jack.

I’ve read that some of your colleagues use a chunk of hardwood in
the opening to make it stronger.

I wonder why Jaguar didn’t use box tubing here in lieu of channel.

Caveat, I’ve never touched a wrench to an E car!!

Carl–
Carl Hutchins 1983 Jaguar XJ6 with LT1 and 1994 Jeep Grand
Walnut Creek, California, United States
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In reply to a message from cadjag sent Mon 28 Mar 2011:

No worries: It’s usually just better to beat them with a 9/16ths
spanner…:wink:

I also use the clay method and is how I reset my (previously
perfect alignment/rad height) apres’ the body shop ‘reconfiguring’
my bonnet/radiator fit.–
The original message included these comments:

  1. Modeling clay is great for measuring blind. Air cleaner to
    bonnett in older domestic V8’s. Piston and valve clearances in the
    combustion chamber.
    Caveat, I’ve never touched a wrench to an E car!!


Paul Wigton, steward to a '60 DKW 1000 SP, Tweety, '63 FHC!
Keenesburg, CO, United States
–Posted using Jag-lovers JagFORUM [forums.jag-lovers.org]–


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