[x300] Messed up fuel rail

I was afraid of this happening…see my previous post
regarding looking for a solution to my ‘‘no start’’ 1995 XJ6 I
tried to check the fuel flow. I was unsuccessful in
loosening the nut on the fuel rail -the one near the fire
wall.The result si that now I have a car that does start,
the radio works - but with a HUGE gasoline leak!!!

The leak is coming from the fuel rail–it appears not to be
coming from the nut…thinking perhaps I did loosen the seal
-it appears (tough to tell) to be leaking from right at the
end of that rail. Does anyone know how these tubes are
constructed? Is than cap on the end brazed on…is the tube
that goes vertical -brazed too… is the metal a thin
walled tubing assembly? Can this be repaired - are there
ANY products that can stop a fuel leak that’s dripping 1
drop a second -sorta like a fancy chewing gum products?

Is this a known problem -IE a weak metal tubing assembly
and WILL shear when tampered with to check fuel flow?

TIA.

John–
1995 XJ6 67,000 miles 2011
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In reply to a message from 1happycamper sent Tue 29 Nov 2011:

Thats a tough break, ( no pun intended )
The hose fitting is the one that turns onto the nut on the fuel rail
If you remove the fuel rail I’m sure any competent welding shop can
repair it, or just get a used one. should be plentiful as they
never wear out ;-’’)

Darrell–
The original message included these comments:

tried to check the fuel flow. I was unsuccessful in
loosening the nut on the fuel rail -the one near the fire
The leak is coming from the fuel rail–it appears not to be
constructed? Is than cap on the end brazed on…is the tube
walled tubing assembly? Can this be repaired - are there


95 X-300 02 VDP http://www.jag-lovers.org/v.htm?1287957641
Delavan Wi., United States
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In reply to a message from 1happycamper sent Tue 29 Nov 2011:

Yuuuukkkkk, a typical case of keep fixing it until it’s
broke, methinks! Now you know why I collect ‘‘round tuits’’ by
the dozen, I’ve never had the rail apart but seem to recall
various posts over the last few years, so try a search in
the Archives, also have a look at the JDHT/Jaguar Classic
Parts website for the schematic as it might give a clue to
the components, seals, glands involved etc.

http://www.jaguarclassicparts.com/html/JCPHomePage.html--
The original message included these comments:

coming from the nut…thinking perhaps I did loosen the seal
end of that rail. Does anyone know how these tubes are
constructed? Is than cap on the end brazed on…is the tube
that goes vertical -brazed too… is the metal a thin
walled tubing assembly? Can this be repaired - are there


Neil 70 '97 3.2S http://www.jag-lovers.org/v.htm?1242166704
MALDON, United Kingdom
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In reply to a message from 1happycamper sent Tue 29 Nov 2011:

oh dear - you mean the dealer gave you the car back with a
fuel leak ?

I don’t think the manifold is particularly weak - it seems
to be well enough made to me. The nuts on the end of mine
came off and back on again fairly easily using two spanners,
one to hold the nut and one to turn the other part - so
avoiding stress on the manifold.

I have repaired this sort of fault using traditional
slow-speed Araldite - once set it is petrol-proof. BUT you
will need to be scrupulously clean about it and will likely
need the fuel manifold off the car to get at the area of the
leak properly. At this stage one off a scrap car might be a
better solution.

Thinking as I type - there is Plastic Padding Leak-Fix over
here so there will be an equivalent over there. I used some
on the outside of our son’s car when the fuel tank sprang a
leak - it lasted 6 months until the car was scrapped. BUT
that wasn’t under pressure of course.

Best wishes from Jim Butterworth
http://www.watchet.dolphins.btinternet.co.uk/

The easiest way to find something lost is to buy a replacement.–
The original message included these comments:

walled tubing assembly? Can this be repaired - are there
ANY products that can stop a fuel leak that’s dripping 1
drop a second -sorta like a fancy chewing gum products?


1995 3.2 Sport - www.jag-lovers.org/v.htm?id=1320795768
Somerset, United Kingdom
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In reply to a message from sfj642 sent Tue 29 Nov 2011:

You might try Amazon.com for J B Weld

says it will do the job, not used it myself.

Best wishes from Jim Butterworth
http://www.watchet.dolphins.btinternet.co.uk/

If it isn’t broken, fix it until it is - wise saying
If it is broken, fix it until it isn’t - ME :-))–
The original message included these comments:

Thinking as I type - there is Plastic Padding Leak-Fix over
here so there will be an equivalent over there. I used some


1995 3.2 Sport - www.jag-lovers.org/v.htm?id=1320795768
Somerset, United Kingdom
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In reply to a message from 1happycamper sent Tue 29 Nov 2011:

Most often it is necessary to use two tubing wrenches so there is
no strain on the tubes. They are like a box wrench but with a
section of the box removed, so it can be slipped over the tube then
slid onto the hex fitting. Using two of them there is no strain
put on the tube.

Yes all of those fittings are brazed to the rail. And it’s a good
idea to put a little anti-seize on the threads. Of the fittings
when you reassemble it. The threads don’t do any sealing so
there is no chance that the anti-seize will contaminate the fuel.

They are easy to repair. While it’s off add a ‘‘T’’ fitting the
tube that feeds the regulator so that a Schrader valve can be
easily installed. It will make checking fuel pressure very easy.
But don’t bring the pressure gauge into the cabin. I temporarily
tie mine to the wiper blade so I can see it while I drive.

After removing the rail and all of its hoses, Flush it with water
to eliminate any chance of a small fire. Then very carefully clean
the area you wish to repair down to bare metal. It must be shiny
clean. Any contamination will guarantee a leak. An acetylene
torch will provide enough heat to re-braze it or silver solder it.
Either will work fine. The coated brazing rod you can get at most
hardware stores will be the easiest to use. Even a MAP Gas torch
will possibly provide enough heat. But that’s a guess.

A very risky solution would be to clean the leaking area to bare
shiny metal. Be sure it is completely dry. Then use some JB Weld
to block the leak, as long as you remember that there is fuel under
close to 50PSI of pressure that you are trusting to a little
epoxy. But that stuff has worked for me many times when common
sense said that it wouldn’t. It’s only problem is that it takes
forever to cure and it is very runny. Unless you build a dam with
some clay, it will run off the tubes before it even starts to cure.
I was able to pick up some epoxy that is the same stuff Boeing uses
to glue their 787 Dreamliner to gather. It is incredible stuff but
it costs $30 for two tubes the size of the small JB Weld tubes that
costs $4.

I personally like the Idea of brazing the leak. But even that is
most likely fixing a tear in the tube and that sort of repair is
always problematic. You will need to be the judge of how risky the
repair will be.

I once had a fuel injection hose leaking, spraying a mist of fuel
into the engine compartment. Somehow it never caught fire and I
figured that I had missed that bullet, but I would never ever temp
the dark side again, at least not if I could help it.

Be sure to use two wrenches when reassembling and preferably hose
or tubing wrenches.–
The original message included these comments:

I was afraid of this happening…see my previous post
regarding looking for a solution to my ‘‘no start’’ 1995 XJ6 I
tried to check the fuel flow. I was unsuccessful in
loosening the nut on the fuel rail -the one near the fire
wall.The result si that now I have a car that does start,
the radio works - but with a HUGE gasoline leak!!!


SpeedyPAL 1995 XJR
Milford / OH, United States
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In reply to a message from SpeedyPAL sent Tue 29 Nov 2011:

Thanks for all of your help!! J-B Weld. Hmmmm. Thats soooo
tempting…

…but me thinks at 67k miles it would be fun (ha ha) to
inspect and clean the fuel injectors -so the rail would be
part of that repair and maintenance.

Cheers,
John–
The original message included these comments:

Yes all of those fittings are brazed to the rail. And it’s a good
idea to put a little anti-seize on the threads. Of the fittings
when you reassemble it. The threads don’t do any sealing so
hardware stores will be the easiest to use. Even a MAP Gas torch
will possibly provide enough heat. But that’s a guess.
shiny metal. Be sure it is completely dry. Then use some JB Weld
to block the leak, as long as you remember that there is fuel under
I was able to pick up some epoxy that is the same stuff Boeing uses
to glue their 787 Dreamliner to gather. It is incredible stuff but


1995 XJ6 67,000 miles 2011
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In reply to a message from 1happycamper sent Tue 29 Nov 2011:

Yep, I would ixnay the JB weld on a high pressure fuel rail. And I
will bet you can buy one used for less than the expoxy anyway. I
do highly recommend you consider the advice to tap a test port in
while you have it off. Enough of these cars fail the pumps or blow
the in tank hose off to make a good fuel pressure test method very
desireable.–
Ross - 89 XJS, 98 XJR, 99 XJR, 02 XJ8
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In reply to a message from sparkenzap sent Tue 29 Nov 2011:

I’m a 110% with Ross on this, with regards ‘‘w*gging up’’ the
fuel rail with any form of weld be it araldite (epoxy) or JB
etc. Brazing might well be acceptable where you have fuel at
~50psi!

Many moons ago I tried to modify a twin choke Webber on my
Mk1 Cortina GT by blocking in a webbed recess at the base
with a plate that I araldited in as being ‘‘muck metal’’ the
casting wouldn’t take a torch, this providing an anti surge
reservoir feeding copper pipes and hence fuel into the
venturies. It was an unmittigated disaster and leaked like
hell, now matter what I did by way of sealing it, petrol
seems to creep and penertrate at will.

Either do it properly or get a replacement from a scrapyard.–
The original message included these comments:

Yep, I would ixnay the JB weld on a high pressure fuel rail. And I
will bet you can buy one used for less than the expoxy anyway. I


Neil 70 '97 3.2S http://www.jag-lovers.org/v.htm?1242166704
MALDON, United Kingdom
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