[Lumps!] Lumping: Step Two


(Paul) #1

Step one went went pretty well; that is the removal of the
Jag engine and the removal of the LT1 from the '96 Caprice
donor car. Step three will be the basic installation &
connections, with step four being the final details like
tidying up, A/C and most likely trouble shooting.

Now it’s time for step two. For me, this step is cleaning up
the Jag engine bay, replacing bushings and prepping the LT1
for installation.

I have many of the new parts for installation purchased and
sitting on stand by. I’ve spent the last couple of nights
removing the all the wiring, dismantling the accessories and
cleaning up.

The goal is to have all, or at least most of the caked on
grease removed and replace as many gaskets & seals as
reasonably possible-including the transmission. It looks
like the only gaskets that won’t be replaced are the intake
& head gaskets.

Upon removing the water pump I found that the driven bearing
is junk. Ordered a remanufactured pump yesterday and will
pick it up today.

After pulling the balancer off and then the timing cover,
realized that I should have ordered a new timing set as
well. You can’t just expect that these parts are going to be
in great shape. I actually feel a little bit guilty about
not freshening up the entire bottom end and going through
the heads to at least lap the valves and install new seals.
We’ll just pretend I’m ignorant to those details.

After cleanup and gasket installation I’ll put on a fresh
coat of engine enamel. Then it will be time to pull the Jag
back into the shop for it’s prep work. Hopefully I’ll be at
that point some time this weekend.

Thanks to all who have pitched in advice, warnings and other
pointers so far. Am looking forward to learning more from
all of you!–
1982 XJ6
Allendorf, Iowa, United States
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(cadjag) #2

In reply to a message from pk10 sent Wed 11 Jun 2014:

Good going.

If you assessed the LT1 in the donor car, I’d not worry.

Oven cleaner works great for the caked stuff on the
Jaguar’s cross member. It also eats paint, but the cross
member can be easily resprayed in black. Getting it on the
body color panels not so good. I found a brown metallic
Duplicolor to touch up the body panels of my Grosvenor
brown car. Not exact, but quite close.

A spray of silver on the silver heat shields spiffs them up
as well.

Purge the AC matrix and attach the hoses prior to
installing the car. Much easier and less risky as to a
connection failure.

Don’t worry too much about the '‘ship wright’ complex. it s
always there!!

Carl–
Carl Hutchins 1983 Jaguar XJ6 with LT1 and 1994 Jeep Grand
Walnut Creek, California, United States
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(bill70jh) #3

In reply to a message from pk10 sent Wed 11 Jun 2014:

Paul:
Great update. Thanks. With the timing cover off, you will
likely want to replace the water pump shaft seal. If you
need the installation tool, let me know - I’ve got one.
Bill–
Bill, Original Owner: '87 XJ6 VDP, '70 Dodge Challenger
Central Coast/California, United States
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(slofut) #4

In reply to a message from pk10 sent Wed 11 Jun 2014:

Paul,
Under the brake booster, where the paint is eaten away, and
on the frame use this,

http://shop.masterseriesct.com/product.sc;jsessionid=4C244388931E255982236783B93C5845.m1plqscsfapp05?productId=12&categoryId=1

The silver is a rust preventive mcu, and the ag111 is an
awesome urethane satin black that you can wipe down with
carb cleaner after it’s cured! Damn near anything else will
wash off or at least bubble up with carb cleaner or brake
fluid.
Bill–
The original message included these comments:

Now it’s time for step two. For me, this step is cleaning up
the Jag engine bay, replacing bushings and prepping the LT1
for installation.


'75XJ6C about to be unlumped, '86 XJ6, '67 FHC, '75TR6
moultrie, ga, United States
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(Paul) #5

In reply to a message from slofut sent Sun 15 Jun 2014:

Thanks for the paint link, Bill. I was actually planning on
using some leftover 10 gage 304 stainless steel to cover the
repair work under the booster. But if any fluid leaks under
the SS, the paint will help protect the new patchwork that
I’ll have in place there.

My weekend was filled with ‘‘insurance’’ work. It also turns
out that there is such a day called ‘‘Father’s Day’’ that
interrupted a couple hours of valuable time on Sunday. There
was a silver lining, though. Upon cleaning my intake, I
decided it would be best to just remove it and replace the
gaskets.

While I was that far along, I figured a head gasket
replacement would be a good idea as well. With the heads
off, it was easy to take them over to the In-Law’s place and
use the ‘‘Farmer-In-Law’s’’ 220v welder to remove the three
exhaust manifold bolts that had been broken off. I used
castle nuts to plug weld to-ended up using 8 nuts to remove
the 3 bolts. At least they all came out.

Now I have to wait a couple of days to get the new head
gasket kit & new bolts as I don’t believe in reusing head
bolts. I should be getting the new timing set tomorrow. In
the meantime I am replacing all of the valve stem seals and
lapping the valves. This also gives me time to get all the
caked on grease cleaned up and make everything look, well,
better.

The bottom end seems in good shape. The cylinder walls are
adequate-not excessively worn, no serious lip, so I am
content to leave it as is. The pistons seem tight, the rods
do not have any play in them to the crankshaft, etc. My only
complaint is that the PO used Quaker State oil. I can tell
by the black film residue coating on all the internals.

In summary, I’m a few days behind, but since I don’t have an
actual schedule, it’s all good. The moral of the story is
that I now know this engine much better and don’t have to
worry as much about the ‘‘what if’s’’ and/or the recurring
anxiety of replacing some gaskets/parts, but not some
others. As I said, to me this is ‘‘insurance’’ and makes me
feel far more comfortable with the expected longevity of the
final product. Plus it’s much easier to do this work in the
engine stand, rather than a year down the road with the
engine in the car!–
The original message included these comments:

Under the brake booster, where the paint is eaten away, and
on the frame use this,


1982 XJ6
Allendorf, Iowa, United States
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(Roger Mabry) #6

In reply to a message from pk10 sent Wed 11 Jun 2014:

You might want to check out this other Forum - lots of
specific LT1 advice and several Jags Lumped with them…

http://www.ls1lt1.com/forum/lt1-|-lt4-|-l99-engine-tech-
10/

You will need all of the available Opti information there -
now or in the future…–
The original message included these comments:

Step one went went pretty well; that is the removal of the
Jag engine and the removal of the LT1 from the '96 Caprice
donor car. Step three will be the basic installation &


'71 XJ6 383/200R, '72 XJ6 LT1/700R, '90 Stang Convertible
Glendora, CA, United States
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(Paul) #7

In reply to a message from Roger Mabry sent Mon 16 Jun 2014:

Thanks Roger, I’ve been looking at that site a lot the last
few weeks. Good info.

More bad news on my end. First we got so much rain Monday
night that our basement actually had water seeping into it.
First time in the 105 year history of the house for that. I
was up all night with the shop vac slurping it up, pouring
it into a 5 gallon bucket and then hauling the bucket
upstairs to dump it outside. 6 gallons every 15 minutes. I’m
pooped. Everything is flooded around here. Good chance of
some more tornadoes & rain tonight.

Upon pulling valves & lifters I found that they are all
scored and pitted. Cam is no better. Someone offered me a
‘‘hot cam’’ (free!), but I’m not sure I want that much punch.
I like the lift & duration of the Crane 104227 cam, but
don’t want to dump $490 into it plus new lifters & valves.
Would be a good torque building cam, but perhaps a bit too
far into the high performance range for what I’m really
looking for. I cannot justify going over .500 lift, that’s a
racing cam, IMO.

The numbers game. Stock cam for my Caprice donor: 191/196
.418/.430 lift 111 LSA.

Crane 104227 specs: (210/224 .511/.553 112lsa) w/1.6RR’s

‘‘Hot’’ Cam: 218/228 .525/.525 112lsa) w/ 1.6RR

Am leaning toward the Melling MC1336: 201/208 .447/.459 lift
117 LSA. Northern Auto has it for $308 includes cam, roller
lifters & lube. Is a slight improvement over stock without
getting too wild. Also do not need to worry about a higher
rated stall converter.

Anything I’m missing?–
1982 XJ6
Allendorf, Iowa, United States
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(Roger Mabry) #8

In reply to a message from pk10 sent Wed 18 Jun 2014:

Torque… that is the secret to moving the heavy Jag… the
LT1 does a OK job - much better than the Jag motors and the
engine weight savings helps. Keep the exhaust system to
smaller pipes – consider running the exhaust under the IRS
with ball flanges for easy removal. Remember the rear IRS
and the brakes and the need to replace/service them
easily… no need for anything other than a stock speed
converter…you are not building a race car…

My '71 Jag with the SBC 383/200R has 470# torque and 410 HP
at low rpms and REALLY moves the car well. Even with the
now 2:88 LSD rear end… in a contest… the LT1/700R with
4:09 gears wins at the beginning but by second gear it is
all over…the only good things are the fuel injection for
consistent starting and stopping and the better economy —
you have to feed those horses.

Choose the new cam for the low end torque and you will be
happy in the end…the higher rpms are seldom seen in Jags
driven as daily drivers…chart should show from idle upward
as the 700R in OD around town will be at very low rpms and
you want that torque available without having to shift down
if possible…

The LT1 Forum is very good… lots of information about the
specific things that are problems with this engine series.
If I was to Lump again today it would be with a LS series
engine and the newer six (6) speed auto trans. Just need to
win the Lotto. The only really bad part of the LT1 engine
is the Optispark and I resolved it all with the Dynaspark
unit…more $$$ but it works and has a great original owner
warranty/rebuilding charge. I used a electric water pump
and all the stock GM radiator/dual fans and AC condenser.
It all drops in easily… photos if you need them…–
The original message included these comments:

Thanks Roger, I’ve been looking at that site a lot the last
few weeks. Good info.
Would be a good torque building cam, but perhaps a bit too
far into the high performance range for what I’m really
looking for. I cannot justify going over .500 lift, that’s a
racing cam, IMO.


'71 XJ6 383/200R, '72 XJ6 LT1/700R, '90 Stang Convertible
Glendora, CA, United States
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(Paul) #9

In reply to a message from Roger Mabry sent Wed 18 Jun 2014:

Thanks for reinforcing my thought process, Roger. It seems
we are seeing eye to eye. Low end torque is the name of the
game.

I have already purchased a mechanical water pump. I see a
number of people like the electric. I really have no opinion
one way or the other. My reman water pump is a direct
replacement for the Caprice. Now that I think about it, I’m
not sure if I should have stayed with that, or if I should
have changed it to a Camaro style…I think they have some
different line ports?

A new Optispark is another item for me to look into. It
appears as though there is no way to go cheap on one of
those! Nor would I really want to.

I should be getting my new 97 Camaro radiator, condenser &
dual fans delivered soon.

Since I’m building a daily driver, I should explain what
that means to me. I drive 10 miles to work & the same back
home. ALL country driving 60 MPH, well maybe a bit over that
on a couple of stretches. Minimal traffic, three 90� corners
to maneuver. Only 1 km of 35 mph town driving. I also live 1
km onto a gravel road. My intention is to slap a set of ugly
mudflaps on to prevent undercarriage pitting/damage.

It seems everyone would like to have an LS conversion. I
thought the $500 I spent for my donor was pretty good. Now
after having to buy so many replacement parts, I’m beginning
to think a new LS wouldn’t have been too much different in
price. Who knows, an LS may have required just as many new
parts…–
The original message included these comments:

converter…you are not building a race car…
Choose the new cam for the low end torque and you will be
is the Optispark and I resolved it all with the Dynaspark
unit…more $$$ but it works and has a great original owner
warranty/rebuilding charge. I used a electric water pump
and all the stock GM radiator/dual fans and AC condenser.


1982 XJ6
Allendorf, Iowa, United States
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(Paul) #10

In reply to a message from pk10 sent Wed 18 Jun 2014:

Keep digging…crankshaft is on it’s way to the machine shop
for a .010 turn, flux & cook. The bearings did not strike me
as acceptable. Crank wasn’t bad, but wasn’t really good,
either. Main bearings came from GM .001 oversized, so a
simple polish job wouldn’t do.

I have the heads done and I’ll be honing out the cylinder
walls this week. New camshaft & lifters are lying in wait. I
went with Melling #MC1337 cam. It’s a stock replacement,
should work just fine by me. Also found the oil pump drive
gear was extremely worn. New one on order (p/n 1103868).

The cam resembled the surface of the moon. I’ve never seen
pitting that severe before. Fortunately, Northern Auto is
out of Sioux City, I can get parts the next day. They have
the cheapest engine/bearing kits available, as well as many
other parts.

My cheap donor car isn’t turning out so cheap. However, even
if it had less miles, I’d still be considering many of these
new parts. At least now I know exactly what I have and won’t
be worried about longevity.–
1982 XJ6
Allendorf, Iowa, United States
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(cadjag) #11

In reply to a message from pk10 sent Wed 25 Jun 2014:

Well, it looks like you will have a really fresh engine.

Either the miles were understated or the PO wasn’t much on
maintenance!!! or perhaps both.

As to the cam, stock will serve you well. The Caprice is a
big car, weights probably close. and GM’s engineers are not
dumb as to creating driveability to match the package.

The rear ratio is probably about 3.09. A tad lower than the
Jaguar’s 2.88, but very close. Again, a good match. 2.77
x .70 OD means great freeway cruises.

And, as to the cam. As I get it, lift s OK for torque, it’s
overlap and duration that move the torque up the RPM
ladder.

Seems like you are on the way to happy miles.

Carl–
The original message included these comments:

My cheap donor car isn’t turning out so cheap. However, even
if it had less miles, I’d still be considering many of these
new parts. At least now I know exactly what I have and won’t
be worried about longevity.


Carl Hutchins 1983 Jaguar XJ6 with LT1 and 1994 Jeep Grand
Walnut Creek, California, United States
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(Paul) #12

In reply to a message from cadjag sent Thu 26 Jun 2014:

Carl,
The donor car had 160,000 miles on it and it looked like it
had already been through a demolition derby. The complete
lack of engine maintenance is not a big surprise given it’s
exterior condition. Oh well, being accustomed to the high
performance side of these SBC’s, I still don’t feel as
though I’m putting too much into it.

The codes on the trunk lid of the Caprice shows GW9, which
indicates a 2.93 rear ratio. That car had 235/70/15 tires,
putting it at 1482 RPM @ 60MPH. Compared to our 2.88 ratio
with 205/65/15 that are on my Jag I should be at about 1594
RPM. Looks pretty good to me. Although, I don’t fully trust
that code sticker as it also had G80, positraction, which I
would say it actually does not have. It did come from
factory with dual exhaust (N10), however.

The Melling cam I picked up reminded me of a RV cam that I
had used in my early ‘‘entry level’’ Pure Stock/Sportsman
racing days. The rule was that the car had to be a 2bbl
intake/carb, stock cast manifolds (no ramshorns) and had to
pull 15 inches of vacuum at 700rpm AFTER the race. I was
running a TRW TP187 cam with Rhoads anti-pump lifters to
meet the criteria. That cam had the same lobe separation,
but 420/443 lift with 204/214 duration (just a tick higher).
That combination pulled my heavy '76 Malibu out of the
corners quite nicely.

Back to the water pump-I also knocked out the water pump
drive/bearing/shaft and am going to replace it. The bearing
felt a bit ‘‘rough’’. Another $120 insurance policy.

I just can’t stress enough to anyone going through the work
on one of these (especially high mileage) SBC’s to be
thorough and don’t take shortcuts. If it costs you an extra
$500-$1000 to go through the engine and replace some vitals
as well as gaskets, you’ve just reduced the probability of
having oil leaks, low oil pressure, or worse having to pull
the engine back out a few miles down the road for something
that would have been simple to replace when it was out, or
even if, heaven forbid, something catastrophic were to happen!–
The original message included these comments:

Either the miles were understated or the PO wasn’t much on
maintenance!!! or perhaps both.
The rear ratio is probably about 3.09. A tad lower than the
Jaguar’s 2.88, but very close. Again, a good match. 2.77
And, as to the cam. As I get it, lift s OK for torque, it’s
overlap and duration that move the torque up the RPM


1982 XJ6
Allendorf, Iowa, United States
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(cadjag) #13

In reply to a message from pk10 sent Fri 27 Jun 2014:

looking good.

I suppose you might jack up a wheel and count the wheel to
drive shaft revolution ratio and verify. My LT1 came from a
Cadillac Fleetwood Brougham. Very close to your car. Ratio
at 3.09. Again, close to what you think yours had. And,
after all, a small matter, it is what it is!! The jaguar’s
2.88 will fit just fine.

My son used to do street stock. AS a machine shop owner at
the time, he built for torque as well. Fords were his
racers of choice. Very able 351’s.

Yeah, on lister here had a rod through the side of his
LT1. OOOOOH.

I’m lucky, mine runs great Op and is smooth as all can be.

Carl–
The original message included these comments:

I just can’t stress enough to anyone going through the work
on one of these (especially high mileage) SBC’s to be
thorough and don’t take shortcuts. If it costs you an extra
$500-$1000 to go through the engine and replace some vitals
as well as gaskets, you’ve just reduced the probability of
having oil leaks, low oil pressure, or worse having to pull
the engine back out a few miles down the road for something
that would have been simple to replace when it was out, or
even if, heaven forbid, something catastrophic were to happen!


Carl Hutchins 1983 Jaguar XJ6 with LT1 and 1994 Jeep Grand
Walnut Creek, California, United States
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(Paul) #14

In reply to a message from cadjag sent Fri 27 Jun 2014:

Cylinders honed over the weekend. Picked up Crankshaft from
machine shop. Hurry up and wait for the bearings to show up.

I am more prone to name an engine than a car. As I was
working on this power plant, I decided it should be called
the ‘‘Onion’’. It seems every layer I peel off this thing
causes my eyes to shed more tears. The payoff: some day
those will be tears of joy.

Put strait edge on the block-looks great. Edge on heads-not
so great. +.003’’ gap in the center. Also shows some pitting
between 3&5 chambers; 4&6 not as bad, but still could use
improvement.

Home brew remedy: I have a 10 gage stainless steel
countertop with 3/4’’ MDF under it in my breeze-way. Duct
taped a 30’’ long 1/4’’ thick mirror to it. Then took 80 grit
DA sandpaper (sticky backed) and staggered them over the
mirror. After an hour of working the head back and forth,
it’s getting close. I have to stop every minute or so and
wipe off the loose material. When it started getting closer
to smooth/flat I used a sharpie marker and colored the
entire face. It’s now under .002’’ virtually .0015’’ gap in
the center. Another 1/2 to 1 hour and it should be good to
go. Then it’s on to the even side head, which isn’t nearly
as bad as the odd side was. I’ll have to take some pictures
of the procedure and post them up.

Boomer is back in the shop. I’ll be continuing to do clean
up work and some time soon start on the bushings. The
‘‘Onion’’ is overpowering the kitchen for now.–
1982 XJ6
Allendorf, Iowa, United States
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(cadjag) #15

In reply to a message from pk10 sent Tue 1 Jul 2014:

AKA ‘‘lapping’’. Old tech. some old guys claimed they copuld
lap the head to block so close as to obviate a head
gasket. Mebbe on old engines sans a pressurized cooling
system and 5 to 1 compression. Today, not a chance!!

Although my son has an onboard air compressor p[owered by
an ancient Tecumseh. No gasket to be found. Surface ground
both head ands block. Lots of pop and it runs. How long???
and much less surface to match.

In the sixties my son and his pal were collecting Renaults.
Free to be had around the neighborhood in Granada Hills,
Ca. a couple were chopped to the pan and caged as dune
buggies. Blown engines, not Roots!!! We chose the little
one and a block from one and a head from another plus odds
and ends. Alloy on alloy. Flunked the straight edge test.
Not a problem teen energy and time available. Kept them
busy. Good for teens. A face plate from a defunct TV proved
quite flat. Coarse Sioux valve grinding compound and lots
strokes. As it got close, switch to fine. Very close. We
did have a good copper sandwich gasket. Honed and reringed
and the valves lapped. it had a neat header. Sounded pretty
durn good on a straight pipe. No good Renault carbs. So, I
used some tubing and hose and grafted on a VW Solex. looked
good, ran nice. Biggest draw back was only a three speed
box. Oh,. well, in the sand it was leave it low and pour
on the throttle.

Sounds like you will end up with a really nice combination.

Carl–
The original message included these comments:

Put strait edge on the block-looks great. Edge on heads-not
so great. +.003’’ gap in the center. Also shows some pitting
between 3&5 chambers; 4&6 not as bad, but still could use
improvement.
Home brew remedy: I have a 10 gage stainless steel
countertop with 3/4’’ MDF under it in my breeze-way. Duct
taped a 30’’ long 1/4’’ thick mirror to it. Then took 80 grit
DA sandpaper (sticky backed) and staggered them over the
mirror. After an hour of working the head back and forth,
it’s getting close. I have to stop every minute or so and
wipe off the loose material. When it started getting closer


Carl Hutchins 1983 Jaguar XJ6 with LT1 and 1994 Jeep Grand
Walnut Creek, California, United States
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(Paul) #16

In reply to a message from cadjag sent Tue 1 Jul 2014:

Thanks Carl. I hope it all comes together…soon. I know
this much for sure, I’m getting a good workout! Odd head
passes straight edge test now, but I’m not happy with some
of the pitting remaining between the 3,5 chambers. I’ll
start again tonight with some fresh sandpaper and see how it
goes.

Funny you mentioned Sioux valve grinding compound. When I
moved onto our acreage, an old Sioux valve grinder had been
left behind by my wife’s grandpa. I ended up giving it to
one of the wife’s cousins when they came down for Grandpa
Ted’s funeral. Loaded in the back of his Cadillac and took
it back to Michigan with him.–
1982 XJ6
Allendorf, Iowa, United States
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(Paul) #17

In reply to a message from pk10 sent Wed 2 Jul 2014:

Getting closer. The bearings are in, rods/pistons with new
seals are in. New oil pump & steel collared shaft in. I’ve
planed the heads and installed them with their new valves.
New cam & lifters, timing chain/gear set in. Pushrods &
rockers in & set. New water pump shaft drive in. Frost plugs
installed.

The engine stand’s supports are too close to install the
rear seal, so I can’t get the pan on. I’ll figure that out
tonight. I’ll add oil and run my homemade distributor with
the gears ground off to prime the oil through the engine and
then put the oil pump gear drive in. Then I’ll install the
intake manifold and the Onion will be ready.

I’ll finally be ready to install the steering & suspension
bushings and tidy up Boomer’s engine bay. The Onion added an
extra three weeks of time onto this project. Well worth the
time, but certainly not expected.–
1982 XJ6
Allendorf, Iowa, United States
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(LnrB) #18

In reply to a message from pk10 sent Tue 8 Jul 2014:

Old distributor shafts are useful for lots of things, aren’t
they.

You’re making great time on this project, Paul, your rains
must have stopped for the time being.
(’;’)–
The original message included these comments:

tonight. I’ll add oil and run my homemade distributor with
the gears ground off to prime the oil through the engine and
then put the oil pump gear drive in. Then I’ll install the
I’ll finally be ready to install the steering & suspension
bushings and tidy up Boomer’s engine bay. The Onion added an
extra three weeks of time onto this project. Well worth the
time, but certainly not expected.


LnrB
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(Paul) #19

Not so much at this point. However, I’m back at it now. After moving to a new house-still in the open countryside on an acreage, but with only an attached garage and no place to work on Boomer, it has sat in the farmer-in-laws tin machine shed for the last nearly 4 years. The storage was not good for it. Thankfully there were no mice invasions, but the corn dust was not kind. The floor was gravel/sand and held moisture and the rust has bloomed. Oh well, the finish wasn’t mint anyway, and this way I have no fears of when, where or what weather I drive in. I’ll get into rust/body work some other day, or scrap it and save the good bits.

So a weekend ago the Mrs. looked at me and suggested we drop the engine in and get the car home. Since I renovated the garage last summer, the timing and workspace is perfect. Now the Bluemin’ Onion is in and sorting out the details has commenced. I’ve forgotten quite a bit, but reviewing notes, photos and manuals has gotten me back on track.

Right off the bat, I’ve found I’ll need to get a Camaro power steering pump (as the kit hose end will not twist
& turn into the rear facing Caprice port & my NAPA can’t replace it), as well as the compressor, accumulator and lines for the AC.

Wasn’t planning on worrying about the AC until later, but since access is available now, I’d rather replace the PS pump & the compressor now. Would like to have the mounting positions located and lines routed, but not hooked up. Then I can safely make the mounts for the PS reservoir & accumulator without having to worry about line interference or tidiness later. While I’m on AC, what is the best method for cleaning out the Jag evaporator? Brake cleaner & compressed air (30psi?)? Other? I’ve downloaded the Camaro shop manual and will be comparing it to the Caprice AC to verify that PCM will work with it and have all the same connections & functions.

I’ve come up with 51-3/4" (or 1/2") for the drive shaft length. That being c-c of U-joints. Different than the 49" suggested in J.S. manual. From the face of the diff to the tail of 4L60E was 54-5/8", in case anyone is wondering. Linkage connected nicely and the throttle cable worked out well. Still need to hook up the new wiring to the shifter.

Passenger (RH) side poly bushing squeeks/groans. Not happy about that. Drivers side was not replaced, as it didn’t want to and my WMD proved ineffective. Quite certain I’m going to need to lower the front end a bit yet. Can’t remember if I removed the spring shims? Might as well lower the spring perches all the way out and check as I’m installing the new 1/2" spacers.

That’s about all I have for now. Soon enough I’ll be diving into the vacuum lines and wiring. That’s when the real fun begins, as I am completely inept in the electrical department!! :zap:


(Bob Loftus) #20

What year is your donor engine? Are you using the harness that came with the engine?