[v12-engine] Re: Introduction - and overheating (help)

Congratulations, Loudon. I have been going back and forth with the idea of
getting a Canadian VdP V12. (Right now, I’m off the idea, at least until I
get a response from DOT about a passive restraint question. I want them to
put their opinion in writing, so that they don’t change their mind after I
already own a car, and then can’t import it.)

The VdP has a big advantage over the XJ-S, in that the temperature gauge is
actually calibrated in degrees, so you have some idea of what is going on.

From reading Kirby’s book, you know that you do not want to overheat a V12.
IMHO, you want to avoid sustained running at over 95 deg C, and if its
consistently running higher than thermostat temperature, try to find out
why. AFAIK, a non-functioning fan should not have any effect on highway
driving. Since your temperature rise showed up only when you got off the
highway, the non-functioning fan may very well have been the cause.

Since you were seeing singns of “slight overheating” on the highway, if you
have an extra $75 kicking around, it would probably be worth the peace of
mind to have the radiator rodded out. Then you will know what kind of shape
it is in.

Enjoy the car.
-To unsubscribe go to

Peter_Cohen@Dell.com wrote:

The VdP has a big advantage over the XJ-S, in that the temperature
gauge is actually calibrated in degrees, so you have some idea of what
is going on.

Hogwash. It’s the SAME gauge, just has numbers instead of C-N-H.
Makes no difference in its accuracy or in the importance of the
information conveyed. In fact, I’d be willing to argue that C-N-H is
BETTER for US drivers who probably don’t know the boiling point of
water in either C or F. The only problem with the C-N-H scale is
that the letters are in the wrong place, and H should be everywhere
from the top of the N on up.

AFAIK, a non-functioning fan should
not have any effect on highway driving.

That’s my thinking, too – but we HAVE had indications that it’s not
true. Apparently with the A/C condenser and the rad in series,
airflow coming through the grille is inadequate for cooling until
you’re going really fast – possibly faster than some highway speeds.
And it’s reportedly WORSE on the XJ12 than the XJ-S, for some reason.

Since you were seeing singns of “slight overheating” on the highway,
if you have an extra $75 kicking around, it would probably be worth
the peace of mind to have the radiator rodded out. Then you will know
what kind of shape it is in.

If the rad has been in there more than 10 years, you’d better scrape
together that $75 and soon. The result of putting it off much longer
will cost a damn sight more than $75.

– Kirbert
-To unsubscribe go to

My 1974 SII D66VdP, has a gauge which is set out thus; C-NORMAL-H

Hogwash. It’s the SAME gauge, just has numbers instead of C-N-H.
Makes no difference in its accuracy or in the importance of the
information conveyed. In fact, I’d be willing to argue that C-N-H is
BETTER for US drivers who probably don’t know the boiling point of
water in either C or F. The only problem with the C-N-H scale is
that the letters are in the wrong place, and H should be everywhere
from the top of the N on up.

If the needle is on MAL, is it sick? (like the pun?)

I’ve read about the C-N-H gauges but never seen one. Can anyone send a pics
of the other gauges so I can compare? Perhaps pics in the jag-lovers album
with “danger zones” superimposed on them would be a good idea?

I would have thought, on mine, that L is too hot (fire and brimstone?) and
it’s when to pull up and cool off.

The needle is vertical between the R and M usually, but last w/end in warm
weather and in traffic, it crept up to A. My fan clutch doesn’t seem to
“bite” even after warming up the engine and playing a propane torch on it
(it’s a metal fan). I reckon e-fans are the way I shall go. My rad looks
fairly new, but even so, I went to the local rad repair man and asked if he
could rod it out. “No” he said, “I dont do that as the core joints could
de-solder.” “I can steam and boil it, flow test it, and pressure test it
for you.”
“OK”, I said. “I’ll think about it.” Well, I did, and wont be going back
there! Reckon I could do it myself - I’ve done one before. Or I’ll find
someone else who will do it. A pair of filters will go in also, and checked
several times at short intervals.

Paul.

-To unsubscribe go to

I’ve read about the C-N-H gauges but never seen one.

Hey, I see one every time I drive my Jag!

Can anyone send
a pics of the other gauges so I can compare? Perhaps pics in the
jag-lovers album with “danger zones” superimposed on them would be a
good idea?

Not a bad plan. If someone will send me suitable pix, I will post on
the jag-lovers.org site. I’d be happy to include a pic of the later
round gauge if someone sends one.

The needle is vertical between the R and M usually

Ah! We’re talking about a round gauge! All bets are off; I still
don’t have enough data to conclusively report where on that gauge is
too hot.

but last w/end in
warm weather and in traffic, it crept up to A. My fan clutch doesn’t
seem to “bite” even after warming up the engine and playing a propane
torch on it (it’s a metal fan).

Where’d you get a metal fan? You been modifying things in there?

My rad looks fairly new

Yeah, THAT’S important! NOT!

I went to the local rad
repair man and asked if he could rod it out. “No” he said, “I dont do
that as the core joints could de-solder.” “I can steam and boil it,
flow test it, and pressure test it for you.” “OK”, I said. “I’ll
think about it.” Well, I did, and wont be going back there!

Good plan.

– Kirbert
-To unsubscribe go to
http://www.jag-lovers.org/cgi-bin/majordomoOn 16 May 2001, at 21:57, Paul Clarkson wrote:

From Kirby:

My fan clutch doesn’t

seem to “bite” even after warming up the engine and playing a propane
torch on it (it’s a metal fan).

Where’d you get a metal fan? You been modifying things in there?

Metal fan is standard fitting on series II V12 (carb versions at least). I
thought the heat from a blowlamp might trigger the bimetal strips to make
the clutch take up. It probably needs the centripetal (centrifugal is a
misnomer - learnt that one from Craig Sawyers) force to move the fluid to
the outside edge at the same time.

The only mod on the engine is a Crane cams XR700 amp and PS91 coil. There
is a question mark over the compatibility of this pairing however, and I am
waiting to get a definitive reply from the suppliers. Other users say it
works great, and so does mine, but a so called Crane technical rep. said
it’s not a good combination.

Paul.

PS. Kirby, a 1974 V12 with 65k on it and the advance weights were clean and
free to move!

-To unsubscribe go to

It probably needs the centripetal (centrifugal is a
misnomer - learnt that one from Craig Sawyers) force to move the fluid to
the outside edge at the same time.

Just looked up “centripetal” in my little Oxford Dict. and it says, “moving
or tending to move towards centre”

Hmmm, will have to check Craig’s explanation again.

-To unsubscribe go to

There is no problem using the PS91 (or LX91) coil with the Crane XR700, but
you will need to use a ballast resistor. According to Crane’s installation
instructions for the PS91, “a 1.2 to 1.9 ohm automotive type ballast
resistor (such as Echlin ICR23 or Wells CR107)” should do the trick.
I have installed the Crane HI-6 CD system on my '71 e-type with a LX92 coil.
You CAN NOT use the PS92 or LX92 with the XR700 or with the Mallory MSD-6
because of the higher current requirement of the LX92 / PS92 coil.

Alan----- Original Message -----
From: “Paul Clarkson” p.c.clarkson@ntlworld.com
To: “V12-engine” V12-engine@jag-lovers.org
Sent: Wednesday, May 16, 2001 8:51 PM
Subject: RE: [v12-engine] Re: Introduction - and overheating (help)

…The only mod on the engine is a Crane cams XR700 amp and PS91 coil.
There
is a question mark over the compatibility of this pairing however, and I
am
waiting to get a definitive reply from the suppliers. Other users say it
works great, and so does mine, but a so called Crane technical rep. said
it’s not a good combination.

Paul.

PS. Kirby, a 1974 V12 with 65k on it and the advance weights were clean
and
free to move!

-To unsubscribe go to
http://www.jag-lovers.org/cgi-bin/majordomo

-To unsubscribe go to

Can anyone send
a pics of the other gauges so I can compare? Perhaps pics in the
jag-lovers album with “danger zones” superimposed on them would be a
good idea?

Not a bad plan. If someone will send me suitable pix, I will post on
the jag-lovers.org site. I’d be happy to include a pic of the later
round gauge if someone sends one.

Can we take this a step further? Can someone hook up a commonly available
electric temp gauge - an AutoMeter or something - to the stock sender and
report what temps on the electric gauge map to what position of the C-N-H?
An additional step would be a calibration to find out what temp the
coolant actually was - stick in a mercury thermometer or something.
Alternatively, calibrate the C-N-H with a mechanical temp gauge.

John

-To unsubscribe go to
http://www.jag-lovers.org/cgi-bin/majordomoOn Wed, 16 May 2001, Kirbert wrote:

I did a bit of a calibration check on my temp gauge (round) sometime back
and got the following results. I performed the test with the gauge in the
car and the sender removed and dangled in a container of heated and stirred
liquid measured with a “mercury in glass” thermometer. The sender was
earthed back to the block with a wire clamped to its casing.
Remember that these gauge set ups are hardly a precision bit of gear.

TEMPERATURE GAUGE PROFILE:

High side of cold line 52C

Right of N 78C

Midway between R & M 86C

Left arm of M 88C

Just left of centre of M 90C

Regards

Ken Gray> On 16 May 2001, at 21:57, Paul Clarkson wrote:

I’ve read about the C-N-H gauges but never seen one.

Hey, I see one every time I drive my Jag!

Can anyone send
a pics of the other gauges so I can compare? Perhaps pics in the
jag-lovers album with “danger zones” superimposed on them would be a
good idea?

Not a bad plan. If someone will send me suitable pix, I will post on
the jag-lovers.org site. I’d be happy to include a pic of the later
round gauge if someone sends one.

The needle is vertical between the R and M usually

Ah! We’re talking about a round gauge! All bets are off; I still
don’t have enough data to conclusively report where on that gauge is
too hot.

but last w/end in
warm weather and in traffic, it crept up to A. My fan clutch doesn’t
seem to “bite” even after warming up the engine and playing a propane
torch on it (it’s a metal fan).

Where’d you get a metal fan? You been modifying things in there?

My rad looks fairly new

Yeah, THAT’S important! NOT!

I went to the local rad
repair man and asked if he could rod it out. “No” he said, “I dont do
that as the core joints could de-solder.” “I can steam and boil it,
flow test it, and pressure test it for you.” “OK”, I said. “I’ll
think about it.” Well, I did, and wont be going back there!

Good plan.

-To unsubscribe go to

From Kirby:

My fan clutch doesn’t

seem to “bite” even after warming up the engine and playing a propane
torch on it (it’s a metal fan).

Where’d you get a metal fan? You been modifying things in there?

Metal fan is standard fitting on series II V12 (carb versions at least).
I
thought the heat from a blowlamp might trigger the bimetal strips to make
the clutch take up. It probably needs the centripetal (centrifugal is a
misnomer - learnt that one from Craig Sawyers) force to move the fluid to
the outside edge at the same time.

The pre HE’s (up to 76 at least) have a metal fan and a viscous coupling
“without” the temp sensing bi-metalic strip arrangement. As far as I am
aware it is a fixed resistance viscous coupling and they are notorious for
displaying lack of coupling after some years use.

Regards

Ken Gray

-To unsubscribe go to

My fan clutch doesn’t
seem to “bite” even after warming up the engine and playing a
propane torch on it (it’s a metal fan).

Where’d you get a metal fan? You been modifying things in there?

Metal fan is standard fitting on series II V12 (carb versions at
least). I thought the heat from a blowlamp might trigger the bimetal
strips to make the clutch take up. It probably needs the centripetal
(centrifugal is a misnomer - learnt that one from Craig Sawyers) force
to move the fluid to the outside edge at the same time.

If you’ve got a SII, methinks you also have the non-thermal fan
clutch. There’s a pic of its innards posted on the www.jag-
lovers.org/xj-s/book site somewhere. It’s just a disk with grease in
it, there aren’t even any bearings.

PS. Kirby, a 1974 V12 with 65k on it and the advance weights were
clean and free to move!

Probably means nobody’s been in there slopping grease on it! The
earlier models seized due to lack of grease, they would rust solid –
but if you avoid the rust, I guess they wouldn’t seize. Somewhere
along the line Jaguar either changed grease or started using grease
at all, and from then on the failure was due to the grease
solidifying.

– Kirbert
-To unsubscribe go to
http://www.jag-lovers.org/cgi-bin/majordomoOn 17 May 2001, at 1:51, Paul Clarkson wrote:

Not a bad plan. If someone will send me suitable pix, I will post
on the jag-lovers.org site. I’d be happy to include a pic of the
later round gauge if someone sends one.

Can we take this a step further? Can someone hook up a commonly
available electric temp gauge - an AutoMeter or something - to the
stock sender and report what temps on the electric gauge map to what
position of the C-N-H? An additional step would be a calibration to
find out what temp the coolant actually was - stick in a mercury
thermometer or something. Alternatively, calibrate the C-N-H with a
mechanical temp gauge.

I highly recommend AGAINST any such activities, for the simple reason
that they might mislead owners into thinking they actually know
something. It simply is of NO IMPORTANCE WHATSOEVER what the actual
temperature readings correspond to in �C or whatever. What matters
is where the car is running normally vs. where you need to stop and
take action.

In a coolant circuit, there are places where the coolant is hotter
than other places – and in THIS coolant circuit, there’s a design
glitch that may cause the two banks to be running at different temps.
If you get a reading of 88�C, and you KNOW it’s 88�C because
someone ran a calibration check on this type of gauge, just what do
you know? You know NOTHING, unless you know what the temperature at
that sender is normally SUPPOSED to be and what temperature
corresponds to panic time.

It’s all stuff and nonsense. Unless we can learn to transcend the
numbers and start addressing when the car is running TOO DAMN HOT,
we’re gonna continue to lose valve seats.

– Kirbert
-To unsubscribe go to
http://www.jag-lovers.org/cgi-bin/majordomoOn 16 May 2001, at 22:42, JGN wrote:

It’s all stuff and nonsense. Unless we can learn to transcend the
numbers and start addressing when the car is running TOO DAMN HOT,
we’re gonna continue to lose valve seats.

Too true. There is however the usual overkill option - fit a hideously
uprated radiator, and make sure the temperature sensors and fans work every
10K miles.

Speaking of which - where can I get a stupidly uprated radiator for a V12
XJS (HE) that will fit straight in without the requirement to “make room for
it”? I’m really looking for a straight bolt-on replacement - just with more
cooling ability.

Cheers.

Gordan

-To unsubscribe go to

It’s all stuff and nonsense. Unless we can learn to transcend the
numbers and start addressing when the car is running TOO DAMN HOT,
we’re gonna continue to lose valve seats.

Too true. There is however the usual overkill option - fit a hideously
uprated radiator

Which is not only unnecessary but arguably unwise. Radiator capacity
is NOT the problem, so adding capacity is a waste of time. And if it
makes the rad EASIER to plug up – which IS the problem – you’ve
just made the problem worse. And, worst of all, you might even THINK
you’ve done some good, and therefore don’t react properly when
problems recur.

and make sure the temperature sensors and fans work
every 10K miles.

That’d be good, but if they fail after 1K, you’ve just driven 9K
without them working. You need to know that they’re working
CONTINUOUSLY, not periodically. That’s why we have a temp gauge –
to tell us all is working. If it’s reading 1/4" higher than it used
to but we just ignore it because it’s still not all the way to the H,
well, do we have anyone to blame but ourselves?

Speaking of which - where can I get a stupidly uprated radiator for a
V12 XJS (HE) that will fit straight in without the requirement to
“make room for it”? I’m really looking for a straight bolt-on
replacement - just with more cooling ability.

Why?

– Kirbert
-To unsubscribe go to
http://www.jag-lovers.org/cgi-bin/majordomoOn 17 May 2001, at 9:03, Gordan Bobic wrote:

It’s all stuff and nonsense. Unless we can learn to transcend the
numbers and start addressing when the car is running TOO DAMN HOT,
we’re gonna continue to lose valve seats.

Too true. There is however the usual overkill option - fit a
hideously uprated radiator

Which is not only unnecessary but arguably unwise. Radiator capacity
is NOT the problem, so adding capacity is a waste of time. And if it
makes the rad EASIER to plug up – which IS the problem – you’ve
just made the problem worse. And, worst of all, you might even THINK
you’ve done some good, and therefore don’t react properly when
problems recur.

I’ve lost you there… I am not talking about capacity as such. I am talking
about a cooling capacity. This should be about volumetric efficiency, not
about the amount of water a radiator will store.

I do accept your argument about using a rad that plugs up easier, which
would, presumeably, be one with smaller diameter piping. So, the idea is, it
seems, to put in a radiator with thicker piping, and more passes.

Ideally, I was looking for a reputable product that someone on the list has
tried and uses, which will “just add cooling”…

and make sure the temperature sensors and fans work
every 10K miles.

That’d be good, but if they fail after 1K, you’ve just driven 9K
without them working. You need to know that they’re working
CONTINUOUSLY, not periodically. That’s why we have a temp gauge –
to tell us all is working. If it’s reading 1/4" higher than it used
to but we just ignore it because it’s still not all the way to the H,
well, do we have anyone to blame but ourselves?

I’m not disputing that, but at the same time, I cannot say that I trust the
temperature gauge on my XJS. This is why I am intending to fit a '87 style
digital dashboard from an XJ40 into it, which has very clearly marked LCD
displays that display the actual temperature.

Speaking of which - where can I get a stupidly uprated radiator
for a V12 XJS (HE) that will fit straight in without the
requirement to “make room for it”? I’m really looking for a
straight bolt-on replacement - just with more cooling ability.

Why?

For added convenience, longer engine life, reduced possibility of dropping
valve seats, or any other overheating related problems? If there is a
not-too-difficult possibility to have a more adequately overspecified
cooling system, then why not do it?

Regards.

Gordan

-To unsubscribe go to

There is however the usual overkill option - fit a
hideously uprated radiator

Which is not only unnecessary but arguably unwise. Radiator
capacity is NOT the problem, so adding capacity is a waste of time.
And if it makes the rad EASIER to plug up – which IS the problem –
you’ve just made the problem worse. And, worst of all, you might
even THINK you’ve done some good, and therefore don’t react properly
when problems recur.

I’ve lost you there… I am not talking about capacity as such. I am
talking about a cooling capacity. This should be about volumetric
efficiency, not about the amount of water a radiator will store.

Then we’re talking about the same thing.

I do accept your argument about using a rad that plugs up easier,
which would, presumeably, be one with smaller diameter piping. So, the
idea is, it seems, to put in a radiator with thicker piping, and more
passes.

Thicker piping is good – but it will REDUCE capacity. At present,
the rad is a 1-1/2 pass (half the coolant makes one pass, half makes
two passes), and the biggest improvement we can make there is to
change it to single pass. This won’t change capacity, and it will
only have a minimal effect on tendency to plug, but it WILL ensure
that both banks run the same temp.

Ideally, I was looking for a reputable product that someone on the
list has tried and uses, which will “just add cooling”…

You’re dealing with a fixed size hole where the radiator goes. If
you can’t install a bigger radiator, then the only way to increase
capacity is to go with smaller tubes, or corrugated tubes, or closer-
spaced fins, or more tubes crammed closer together – all of which
either makes the coolant passages easier to plug up or the air path
easier to plug up. IOW, you’re making our known problems worse, not
better.

You need to know that they’re working
CONTINUOUSLY, not periodically. That’s why we have a temp gauge –
to tell us all is working.

I’m not disputing that, but at the same time, I cannot say that I
trust the temperature gauge on my XJS. This is why I am intending to
fit a '87 style digital dashboard from an XJ40 into it, which has very
clearly marked LCD displays that display the actual temperature.

Which will accomplish exactly what? Either one works fine if you
heed it.

Speaking of which - where can I get a stupidly uprated radiator
for a V12 XJS (HE) that will fit straight in without the
requirement to “make room for it”? I’m really looking for a
straight bolt-on replacement - just with more cooling ability.

Why?

For added convenience

I suppose not having a engine overheat would be convenient.

longer engine life

You won’t get that from a radiator prone to clogging, no matter what
it’s capacity is.

reduced possibility of
dropping valve seats

Ditto

or any other overheating related problems?

IOW, you apparently have completely failed to understand the CAUSE of
the overheating problems. Hint: it ain’t capacity.

If
there is a not-too-difficult possibility to have a more adequately
overspecified cooling system, then why not do it?

Because of the negative aspects, such as increased tendency to clog.
In fact, put an aftermarket radiator for the XJ-S on the market with
the following claim: “a 1/16” ball bearing can pass through the
tubes" and you’ll have something. Unfortunately, I think you’d be
hard-pressed to get anything thicker than a fingernail file through
the tubes on this rad, and the “uprated” cores are usually even
worse, sometimes having corrugations on the tubes to increase surface
area, which gives a higher capacity when clean but just encourages
stuff to get lodged in there and makes it nearly impossible to rod
out.

If I understand it correctly, the aluminum radiators use larger tubes
than brass radiators. Dunno why brass radiators don’t use larger
tubes as well, since it’s not THAT much of a factor on the total
capacity. But you CAN use a tiny tube on a brass radiator, while
using larger tubes on aluminum radiators makes the welding easier.
Whatever, it ends up a powerful argument for going to an aluminum
radiator.

All of this, of course, illustrates why the MOST important thing is
to get coolant filters in those upper radiator hoses. Without them,
all is lost.

– Kirbert
-To unsubscribe go to
http://www.jag-lovers.org/cgi-bin/majordomoOn 18 May 2001, at 9:10, Gordan Bobic wrote:

I’m not disputing that, but at the same time, I cannot say that I
trust the temperature gauge on my XJS. This is why I am intending to
fit a '87 style digital dashboard from an XJ40 into it, which has very
clearly marked LCD displays that display the actual temperature.

Which will accomplish exactly what? Either one works fine if you
heed it.

Only one problem with that, the XJ40 digital display is notoriously
unreliable.

Paul

-To unsubscribe go to

I have followed this thread with interest. My thanks to all, as I
continue to learn from you - albeit slowly :slight_smile:

It is hard for me to comment on everything that has been said in the
course of this thread, especially since I know most of you drive
different cars than the XJ12. And I do not know enough about the
differences between the XJ-S and the XJ12 to know how any differences
in engineering or operation might affect the issue. But perhaps a few
observations might be in order.

First, re what I observed on my drive home. For the earlier part of
the journey the temp gauge was indicating about 92�C. I was cruising
at about 80mph for most of this time. This seemed a hair warmer than
my XJ6, which normally runs at a very steady 88�C, but not enough to
alarm me. Later on my trip the needle went down to 90�C, and stayed
there until I got off the highway. The drop in temp may have been due
to the fact that I was then driving into a fairly steady
approximately 15mph breeze. As soon as I left the highway the gauge
started to climb. After some 10 minutes of fairly slow driving with
quite a few stop lights, it had passed 95�C. I turned the climate
control to full heat with the blower fans on high, which more or less
stabilized the temperature (but not mine!) so that it never actually
reached an indicated 100� and got me home about 10 minutes later.

The following day, investigation revealed that the aux fan was not
operating with the A/C compressor. I don’t know if it comes on when
the A/C compressor kicks in on the XJ-S, but it should on the XJ12.
With that problem fixed - and I have not driven the car a lot since -
the temp gauge will show a steady 90�C with the A/C on, no matter
what the driving conditions. With the A/C off, the temp stabilizes at
an indicated 95�C in stop and go traffic, at which point the thermo
switch closes, nd the temperature stabilizes. The aux fan also kicks
on after I have stopped the car especially if I have been running
without the A/C for any length of time. On the highway at speeds
around 60mph, the temp gauge remains at 90�C, whether the A/C is on
or off.

So much for what I have observed. My next step is to drain the
cooling system, and as long as I am doing that I might as well have
the radiator rodded, just on GP. And as long as I am going that far,
I think I will replace all the hoses - assuming that I can (a) figure
out where they all are and (b) get to them�

Apart from the aux fan, the other cause of low speed overheating
seems to be the distributor vacuum advance module. Sucking on the
hose to mine seems to suggest that it is holding a vacuum, but I have
not taken the cap off again to see if in fact there is any movement
in the operating arm when vacuum is applied. I guess I’ll check that
out when I drain the cooling system.

All Kirbert’s caveats about the temp gauge make a lot of sense to me.
I tend to think that mine is probably giving a correct indication of
the actual coolant temp at the sensor, but to make sure, I assume it
would not hurt to have my local Jaguar specialist check the
calibration with a remote temp sensor. If I know that my temp sensor
means 90� when it says 90�, I assume that all that is required is to
keep half an eye on it and stop driving if it ever reaches anything
over 95�, which seems to be where it now stabilizes with the A/C off
in city traffic. On my XJ6 I am usually running about a needle width
to the left of vertical, which is an indicated 88�C. I don’t know if
that correlates to anything meaningful on the C-N-H gauges you are
all talking about.

One question - if the engine fan does not provide sufficient air flow
at slow speeds with the A/C off to prevent the coolant from reaching
the temp at which the thermo switch closes, what would be the
downside to rewiring the aux fan so that it comes on automatically as
soon as the engine is started, but also comes on via the thermo
switch when the engine is not running? Or, to put essentially the
same question another way, if my coolant gets hot enough to close the
aux fan switch in city driving with the A/C off, do I still have an
undiagnosed problem?

Thanks again to you all…

Cheers,
Loudon-
85 VdP6, Josephine, 75K miles
86 VdP12, Gypsy, 113K kms

At 13:27 -0500 5.16.01, Peter_Cohen@Dell.com wrote:

Since you were seeing singns of “slight overheating” on the highway, if you
have an extra $75 kicking around, it would probably be worth the peace of
mind to have the radiator rodded out. Then you will know what kind of shape
it is in.

Enjoy the car.
-To unsubscribe go to
http://www.jag-lovers.org/cgi-bin/majordomo

-To unsubscribe go to

Hi Gordon: I don’tknow who wrote this originally but whoever did write it
left me really puzzled with this phrase:

<<<<Too true. There is however the usual overkill option - fit a hideously
uprated radiator>>>>

What is a hideously uprated radiator? Bradley Smith

-To unsubscribe go to